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					 Multidisciplinary Showcase for Student Research




CO-SPONSORED BY THE GRADUATE SCHOOL AND THE UNIVERSITY HONORS PROGRAM
18 t h Annual Student Research Forum

                              SCHEDULE AT A GLANCE


Registration and Poster Set-Up .............................................................. 9:30 – 10:00


Poster Review and Judging ................................................................... 10:00 – 11:30


Lunch, Score Computation, Remarks.................................................. 11:30 – 12:30
     Dr. Andrew Myers, Vice Provost for Research
     Dr. Chrisann Schiro-Geist, Vice Provost for Academic Affairs


Presentation of Awards ........................................................................... 12:30 – 1:00
     Provost Ralph Faudree
     (assisted by Dr. Karen Weddle-West and Dr. Melinda Jones)
     Dr. Randel Cox, Sigma Xi Award


Posters Picked Up....................................................................................... 1:30 – 3:30




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18 t h Annual Student Research Forum

                                     TABLE OF CONTENTS

Schedule at a Glance .................................................................................................. 1

Undergraduate Abstracts
          Education ................................................................................................. 7
                  Engineering ............................................................................................. 8
                  Liberal Arts and Fine Arts ....................................................................... 9
                  Life and Health Sciences ....................................................................... 10
                  Math and Computer Science ................................................................. 14
                  Physical and Applied Sciences .............................................................. 14
                  Social and Behavioral Sciences ........................................................... 16

Graduate Abstracts
                  Business ................................................................................................. 19
                  Education ............................................................................................... 19
                  Engineering ........................................................................................... 21
                  Liberal Arts and Fine Arts ..................................................................... 27
                  Life and Health Sciences ....................................................................... 30
                  Math and Computer Science ................................................................. 33
                  Physical and Applied Sciences .............................................................. 35
                  Social and Behavioral Sciences ........................................................... 41


Index of Participants
            Undergraduates .................................................................................... 47
                  Graduates ............................................................................................. 48




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18 t h Annual Student Research Forum




April 11, 2006




Dear Student Researchers,

On behalf of students, faculty, and staff at The University of Memphis, I want to offer
congratulations for the quality research you have accomplished and for your participation in the 18th
Annual Student Research Forum. The reality of doing careful research leads to new discoveries and
new knowledge. Your own personal joy of discovery, combined with the desire to share your
knowledge, enriches us all.

Our University has become a major comprehensive urban research center, focusing on basic and
applied research that is directly beneficial to this region. Your research and presentations here and
in other regional and national forums bring honor and recognition to The University of Memphis.

Sincerely,



Shirley C. Raines,
President




                                 A Tennessee Board of Regents Institution
                                 A Tennessee Board3 Regents Institution
                                                          of
                                   An Equal Opportunity/Affirmative Action University

                                    An Equal Opportunity/Affirmative Action University
18 t h Annual Student Research Forum




April 11, 2006




Dear Student Researchers,

Thank you for contributing to the 18th Annual Student Research Forum. It is our pleasure to attend
this event and learn of the interesting research our students are doing. One of the most critical goals
of higher education is to encourage intellectual inquiry and critical thinking. Research provides
significant hands-on experience in these areas as you‘ve discovered in your own projects. Whether
you pursue a research-related career or not, the skills you have learned in carrying out your projects
will serve you well. Research skills are valuable life skills in our increasingly information-rich
world. The ability to define a question, collect and organize information relevant to that question,
evaluate and ultimately use the new knowledge will be useful in many facets of your lives.

Congratulations on your achievements. Your project is a testament of your hard work,
determination, perseverance, and commitment, and a monument to the dedication of your faculty
mentors. We hope you enjoy this year‘s research forum and best wishes for your continued success.

Sincerely,



Karen Weddle-West, Ph.D.
Assistant Vice Provost, Graduate Studies




Melinda Jones,
Director, University Honors Program




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April 11, 2006




Dear Judges,

On behalf of all those involved in organizing and presenting this year‘s Student Research Forum,
and on behalf of the students participating in this year‘s event, I‘d like to thank all of you for giving
so graciously of your time and expertise.

The judges for this forum come from a wide variety of disciplines and scholarly traditions. One of
the advantages of an event such as this is the opportunity it provides for students to interact with
faculty and gain valuable feedback on their projects. Hopefully this experience will also be
beneficial to you by providing you with exposure to the wide range of interests pursued by students
at The University of Memphis, and by giving you a preview of the future of your respective fields
and disciplines.

Again, thanks to each of you for participating in this year‘s Student Research Forum. Without your
cooperation, support, and enthusiasm, our students would miss a wonderful opportunity to interact
with and learn from the highly skilled faculty here at The University of Memphis.

Sincerely,



Karen Weddle-West, Ph.D.
Assistant Vice Provost, Graduate Studies




Melinda Jones,
Director, University Honors Program




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   UNDERGRADUATE

                ABSTRACTS




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EDUCATION
                      Development of Food Bars for Antioxidant Repletion

   Angela Wallick, Jacquelyn Scott, Katie Fienup, Molly Seward, Karen Brown, and Laura
                      Hilliard (Health and Sport Sciences), Presenters

       Antioxidants, which have disease-preventing and immune-building properties, are found in
foods such as raisins, pineapples, cherries, and green tea. The purpose of the research was to
determine sensory attributes of three food bars with maximized levels of antioxidants from food
sources. The research team developed high antioxidant food bars and recruited students and faculty
as panelists to perform sensory evaluation tests. Results showed that, with added antioxidants,
physical properties of the food bars were not significantly altered; however, nutrient analysis
showed that antioxidant levels were not increased.


                        Food Security and the Utilization of Leftover Rice

        Laura M. Girsch and Christa A. Webb (Health and Sport Sciences), Presenters

        To improve food security, undergraduate researchers developed 3 recipes to determine
whether differences can be detected between 0-day-old cooked rice and 1-day-old cooked rice as a
food ingredient. The research team recruited university students (n=14) to serve as sensory
evaluators and perform both triangle and paired-comparison tests. Sensory studies were conducted
using selected attributes. The p-value for the triangle and the paired-comparison tests were p= 0.314
and p= 0.345, respectively. Both p-values are greater than the critical value of p= 0.05; therefore the
panelists were unable to detect differences between recipes made with 0-day-old cooked rice and 1-
day-old cooked rice.


