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					                State of Arizona

   Target Network Architecture
   Information Technology (IT) Technical Document


“A Networking Framework for e-Government Solutions”




                               EA

                 Az Enterprise
                Architecture

                       Revision 2.0
                       October 17, 2003
                         Prepared by

           Government Information Technology Agency
                  Chris Cummiskey, Director
                 100 North 15th Ave, Suite 440
                    Phoenix, Arizona 85007
                                       Ariz ona Enterprise Architecture
       EA                                Guiding Arizona to Ever Improving Citizen Service

Az Enterprise   602.364.4482
Architecture    Fax 602.364.4799                                                                                100 N 15th Ave, Suite 440
                ea@azgita.gov                                                                                     Phoenix, Arizona 85007



Revision          Effective        Summary of Changes
                    Date
    NC           01/10/2002        Initial release

    1.0          05/06/2003        Revision 1.0 release

    2.0          10/17/2003        Revision 2.0 release
                                   1. Introduction. Revised text to be consistent with newer domain documents. Added a graphic,
                                   references to applicable policies and standards, and footnote containing link to Enterprise
                                   Architecture Trends document. Expanded EWTA Domains graphic to be consistent with the one
                                   on the EA website.

                                   4. Target Network Architecture. Updated the recommended implementation approach to clarify
                                   that the implementation of Target Network Architecture is the responsibility of each Agency and,
                                   when undertaken, shall be in accordance with Statewide Policy P700, Enterprise Architecture,
                                   and Statewide Policy P340, Project Investment Justification (PIJ).

                                   Removed implementation information relative to the roles and responsibilities for incorporation of
                                   the recommended principles, standards, and best practices into statewide IT contracts. The
                                   alignment of EWTA standards and best practices with statewide and agency IT contracts is
                                   presented in the Framework and Strategies document and Statewide Policy P700, Enterprise
                                   Architecture, to consistently address all EWTA domains.

                                   Replaced Network Architecture Table with Target Technology Table encompassing all EWTA
                                   domains, available at
                                   http://www.azgita.gov/enterprise_architecture/AZ_EA_Target_Technology_Table.htm.

                                   5. Network Architecture Standards. Incorporated all Recommended Standards into the current,
                                   published version of Statewide Standard P710- S710, Network Infrastructure, available at
                                   http://www.azgita.gov/policies_standards.

                                   6. Network Architecture Purpose. Removed the description of Enterprise Architecture Strategic
                                   Alignment with FY2002-03 State IT Plan. It is available at:
                                   http://www.azgita.gov/enterprise_architecture/.

                                   8. Network Architecture Recommended Best Practices. Updated section to reflect the
                                   incorporation of certain Best Practices into Statewide Standard P710- S710, Network
                                   Infrastructure. Added several new recommended best practices.

                                   9. Network Architecture Technology Trends. Removed entire section since reference to the
                                   location of the document it referenced has been added to the footnote in Section 1, Introduction.

                                   Appendix A. OSI Reference Model. Removed. Content has been replaced by the Target
                                   Technology Table, available at
                                   http://www.azgita.gov/enterprise_architecture/AZ_EA_Target_Technology_Table.htm.

                                   Appendix B. Agency Network Architecture “As-Is.” Removed. High-level and detailed
                                   network/system diagrams are maintained and collected in accordance with Statewide Standard
                                   P800-S815, Configuration Management.

                                   Appendix C. Internet Protocol Services Version Summary. Removed. IPv6 has been ratified
                                   as an industry standard and incorporated into Statewide Standard P700-S710, Network
                                   Infrastructure.




