technology integration in education

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					Picture This: Effective Technology Integration in
Schools
Facilitator: Jeni O'Sullivan Corn SEIR*TEC at SERVE 3329 Chapel Hill Blvd., Suite 100 Durham,
NC 27707 (email) josulliv@serve.org (p) 919-402-1060 or (f) 919-402-1617




Workshop Presentation & Handouts

Picture This: Effective Technology Integration in Schools (PowerPoint Handouts
as a PDF file)

Scoring Guide developed for this workshop (Microsoft Word Document)

Sample Rubrics from ISTE, NCRTEC, and Intel (Microsoft Word Document)

Session Objectives

      Participants will have a clear definition(s) of technology integration
      Participants will be able to provide specific examples of technology
       integration




Quotes about New Technologies

SLATES
“Students today can’t prepare bark to calculate their problems. They depend on
their slates, which are more expensive. What will they do when the slate is
dropped and it breaks? They will not be able to write.”
~Teachers Conference, 1703

PAPER
“Students today depend upon paper too much. They don't know how to write on
slate without getting chalk dust all over themselves. They can't clean a slate
properly. What will they do when they run out of paper? “
~ Principal's Association, 1815

FOUNTAIN PENS
“Students today depend on these expensive fountain pens. They can no longer
write with a straight pen and nib. We parents must not allow them to wallow in
such luxury to the detriment of learning how to cope in the real business world
which is not so extravagant.”
~ PTA Gazette, 1914

INK
"Students today depend upon store bought ink. They don't know how to make
their own. When they run out of ink they will be unable to write words or ciphers
until their next trip to the settlement. This is a sad commentary on modern
education."
~ The Rural American Teacher, 1929

BALLPOINT PENS
"Ballpoint pens will be the ruin of education in our country. Students use these
devices and then throw them away. The American virtues of thrift and frugality
are being discarded. Business and banks will never allow such expensive
luxuries."
~ Federal Teacher, 1950

TECHNOLOGY
“While nobody will ever dispute the importance of a good education, meeting the
needs of today's students has changed dramatically from what it was 10 or 20
years ago. Students today are exposed to a vast amount of information and
technology early in their lives. Computers, electronic mail, long-distance learning,
and the internet have changed the dynamics of education here in our region and
throughout world. ~ Congressman Jerry Moran , 1999




"Technology integration is..."

Effective integration of technology is achieved when students are able to select
technology tools to help them obtain information in a timely manner, analyze and
synthesize the information, and present it professionally. The technology should
become an integral part of how the classroom functions -- as accessible as all
other classroom tools.
~ International Society for Technology in Education. (2000). National Educational
Technology Standards for Students. Retrieved May 13, 2004 from
http://cnets.iste.org/students/

Technology integration is occurring if teachers are trained in a full range of
technology uses and in the determination of their appropriate roles and
applications; teachers and students routinely turn to technology when needed;
and, teachers and students are empowered and supported in carrying out those
choices. The conditions necessary in a school to support the integration of
technology are the physical facilities, capacity, and conditions, curricular
connections, teacher actions and characteristics, student activities, and support
~ Northwest Educational Technology Consortium (NETC). (2004). Overview of
Technology Integration in Schools. Retrieved August 20, 2004 from
http://www.netc.org/images/pdf/tech.integration.pdf


Technology integration is the incorporation of technology resources and
technology-based practices into daily routines, work, and management of
schools. Technology resources are computers and specialized software,
network-based communication systems, and other equipment and infrastructure.
Practices include collaborative work and communication, Internet-based
research, remote access to instrumentation, network-based transmission and
retrieval of data, and other methods…it is important that the integration be
routine, seamless, and both efficient and effective in supporting school goals and
purposes.
~ National Forum on Education Statistics. (2002). Technology integration. In
Technology in Schools. Suggestions, Tools and Guidelines for Assessing
Technology in Elementary and Secondary Education (pp.74-97). Washington,
DC: National Center for Educational Statistics

