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English II Honors 1st Semester -

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                                       Bishop Moore Catholic High School

Syllabus for English II Honors # 226             2009-2010                Semester 1             Muller

                                                                                                 Saulpaugh

Course Overview:

This course emphasizes writing and analyzing the literature read both in and out of class. Vocabulary
development and grammar review continue with stress on strategies for taking standardized tests. Literature
concentration focuses on writers and their contributions to world culture. Each quarter students are expected
to read and analyze a book outside-of-class, and they are required to write essays that focus on the entire
writing process, including revision.

Overall Course Objectives:

       The student analyzes the effectiveness of complex elements of plot, such as setting, major events,
        problems, conflicts, and resolutions.

       The student understands the relationships between and among elements of literature, including
        characters, plot, setting, tone, point of view, and theme.

       The student analyzes poetry for the ways in which poets inspire the reader to share emotions (such as
        the use of imagery and figures of speech, including personification, simile, and metaphor; and the use of
        sound, such as rhyme, rhythm, repetition, and alliteration).

       The student understands the use of images and sounds to elicit the reader's emotions in both fiction and
        nonfiction.

       The student analyzes the relationships among author's style, literary form, and intended impact on the
        reader.

       The student recognizes and explains those elements in texts that prompt a personal response (such as
        connections between one's own life and the characters, events, motives, and causes of conflict in texts).

       The student examines a literary selection from several critical perspectives.

       The student knows that people respond differently to texts based on their background knowledge,
        purpose, and point of view.

Textbooks:

     The Norton Anthology of Short Fiction

     NTC’s Anthology of Non Fiction

     Sadlier-Oxford Vocabulary Workshop Level F

Other Materials:

    Books:

     A Land Remembered (summer) Patrick Smith
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     Brave New World (summer)          Aldous Huxley

     Ethan Frome (summer)               Edith Warton

     Mythology                          Edith Hamilton

     Their Eyes Were Watching God       Zora Neale Hurston

Additional Student Required Materials:
    Blue or Black ink Pens
    White Loose Leaf Paper – college ruled (no spirals)
    A Red or Green or Purple Pen
    Pencils
    Highlighters (blue, pink, yellow, green, orange)
    Notebook 3 ring binder at least 1 inch thick with 5 tabbed sections
    jump drive or thumb drive


Teacher Web Pages
Students are expected to check the teacher web pages daily. Changes may be made daily by 4:00 p.m. The best
way to contact the teacher is through email. If a teacher response is requested then the student must carbon
copy a parent/guardian email address.


Writing Portfolios:
Students are expected to maintain their writing portfolios and this will be part of the grade for the course. All
assigned writing should be kept in their folders on line at school. Students should save each draft and label it as
draft 1, draft 2 etc. All files should be in Word 2003 format. Students should always include all rough draft
material with the final draft of all writing assignments. Students will periodically evaluate work and assess their
strengths and weaknesses in order to improve their writing. All writing assignment final drafts MUST be run
through Turnitin.com and MUST be submitted with the Turnitin.com Originality Report stapled to the front.
Final drafts will not be accepted without the Turnitin.com Originality Report

Format:
All assignments must be written in blue or black ink on one side of the paper only. Heading should be in the
upper right corner and should include:
         Name
         Date
         Teacher/period
Typed papers should be double-spaced and include the same heading except it should be on the left. Students
are encouraged to use the computer lab to type all essays. Sloppy work will not be accepted, and it will be
returned to the students for resubmission with a late penalty. Any paper submitted to teacher electronically
must be formatted in Word 2003.


Grading policy:

The grading system is consistent with the Bishop Moore grading system. One third of your grade will be daily
work. This will include participation, having materials in class, daily quizzes, homework, and worksheets. One
third of your grade will be tests. This will include unit tests or other alternative assessments for unit evaluations.
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Lastly, one third of your grade will be alternate assignments. This will include essays, research papers and
projects.

Daily Assignments- 15% of total grade                 Tests- 50% of total grade

Alternate Assessments- 35% of total grade



Absent and Make up policy:
Upon returning from an absence, it is the students’ responsibility to inquire about work missed. Students are
accountable for all missed work. Students will have one day for every day missed to make up work.
     If a student is absent the day a final writing assignment is due the assignment must still be turned in
       that day. The student may e-mail the assignment to the teacher or send it with another student.
     If a student is absent on the day of a quiz/ test, the student will be expected to see me immediately and
       schedule time to take the quiz/ test. If it is not made up during the allotted time, the student will
       receive a zero.

If students come late to school or leave early they are expected to check with the teacher to make up any work
they missed and make it up on that day.