                                                                           i
                                             Ariz ona Enterprise Architecture
            EA                                 Guiding Arizona to Ever Improving Citizen Service

     Az Enterprise   602.364.4482
     Architecture    Fax 602.364.4799                                                                                            100 N 15th Ave, Suite 440
                     ea@azgita.gov                                                                                                 Phoenix, Arizona 85007




                                                             TABLE OF CONTENTS

1.      INTRODUCTION .................................................................................................................................... 1

2.      NETWORK ARCHITECTURE VISION ................................................................................................... 2

3.      NETWORK ARCHITECTURE DEFINITION ........................................................................................... 2

4.      TARGET NETWORK ARCHITECTURE................................................................................................. 2

5.      NETWORK ARCHITECTURE STANDARDS ......................................................................................... 3

6.      NETWORK ARCHITECTURE PURPOSE .............................................................................................. 4

7.      NETWORK ARCHITECTURE GENERAL PRINCIPLES........................................................................ 5

8.      NETWORK ARCHITECTURE RECOMMENDED BEST PRACTICES ................................................... 7




                                                                                  ii
                                     Ariz ona Enterprise Architecture
        EA                             Guiding Arizona to Ever Improving Citizen Service

 Az Enterprise   602.364.4482
 Architecture    Fax 602.364.4799                                                                                          100 N 15th Ave, Suite 440
                 ea@azgita.gov                                                                                               Phoenix, Arizona 85007


1. INTRODUCTION
         The State of Arizona’s Enterprise Architecture (EA) describes a comprehensive framework for
         information technology (IT)1 and business that supports the Arizona State government strategic
         plan. EA facilitates the application of information technology to business initiatives and objectives
         and subsequent change in an orderly, efficient manner by describing a direction for current and
         future activities, supported by underlying principles, standards, and best practices.

         EA effectively supports and enhances the business of government and
                                                                                                         Security
         improves the ability to deliver responsive, cost-effective government
         functions and services. Effective utilization of technology to achieve                                 Ef
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         business functions and services, increasing citizen access to those




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         government, and maximizing IT resources investment are major                                    E-Gov

         motivating factors for the development and implementation of EA.




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         The implementation of EA presents opportunities for State agencies




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         to interoperate together to deliver a higher level of courteous, efficient,       /In
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         responsive, and cost-effective service to the citizen owners and                            io                 So
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         employees of State government. Individually, each State agency can
         independently implement EA components that are interoperable, however, e-government initiatives,
         economies of scale, consolidation, and cross-agency savings may best be realized not just through
         interoperability, but also by working together in partnership and sharing.

         EA includes important business, governance, and technical components. The technical
         components, collectively referred to as Enterprise Wide Technical Architecture (EWTA), provide
         technical guidance to State agencies. That guidance is supported by principles correlated to
         agency business functions, recommended standards, applicable recommended best practices, and
         technology trends2. Each component, or domain, of the EWTA is a separate but interrelated,
         architectural discipline. EA is the glue that integrates each of these technical disciplines into a
         cohesive framework having the potential to transform government by improving service delivery,
         reducing costs, simplifying and streamlining requirements and services, and increasing efficiency
         and effectiveness.
                                                       Arizona’s EWTA Domains
                                           Infrastructure                             Application
                                              Platform                             Data/Information
                                              Network                                      Software
                                                                   Security
                                                  Basic, Fundamental Principles of EA
                                                     Business Focus and Alignment

                                     Secure Interoperability, Flexibility, Adaptability, Scalability,
                                      Portability, common, secure, pervasive, industry-wide,
                                                open-standards-based technologies


         1
           Terminology used throughout this document is defined in the GITA Policies, Standards, and Procedures (PSP) and
         Enterprise Architecture (EA) Glossary of Terms available at: http://www.azgita.gov/policies_standards/glossary.htm.
         2
           Trends, economic, governmental, and technical, that impact and influence EA are available at
         http://www.azgita.gov/enterprise_architecture/.
                                                                     Page 1
                                        Ariz ona Enterprise Architecture
        EA                               Guiding Arizona to Ever Improving Citizen Service

 Az Enterprise    602.364.4482
 Architecture     Fax 602.364.4799                                                                              100 N 15th Ave, Suite 440
                  ea@azgita.gov                                                                                   Phoenix, Arizona 85007

         EA applies to all agencies. The agency director, working in conjunction with the agency CIO, is
         responsible for ensuring the implementation of EA within the agency’s “sphere of influence,” as
         designated by statute or rule. The EA Target Domain Architecture documents define an overall
         strategy and technical framework; however, by design, the capital planning, process approach and
         timeframes for transition, project management, and investment control for the implementation of the
         target architectures are the responsibility of the agency3. Implementing EA requires significant
         capital investments. Arizona, like most states, does not have unlimited capital to invest in
         implementing EA, therefore, migrating to EA within available budgets is the only viable method.

