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Dangerous Products Policy

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					                                          <Service name>


                                    Dangerous Products Policy


Services have a responsibility to protect the health and safety of each individual at
all times. A service’s health and safety policies and practices affect an individual’s
physical and psychological health and safety.

The Dangerous Products Policy is important not only for children, families and
staff/carers, but relates to every person who enters the service’s premises or uses the
service’s equipment.

Federal, state and territory governments have their own Occupational Health and
Safety (OHS) legislation and regulations, which govern the standards of health and
safety in the workplace. Therefore, services must comply with the relevant OHS
legislation.

Services should contact their state or territory OHS worksafe management agency for
further information and advice.


Policy Number                    <number>

Link to CCQA Principles          Family Day Care Quality Assurance (FDCQA)
                                 Quality Practices Guide (2004) – Principle 4.1 /
                                 Outside School Hours Care Quality Assurance (OSHCQA)
                                 Quality Practices Guide (2003) – Principle 7.3, 8.1 /
                                 Quality Improvement and Accreditation System (QIAS)
                                 Quality Practices Guide (2005) – Principle 5.3, 5.4, 5.5


Policy statement

       <Service name> has a duty of care to provide all persons1 with a safe and
        healthy environment.

       The service defines a dangerous product as any chemical, substance or
        material that can cause potential harm, injury or illness to persons or damage
        to the service’s environment.

       The service categorises dangerous products into the following sub groups;
           o hazardous chemicals and substances;
           o dangerous goods;

1For the purpose of this policy, 'persons' include <children, families, staff, carers, carers' family,
management, coordination unit staff, ancillary staff (administrative staff, kitchen staff, cleaners,
maintenance personnel), students, volunteers, visitors, local community, school community, licensee,
sponsor and/or service owner>.



                                                                                            Page 1 of 10
           o poisons;
           o drugs (including medications); and
           o miscellaneous dangerous products.
        These categories are examples of how services can reference dangerous
        products to recognised authorities. For example, the recognised authority for
        categorising poisons and drugs into ‘Schedules’ is the Therapeutic Goods
        Administration.

        The Australia National Transport Commission is the recognised authority for
        coding hazardous chemicals and substances into ‘Classes’, known as the
        Australian Dangerous Goods (ADG) Code.

        The understanding of schedules and codes can assist services when
        developing their policy and risk management strategies.

       The service ensures that there are emergency procedures and practices for
        accidental spills, contamination and corresponding first aid plans for all
        dangerous goods handled and stored in the service.

       It is understood that there is a shared legal responsibility and accountability
        between, and a commitment by, all persons to implement the service’s
        Dangerous Products Policy, procedures and practices.

       The service also complies with <OHS National Standards, codes of practice,
        Australian Standards> and best practice recommendations from recognised
        authorities.

       The procedures relating to the Dangerous Products Policy are laminated,
        clearly labelled and displayed in the service for all stakeholders to read.
        OHS procedures and practices should be easy to read and interpret. Services
        may need to consider obtaining information in community languages.


Rationale

The rationale represents a statement of reasons that detail why the policy and/or
procedures have been developed and are important to the service.

Please refer to:
    <title of federal/state/territory legislation and regulations2>
      Please refer to the relevant federal, state or territory OHS legislation and
      worksafe management agency3.




2 There are legislative Acts and regulations for each state and territory that address the issue of
Occupational Health and Safety. Services are advised to seek information that is relevant to their
jurisdiction.
3 Services should contact their federal, state or territory worksafe management agency to clarify their

OHS obligations and seek further information and advice.

                                                                                             Page 2 of 10
      The service also complies with the <title of state/territory children’s services
       licensing regulations or national standards> which reflect additional health
       and safety requirements.

      Australia National Transport Commission -
       www.ntc.gov.au/ViewPage.aspx?page=A022113024004706250

      National Occupational Health & Safety Commission -
       www.ascc.gov.au/NR/rdonlyres/B157A229-4D9B-4648-B462-
       A06EA18E2A93/0/NOHSC10152001_STANDARD.pdf

      Therapeutic Goods Administration - www.tga.gov.au/ndpsc/index.htm

      The strategies, procedures and practices document in the Dangerous
       Products Policy reflect the service’s Occupational Health and Safety (OHS)
       Policy.


Responsibilities of different stakeholders

      Services can link this section by stating:
       Please refer to the service’s Occupational Health and Safety Policy.