       Effects of Cup Stacking Exercise on Psychomotor Skill Development of Children

       Adrienne Solis and Tiffany Liggins (Health and Sport Sciences), Presenters

        The present study examined the effects of cup stacking intervention on fine motor skill
development for children. Eighty 2nd graders were randomly selected. Thirty-six students
participated in a cup stacking program for 15 minutes every day for 12 weeks. The other 44 students
served as the control with no intervention. Three psychomotor tests were administered at the pre-
and post-intervention: 1) Finger choice reaction (RT) time; 2) Rotary Pursuit Tracking; 3) Manual
Dexterity. The results showed a significant improvement in two-choice RT test for the group with
the cup-stacking exercise intervention, but not the control group. No other group difference was
found.




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ENGINEERING
          Investigating Plane Poiseuille Flow Using Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV)

                     Daniel Hochstein (Mechanical Engineering), Presenter

         Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV) is a flow measurement technique selected as the basis for
an experiment to demonstrate modern methods in fluid flow visualization and obtain accurate flow
field data. The method of PIV was used to investigate Poiseuille flow through a square tube using a
seeded water-glycerine suspension. The flow was illuminated using a sheet or volume of light from
a laser. A single or multi-exposure image was utilized to record the position of the seed particles as
a function of time. The spacing between these particle images was used to provide a measure of the
local flow velocity. Experiment results for a range of low Reynolds number flows are presented
and compared to analytic solutions. It was also shown that the accuracy of the data was improved
by optimizing seed particle density, displacement gradients, and size of the interrogation region in
the cross-correlation analysis used to estimate the velocity vectors.


                               Engine Testing with a Dynamometer

                        Joe A. David (Mechanical Engineering), Presenter

        The department of Mechanical Engineering has acquired an engine dynamometer to perform
testing of the outputs of internal combustion engines. This project involves getting an engine to run
and to make it safe, with hopes of one day being a viable laboratory experiment for undergraduate
students. Hopefully this project can draw interest upon itself and the engineering department as a
whole, while providing students with a detailed look at how IC engines and dynamometers function.


             Alternative Methods for Polystyrene Aggregate Expansion for Use in
                           Onsite Wastewater Treatment Systems

                      Jeffrey G. Karl (Mechanical Engineering), Presenter

        Expanded polystyrene (EPS) is currently being used as an alternative to gravel fill in onsite
wastewater treatment systems. The polystyrene is currently expanded from ―beads‖, containing
pentane blowing agent, in a crude steam tunnel apparatus. The steam provides energy to heat the
polystyrene into the semi-plastic region while simultaneously causing the pentane to expand. This
process, however, expands beads unevenly, requires two expansions and 36 hours of cure time for
equilibration of partial pressures. Two alternative methods are designed create an ambient
condition for expansion to create a more uniform EPS bead. The third is designed to increase the
rate of diffusion to decrease cure time. Experimentation shows that both expansion methods
improved quality from a range of .3-.5 lbs/ft^3 to a range of .38-.42 lbs/ft^3, but also cure time was
successfully reduced from 36 hours to 21 hours via the third method.




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                                             Heat Pipe

                   Eddie Strickland, Jr. (Mechanical Engineering), Presenter

        A heat pipe is a device used to remove excess or waste heat from an environment, such as
the inside of a computer or a spacecraft. The type of heat pipe that is currently being researched is
the free convection heat pipe in which steam condenses at the top, or head, and returns water to the
reservoir unassisted other than by gravity. The aims of my research are to design, build, and test a
heat pipe sufficient for classroom demonstration and for research on the influence of head geometry
on heat rejection rates.


                     Simulation of Jet-Induced Geysers in Reduced Gravity

                     Robert Benedetti (Mechanical Engineering), Presenter

        Controlling cryogenic propellant tank pressure during tank refueling and expulsion in low
gravity is an important technical challenge to overcome for future long duration missions or an
orbiting fuel depot. One solution involves using jet-induced geysers and a computational simulation
allows for the investigation of their formation in reduced gravity. The effects of spread rate, the
influence of contact angle, and the jet inlet conditions were evaluated with respect to dimensionless
geyser height. The results affirm that using the k- turbulence model provides the most accurate
results for jet-induced geysers in reduced gravity when compared to available experiment data.


                               Force Sensing Computer Keyboard

                     Bradley Slakans (Engineering Technology), Presenter

        The force sensing keyboard was designed to sense how much force the user of a standard
desktop computer was exerting on the keyboard keys. The keyboard is intended to be used as a
sensor input which would help to determine the user‘s mood. The physical forces are measured by
variable force resisters. The analog measurements are then interfaced into a PC, converted to a
useable unit measure and stored in a file. This information could then be accessed by other existing
program languages or stored as a data file.


LIBERAL AND FINE ARTS
                    The Non-Traditional Presentation of Traditional Music

                                Fallon Stillman (Music), Presenter

       My presentation will demonstrate the new opportunities that modern recording and mixing
techniques in the music industry provide to traditional music performances. After recording and
mixing traditional music in the Contemporary Christian genre in stereo and surround format, I will


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display new methods of presentation for the music. I will also research and examine the reaction of
audiences to new methods of presentation to determine the effectiveness of alternate and innovative
mixing and recording techniques within the genre. This research will test the validity of presenting
traditional music in alternate formats.


LIFE AND HEALTH SCIENCES
            Parathyroid Hormone (PTH) Transactivates Epidermal Growth Factor
              Receptor (EGFR) Through Metalloproteinase-Induced Shedding of
               Heparin Binding-EGF (HB-EGF) in Opossum Kidney (OK) Cells

                               Heather Woolls (Biology), Presenter

        PTH regulates calcium homeostasis by controlling calcium reabsorption and phosphate
excretion in the kidney and calcium release through osteoclastic function in bones. PTH functions
by binding to its G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR), PTHR1, which activates adenylyl cyclase
converting ATP to cAMP and phospholipase C producing inositol triphosphate (IP3) to increase
intracellular calcium and diacylglycerol (DAG) to activate protein kinase C (PKC). In addition to
stimulating these classical GPCR second messenger systems, PTH regulates growth and
differentiation through extracellular signaling regulated kinase (ERK) activity. In OK cells, PTH-
dependent ERK activation is preceded by EGF receptor phosphorylation and is blocked by EGFR
inhibitors. We hypothesized that PTH controls ERK activity through a metalloproteinase-induced
shedding of an epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) ligand, which in turn transactivates EGFR.
Our results show that in OK cells, PTH stimulation causes a metalloproteinase-induced shedding of
HB-EGF, an EGFR ligand, which transactivates the EGFR and subsequently increases ERK
activity.