2. NETWORK ARCHITECTURE VISION
         The State of Arizona’s Network Architecture delineates a reliable, scalable, resilient set of agency
         infrastructures that economically support the State’s business functions in an efficient and effective
         manner. Network Architecture describes a network infrastructure that supports converged services,
         as well as accommodating traditional data, voice, and video services, providing the framework and
         foundation to enable budget unit business processes, new business opportunities, and new
         methods for delivering service.

3. NETWORK ARCHITECTURE DEFINITION
         Network Architecture defines common, industry-wide, open-standards-based, secure, interoperable
         network infrastructures providing reliable and ubiquitous communication for the State's distributed
         information processing environment. It defines various technologies required to enable connections
         between the State and its citizens, businesses, political sub-divisions and the federal government.

4. TARGET NETWORK ARCHITECTURE
         Target Network Architecture is the foundational element of Arizona’s EWTA that defines the secure,
         interoperable, wired and wireless infrastructure which data, voice, and video must traverse to
         support homeland security, complete an electronic government service transaction or inquiry, deliver
         an email message, connect citizen-to-government telephone calls, provide media-rich information
         streams, etc. Like the electric power grid, Target Network Architecture encompasses public and
         private networks to build a virtual/physical grid that transparently provides secure accessibility and
         connectivity to IT resources supporting government services, regardless of location. Target Network
         Architecture provides the foundation through which the State can securely connect and share
         data/information and computing resources that may be both centrally available and fundamentally
         disaggregated and distributed. Considering the wide variety and types of service as well as
         geographically-independent locations that the network infrastructure must accommodate and the
         business requirements for efficiency and effectiveness to meet the ever increasing demands from
         citizens and business on State government, it is essential that the Target Network Architecture is
         defined based on industry best practices, technology trends, and supported by pervasive, industry-
         wide, open standards. As such, the development of Target Network Architecture addresses all
         relevant criteria on a broad scale, rather than as part of the deployment of an individual application
         or service. Consequently, the recommendations and decisions that are made during the
         development process may limit or eliminate certain options for future network components or
         services.

         Arizona’s Target Network Architecture is supported by principles correlated to agency business
         functions, recommended standards, applicable recommended best practices, and technology
         trends. The principles and recommended standards contained in this document are codified in

         3
             The IT Project implementation process is described in Statewide Policy P340, Project Investment Justification (PIJ).
                                                                       Page 2
                                    Ariz ona Enterprise Architecture
        EA                            Guiding Arizona to Ever Improving Citizen Service

 Az Enterprise   602.364.4482
 Architecture    Fax 602.364.4799                                                                         100 N 15th Ave, Suite 440
                 ea@azgita.gov                                                                              Phoenix, Arizona 85007

         Statewide Policy P710, Network Architecture, and Statewide Standard P710-S710, Network
         Infrastructure, respectively. Policies and standards generated as part of EA are subject to the
         review, approval, and refresh/renewal procedures outlined in Statewide Policy P105, Policies,
         Standards, and Procedures (PSP) Policy.