Students who leave early or miss class (athletics/field trips etc.) are expected to check with the teacher prior to
absence to get class work or homework. Prearranged absences does not allow for extra time for the student.

Late Assignments:
Late assignments will not be accepted for any reason as stated in the Bishop Moore Student Handbook. If
students do not have the assignment with them IN CLASS on the due date, a zero will be given for that
assignment but the assignment must still be completed. A homework detention will also be assigned.
Help Sessions or Conferences:
Conferences or help sessions may be scheduled with the teacher before or after school. Wednesday afternoon
is a teacher meeting time so students should not plan on meeting at that time.

Teacher Expectations of Students:
 Students are expected to be in class when the bell rings; tardiness will result in after school detention.
 Students are expected to come to class prepared [with book, pen, paper, and any other materials requested
   by the teacher] and ready to learn. Failure to come prepared may result in an after school detention.

Classroom Policies:
 All rules stated in the student handbook must be followed.
 Respect for all members of the class.
 No pictures or recordings can be made without the express permission of the teacher

Unit One: Summer Reading

       Dates: 8/18-8/26
       Unit Objectives: discussion of summer reading, themes, characters
       Unit Content: A Land Remembered by Patrick Smith, Brave New World by Aldous Huxley, Ethan Frome
        by Edith Wharton
        LA.910.1.6.2: The student will listen to, read, and discuss familiar and conceptually challenging text;
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       LA.910.1.7.2: The student will analyze the authors purpose and/or perspective in a variety of text and understand
       how they affect meaning;
       LA.910.1.7.3: The student will determine the main idea or essential message in grade-level or higher texts through
       inferring, paraphrasing, summarizing, and identifying relevant details;

       Assignments (Formative)
       Over the course of three days, students will discuss the plot, characters, symbolism, and authors of the
       novel.
       Students will also relate the themes of these novels, i.e. dystopia, naturalism, man vs. nature, to those
       previous novels they have read.
       As these details are discussed and written on the board, students should take notes in order to have
       suitable material to study for the summer reading test. The test will consist of three parts: Ethan Frome
       (multiple choice,) A Land Remembered (multiple choice,) and Brave New World (essay.)

       Assessments (Summative)-
       Three individual tests covering characters, theme, and plot will be given. A Land Remembered and Ethan
       Frome have multiple-choice tests, and Brave New World has an essay test centering on theme

      Unit Evaluations: objective tests on each novel and an essay test on one novel

Unit Two: Fiction

      Dates: 8/27- 9/24

      Unit Objectives: The student identifies the characteristics that distinguish literary forms. The student
       understands why certain literary works are considered classics. The student identifies universal themes
       prevalent in the literature of all cultures. The student understands the characteristics of major types of
       drama. The student understands the different stylistic, thematic, and technical qualities present in the
       literature of different cultures and historical periods.

      Unit Content:
              I Want to Know Why                              Wounded Soldier
              Death by Landscape                              Birthmark
              Snow                                            Conscience of the Court
              Witness                                         Lottery / Bliss
              The Veldt                                       Metamorphosis
              The Enormous Radio                              A Hunger Artist
              The Lady with the Dog                           The Man Who Would Be King
              Sorrow Acre                                     The Horse Dealer’s Daughter
              Matchimanito                                    The Ones Who Walk Away from Omelas

       Students read an average of one story a day and cover the following criteria through classroom
       discussions and note-taking:

         LA.910.1.7.6: The student will analyze and evaluate similar themes or topics by different authors across a variety of
       fiction and nonfiction selections;
       LA.910.1.7.8: The student will use strategies to repair comprehension of grade-appropriate text when self-monitoring
       indicates confusion, including but not limited to rereading, checking context clues, predicting, note-making,
       summarizing, using graphic and semantic organizers, questioning, and clarifying by checking other sources.
       LA.910.2.1.8: The student will explain how ideas, values, and themes of a literary work often reflect the historical
       period in which it was written;
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       LA.910.2.1.9 : The student identifies, analyzes, and applies knowledge of the elements of a variety of fiction and
       literary texts to develop a thoughtful response to a literary selection.
       LA.910.3.4.5: The student will edit for correct use of sentence formation, including absolutes and absolute phrases,
       infinitives and infinitive phrases, and use of fragments for effect.
       LA.910.3.4.3: The student will edit for correct use of punctuation, including commas, colons, semicolons,
       apostrophes, dashes, quotation marks, and underlining or italics;
       LA.910.3.4.1: The student will edit for correct use of spelling, using spelling rules, orthographic patterns,
       generalizations, knowledge of root words, prefixes, suffixes, knowledge of Greek, Latin, and Anglo-Saxon root words,
       and knowledge of foreign words commonly used in English (laissez faire, croissant);
       LA.910.6.3.1: The student will distinguish between propaganda and ethical reasoning strategies in print and nonprint
       media;