Lower Mississippi River Least Tern Colonies: Long-Term Patterns and Effects of Hydrology

                              Andrea Carpenter (Biology), Presenter

        US Army Corps of Engineers surveys of least tern populations along the lower Mississippi
River indicate overall numbers have increased, but do not indicate if this relates to more tern
colonies or greater colony size. Re-evaluation of the dataset indicates that increases are in fact due
primarily to increased colony sizes. However, variable hydrologic patterns that occur during the
nesting season influences whether some colonial nesting sites are used during any given year. This
indicates that hydrology does influence some nesting sites and that least terns opportunistically use
these sites when available.




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             Oxidative Genotoxicity of Tryptophan’s Metabolites and Antioxidative
                                 Prevention with Polyphenols

                              Christine Hauther (Biology), Presenter

        Plant polyphenols have been reported to have antioxidative and antimutagenic properties.
By reducing reactive oxygen species (ROS) with the polyphenols, DNA damage caused by known
mutagens would be significantly reduced. We plan to test antimutagenic capabilities of some plant
polyphenols such as: gallic acid, ellagic acid, (-)-gallochatechin, (-)-epigallochatechin gallate, and (-
)-gallochatechin gallate against suspected mutagenic tryptophan metabolites (3-hydroxykynurenine
and kynurenine). A ROS sensitive tester strain of Salmonella typhimurium, TA102, will be used in
the Ames Salmonella/microsomal mutagenicity assay. We also used a common lipid peroxidation
assay to asses how well these polyphenols could prevent lipid peroxidation in bladder epithelial
cells.



                        The Role of Thyroid Hormone in Photoperiodism

                               Carlesia D. Smith (Biology), Presenter

        Siberian hamsters exhibit seasonal cycles of reproduction driven by photoperiod and
melatonin. The mechanism by which melatonin signals are decoded in the brain remains
uncharacterized. Exposure to short days decreases hypothalamic expression of type 2 iodothyronine
deiodinase (Dio2) mRNA. Dio2 catalyzes the conversion of the thyroid hormone thyroxine to
triiodothyronine (T3). We tested the hypothesis that injections of exogenous T3 in short-day housed
hamsters would mimic long day lengths with respect to reproduction. The results indicate that
exogenous T3 induced gonadal growth in short day hamsters and delayed spontaneous
recrudescence. T3 mimics long days in Siberian hamsters.



                             Sunlight and Projected Leaf Surface Area

                                 Erik Filsinger (Biology), Presenter

        The amount of time a plant is exposed to light has a direct effect on leaf surface areas. Shade
treatments were set up to alter the light exposure of Salix nigra according to the diurnal movement
of the sun. Using computer imagery, the surface areas of plants was measured. Data were analyzed
for trends. Plant leaf surface areas differed significantly with variations in light quantity and
quality.




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                       Plant Response to Changes in Resource Availability

            Jonathan Callegari, Karla Gage, and Melissa Lee (Biology), Presenters

        The resource gradient between core habitats is a function of interactions among
environmental factors, such as light availability, temperature, and soil moisture. For autotrophic
plants these are the three most critical resources affecting their survival and growth. Thus, plants
have potential as bio-indicators of environmental edges due to the fact that leaf surface areas may
quantitatively reflect changes in resource availability. Patterns of plant response in a controlled
greenhouse study will be presented as an example of a species-specific index. In the future, these
methods might assist in quantitative assessment of the dynamics of resource gradients between
habitat types.


                 Plasmid Episomal Recombination in Plasmodium Falciparum

          Lillian Alando Nyindodo and Anusha Gopalakrishnan (Biology), Presenters

        Episomal recombination has been recently described in Plasmodium falciparum parasite.
This recombination seems to be restricted to the promoter region. In order to identify cis acting
sequences required for episomal recombination, we generated nested promoter deletions and
assessed the recombination efficiency on the truncated promoter compared to the full length
promoter. Our results indicated the presence of a promoter region involved in episomal plasmid
recombination. Interestingly, this cis acting-region was also involved in stage specific promoter
activity. Taking together these results suggest the presence of a promoter region involved in
episomal recombination and promoter transcription.


                   Fructose Transport Mechanism of the Highly Radiation-Resistant
                                Bacterium Deinococcus Radiodurans

                   Iranzu Magallon and Valentyna Bardakova (Biology), Presenters

        Deinococcus radiodurans can utilize fructose. Yet, one of the corresponding fructose
transporter, fru B, is considered nonfunctional due to a frame-shift mutation. We proposed that
such mutation would generate an alternative active-site and thus allow fructose be phosphorylated
We showed (1) the bacterium utilized ATP (not PEP) to phosphorylate fructose (2) antibodies
against the target sites reduced the enzymatic activity (3) Protein-antibodies analysis demonstrated
the corresponding phosphorylated protein (4) over expression of fruB in E. coli resulted in a protein
similar to the proposed protein. These data support our hypothesis the novel fruB gene was
functional in this bacterium.




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                              Light Intensity and Leaf Surface Area

                       Nikita Neeley and Karla Gage (Biology), Presenters

       Sunlight is the only source of energy for autotrophic plants. Plants capture sunlight energy
through leaf surface area. Light quantity and quality affects plant growth and development. In
present study willow plants were exposed to various light levels. Leaf surface area of plants was
measured using digital image analysis. ANCOVA results indicated that leaf surface area of willow
was significantly affected by availability of light.


      Prostaglandin in Tick Salivary Gland Extract Inhibits the Migration of Fibroblasts

                                Zach Nahmias (Biology), Presenter

        The salivary gland extract of the American Dog Tick (Dermacentor variabillis) was
determined to contain prostaglandin E (PGE) using an Enzyme-Linked Immunosorbent Assay
(ELISA). In humans and other mammals, the prostaglandin derivatives are known to induce
inflammation in response to various stresses. Since ticks are capable of sustaining a feeding lesion,
it was hypothesized that the PGE in salivary gland extract acts in opposition to platelet-derived
growth factor (PDGF) at a wound site, preventing the appropriate migration of fibroblasts for
healing. To test the hypothesis, blind-well migration assays and ELISA were performed under
numerous conditions. The results support the original hypothesis on the inhibitory effect of the
salivary gland extract on fibroblast migration into a wound site.