         The agency director, working in conjunction with the agency CIO, is responsible for ensuring the
         implementation of Target Network Architecture within the agency’s “sphere of influence,” as
         designated by statute or rule. The Target Network Architecture document defines an overall strategy
         and technical framework that is codified in Statewide Policy P710, Network Architecture, and
         Statewide Standard P710-S710, Network Infrastructure; however, by design, the capital planning,
         process approach and timeframes for transition, project management, and investment control for
         the implementation of the target architectures are the responsibility of the agency. Implementation
         strategies and conformance of IT investments and projects with EA is described in Statewide Policy
         P700, Enterprise Architecture, and Arizona’s Enterprise Architecture Framework and Strategies
         document.

         Rather than present individual target domain tables that potentially could overlap or become
         outdated as other domains and associated statewide policies and standards are reviewed and
         updated, the technical components of the Target Network Architecture are summarily presented
         relative to the OSI 7498-1 Network Reference Model in a composite, integrated domain table,
         consolidated from the individual EWTA domains, referred to as the Target Technology Table and
         available at http://www.azgita.gov/enterprise_architecture.

         The development of the Target Network Architecture is a collaborative process to allow all agencies
         to participate so that their current investment in certain products and services can be maximized
         while also developing a transition plan4 to allow obsolete or non-conforming elements to be phased
         out. Maximizing the investment and transitioning these elements should not be seen as mutually
         exclusive activities, since both are in the best interest of agencies and the State enterprise.
                                                                                                         5
         The development of the Target Network Architecture is also a continuous process , which is
         critically important in an environment where funding to implement may not be immediately available.
         The ongoing process provides the opportunity to continually refine the Target Network Architecture
         to keep it aligned with business strategies and requirements, emerging standards, and changing
         technology.

5. NETWORK ARCHITECTURE STANDARDS
         Network Architecture Standards are established to coordinate agency and State designs and
                6
         secure implementations of network infrastructure that support converged services, while
         accommodating traditional data, voice, and video services. The goal is to employ only open systems
         based on common, proven, and pervasive industry-wide, approved, open standards; however, a full
         complement of open standards does not yet exist for all components of network infrastructure.
         Therefore, combinations of open standards, de facto industry standards, and mutually agreed upon
         product standards are currently required to support the State's heterogeneous operating
         environment.


         4
           Transition plans and the implementation of Target Network Architecture are addressed in Statewide Policy P700,
            Enterprise Architecture.
         5
           The Enterprise Architecture lifecycle process is defined in Framework and Strategies and Statewide Policy P700,
            Enterprise Architecture.
         6
           Network security is addressed in Target Security Architecture and Statewide Standard P800-S830, Network Security.
                                                                    Page 3
                                       Ariz ona Enterprise Architecture
        EA                               Guiding Arizona to Ever Improving Citizen Service

 Az Enterprise    602.364.4482
 Architecture     Fax 602.364.4799                                                                            100 N 15th Ave, Suite 440
                  ea@azgita.gov                                                                                 Phoenix, Arizona 85007

         The Network Architecture Standards contained in previous revisions of this document have been
         codified in Statewide Standard P700-S710, Network Infrastructure, and related statewide security
         standards.

         Budget unit compliance with Statewide Standard P700-S710, Network Infrastructure, shall be in
         accordance with Statewide Policy P700, Enterprise Architecture.

         Network Architecture Standards contained in Statewide Standard P700-S710, Network
         Infrastructure, are reviewed, updated, and approved in accordance with Statewide Policy P105,
         Policies, Standards, and Procedures (PSP) Policy.

         All Statewide Policies, Standards, and Procedures referenced in this document are available at
         http://www.azgita.gov/policies_standards.

6. NETWORK ARCHITECTURE PURPOSE
         Network Architecture specifies how information-processing resources are interconnected and
         documents the standards for topology (design of how devices are connected together), transport
         media (physical medium or wireless assignments), and protocols (for network access and support
         for converged services communication).