The OHS representative and/or committee

      Services can state the role of the OHS committee and/or OHS representative
       in relation to the Dangerous Products Policy. For example, the OHS
       representative may be the responsible person required to:
           o discuss with and train staff/carers on the recommended handling,
               dilutions, storage, transportation and disposal of dangerous products;
           o conduct all safety checks relating to dangerous products; and
           o ensure all dangerous products are correctly labelled, stored and
               diluted.
      Services should contact their federal, state or territory worksafe management
       agency for further information and advice.
      Services can link this section by stating:
       Please refer to the service’s Occupational Health and Safety Policy.


Strategies and practices

These are examples. Services are encouraged to develop and adapt the following
strategies and practices as required to meet their individual circumstances and daily
best practices.


Risk management strategies
     Services can link this section by stating:
      Please refer to the service’s Occupational Health and Safety Policy.

                                                                                Page 3 of 10
      Services can include the following information to assist in developing a risk
       management strategy:
          o Material Safety Data Sheets (MSDS);
          o handling, storing, transporting and disposal procedures and practices;
          o safety checks;
          o recommended Personal Protection Equipment (PPE); and
          o first aid emergency plans.
      Services can either list each dangerous product one by one, or use the sub
       groups outlined in the ‘Register of dangerous products’ section.

Register of dangerous products
    Brief and concise detail of the service’s strategy.
    The service should list all the dangerous products in the service, even those
       products that do not require a MSDS.
    Services can develop a register, which categorises dangerous goods into sub
       groups with commonalities. For example:
           o hazardous chemicals and substances, in either a solid, liquid, gas or
              fume state;
           o dangerous goods;
           o poisons;
           o drugs (including medications); and
           o miscellaneous dangerous products.
    Services should consider the following reflective questions:
           o Where is the register located?
           o Who has authority to update the register?
           o How often is the register reviewed?
           o What type of documentation supports the register? For example, OHS
              procedures and practices, relevant MSDS, first aid instructions or risk
              management assessments.

Hazardous chemicals and substances
    Brief and concise detail of the service’s strategy.
    Examples of hazardous chemicals or substances:
         o any product that produces a toxin in either a solid, liquid, gas or fume
            state and is labelled with an ADG Code;
         o corrosive properties;
         o causes skin or respiratory problems;
         o carcinogenic, such as asbestos;
         o flammable or has combustible properties; or
         o caustic, such as cleaning products.

Handling and storing hazardous chemicals and substances
   Brief and concise detail of the service’s strategy.
   MSDS can guide services to handle, label and store specific chemicals or
      substances in a safe manner.
   Services should consider the following reflective questions:
         o How are hazardous chemicals and substances handled? For example,
            staff/carers may need to wear gloves and a facemask when handling
            chemicals.


                                                                           Page 4 of 10
         o   How are hazardous chemicals and substances stored out of reach of
             children? For example, in a key locked storeroom or an out of reach
             cupboard.
         o   What type of labelling does the service use to notify persons of storage
             areas?
         o   Is the storeroom well ventilated and lit?
         o   Who is responsible for the maintenance of stored chemicals and
             substances?
         o   Are chemicals and substances stored appropriately together? For
             example, some chemicals stored in close proximity can be dangerous.
             How does the service minimise or eliminate this risk?
         o   When chemicals are decanted, what is the safety condition of
             containers?

Transporting hazardous chemicals and substances
    Brief and concise detail of the service’s strategy.
    MSDS can guide services to transport chemicals or substances in a safe
      manner.
    Services should consider the following reflective questions:
           o How does the service ensure the safety of transporting hazardous
              chemicals or substances?
           o How do services promote correct manual handling practices when
              transporting dangerous products?

Disposing of hazardous chemicals and substances
    Brief and concise detail of the service’s strategy.
    MSDS can guide services to dispose of chemicals or substances in a safe
       manner.

Dangerous goods
   Brief and concise detail of the service’s strategy.
   Dangerous goods may:
        o contain lead, such as paints;
        o emit radiation, such as microwaves or computers; or
        o include toners for printers and photocopiers.

Poisons
    Brief and concise detail of the service’s strategy.
    Examples of poisons or products that produce poisons are:
         o pesticides and fertilisers;
         o oven cleaners; and
         o plants and animals, such as venom from spiders or snakes.

Drugs and medications
    Brief and concise detail of the service’s strategy.
    Examples of drugs and medication are:
         o prescribed and non-prescribed medication;
         o alcohol and illegal drugs.



                                                                           Page 5 of 10
      Services can link this section by stating:
       Please refer to the service’s Smoke Free Environments Policy.