                                 QSAR Modeling of LPA3 Activity

                              Titilola Afolabi (Chemistry), Presenter

        Lysophosphatidic Acid (LPA) is a phospholipid growth factor that activates the cell through
a family of G protein coupled receptors which are LPA1, LPA2, LPA3, and LPA4. Due to the
growing understanding of LPA initiating a myriad of responses which includes cell apoptosis,
migration, cytoprotection, chemotaxis and oxygen radical production, the study of the specific
receptor activities is vital to the understanding of the pathological and physiological role of LPA. In
this research, agonism at LPA3 is studied using Quantitative Structure Analysis Relationship
(QSAR) to relate biological activity of LPA analogs to structure using a mathematical model.
Agonism at LPA3 and LPA1 receptors activate platelet aggregation leading to atherosclerotic plaque
rapture, a precursor to stroke and heart attack. The result of this research will be used to predict the
agonism or antagonism of compounds of unknown activity at the LPA3 receptor and improve the
knowledge guiding drug synthesis.




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MATH AND COMPUTER SCIENCE
                             Radio Frequency Identification (RFID)

                        Folarin Osibodu (Computer Science), Presenter

         Radio Frequency Identification (RFID), the next generation of bar codes, is an automatic
identification method that operates by storing and remotely retrieving data using an RFID scanner
(to broadcast a signal) and RFID tags (to encode the data and respond to the signal). When
immersed in a real world environment, performance is dependent on the strength and frequency of
the signal. Our experiments involve systematically assessing the strength of the electro-magnetic
field in a typical office environment by varying the position of the receiving antenna and the
frequency of the transmitted signal.



                                           ICA on EEG

                           Clifton Russ (Computer Science), Presenter

        In the study of neurology, analyzing electroencephalographic (EEG) is very important. EEG
measures the electrical movements from the brain. These measurements are recorded from
electrodes that are positioned in various places on the scalp. When examining these multiple
signals, some of the signals are irrelevant. Independent Component Analysis is a computational way
to separate multivariate signals. ICA can be applied to various subjects. My subject of interest is
finding the sources of epileptic seizures. Through my research, I have come to find out that ICA
may not be suitable for finding the source of epileptic seizures.



PHYSICAL AND APPLIED SCIENCES
                      Magnetic Properties of Ball Milled Mn Nanoparticles

                                 John Griffis (Physics), Presenter

       Here in we report detail structural and magnetic properties of antiferromagnetic Mn
nanoparticles prepared via mechanical ball milling. The surface defects in particle are induced by
reducing the particle size and strain induced by ball milling. The x-ray diffraction measurement
along with DSC suggests presence of Mn3O4 phase in the sample, a ferrimagnetic phase which
increases with the milling time. Upon ball milling a decrease in the Curie temperature of Mn3O4
phase (Tc~42K) to a value Tc~35 K has been observed. A large coercive field at 25K and shifted
hysteresis loops along the field and magnetization direction clearly indicate that the overall
magnetic properties of the system are governed by surface defects on the particles.




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        Assessing the Rigidity of the Puerto Rico-Northern Virgin Islands Microplate:
                   Results from GPS Geodesy in the British Virgin Islands

                           D. Sarah Stamps (Earth Sciences), Presenter

       This poster presentation will cover the research and results of a 2005 Global Positioning
System (GPS) campaign in the British Virgin Islands (BVI). The BVI are part of the Puerto-Rico
Northern Virgin Islands microplate, one of three in the Northern Carribbean including the
Hispaniola and Gonave microplates. Past studies show possible east-west extension between
Puerto-Rico and the British Virgin Islands. Results from the campaign indicate the microplate may
be more rigid than expected.


             The Elastic Properties of Lipid Membranes with Adsorbed Polymers

                                 Joel Revalee (Physics), Presenter

         Lipid membranes are found in every creature, from bacteria to human beings. Before
advancements in computer power were made in the 1990s, it was only possible to study these
membranes by theory or direct experimentation. It is difficult to obtain accurate experimental
results in investigations of lipid membranes, and since theoretical work in this area must be tested,
computer simulations provide a more accurate method of study. I numerically study the elastic
properties of lipid membranes with polymers adsorbed to one side of the membrane. This research
should provide insights into artificial membranes (liposomes) and also the eukaryotic cell
membrane.


               Locating Regions of Complex Zeros of the Mittag-Leffler Function

                   Stephan Spencer and Trenton Ensley (Physics), Presenters

        The Mittag-Leffler function Eα, β (z), which is a generalization of the exponential function,
arises frequently in the solutions of differential equations of fractional order. Moreover, the zeros
of Eα, β (z) for some values of α and β are the eigenvalues of fractional differential operators.
Consequently, knowledge of their zeros and their distribution is of fundamental importance. This
work focuses on the distribution of zeros in the region where the Mittag-Leffler function possesses
an infinite number of real zeros and a finite number of complex zeros and is restricted to the range 2
< α ≤ 3 and β ≤ 14.




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        The Evaluation of Performance in Salix Nigra in Response to Light Availability

                                  Niki Patel (Biology), Presenter

        The leaf‘s physical characteristics reflect the plant‘s ability to facilitate the uptake of
nutrients and gas exchange. Three major environmental factors – light, temperature, and moisture –
act together as one factor in order to promote plant performance. To proceed from each
phenological stage, a plant needs a certain amount of light and moisture. Plants of Salix Nigra were
exposed to shade treatments, which created a gradient of light. These environmental scales (light,
temperature, and moisture) will determine the leaf‘s surface area, thereby demonstrating the
competition existing between plants. The study was designed to evaluate plants nondestructively.


SOCIAL AND BEHAVIORAL SCIENCES
                Investigating How College Students Approach Critical Thinking

                               Kristy Tapp (Psychology), Presenter

        The purpose of the study was to investigate how various concepts within creativity, critical
thinking and analytical reasoning manifest themselves in a standardized critical thinking skills test
and in a proposed measure. The standardized measure used was the California Critical Thinking
Skills Test (CCTST) and the proposed measure is a series of interactive narrative text stories. The
participants‘ results from both the standardized and proposed measures were correlated with eleven
concepts within creativity, fourteen concepts within critical thinking and twelve concepts within
analytical reasoning.