         Network Architecture components of topology include the following:

          Local Area Networks (LAN) consist of communications systems of multiple interconnected
           workstations, peripherals, data terminals, or other devices confined to a limited geographic area
           consisting of a single building or a small cluster of buildings.
          Campus Infrastructure consists of communication systems between groups of buildings within a
           larger geographic area. Campus Infrastructure typically interconnects disparate groups of
           interest for information sharing and interoperability using private facilities or public carrier
           communication facilities.
          Wide Area Networks (WAN) and Metropolitan Area Networks (MAN) are communications
           systems that span a very large geographical area. WANs and MANs interconnect distributed
           branch facilities of agencies and also may function as aggregation mechanisms for disparate
           agencies with common communication requirements. WANs and MANs typically use public
           carrier communication facilities.

         Network Architecture components of transport media include: wire-based, which uses physical
         media (copper, fiber) to connect between two or more points, and wireless (mobile, voice/data,
         microwave, and satellite).

         Network Architecture protocols address the set of rules for providing network access and
         communication support for converged services and include SONET, Frame Relay/ATM, and
         Ethernet at the lower communication protocol layers, TCP/IP, and IPSec at the upper layers.

         Target Network Architecture aligns with and facilitates the strategic goals of the State and agency IT
         plans7 and supports the business and program priorities of State government. EA is a strategic
         initiative of the current State IT Plan and is interwoven with the Governor’s objectives for the State.
         7
             The Arizona IT Strategic Plan is available at http://www.azgita.gov/tech_news/GITA_brochure.htm. Individual Agency IT
              Plans are available at http://www.azgita.gov/planning_inventory/. Alignment of the initial EA domain documents to the
              FY2002-03 State IT Plan is available at:
              http://www.azgita.gov/enterprise_architecture/NEW/Architecure_Strategies_Framework/strategic_alignment.htm.
                                                                       Page 4
                                    Ariz ona Enterprise Architecture
        EA                           Guiding Arizona to Ever Improving Citizen Service

 Az Enterprise   602.364.4482
 Architecture    Fax 602.364.4799                                                          100 N 15th Ave, Suite 440
                 ea@azgita.gov                                                               Phoenix, Arizona 85007



         Technology investments in Network Architecture must provide measurable improvements to public
         service and facilitate the Governor’s goals for the State. The Network Architecture must enable the
         development of software application systems that make State information and programs more
         accessible to the people of Arizona.

         Network Architecture must enable new software applications to be developed more rapidly and
         modified more easily as business requirements change. New software application systems must be
         developed to accommodate rapid rates of change in the business and technical environments.

7. NETWORK ARCHITECTURE GENERAL PRINCIPLES
         The importance of secure, network architecture continues to increase as State government seeks to
         adopt an e-Government model for service delivery and internal efficiency and effectiveness.
         Network Architecture Principles are established to guide the planning, design, and selection of
         network technology and services and are incorporated into Statewide Policy P710, Network
         Architecture.

   Principle 1
   Networks provide the infrastructure to support agency business and administrative processes.

         Rationale:
          Networks enable access to a wide spectrum of information, applications, and resources,
            regardless of the method of delivery or the location of the customer.
          Networks must accommodate new and expanding applications, different types of data (e.g.,
            voice, data, image, and video), and a variety of concurrent users.
          Information must pass across the network in a timely manner so that business decisions can be
            based on up-to-date information.
          Networks that both support agencies and provide statewide access to information and resources
            best serve stakeholders’ interests.

   Principle 2
   Networks must be operational, reliable, and available (24x7x365) for essential business
   processes and mission-critical business operations.

         Rationale:
          Networks provide the delivery and execution of agency business functions and processes.
          Networks consist of and rely on many interrelated and often highly complex components
            distributed across a wide geographic area.
          Reliability, redundancy, and fault tolerance must be built-in, not added on, to ensure that any
            single point of failure does not have severe adverse effects on business applications or services.

   Principle 3
   Networks must be designed for growth, flexibility, and adaptability.