Miscellaneous dangerous products
    Brief and concise detail of the service’s strategy.
    Examples of miscellaneous dangerous products can be items or objects that:
          o cause a blocked airway (small toys, foam packing);
          o cut or pierce (knives, scissors);
          o burn (irons, ovens); or
          o cause illness and infection (animal faeces).
    Services can link this section by stating:
       Please refer to the service’s First Aid Policy.

Material Safety Data Sheets (MSDS)
   Brief and concise detail of the service’s strategy.
   MSDS are produced and supplied by the manufacturers of hazardous
      chemicals and substances.
   MSDS should be clearly displayed near the hazardous chemical or substance
      storage area and the service’s first aid cabinet.
   MSDS should detail how the hazardous chemical or substance is safely:
      handled; stored; diluted; transported; and disposed.
   Services should not alter or delete the information on a MSDS.
   Translating MSDS into community languages should only be considered if the
      service assesses the risk of misinterpretation as high.
   Services should consider the following reflective questions:
          o How does the service ensure that the information recorded on MSDS is
              current and accurate?
          o Where are MSDS located and displayed in the service?
          o Who is responsible for reviewing the MSDS?
          o How does the service communicate the MSDS requirements of
              hazardous chemicals or substances to family day carer’s in their own
              home?
          o How does the service communicate MSDS information to persons who
              are non-English speaking?

Labelling of dangerous products
    Brief and concise detail of the service’s strategy.
    MSDS can guide services to label specific dangerous products.
    Many services decant or dilute hazardous chemicals or substances from the
       packaging provided and labelled by the manufacturer, into smaller and more
       useable containers. This is a major risk, especially if the container is not labelled
       and the contents cannot be identified or verified.
    Services should consider the following reflective questions:
          o How does the service ensure that the information labelled is current
              and accurate?
          o Are labels written in English?
          o Who is responsible for labelling containers?
          o Who is responsible for diluting and decanting chemicals or substances?



                                                                                Page 6 of 10
          o   How does the service communicate the information on labels to
              persons from non-English speaking backgrounds?
          o How durable is the label?
          o What type of information is on a label? For example, the:
                   name of the chemical or substance;
                   dilution rate;
                   date the container was refilled; and
                   first aid requirements.
          o How does the service ensure that labels are removed once the
              container no longer stores a particular dangerous product?
      Services should contact their federal, state or territory worksafe management
       agency for further information and advice.

Important: At no time should the service store a dangerous product in a container
which is labelled for something different. Children, regardless if they can read or not,
are often more aware of symbols; similarly, adults will often interpret a symbol before
reading the text. Therefore, placing a hazardous chemical in a milk carton, for
example, even if there is clear labelling communicating that the liquid is a hazardous
chemical, is an extremely risky practice. Children and adults may perceive the
carton to contain milk and consume the contents.

At all times, services should ensure the containers that store hazardous chemicals or
substances are clear of symbols representing any other product and correctly
labelled.

First aid
      At all times, a staff/carer with first aid qualifications is on duty.
      The Poisons Information Centre telephone number 131126 is displayed:
           o next to every telephone in the service; and
           o where dangerous products are stored.
      Brief and concise detail of the service’s strategy.
      Services can link this section by stating:
        Please refer to the service’s First Aid Policy.

Protective behaviours and practices
Staff, carers, students and volunteers as role models
    Children learn through example and modelling is an important way to teach
        children about safe behaviours and practices.
    Staff/carers, students and volunteers must comply with the Dangerous
        Products Policy.

Staff/Carer professional development opportunities
    Brief and concise detail of the service’s strategy.
    The service can describe how it aims to maintain and strengthen the skills and
       knowledge of staff/carers in relation to dangerous products.




                                                                             Page 7 of 10
Communication with different stakeholders

Children
    Brief and concise detail of the service’s strategy.

Families
    Brief and concise detail of the service’s strategy.

Staff/Carers
     Brief and concise detail of the service’s strategy.
     In some state or territories, family day carers are not required to collect MSDS
       for the products used in their homes. The family day care scheme should
       consider the following reflective questions:
           o How does the carer ensure the first aid information for dangerous
              products is accurate and available to access in an emergency?
           o How does the carer communicate about dangerous products to their
              family?
           o How does the carer ensure that dangerous products used by the
              carer’s family are handled, stored and disposed of safely when children
              are in care?