        Implementation of the Family-to-Family Program for Rebuilding Foster Care

                            Natasha Delong (Social Work), Presenter

        The Annie E. Casey Foundation‘s Family-to-Family program is a program aimed at
reforming the foster care system in the United States with the goal of lessening the trauma to
children in state custody. Many foster care agencies across the country have begun implementing
this program; however there has been little research done on the program itself or its
implementation. Using survey research, this study sought to look at the implementation of this
program, on the individual case manager level, in one foster care agency in the Mid-South.




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               Meadow Voles May Have the Capacity for Episodic-Like Memory

                                 Amy Combs (Biology), Presenter

        We tested whether meadow voles possess episodic-like memory (ELM). ELM is the ability
to recall information of a single past event: what, when, where. Males were placed in a two-
chamber arena. One chamber contained a pregnant female and the other contained a female that
was neither pregnant nor lactating. 24 hours later the pregnant female delivered pups and entered
postpartum estrus. The males were then returned to the empty arena and explored the arms. Males
spent more time in the arm that originally contained the pregnant female, suggesting males have
ELM.


               Correlation between Personal Construct Content and Depression

                              Donna Roland (Psychology), Presenter

        Ninety-nine participants received one of three types of therapy: interpersonal, cognitive with
no homework, and cognitive with homework. Both before and after therapy, participants filled out
repertory grids and depression inventories. The relationships between these variables were then
analyzed. Results suggest that there is a significant positive correlation between constructs relating
to emotion and higher depression scores. Also, there seems to be a relationship between therapy
type and content change among constructs. Lastly, there were no constructs that allowed for
prediction of post-therapy depression inventories.


                          Separating Emotions from Facial Expressions

                           Dominique Crocitto (Psychology), Presenter

        During conversations, a variety of facial expressions are used to convey particular cognitive
states. Assigning specific cognitive states to facial expressions can be difficult. This paper will
explain why coding for cognitive states during certain tasks can be tricky, yet beneficial. Results
show that sometimes a facial expression can be viewed as two different cognitive states. Our
research has shown that for determining emotional states, there is high inter-rater reliability for
confusion. Cognitive states, such as encouraged, distracted, bored, and engaged are difficult to
recognize. Since there are no set rules for determining cognitive states based on facial expressions,
suggested coding schemes will be discussed.




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                 GRADUATE

                ABSTRACTS




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BUSINESS
       Influence of Hospice Use on Hospital Inpatient Mortality: A State-Level Analysis

                         Stephanie C. Steinberg (Economics), Presenter

        This study tests the hypothesis that high hospice enrollment is associated with lower
Medicare inpatient mortality. The results show that Medicare inpatient mortality in a state can be
explained by hospice enrollment and a host of demographic and market environment variables.
Specifically, an increase in hospice population by 100 individuals is associated with a reduction of
28 inpatient deaths, ceteris paribus. The results suggest, among other things, that opportunities exist
for greater expansion of hospice capacity in low utilization states to reduce deaths in the expensive
hospital setting and improve the quality of end-of-life care for terminally ill patients.


                    Resolving Zeno’s Paradoxes by Special Relativity Theory

                               Jeff G. Chen (Economics), Presenter

     This paper, by applying the Special Relativity Theory, resolves the famous Zeno‘s
Paradoxes of Motion. And, both as a logical necessity for and side-product of the solution,
space-time is proved to be discrete.


EDUCATION
   The Effects of Teacher Read Alouds on Fifth Graders’ General Vocabulary Acquisition

             Amanda Otsuki (Instruction and Curriculum Leadership), Presenter

         This study investigated the effects of teacher read alouds on the general vocabulary growth
for fifth grade students. Seventy fifth-grade students from an urban public school in the Southeast
participated in the study. Students in both groups took two standardized vocabulary tests prior to
the treatment period, as well as after the experiment. A mixed factorial analysis of variance was
used to analyze the differences in pre- and posttest scores based on instructional method and gender.
Data analysis revealed that all students, regardless of instructional group, increased their general
vocabulary knowledge during the semester.


              Lipid Peroxidation Following Aerobic and Anaerobic Power Testing

                       Webb Smith (Health and Sports Science), Presenter

       To compare lipid peroxidation (LP) in untrained individuals before and after strenuous
exercise. Methods: 18 subjects performed tests of aerobic and anaerobic power. Pre and
postexercise blook lactate, heart rate, and RPE were recorded. Resting blood glutathione was


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measured before each test. Malondialdehyde was used as a measure of LP. Results: Lactate and
RPE were not different; time main effects were noted for both. Resting glutathione was not
different between tests. Malondialdehyde was not different between tests but increased following
both. Conclusion: Both aerobic and anaerobic power testing results in elevated LP with little
difference between modes.


    Preparation to Practice: Student Teachers’ Uses of Technology and their Cooperating
                                     Teachers’ Impact

              Anna Clifford (Instruction and Curriculum Leadership), Presenter

        Student teaching is a vital component of the professional preparation of preservice teachers.
Many of today‘s student teachers are products of teacher education programs which have undergone
significant positive changes, better preparing preservice teachers to teach in the technological-savvy
world. This study followed the experiences of eight preservice teachers from a liberal arts Christian
university in the mid-south and their cooperating teachers during the fall of 2005. Results indicated
preservice teachers were using technology to enhance lessons, cooperating teachers‘ support did
affect their use of technology, and preservice teachers were able to identify barriers/enablers which
influenced their use of technology.


           Self Efficacy, Family Cohesion, and Meaning as Predictors of Satisfaction
                             Among Parents of Disabled Children

        James Sweeney (Counseling, Educational Psychology and Research), Presenter

       In this study, the authors tested whether generalized self-efficacy, coping style, family
cohesion, and meaning in life predicted unique variance in family satisfaction among parents of
disabled children. Whether meaning in life mediates the relationship between family cohesion and
family satisfaction also was tested. Parental health, cohesion, the search for meaning in life, and
presence of meaning in life predicted unique portions of the variance in family satisfaction, together
accounting for 37% of the variance. Meaning in life did not mediate the relationship between family
cohesion and family satisfaction. However, family cohesion mediated relationships between
emotion-oriented coping and family satisfaction.


                      Katrina 400 Miles Onshore: Providing Support and
                      Combating Compassion Fatigue in Care Providers

                    Laura Battle and Mardi Smith (Counseling, Educational
                            Psychology and Research), Presenters

       School counselors and teachers, as far as 400 miles inland from Hurricane Katrina, were
assessed for vicarious trauma and compassion fatigue symptoms experienced after counseling
evacuee students that had relocated and enrolled in their schools from the New Orleans area. Pre-



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Katrina and Post-Katrina assessments were completed. Factors studied included changes in
Compassion Satisfaction and Compassion Fatigue. Risk factors associated with counselors and
teachers who show the highest indicators of compassion fatigue were identified. Actions are taken
to help alleviate compassion fatigue symptoms.