         Rationale:
          Changing business processes and requirements drive application and network architecture.
          Scalable, flexible, and adaptive networks facilitate the delivery of applications resulting from
            changing business requirements.
          As new processes are developed and new information becomes available, networks must scale
            to allow for increased demand.
                                                                   Page 5
                                   Ariz ona Enterprise Architecture
       EA                           Guiding Arizona to Ever Improving Citizen Service

Az Enterprise   602.364.4482
Architecture    Fax 602.364.4799                                                        100 N 15th Ave, Suite 440
                ea@azgita.gov                                                             Phoenix, Arizona 85007



  Principle 4
  Networks must use industry-proven, mainstream technologies based on industry-wide, open
  standards, and open architecture.

        Rationale:
         All networks must interoperate to reduce communication and integration complexity.
         All networks must provide for the sharing of information across the State enterprise and agency
           boundaries.
         All networks must be based on vendor-neutral protocols that provide for Open Systems
           Interconnection (OSI) as identified by the International Standards Organization (ISO).
         Industry-wide, open standards and architecture provide for the consistent deployment,
           management, and expansion of networks to allow agencies to respond more quickly to changing
           business requirements.
         Network Architecture based on industry-wide, open standards guide the appropriate technology
           standards while still enabling old and new systems to work together.
         Industry-wide, open standards allow agencies to choose from a variety of sources and select the
           most cost-effective and efficient network solutions without adversely impacting applications.

  Principle 5
  Networks must be designed with confidentiality and security of data as a high priority.

        Rationale:
         Agency operations, data, and applications are valuable assets that support business functions.
         Networks are the delivery mechanism for State and agency information and services.
         Networks must be implemented with adherence to security, confidentiality, and privacy policies
           as well as applicable statutes, to protect information from unauthorized access and use.
         Network Architecture must increase access to information and services for both citizens and
           government employees, while protecting privacy and fostering openness in government.
         Network Architecture must enable easier access and more widely available information, while
           still protecting individual rights of privacy.

  Principle 6
  Network access must be a function of authentication and authorization, not of location.

        Rationale:
         Access to information, applications, and system resources must be available in a timely and
           efficient manner to appropriate requesters.
         Access to information, applications, and system resources must be available from a variety of
           public and private networks, as well as from the Internet.
         Authentication and authorization of users must be performed according to the security rules of
           the State and the agency.




                                                                  Page 6
                                    Ariz ona Enterprise Architecture
        EA                           Guiding Arizona to Ever Improving Citizen Service

 Az Enterprise   602.364.4482
 Architecture    Fax 602.364.4799                                                          100 N 15th Ave, Suite 440
                 ea@azgita.gov                                                               Phoenix, Arizona 85007

   Principle 7
   Networks should be designed to support converged services while accommodating traditional
   data, voice, and video services and to be “application aware” in the delivery of business-critical
   application systems.

         Rationale:
          Networks are the distribution mechanism for State and agency applications that deliver agency
            business functions.
          Network Architecture must support the use of information technology to continually improve
            government efficiency and effectiveness.
          Network Architecture provides the ability to seamlessly deploy business-critical application
            systems alongside other, more bandwidth-intensive applications such as multimedia, voice, and
            web-based Intranet applications.
          To deliver service, networks must recognize, classify, prioritize, and protect business-critical
            applications while still enabling bandwidth-intensive and delay-sensitive multimedia and voice
            applications.

8. NETWORK ARCHITECTURE RECOMMENDED BEST PRACTICES
         Best Practices are approaches that have consistently been demonstrated by diverse organizations
         to achieve similar high-level results, which, in the case of architecture, means demonstrating the
         principles.

   Recommended Best Practice 1
   When industry standards do not yet exist, use interim, common, proven, and pervasive product-
   based standards for networks.

         Rationale:
          Use product-based, interim standards that are common, proven, and pervasive to simplify the
            process of developing and managing networks.
          Comprehensive industry standards have not been established for all the components of WAN
            design and implementation. Product-based standards can provide interim guidelines for the
            development, deployment, and management of WAN technology.
          The cooperative, collaborative, and geometric nature of networks mandates that standards be
            used in order to build a cohesive environment.

