VINTAGE LENSES in the DSLR Age

Document Sample
VINTAGE LENSES in the DSLR Age Powered By Docstoc
					                                                                              event dv FEATURE




LENSES
 in the DSLR Age
    R
            eading this article will save you   investment of about $2,768. This would
            thousands of dollars. I know that   include a 17mm–55mm f/2.8 with image
            statement sounds like something     stabilizer ($1,119), a 70mm–200mm
    you’d hear while channel surfing at         f/2.8 without image stabilizer ($1,300),
    3 a.m., but it’s absolutely true. All       and a 50mm f/1.4 ($369.95). You can cut
    you need is the time it takes to read       this total nearly in half if you go with
    this article, an open mind, and an          lenses from companies such as Sigma,
    adventurous spirit. So let’s get started!   Tokina, and Tamron. But you’re still
       If you’re one of the thousands of        looking at a sizable investment, and the
    videographers who are currently or          price tag could double or triple if you
    have recently upgraded to a DSLR such       buy duplicates for a second and third
    as the Canon 5D Mark II, EOS 7D, or         DSLR. You’ll be amazed at how quickly
    Rebel T2i for video, you’ve likely          it adds up.
    experienced the sticker shock of how           The upside of this approach is that
    much money you’ll need to invest in         there’s a reason the Canons are so
    lenses. The cost of DSLR purchases is       expensive. They feature quality optics
    completely different from investing in      both in build and image quality. If you
    fixed-lens camcorders; the $2,500 or        take care of them, you’ll never have to
    $1,700 you spend on the 5D or 7D            buy lenses again, and you’ll be able to
    (respectively) is just the beginning        resell them at the cost you paid for them.
    when it comes to equipping these            The downside is that they’re expensive,
    cameras to get the shots you want.          and the high cost of just getting started
       The conventional wisdom is that          might be a deterrent to those who want
    there are two ways forward when it          to get in the DSLR game.
    comes to lens purchasing: One way is to        If you choose the second option,
    invest in the fastest glass you can find    you’ll save some money, but you won’t
    and write it off as the cost of doing       get the most you can out of your
    business. The other way is to make          equipment. The lenses on the budget
    compromises and buy slower glass at a       end of the spectrum tend to be slower
    lower cost just so you have something       and cheaply built. If you’re on a budget,
    to start out with in the hopes of           you can get a Tamron 18mm–250mm
    upgrading to something better later.        f/3.5–6.3 ($329) and a Canon 50mm
    We’ll look at the pros and cons of each.    f/1.8 ($99) and be somewhat OK for less
                                                than $500 per lens suite. But you have
    CHOOSING YOUR GLASS                         to make compromises when it comes to
      Let’s say you choose the first option     the speed of your main lens, and the
    and go with the Canon brand lenses. For     budget lenses might be difficult to use
    a minimum suite of lenses for shooting      in dim locations such as a wedding
    a wedding video, you’re looking at an       reception venue. Still, choosing cheaper


                                                               July/August 2010 • EventDV   39
vintage lenses in the DSLR age
        glass is a good way to at least get
        started with DSLR video on a
        restricted budget, but it’s not the best
        way, by far. That leads us to the third
        way forward: vintage lenses.

        GOING OLD SCHOOL
          Once again, let’s take the example of
        the minimum suite of lenses you’ll need
        for a wedding shoot. Here are the lenses
        that are in my bag and the prices I paid
        for them:
          • Standard Zoom: Tokina RMC (OM
             mount) 28mm–70mm f/2.8–4.3, $35
             (shipped)
          • Telephoto Zoom: Vivitar Series 1
             (OM mount) 70mm–210mm f/3.5,
             $90 (shipped)
          • 50(ish) fast prime: Mamiya Sekor
             (M42 mount) 55mm f/1.4, $40
             (local pickup)                           Chris Watson’s Canon 550D Rebel T2i with the vintage Helios 44M lens
          • Adapters: $20 x 3 = $60
          • Grand Total: $225

          If you go this route and have a lens
        budget of $500, you’ll have money left
        over. You can add a few other lenses
        that I have in my bag just for fun:
          • Helios 44M (M42 mount) 58mm
            f/2, $35
          • Mamiya Sekor (M42 mount) 35m
            f/2.8, $27
          • Jupiter 9 (M42 mount) 85mm f/2,
            $128
          • Adapters: $20 x 3 = $60
          • Aggregate Total: $975

          By now, you probably have a few
        questions, and they are probably in this
        order:
          1. Where did you find these lenses at
             such a great cost?
          2. What lenses can be adapted, and
                                                      Footage capture with the 550D and the Jupiter-9 85mm
             how do I go about doing it?
          3. Are these lenses any good?

          Let’s go in the opposite direction,      lens but also a more rugged build.                             focus every time without the need
        because in order to really appreciate      These babies are built to last.                                for any expensive accessories. I can’t
        the price of 
				
DOCUMENT INFO
Description: If you're one of the thousands of videographers who are currently or have recently upgraded to a DSLR such as the Canon 5D Mark II, EOS 7D or Rebel T2i for video you've likely experienced the sticker shock of how much money you'll need to invest in lenses. The conventional wisdom is that there are two ways forward when it comes to lens purchasing: One way is to invest in the fastest glass you can find and write it off as the cost of doing business. The other way is to make compromises and buy slower glass at a lower cost just so you have something to start out with in the hopes of upgrading to something better later. Let's go in the opposite direction, because in order to really appreciate the price of these classic lenses you have to understand the value of vintage lenses, especially for the videographer.
BUY THIS DOCUMENT NOW PRICE: $6.95 100% MONEY BACK GUARANTEED
PARTNER ProQuest LLC
ProQuest creates specialized information resources and technologies that propel successful research, discovery, and lifelong learning.