ENGINEERING
             Cerebrovascular Pressure Transmission: Comparison and Validation
                      of System Identification with Windkessel Model

             Nithya Narayanan (Electrical and Computer Engineering), Presenter

        As a means to evaluate autoregulation of cerebral blood flow in the clinical setting, system
identification (SYSID) modeling method has been used to assess changes in the modes of
cerebrovascular pressure transmission, the dynamic relationship between arterial blood pressure and
intracranial pressure. To implement this model, a mathematical description of cerebrovascular
pressure transmission was derived from a physiological parameter based Windkessel model. The
aim of this study was to examine the validity of the SYSID model which is unconstrained by
physiological considerations, by simulations of the physiologically constrained Windkessel model.


       Prototype Instrumentation for Assessment of Regulation of Cerebral Blood Flow

                Orges Furxhi (Electrical and Computer Engineering), Presenter

        The purpose of this study is to develop prototype instrumentation which continuously
assesses the regulation of cerebral blood flow (CBF) by real time system identification modeling of
cerebrovascular pressure transmission. The algorithm used in the instrumentation is based on
previous clinical and laboratory studies of traumatic brain injury. Those studies have demonstrated
that changes in the modal frequencies of the system can be used to assess regulation of CBF.
Instrumentation hardware consists of an analog to digital converter connected to a laptop computer.
The assessment algorithm and data visualization are implemented using Matlab and Visual Basic.


        Subarachnoid Hemorrhage: Effects on Autoregulation of Cerebral Blood Flow

            Benjamin Hamilton, Micah Hall, Sir Walter Richardson (Electrical and
                            Computer Engineering), Presenters

       The aim of this study was to assess the influence of sub-arachnoid hemorrhage on
autoregulation of cerebral blood flow. A MATLAB system identification algorithm was used to
process individual patient data to obtain highest modal frequencies (HMF) of cerebrovascular
pressure transmission, the dynamic relationship between intracranial pressure and arterial blood
pressure. By examining the relationship between changes in HMF and changes in the cerebral



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perfusion pressure, patients were classified as regulating, not regulating, or undetermined. Results
show that 55% of the patients were not regulated on the first day of monitoring.


                     Biodegradable, Antibacterial Coatings for Orthopaedic
                              and Dental/Craniofacial Implants

                  Peter “Drew” Norowski (Biomedical Engineering), Presenter

       2.6 million people in the United States receive orthopaedic implants annually.
Approximately 4% of these implants must be removed due to bacterial infection acquired during
implantation. An innovative method of treatment for infection could reduce the number of implants
removed due to infection. Localized delivery of antibiotics appears to be an efficient treatment
approach. This study evaluated the in vitro release of gentamicin from chitosan coated titanium.
The antibiotic-loaded coatings contained 36 wt % gentamicin. Elution testing was performed to
determine the amount of antibiotic eluted over a three day period. A zone of inhibition study
demonstrated the antibacterial activity of the coatings against staphylococcus epidermitis and
staphylococcus aureus. Based on these results, antibiotic-loaded chitosan demonstrates the
potential to serve as a suitable coating for orthopaedic and dental/craniofacial implants.


                 Chitosan Coating: Improving the Local Drug Delivery System

                      Shweta Sharma (Biomedical Engineering), Presenter

        Calcium sulfate (CaSO4), an effective bone graft substitute, acts as a carrier for antibiotics,
compatible with osteogenic cells and display osteoconductive properties to aid in bone regeneration.
A need exists to extend the antibiotic release for localized treatment of bone infections.
         The combination of chitosan coated CaSO4 pellets could decrease the degradation rate and
potentially lessen a drainage issue associated with plain CaSO4 pellets which in turn will lead to
extended release times of antibiotics.
        Elution and dissolution studies conducted in vitro to measure the amount of drug release in
relation to time support the hypothesis that chitosan coating on CaSO4 pellets improves the
antibiotic release as needed for the localized treatment of bone defects.

              Characterization of Chitosan / Hydroxyapatite Composite Scaffolds
                                 for Bone Tissue Engineering

                       Betsy Chesnutt (Biomedical Engineering), Presenter

        We have developed a novel porous scaffold for use in bone tissue engineering that is
composed of nanocrystalline hyroxyapatite in a chitosan matrix. The scaffold consists of fused
microspheres approximately 1 mm in diameter, and the porosity of the scaffold is 35.5±6.7% with
pore sizes from 100 to 600 μm. The compressive modulus of the composite scaffolds was 5.7±1.7
MPa. X-ray diffraction confirmed the presence of hydroxyapatite with a crystallinity of 16.7±6.8%.
Osteoblast cells were able to attach and grow significantly better on the composite scaffolds than on



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chitosan scaffolds, and had begun to grow into the interior pores after 7 days. These results clearly
demonstrate that this composite scaffold has the potential to be used in bone regeneration.


                         Antibiotic Release from Chitosan Microspheres

                   Gangadhar Utturkar (Biomedical Engineering), Presenter

        Chitosan is the deacetylated derivative of the natural biopolymer, chitin. Previous
gentamicin-loaded chitosan bars suggests it as an effective biomaterial for bone infection treatment.
This study investigated the release and degradation of chitosan-gentamicin sulfate loaded
microspheres as a possible treatment of bone infections.
        Plain chitosan microspheres degrade faster than chitosan-gentamicin sulfate microspheres.
Peak gentamicin sulfate (GS) concentration of 2887.5 µg occurred on day 1 decreasing to 3.875 µg
on day 5 (Previous study - 1000 µg on day 1 and by 17.3 µg on day 5). Microspheres produce a
greater burst effect as compared with the antibiotic loaded chitosan bars.