   Recommended Best Practice 2
   Network planning must be an integral part of application design and development; it must be
   continually reviewed in production.

         Rationale:
          Network planning ensures that network capacity, availability, and performance are well
            integrated with applications design/acquisition and rollout. From the application analysis stage
            through the design/acquisition stage, agencies should review application bandwidth
            requirements, real-time data flow needs, and expected system capacity changes from other
            sources.
          Network planning ensures documentation and standard practices are followed.
          Network planning ensures that any changes in business volume, staffing levels, applications, or
            facilities (e.g., relocation, construction, or renovations) are addressed.


                                                                   Page 7
                                   Ariz ona Enterprise Architecture
       EA                           Guiding Arizona to Ever Improving Citizen Service

Az Enterprise   602.364.4482
Architecture    Fax 602.364.4799                                                          100 N 15th Ave, Suite 440
                ea@azgita.gov                                                               Phoenix, Arizona 85007

  Recommended Best Practice 3
  Design network-neutral applications.

        Rationale:
         Application code should be isolated from the network-specific code so business rules and data
           access code can be deployed without regard to the type of network (i.e. WAN or LAN) or
           redeployed on a different platform, as necessary.
         Network-neutral applications allow networks to remain scalable and portable.

  Recommended Best Practice 4
  Consider the impact of middleware and data movement on network utilization and performance.

        Rationale:
         Perform transactions locally between the resource manager and the queue to minimize network
           traffic.
         Use asynchronous, store-and-forward messaging to limit the scope of transactions and network
           requirements between remote sites.
         Use push technology, rather than client polling, to balance server and network link loading.
         Use multicast, rather than broadcast transmission, to distribute messages to multiple points.

  Recommended Best Practice 5
  Encourage Agencies to agree on the use of a common, automated tool for network design and
  documentation.

        Rationale:
         Use of a common, automated tool ensures documentation and standard practices are followed.
         A common, automated tool allows for cross-agency analysis and promotes opportunities for
           sharing and consolidation.

  Recommended Best Practice 6
  Establish a central authority to administer and coordinate “private” and “public” registered IP
  addresses for all budget units.

        Rationale:
         Central administration and coordination of “private” addresses will avoid collision issues with
           overlapping networks as a potential result of multiple agencies having LANs within a facility or
           campus sharing common, internal connection points and utilizing “private” addresses in
           accordance with Statewide Standard P710-S710, Network Infrastructure.
         Agencies should record all existing “private” and “public” registered IP addresses with the central
           authority and coordinate all new “private” and “public” registered IP addresses with the central
           authority.

  Recommended Best Practice 7
  Competitively acquire, consolidate, and aggregate public transport media (carrier services) to
  reduce costs as well as eliminate duplication and redundancies.

        Rationale:
         The telecommunications field is an open, competitive market in which many companies provide
           varying types of carrier services.


                                                                  Page 8
                                   Ariz ona Enterprise Architecture
       EA                           Guiding Arizona to Ever Improving Citizen Service

Az Enterprise   602.364.4482
Architecture    Fax 602.364.4799                                                         100 N 15th Ave, Suite 440
                ea@azgita.gov                                                              Phoenix, Arizona 85007

         Existing Statewide Carrier Services contracts are awarded to multiple, qualified service providers
          competing for State telecommunications business based on Service Level Agreements (SLAs)
          to insure vendor performance. Carrier service types are based on industry standards that
          provide for interoperability between service providers. With consideration to geographic areas
          within the State, multiple, qualified vendors provide service types supported by contract-standard
          SLAs. Fostering competition among awarded vendors encourages better services at lower
          prices
         Consolidation and aggregation of carrier services reduces costs and eliminates unnecessary
          duplication and redundancies in telecommunication services.
         Establishing common, “meet-me” points for public transport media (carrier services), wherever
          feasible, increases the potential for competitive carrier services by eliminating the requirement
          for local loop and entrance cables to specific facilities.




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Description: Information Technology Architecture Strategy Plans document sample