Integrating technology is not about technology – it is primarily about content and
effective instructional practices. Technology involves the tools with which we
deliver content and implement practices in better ways. Its focus must be on
curriculum and learning. Integration is defined not by the amount or type of
technology used, but by how and why it is used.
~ Earle, R.S. (2002). The integration of instructional technology into public
education. Educational Technology Magazine, 42(1), 5-13. Retrieved May 15,
2004 from http://bookstoread.com/etp/earle.pdf


Technology integration is the use of technology resources -- computers, digital
cameras, CD-ROMs, software applications, the Internet, etc. -- in daily classroom
practices, and in the management of a school. Technology integration is
achieved when the use of technology is routine and transparent. Technology
integration is achieved when a child or a teacher doesn't stop to think that he or
she is using a computer or researching via the Internet.
~ George Lucas Educational Foundation. (2004). Technology integration.
Instructional modules. Retrieved May 13, 2004 from http://www.glef.org

SEIR*TEC’s lessons learned working with 12 intensive site schools:
1. Leadership is the key ingredient.
2. If you don’t know where you’re going, you’re likely to end up somewhere else.
3. Technology integration is a s-l-o-w process.
4. No matter how many computers are available or how much training teachers
have had, there are still substantial numbers who are “talking the talk” but not
“walking the walk.”
5. Effective use of technology requires changes in teaching; in turn, the adoption
of a new teaching strategy can be a catalyst for technology integration.
6. Each school needs easy access to professionals with expertise in technology
and pedagogy.
7. Barriers to using technology to support learning are the same for all poor
communities, but some populations have additional issues.
8. Evaluation is often the weakest element of technology programs.

~ Byrom, E. & Bingham, M. (2001). Factors influencing the effective use of
technology for teaching and learning. Durham, NC: SEIR*TEC at SERVE.
Available from http://www.seirtec.org/publications/lessons.pdf




References & Resources

      ATEC. (2003). Classroom Observation Protocols: Potential Tools for
       Measuring the Impact of Technology In the Classroom. Retrieved June 1,
       2004 from http://www.the-atec.org/docDownload.asp?docID=31
      George Lucas Educational Foundation. (2004). Technology integration.
       Instructional modules. Retrieved May 13, 2004 from http://www.glef.org
      Intel. (2004). Exemplary Plans – Scoring Guide. Retrieved June 1, 2004
       from http://www.intel.com/education/unitplans/scoring_guide.htm
      International Society for Technology in Education. (2000). ISTE NETS*T
       Sample Rubrics - Assessment of Technology Integration in a Lesson.
       Retrieved May 13, 2004 from
       http://cnets.iste.org/teachers/web/t_rubric_assess-tech.html
      International Society for Technology in Education. (2000). National
       Educational Technology Standards for Students. Retrieved May 13, 2004
       from http://cnets.iste.org/students/
      Key Curriculum Press. (2002). Quotes and quips. Retrieved May 13, 2004
       from http://www.keypress.com/fathom/quotes.html
      Moran, J. (1999). Meeting the needs of students today and beyond.
       Retrieved August 20, 2004 from
       http://www.house.gov/moranks01/ed_99_education_student.htm
      National Forum on Education Statistics. (2002). Technology integration. In
       Technology in Schools. Suggestions, Tools and Guidelines for Assessing
       Technology in Elementary and Secondary Education (pp.74-97).
       Washington, DC: National Center for Educational Statistics.
      North Central Regional Technology Education Consortium. (2004).
       Scoring Guide for Lesson Plans That Use Technology Resources .
       Retrieved June 1, 2004 from http://www.ncrtec.org/tl/sgsp/index.html
      Partnership for 21st Century Skills. (2004). Learning for the 21st Century.
       Washington, DC. Retrieved August 3, 2003 from
       http://www.21stcenturyskills.org/downloads/P21_Report.pdf
      Sandholtz, J., Ringstaff, C., & Dwyer, D. (1997). Teaching with
       Technology: Creating Student Centered Classrooms. New York: Teachers
       College, Columbia University.
      Scott, P., & Borgman, J. (2004). Zits Comic Strip. Retrieved July 7, 2004
       from http://www.kingfeatures.com/features/comics/comics.htm


This site was last updated May 25, 2005

				
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