 Hyperaldosteronism-Induced Fibrosis, Calcium Loading, and Ventricular Arrhythmias are
            Attenuated with Furosemide and Hydrochlorothiazide Treatment

                    Jennifer T. Nguyen (Biomedical Engineering), Presenter

        Deaths due to chronic heart failure (CHF) are attributed to ventricular arrhythmias. Fibrosis
and calcium loading are thought to support and maintain the arrhythmia. Studies show that
hydrochlorothiazide (HCTZ) reverses the effects of fibrosis and calcium loading. We hypothesize
that HCTZ will attenuate ventricular arrhythmias in CHF. Previous rat studies have shown that
chronic administration of aldosterone (0.75 ug/h) and 1% NaCl diet leads to interstitial and
perivascular fibrosis, microscopic scarring, and increased calcium in cardiac tissue, similar to that
which appears in CHF. Three groups of rats were included: controls (no treatment), 6-week
aldosterone-treated, and 6-week aldosterone+HCTZ-treated (50 mg/kg/d). Following treatment,
open chest surgery exposed the heart for electrical stimulation at the apex and base to determine
arrhythmia inducibility. Results show that 7 out of 8 aldosterone-treated rats, 2 out of 8
aldosterone+HCTZ, and 2 out of 10 controls were inducible. We suggest that HCTZ is cardio-
protective and may decrease incidence of sudden cardiac death in CHF.


                   Robust Recognition of Emotion from Speech for E-learning

           Mohammed E. Hoque (Electrical and Computer Engineering), Presenter

       This paper presents novel techniques for robust recognition of emotion from speech in the
context of e-learning. It is widely believed that lexical features are better suited for emotion
recognition than acoustic features. To extract the lexical features a set of prosodic features
containing intonational patterns, pause, gap, rhythm, speaking rate were computed. These features
were used to develop models for each emotion using a number of machine learning techniques. It



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was found that the prosodic features containing lexical information at word level yields robust
classifying emotions.


           The Manipulation of the Hydrophilicity of Polydimethylsiloxane Surface

                        I-Jane Chen (Biomedical Engineering), Presenter

      Polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) is widely used as a material for microfluidic systems
manufacturing. However, the unstable hydrophilicity of surface is a current limitation. In our work,
PDMS surfaces were modified with radio frequency plasma oxidation. The hydrophobic methyl
group is oxidized to hydrophilic hydroxyl group. PDMS is treated with plasma under different
duration and pressure, followed with different storage temperature in air or aqueous medium. From
contact angle measurement, we‘ve shown the hydrophilicity can be preserved to over 1 month.
Infrared spectrum proved the hydrophilicity of surface is contributed by the formation of hydroxyl
group and the loss of methyl group.


        Mathematical Modeling of Chronopotentiometry for Ion-Selective Membranes

                        Justin Zook (Biomedical Engineering), Presenter

        The detection limit of almost all standard potentiometric ion sensors is limited to around 10-6
M. This limit has been attributed to leaching of ions from the membrane into the sample solution.
One method that has been proposed to improve the detection limit is to apply a current to eliminate
the flux of ions into the sample. This work proposes a mathematical model for the application of a
constant current to ion-selective membrane. From this model, we can model how ionophore
concentration and membrane potential vary with space and time. For the maximum current range
applied to improve the detection limit, the voltage drift is stable to 0.1 mV/min in less than 5 min.


          A Web-Based Interactive Interface for Visualizing High Dimensional Data

                Bhanu Chander Reddy Vanteru, and Jahangheer Shareef Shaik
                     (Electrical and Computer Engineering), Presenters

        This paper presents the design and development of a web-based interface for visualization of
high dimensional databases. A coordinate based, namely, automated 3D Star Coordinate (3SC)
projection technique is used for visualization. The proposed web-based interface enables the user to
upload a dataset and visualize the projection on an applet running on the client web browser. The
projection algorithm runs in Matlab at the server side for faster computation and enhanced security,
and using Java Servlets the results are delivered to the client machine.




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                     Quantitative Analysis of Potassium in Biological Media

           Dwight Bordelon and Tino LoSicco (Biomedical Engineering), Presenters

        The importance of blood electrolyte concentrations in the maintenance of nervous, renal,
and cardiovascular performance cannot be overstated. The concentration of one electrolyte of
particular interest, potassium, is closely associated with proper cardiac function and kidney failure.
Determination of potassium concentrations in a patient‘s blood is a critical diagnostic tool that is
performed routinely in the hospital setting. The goal of this research is the development of a rapid,
cost effective, and accurate optical detection method for potassium in biological fluids such as
blood, plasma, or urine using reflection mode spectroscopy and optode technology.


            Design of a Device to Stretch Osteoblasts Growing on Implant Titanium

                       Brandon Allen (Biomedical Engineering), Presenter

        The mechanisms behind the response of bone to loading have yet to be completely
understood. Loading is essential for proper long bone growth. This can be demonstrated by the
loss of bone density of astronauts. In recent years, researchers have developed several loading
devices to stretch bone cells. These devices have not taken into account growing bone cells on the
surface of implants.
        We have designed a device that utilizes four-point bending to stretch osteoblasts plated on
implant titanium. The device is able to apply variable strain rates to these cells in tension or
compression.


                  Effect of Different Organic Acids on the Physicochemical and
                                 Biological Properties of Chitosan

                   Nayana Brahmandam (Biomedical Engineering), Presenter

         Chitosan is a natural polysaccharide made from chitin found in the exoskeletons of
crustaceans. Chitosan is used for diverse applications in biomaterials as it is biocompatible,
biodegradable, and antibacterial.
         Chitosan is commonly made with acetic acid for biomedical applications. Acids such as
citric, formic and, lactic have also been used to make chitosan materials. The use of different acids
affects the physicochemical properties of chitosan but changes in its biological properties are not
very well known. The significance of this work will be to begin to understand how lactic, formic,
and citric acids affect the biological properties of chitosan.




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  Developing a Real-Time Bedside Measurement System to Detect Sodium Content in Urine

                       Neel Gandhi (Biomedical Engineering), Presenter

        There has been a growing need for real-time electrolyte measurements in the intensive care
setting. Previous research work has consisted of designing an optimal flow-through sodium-sensing
system to detect sodium in urine, serving as a preliminary design for bedside measurements. This
research consisted of the design of the optimal measurement protocol for this system, such as: the
mode of calibration, the sample preparation, and the statistical approach to data analysis. The
accuracy of this system was also tested with urine samples of actual patients, comparing measured
values with the flow-through system and measured values from a ―gold standard‖ clinical analyzer.


