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Blood Sampling Device - Patent 5487748

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Blood Sampling Device - Patent 5487748 Powered By Docstoc
					


United States Patent: 5487748


































 
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	United States Patent 
	5,487,748



 Marshall
,   et al.

 
January 30, 1996




 Blood sampling device



Abstract

A blood sampling device has a tubular body (1, 2) housing a spring loaded
     (7) lancet (8) whose needle (17) is initially protected by a cap (20)
     which projects out from the forward end of the body. A rocker-like trigger
     (9) is formed as part of the moulded body (1,2) and holds the lancet (8)
     in a retracted position when the lancet is pushed back by the projecting
     cap (20). The cap can then be removed by a twist and pull action, breaking
     it free from the lancet body, which is prevented from rotating. Pressure
     on the trigger (9) releases the lancet (8), which is shot forward by the
     spring (7) for momentary projection of the needle tip (19), and then
     retracts to bring the needle tip within the body.


 
Inventors: 
 Marshall; Jeremy (Oxford, GB), Crossman; David D. (Oxford, GB) 
 Assignee:


Owen Mumford Limited
 (Oxford, 
GB)





Appl. No.:
                    
 08/307,624
  
Filed:
                      
  September 27, 1994
  
PCT Filed:
  
    March 30, 1993

  
PCT No.:
  
    PCT/GB93/00650

   
371 Date:
   
     September 27, 1994
  
   
102(e) Date:
   
     September 27, 1994
   
      
PCT Pub. No.: 
      
      
      WO93/19671
 
      
     
PCT Pub. Date: 
                         
     
     October 14, 1993
     


Foreign Application Priority Data   
 

Apr 01, 1992
[GB]
9207120



 



  
Current U.S. Class:
  606/182  ; 600/503; 600/583; 606/181
  
Current International Class: 
  A61B 5/15&nbsp(20060101); A61B 5/15&nbsp(20060101); A61B 19/00&nbsp(20060101); A61B 19/00&nbsp(20060101); A61B 005/14&nbsp()
  
Field of Search: 
  
  








 128/749,751,753,754,760,770 609/263 606/181,182
  

References Cited  [Referenced By]
U.S. Patent Documents
 
 
 
4375815
March 1983
Burns

4539988
September 1985
Shirley et al.

4577630
March 1986
Nitzche et al.

4976724
December 1990
Nieto et al.

5100427
March 1992
Crossman et al.

5282822
February 1994
Macors et al.

5304193
April 1994
Zhadonov

5368047
November 1994
Suzuki et al.



 Foreign Patent Documents
 
 
 
0255338
Feb., 1988
EP

0427406
May., 1991
EP

0433050
Jun., 1991
EP

0458451
Nov., 1991
EP

771890
Oct., 1934
FR

4213351
Oct., 1993
DE



   Primary Examiner:  Rimell; Sam


  Attorney, Agent or Firm: Young & Thompson



Claims  

We claim:

1.  A disposable pricker comprising an elongate body with a lancet non-rotatably carried therein, the lancet tip normally being within the body, a spring urging the lancet in a direction
to project its tip from the body, a trigger mechanism carried by the body with a portion within the body arranged to retain the lancet in a fully retracted position energizing the spring and a second portion outside the body manually actuable to release
the lancet to cause the tip to have a momentary position projecting from an opening in the forward end of the body, and a cap encasing the lancet tip and having a shank traversing said opening, wherein said shank extends outwardly of said body through
said opening a distance sufficient to permit said lancet to be moved against the action of said spring to said fully retracted position solely by pushing said cap further into said body through said opening, and wherein said cap is breakable free of the
lancet by twisting when so retracted to leave the tip exposed within said body.


2.  A disposable pricker as claimed in claim 1, characterised in that the body is moulded in two parts connected by a thin flexible web, presenting the body in an opened out condition but closeable together when the lancet and spring means are in
place.


3.  A disposable pricker as claimed in claim 1, characterised in that the trigger mechanism comprises a rocker and is formed integrally with the body, said trigger and said body being formed of moulded plastics material.


4.  A disposable pricker as claimed in claim 3, characterised in that the rocker is centrally connected to the body by first webs which are distortable to allow the rocker action.


5.  A disposable pricker as claimed in claim 4, characterised in that the rocker has second webs connecting it to the body to resist pivoting below a predetermined actuating force but once that force has been exceeded to offer little further
resistance.


6.  A disposable pricker as claimed in claim 1, characterised in that the lancet has a detent and the first portion of the trigger mechanism is a lug that co-operates with the detent, the detent being arranged to snap past the lug as the lancet
is retracted to hold the lancet in that position.