       Assignments (Formative)-
       Written assignment comparing/contrasting obsession in at least three stories, one being The Birthmark
       Identifying logical fallacies in media and eventually in stories and non-fiction
       Creating original logical fallacies to demonstrate application
       Character maps are created for use in seeing specific traits. This will be used frequently with
       Metamorphosis.
       Students will listen to “Ants Marching” by Dave Matthews to see how insects are used to symbolize
       monotony and over-worked animals in order to understand possible themes of Metamorphosis.

       Assessments (Summative)-
       Two quizzes checking reading comprehension
       Two-part test consisting of character matching and short answer questions regarding theme, the
       Freudian model, plot, characters, and setting with an essay focusing on theme


      Elements of Fiction terms:
      Character
           o   Protagonist                        Characterization                            Plot Diagram
           o   Antagonist                         Setting and Mood                                 o Exposition
           o   Flat character                     Conflict                                         o Rising action
           o   Rounded                            Plot                                             o Climax
               character                          Theme                                            o Falling action
           o   Static character                   Tone vs. Attitude of                             o Resolution
           o   Dynamic                             Meaning                                          o Denouement
               character
           o   Stock character
           o   Motivation

      Grammar: subject / verb agreement; pronoun / antecedent agreement; punctuation

Unit Three: Dracula

Dates: 9/25-10/21

      Unit Objectives: To read and understand Bram Stoker’s Dracula
      Unit Content: Analysis and evaluation of novel form
      Skills: Interpret and infer from literature and historical context
      Assessment: reading quizzes and essay
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        Writing: Essay on Dracula
        Grammar: sentence fragments; commas; adjective and adverb usage

Unit Content: Synthesis of novel in context

LA.910.4.1.1: The student will write in a variety of expressive and reflective forms that use a range of appropriate strategies
and specific narrative techniques, employ literary devices, and sensory description; and
LA.910.3.5.1: The student will prepare writing using technology in a format appropriate to the purpose (e.g., for display,
multimedia);
LA.910.2.1.10: The student will select a variety of age and ability appropriate fiction materials to read based on knowledge of
authors styles, themes, and genres to expand the core foundation of knowledge necessary to connect topics and function as a
fully literate member of a shared culture.
LA.910.3.1.3: The student will prewrite by using organizational strategies and tools (e.g., technology, spreadsheet, outline,
chart, table, graph, Venn Diagram, web, story map, plot pyramid) to develop a personal organizational style.
LA.910.3.4.5: The student will edit for correct use of sentence formation, including absolutes and absolute phrases, infinitives
and infinitive phrases, and use of fragments for effect.
LA.910.3.4.3: The student will edit for correct use of punctuation, including commas, colons, semicolons, apostrophes, dashes,
quotation marks, and underlining or italics;
LA.910.3.4.1: The student will edit for correct use of spelling, using spelling rules, orthographic patterns, generalizations,
knowledge of root words, prefixes, suffixes, knowledge of Greek, Latin, and Anglo-Saxon root words, and knowledge of foreign
words commonly used in English (laissez faire, croissant);
LA.910.5.2.3: The student will use appropriate eye contact, body movements, voice register and oral language choices for
audience engagement in formal and informal speaking situations;
LA.910.5.2.5: The student will research and organize information that integrates appropriate media into presentations for oral
communication (e.g., digital presentations, charts, photos, primary sources, webcasts).
LA.910.6.4.2: The student will routinely use digital tools for publication, communication and productivity.
A PowerPoint will present the main ideas of Greek/Roman mythology to re-introduce them to the
world of mythology.

Assignments (Formative)-
Students will read the book and apply the definition of a myth, ““A story of forgotten or vague origin, basically
religious or supernatural in nature, which seeks to explain or rationalize one or more aspects of the world or a
society,” to each story to understand its meaning.
Creating a myth theme park, Atalanta’s Race, listening to “Arachne” on CD, comparing archetypes of
Greek/Roman gods/goddesses to superheroes and other literary characters, written assignment writing a
modern version of a myth we have read, analyzing Greek/Roman heroes for character traits that their society’s
admired.
Students will create a poster displaying one particular god/goddess surrounded by symbols, words, and other
characters that stress who the particular god/goddess is.
Students will view a modern cartoon, The Justice League, to see how some modern superheroes are directly
linked into Greek mythology as well as some villains.