Management/Coordination unit staff
   Brief and concise detail of the service’s strategy.
   The service can consider undertaking a review of dangerous products used
     by staff/carers at the service with the aim to minimise those products
     identified as toxic. This strategy can assist services to investigate the use of
     similar, safer products.


Experiences

      Brief and concise detail of the service’s strategy.

Excursions
    Brief and concise detail of the service’s strategy.

Community
   Brief and concise detail of the service’s strategy.


Policy review

      The service will review the Dangerous Products Policy and procedures, and
       related documents, every <timeframe>.
      Families are encouraged to collaborate with the service to review the policy
       and procedures.
      Staff/carers are essential stakeholders in the policy review process and will be
       encouraged to be actively involved.



                                                                             Page 8 of 10
Procedures

The following are examples of procedures that a service may employ as part of its
practices.
Examples:
    Employee induction procedure.
    Policy development and review procedure.
    Procedure for non-compliance of the Dangerous Products Policy and
        procedures by a:
           o child;
           o staff/carer;
           o parent or family member;
           o student/volunteer; or
           o visitor.
    Student and volunteer induction procedure.


Measuring tools

The service may further specify tools that assist in measuring the effectiveness of the
policy.


Links to other policies

The following are a list of examples:
    Child protection
    Emergency
    Employment of child care professionals
    First aid
    Food safety
    Hygiene and infection control
    Illness
    Maintenance of buildings and equipment
    Medication
    Occupational health and safety
    Rest and sleep
    Smoke free environments
    Staff/carers as role models
    Supervision
    The role of carers’ families in family day care


Sources and further reading

      Australia National Transport Commission. (n.d.). Australian dangerous goods
       code. Retrieved June 25, 2007, from
       www.ntc.gov.au/ViewPage.aspx?page=A022113024004706250




                                                                              Page 9 of 10
       Australian Safety and Compensation Council. (2007). Index of national
        standards codes of practice and related guidance notes. Retrieved June 25,
        2007, from
        http://www.ascc.gov.au/ascc/AboutUs/Publications/NationalStandards/Inde
        xofNationalStandardsCodesofPracticeandrelatedGuidanceNotes.htm
       Frith, J., Kambouris, N., & O’Grady, O. (2003). Health & safety in children’s
        centres: Model policies and practices (2nd ed.). NSW: School of Public Health
        and Community Medicine, University of New South Wales.4
       Kids and Poisons. (n.d.). Safeguarding against poisons. Retrieved June 28,
        2007, from
        http://www.childsafetyaustralia.com.au/community/poisons/poisons.htm
       McLeod, P. (2005). Health and safety information on the internet. Putting
        Children First, 15, 12-13.
       National Occupational Health & Safety Commission. (2001). Storage and
        handling of workplace dangerous goods: National Standard [NOHSC:
        1015(2001)]. Retrieved June 28, 2007, from
        http://www.ascc.gov.au/NR/rdonlyres/B157A229-4D9B-4648-B462-
        A06EA18E2A93/0/NOHSC10152001_STANDARD.pdf
       Poisons Information Centre Listing. (n.d.). Retrieved June 28, 2007, from
        http://ausdi.hcn.net.au/poisons.html
       Tansey, S. (2006). Outside School Hours Care Quality Assurance Factsheet #3:
        Safety in children’s services. NSW: National Childcare Accreditation Council
        Inc.
       Tansey, S. (2006). Quality Improvement and Accreditation System Factsheet
        #2: Safety in children’s services. NSW: National Childcare Accreditation
        Council Inc.
       Tarrant, S. (2002). Managing OHS in children’s services: A model for
        implementing an Occupational Health and Safety (OHS) management
        system in your children’s service. NSW: Lady Gowrie Child Centre.
       Therapeutic Goods Administration. (2000). A guide to labelling drugs and
        poisons. Retrieved June 238, 2007, from
        http://www.tga.gov.au/ndpsc/gldap.htm
       Therapeutic Goods Administration. (2007). Scheduling of medicines and
        poisons: National Drugs and Poisons Schedule Committee (NDPSC). Retrieved
        June 28, 2007, from http://www.tga.gov.au/ndpsc/index.htm


Policy created date              <date>

Policy review date               <date>

Signatures                       <signatures>




4This publication is produced on behalf of Early Childhood Australia New South Wales (NSW) Branch
and the NSW Children’s Services Health and Safety Committee. Services should be aware that the
publication may refer to practices that reflect NSW licensing regulations or health department exclusion
guidelines.

                                                                                          Page 10 of 10

				
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