7.  A disposable pricker as claimed in claim 1, characterised in that the lancet is substantially narrower than the body so that, once the lancet has been fired, it will lie skew to the axis of the body. 
Description  

This invention relates to blood sampling devices, and in particular to a pricker to draw a small drop of blood for analysis.  Such prickers are widely used by diabetics, for example, who need to know their sugar
level.  However, there are many other applications.


These days, with AIDS, there is widespread concern surrounding the use of needles and their part in transmitting disease.  Once a needle has been used on an infected person, subsequent use or an accidental prick on another could be fatal.


There is therefore a growing demand for a pricker which can be used just once and, having been used, is automatic-ally rendered safe for carriage and disposal.


Several such prickers have been proposed, for example in EP-A-0427406 and EP-A-0433050.  These work well, and use a lancet which has been in production for many years.  However, it is important for disposable objects with a very transient life to
be made as simply and cheaply as possible, without compromising on effectiveness.  This the present invention aims to do.


According to the present invention there is provided a disposable pricker comprising an elongate body with a spring-loaded lancet carried therein, the lancet tip normally being within the body, a trigger mechanism to retain the lance in a fully
retracted position energising the spring means and actuable to release the lancet to cause the tip to have a momentary position projecting from the forward end of the body, and an elongate cap encasing the lancet tip and having a head external of the
body, the cap providing means to retract the lancet and being breakable free of the lancet to leave the tip exposed.


Conveniently, the trigger mechanism comprises a rocker with an outwardly projecting portion for manual operation and an inwardly projecting portion for co-operation with the lancet.  The rocker may be centrally connected to the main part of the
body by small webs which are distortable to allow the rocker action.


It has been found beneficial for the rocker to have further means connecting it to the body to resist pivoting below a predetermined actuating force.  This prevents accidental operation.


Preferably the trigger mechanism is formed integrally with the body, which will generally be moulded in plastics material with a certain resilience.  As the lancet is pushed back to prime the device, a projection on it can snap past an inwardly
projecting lug on one end of the trigger and this will temporarily hold the lancet retracted.  Pressure on the other end of the trigger will raise the lug clear and release the lancet.


Although the body and trigger will preferably be integral, they may initially be moulded as two main parts, one of which contains the trigger, connected by a thin flexible web, presenting the body in an opened out condition.  When the lancet and
spring means are in place, these two parts will be folded together and secured, as by adhesive or ultrasonic welding.


In order to assist in breaking the cap away from the lancet, the latter may have an engagement with the interior of the body that prevents it rotating about its longitudinal axis, at least when the lancet is retracted.  The cap may therefore be
twisted off by one hand with the other holding the body.


Another characteristic of the fit of the lancet within the body is preferably that, once the lancet has been fired, it should tend to lie skew to the axis of the body.  This would make it difficult, using the twisted off cap for example, to
insert it again and press the lancet back for possible re-use. 

For a better understanding of the invention, one embodiment will now be described, by way of example, with reference to the accompanying drawing, in which:


FIG. 1 is a longitudinal section of a blood sampling pricker,


FIG. 2 is a plan view of the pricker of FIG. 1, and


FIG. 3 is a cross-section on the line III--III of FIG. 1. 

The body of the pricker is of generally square tubular form and is of moulded plastics construction.  Two channel-like parts 1 and 2 are closed together and secured in a plane A to
form the tube, which is closed at the rear end 3 and which has an opening 4 at the forward end.  An external bevel 5 around this opening forms a shallow recess into which a thumb or finger, for example, can be pressed for pricking.


The parts 1 and 2 have interior lugs 6 opposing each other close to the rear end 3 to provide a trap for one end of a coil spring 7 by which a lancet 8, to be described in more detail below, is made captive.  Otherwise, the lower part 2 is plain. However, the upper part 1 has a trigger 9 integrally moulded with it.  The trigger lies largely within a bottle shaped aperture 10, the head of the bottle pointing forwards, and in plan view the trigger 9 is similarly shaped but smaller.  Its main
connection to the part 1 is by short bridges or webs 11 at the shoulders of the "bottle" and in the normal, relaxed state, the pricker adopts the position shown in FIG. 1.  In that case, the forward end of the trigger, in front of the webs 11, is
generally flush with the interior of the upper part of the body 1, but at its leading end a hook 12 projects down into the body cavity.  The hook 12 has a shallow slope facing forwards and a steep rear face.  To the rear of the webs 11, the pricker 9
steps upwardly to a thumb pad 13 by which it can be pivoted, and there are two optional thin L-shaped strips 14 connecting the rear corners of this pad 13 to the main part 1 of the body.  When the pad 13 is pressed, these strips 14 (if provided) buckle
or shear off at their connection to the rear end 3 and the trigger pivots to move the hook 12 out clear of the interior of the body 1.  Longitudinal reinforcing ribs 15 and 16 make the trigger 9 an effectively rigid rocker.