Assessments (Summative)-
Three quizzes checking for reading comprehension based on readings students do at home
Final test consisting of 50 multiple-choice questions checking comprehension, character analysis, and themes
with an essay asking students to apply the definition of a myth to at least three they have read or applying an
archetype to a mythological hero
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Unit Four: Non-Fiction

      Dates: 10/21- 11/13

      Unit Objectives: The student identifies the characteristics that distinguish literary forms. The student
       understands why certain literary works are considered classics. The student identifies universal themes
       prevalent in the literature of all cultures. The student understands the characteristics of major types of
       drama. The student understands the different stylistic, thematic, and technical qualities present in the
       literature of different cultures and historical periods.

      Unit Content:
              Summer Beyond Wish                             Living Like Weasels
              An Island on an Island                         Here Be Chickens
              Imelda                                         What is Science
              From Strikes Have . . .                        Measuring the Dark Hours
              Memorandum                                     In Praise of Sunshine
              Basketball Season                              The Glass Half Empty
              Running the Table                              Defying Mrs. Tweedie
              Sports for Over 40 Person                      The Language We Know
              The Marginal World

       Major Assignments (Formative)-
       Similar to the short fiction unit, students will read one non-fiction piece in class and one for homework
       each night.
       Notes must be taken on the following information regarding each non-fictional piece: purpose, tone,
       plot, characters, setting. These notes will eventually serve as a study guide for the non-fiction test which
       specifically requires students to recall this information. In addition, students will discuss topics relating
       to each piece by relying on prior knowledge of those topics.
       Students will discuss how discovering an author’s tone in writing requires looking at word choice.
       Students will write a memoir based on the model of the piece, Summer Beyond Wish.

       Assessments (Summative)-
       Essay comparing/contrasting obsession in three of the short stories
       Two quizzes checking recall and comprehension of the short stories
       Final test in multiple-choice format checking comprehension and analysis with an essay focusing on
       synthesis of common themes and archetypes

       LA.910.2.2.4: The student identifies, analyzes, and applies knowledge of the elements of a variety of nonfiction,
       informational, and expository texts to demonstrate an understanding of the information presented.
       LA.910.3.1.3: The student will prewrite by using organizational strategies and tools (e.g., technology, spreadsheet,
       outline, chart, table, graph, Venn Diagram, web, story map, plot pyramid) to develop a personal organizational style.
       LA.910.3.4.5: The student will edit for correct use of sentence formation, including absolutes and absolute phrases,
       infinitives and infinitive phrases, and use of fragments for effect.
       LA.910.3.4.3: The student will edit for correct use of punctuation, including commas, colons, semicolons,
       apostrophes, dashes, quotation marks, and underlining or italics;
       LA.910.3.4.1: The student will edit for correct use of spelling, using spelling rules, orthographic patterns,
       generalizations, knowledge of root words, prefixes, suffixes, knowledge of Greek, Latin, and Anglo-Saxon root words,
       and knowledge of foreign words commonly used in English (laissez faire, croissant);
       LA.910.4.1.2: The student will incorporate figurative language, emotions, gestures, rhythm, dialogue,
       characterization, plot, and appropriate format.
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        Elements of non-fiction: Character, plot, setting, purpose, tone
        Unit Evaluations: reading quizzes, objective test and essay
        Writing: Essay on nonfiction
        Grammar: commas; subject / verb agreement; sentence fragments


Unit Five: Eyes Were Watching God

        Dates: 11/13 – 12/12

Unit Objectives: The student selects and uses appropriate pre-writing strategies, such as brainstorming, graphic
organizers, and outlines. The student drafts and revises writing that is focused, purposeful, and reflects insight
into the writing situation; has an organizational pattern that provides for a logical progression of ideas; has
effective use of transitional devices that contribute to a sense of completeness; has support that is substantial,
specific, relevant, and concrete; demonstrates a commitment to and involvement with the subject; uses creative
writing strategies as appropriate to the purposes of the paper; demonstrates a mature command of language
with precision of expression; has varied sentence structure; has few, if any, convention errors in mechanics,
usage, punctuation and spelling.

Unit Content: Their Eyes Were Watching God by Zora Neale Hurston
LA.910.1.6.2: The student will listen to, read, and discuss familiar and conceptually challenging text;
LA.910.1.6.3: The student will use context clues to determine meanings of unfamiliar words;
LA.910.1.7.1: The student will use background knowledge of subject and related content areas, prereading strategies (e.g.,
previewing, discussing, generating questions), text features, and text structure to make and confirm complex predictions of
content, purpose, and organization of a reading selection;
LA.910.1.7.2: The student will analyze the authors purpose and/or perspective in a variety of text and understand how they
affect meaning;
LA.910.1.7.3: The student will determine the main idea or essential message in grade-level or higher texts through inferring,
paraphrasing, summarizing, and identifying relevant details;
LA.910.1.7.4: The student will identify cause-and-effect relationships in text;
LA.910.1.7.5: The student will analyze a variety of text structures (e.g., comparison/contrast, cause/effect, chronological order,
argument/support, lists) and text features (main headings with subheadings) and explain their impact on meaning in text;
LA.910.1.7.6: The student will analyze and evaluate similar themes or topics by different authors across a variety of fiction and
nonfiction selections;
LA.910.1.7.8: The student will use strategies to repair comprehension of grade-appropriate text when self-monitoring indicates
confusion, including but not limited to rereading, checking context clues, predicting, note-making, summarizing, using graphic
and semantic organizers, questioning, and clarifying by checking other sources.
LA.910.2.1.8: The student will explain how ideas, values, and themes of a literary work often reflect the historical period in
which it was written;
LA.910.2.1.9: The student will identify, analyze, and compare the differences in English language patterns and vocabulary
choices of contemporary and historical texts; and
LA.910.2.1.10: The student will select a variety of age and ability appropriate fiction materials to read based on knowledge of
authors styles, themes, and genres to expand the core foundation of knowledge necessary to connect topics and function as a
fully literate member of a shared culture.

Assignments (Formative)-
Students will examine Zora Neale Hurston and learn about her life, why her novel was unpopular because it was
not “Harlem Renaissance” writing, and the re-emergence of her novel.
They will then read two chapters of the novel each night after listening to the first chapter on audio, and each
day, class will begin with about 8-10 questions of which they are to write down answers so they comprehend
the reading. Some of these answers will be discussed in class. They will also make character maps of the
following characters in the novel: Janie, Logan, Joe Starks, and Tea Cake. These maps are part of their study
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materials for the test. While we are going through the novel, bell work consisting of popular allusions, their
history and modern meanings will start each class.


Assessments (Summative)-
 A 35 multiple-choice test focusing on characters, quotes, plot, and an essay examining theme and character
relationships


       Unit Evaluations: reading quizzes, objective test and essay
       Writing: Essay on Their Eyes Were Watching God
       Grammar: active / passive voice; commas; semicolons

Unit Six: Vocabulary
     Dates: 8/20– 12/12

       Unit Objectives: The student refines vocabulary for interpersonal, academic, and workplace situations,
        including figurative, idiomatic, and technical meanings.

    Unit Content: Vocabulary Lessons 1-6
    LA.910.1.6.3: The student will use context clues to determine meanings of unfamiliar words;
    LA.910.1.6.5: The student will relate new vocabulary to familiar words;
    LA.910.1.6.6: The student will distinguish denotative and connotative meanings of words;
    LA.910.1.6.7: The student will identify and understand the meaning of conceptually advanced prefixes, suffixes, and root
    words;
    LA.910.1.6.8: The student will identify advanced word/phrase relationships and their meanings;
    LA.910.1.6.9: The student will determine the correct meaning of words with multiple meanings in context;
    LA.910.1.6.10: The student will determine meanings of words, pronunciation, parts of speech, etymologies, and alternate
    word choices by using a dictionary, thesaurus, and digital tools; and

    Activities used to enhance and promote vocabulary words- sentence creations using the words, image
    relation to vocabulary words, matching definitions/words

    Assignments (Formative)-
    Creating original sentences with the vocabulary words and relating those sentences to novels
    “Prepping” a member of a team to compete against others at recalling vocabulary definitions

    Assessments (Summative)-
    Units 1-7 multiple-choice tests requiring completing the sentence and recalling definitions from past
    chapters
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Honor Code
Bishop Moore Catholic High School has an honor code. All students should are expected to abide by this honor
code at all times. Submission of any work (homework, essays, quizzes, tests) implies the following honor code
pledge:
       “On my honor, I have not given, nor received, nor witnessed any unauthorized
assistance on this work.”



                                            See Below
                               Student / Parent Honor Code Contract

Please sign and date and cut on the line and have your parent/guardian sign and date it and hand it in.



I understand that submission of any work (homework, essays, quizzes, tests) implies
the following honor code pledge:
       “On my honor, I have not given, nor received, nor witnessed any unauthorized
assistance on this work.”



Print student name:                                             Signature student name:



                                                                                                 Date:


Print parent/guardian name:                                     Signature parent/guardian name:




                                                                                                 Date:

				
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