The strips 14 are not necessary if the device is to be provided with the lancet 8 as shown in FIGS. 1 and 2 and as described below, when it has to be cocked by the user before release.  But there is also a call for pre-cocked devices and then
there is a need to prevent premature actuation of the trigger, as by careless handling for example.  The strips 14 perform this safety function, since they demand a very positive pressure on the pad 13.  They will generally buckle or shear suddenly,
giving a quick action of the trigger and clean release of the lancet.  A pre-cocked lancet will still usually have a cap, as described below, to maintain sterility of the needle.


The lancet 8 comprises a steel needle 17 almost entirely encased in a cruciform-section jacket 18, except for its tip 19.  Initially, this tip is concealed within the rear end of an elongated cap 20 joined to the jacket 18 by a weak collar 21. 
The cap 20 passes freely through the aperture 4 and terminates outside the body 1 in a tab 22.


Just to the rear of the collar 21, the jacket 18 terminates at its forward end in two opposed wedges 23, their sloping sides facing rearwardly and being convergent, while their forward sides are co-planar and at right angles to the axis of the
needle 17.  Viewed end-on, as in FIG. 3, the wedges 23 form a rectangle slightly smaller than the inner cross-sectional profile of the body 1,2.  At the rear end, the jacket is formed with a domed stud 24 with an undercut slot 25 to locate and trap the
forward end of the coil spring 6, which fits over the stud 24.


Initially, the pricker is as shown in FIG. 1, with the cap 20 projecting well beyond the forward end of the body 1, 2 but with the tip 19 of the needle still inside the body and encased by the rear end of the cap 20.  To prime or cock the
trigger, the cap is simply pressed axially towards the body 1 causing the lancet to compress the spring 7.  As one of the wedges 23 reaches the hook 12, the sloping surfaces co-operate to rock the trigger 9 until the wedge 23 snaps pas the hook 12,
whereupon the resilience of the webs 11 and the strips 14 restores the trigger back to the FIG. 1 position to trap the lancet in a fully retracted position.  The tab 22 is then grasped and, with the body 1 held, is given a twist.  The wedges 23 prevent
the lancet rotating within the body 1, and so the weak collar 21 is sheared.  The cap 20 can then be withdrawn.  A thumb or finger is pressed into the aperture 4 and the pad 13 is pressed releasing the lancet.  It shoots forward to make the prick and,
the spring 7 momentarily having been over extended, draws the lancet back a little so that the tip 19 ends up safely inside the body 1,2.


Although the leading end of the lancet does not have much freedom of movement within the body 1,2 its rear end can shift up and down.  The lancet will therefore tend to come o rest slightly skew to the axis of the body 1,2.  Certainly, if an
attempt is made to retract the lancet again by inserting something through the hole 4, the spring 7 and the lancet will tend to go out of alignment.  This makes it very difficult to use the discarded cap to poke the lancet back for possible re-use. 
Thus, the pricker and cap will have to be discarded.


* * * * *























				
DOCUMENT INFO
Description: This invention relates to blood sampling devices, and in particular to a pricker to draw a small drop of blood for analysis. Such prickers are widely used by diabetics, for example, who need to know their sugarlevel. However, there are many other applications.These days, with AIDS, there is widespread concern surrounding the use of needles and their part in transmitting disease. Once a needle has been used on an infected person, subsequent use or an accidental prick on another could be fatal.There is therefore a growing demand for a pricker which can be used just once and, having been used, is automatic-ally rendered safe for carriage and disposal.Several such prickers have been proposed, for example in EP-A-0427406 and EP-A-0433050. These work well, and use a lancet which has been in production for many years. However, it is important for disposable objects with a very transient life tobe made as simply and cheaply as possible, without compromising on effectiveness. This the present invention aims to do.According to the present invention there is provided a disposable pricker comprising an elongate body with a spring-loaded lancet carried therein, the lancet tip normally being within the body, a trigger mechanism to retain the lance in a fullyretracted position energising the spring means and actuable to release the lancet to cause the tip to have a momentary position projecting from the forward end of the body, and an elongate cap encasing the lancet tip and having a head external of thebody, the cap providing means to retract the lancet and being breakable free of the lancet to leave the tip exposed.Conveniently, the trigger mechanism comprises a rocker with an outwardly projecting portion for manual operation and an inwardly projecting portion for co-operation with the lancet. The rocker may be centrally connected to the main part of thebody by small webs which are distortable to allow the rocker action.It has been found beneficial for the rocker to have