                 Chitosan-Coated Anesthetic-Loaded Calcium Sulfate Vehicles
                             Used for Localized Drug Delivery

                         Scott Noel (Biomedical Engineering), Presenter

        The localized delivery of drugs has emerged as an alternative to conventional methods of
treating certain ailments. A biodegradable delivery system would expand treatment options for
orthopaedic surgeons. Chitosan and calcium sulfate have both been determined to be biocompatible
materials capable of being carrier systems. In this study, the localized delivery of lidocaine was
tested in vitro by making a calcium sulfate/lidocaine composite carrier and measuring the elution
profile via ELISA testing. It was determined that the chitosan coating applied to the calcium
sulfate/lidocaine composite effectively acted to slow the initial burst rate and extend therapeutic
release times.


                       Adaptive Weighted Fusion and Evaluation of Medical Images
          Sudhir Reddy Medapati (Electrical and Computer Engineering), Presenter

        This paper presents a holistic approach of medical image fusion and evaluation of fused
images. The key idea here is to fuse two images based on the local characteristics of the images. An
adaptive approach is used to select the local image blocks and weighted fusion rules for each image
blocks. A number of transformations, namely, orthogonal transforms (Wavelets etc.) and Geometric
transforms (Fractal etc.) were used to compute the coefficients and fused using weighted fusion.
The fused image obtained were evaluated using a number of performance metrics and were
compared with other fusion techniques.


                 The Development of Multianalyte Electrochemical Immunoassays

                           Ying Liu (Biomedical Engineering), Presenter

      Multianalyte electrochemical immunoassays based on microfabricated electrode arrays
combine advantages of microfabrication with the specificity of antibody-antigen reactions. As a


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model for multianalyte electrochemical immunoassays, enzymes, instead of antibodies, were site-
specifically immobilized onto individual microfabricated electrode arrays (MEAs) in one
amperometric microcell. Scanning electrochemical microscope (SECM) was used to get the
topographic profiles of bare gold MEAs and chemical images of gold MEAs immobilized with
enzymes. Amperometric microcells, with different enzymes immobilized, act as multianalyte
biosensors and were utilized as models for protein immobilization and label enzyme activity
detection. The activity of immobilized enzymes was determined with both SECM and amperometric
microcells.


                           Knowledge Discovery in Microarray Data

         Jahangheer Shareef Shaik (Electrical and Computer Engineering), Presenter

        This poster presents unified frame work for knowledge discovery from microarray data.
The framework consists of three modules: (i) functional classification of genes, (ii) differential
expression of genes and (iii) visualization. The first module employs two-way clustering for
functional classification and finding differentially expressed genes (DEGs). The second module
consists of adaptive randing based algorithm for finding DEGs. The DEGs obtained are further
analyzed to find potential genes that may be responsible in the formation of diseases or biological
concepts. Finally, the visualization module displays the selected genes and discovers knowledge by
using linear, non-linear and axis based algorithms, respectively.


LIBERAL AND FINE ARTS
                          The Political Thought of Catherine of Siena

                            Whitney Ellen Huey (History), Presenter

       After St. Catherine of Siena died, her followers separated her head from her body, burying
her body in the Church of Minerva sopra Maria in Rome and placing her head in the Church of San
Domenico in Siena. Like her followers, modern scholars have separated Catherine‘s mysticism
from her politics. Numerous scholarly works have been produced on Catherine‘s religiosity and
mysticism, but few on her politics, leaving remarkable gaps in our understanding. Only when we
study Catherine‘s political thought as well as her mysticism can we begin to fully realize
Catherine‘s impact on her world.




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           A Community Based Health Assessment in Inner City Memphis: Middle
              Schoolers Perceptions of a Healthy and Unhealthy Neighborhood

                     Beth Jacob and Laura Mo (Anthropology), Presenters

       Our community based research project uses surveys, focus groups, interviews, participants‘
photography, and participant observation to gather inner-city 6th graders perceptions of healthy
versus unhealthy communities. Our poster contextualizes our anthropological approach and
explains the public school-based studies‘ results.


             Handheld Communication Technology Holds Promise for Improving
                the Informed Consent Process in Pediatric Cancer Research

                        Jonathan W. Camp (Communication), Presenter

        Medical research involving human subjects is fraught with communication challenges and
ethical complexities, especially when the research subjects are children. This poster presentation
reports on a collaborative project between the University of Memphis and St. Jude Children‘s
Research Hospital to develop the Informed Consent Team Link, a handheld, multi-media device to
assist parents of St. Jude pediatric patients in the informed consent process of a Phase I Clinical
Trial. This presentation includes results of focus group research that informs the design of the IC
Team Link, incorporates screen shots from the device, and discusses possible future applications of
our research.


                 Measuring Cognitive Load to Test the Usability of Web Sites

                            Janet Patton Tracy (English), Presenter

        This presentation offers a synopsis of three methods of measuring cognitive load, and
provides a summary of how cognitive load theory is relevant to web site design. As a person
completes a usability test, the Sternberg Memory Test and a tapping task are incorporated to
measure cognitive load. NASA-TLX is the universal method, but is a post-event measure. After
establishing the areas of high cognitive load, websites can be redesigned to minimize the elements
likely contributing to high levels of cognitive load.


                 Twentieth-Century Women’s Spheres of Rhetorical Influence

                  Christopher Oldenburg, Maranja May, Jessica Lynn Allen,
                       and Jennifer Niter (Communication), Presenters

       In contrast to the widely held belief that American women retreated from the public sphere
after World War II, we argue that the mid-twentieth-century witnessed a widening of the political
circumference in which women became inspiring oratorical leaders for causes in addition to their



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18 t h Annual Student Research Forum

own. These spheres included, among others, civil rights, reproductive rights, environmental
concerns, and national politics. This panel features analysis of the inspired and inspiring rhetoric of
civil rights organizer Ella Baker, biologist and writer Rachel Louise Carson, feminist Gloria
Steinem, and politician Geraldine Ferraro.


                  Hear Her Voice: Four Women’s Use of Figurative Rhetoric

                     Kimberly P. Johnson, Diane Rozar, Laurel Helms, and
                        Michaela DeWitt (Communication), Presenters

        This research explores the powerful voices of Clara Barton, Margaret Sanger, Blanche
Ames, and Bishop Vashti McKenzie who used verbal and visual metaphors to move people to
action. Civil war nurse, Clara Barton, appealed to her northern audiences through violent images
and ―bloody shirt‖ rhetoric. Birth control advocate Margaret Sanger inspired others to view
motherhood and childcare as delicate plants requiring careful cultivation. Activist Blanche Ames
created political cartoons to express the necessity of women‘s right to vote. AME Bishop Vashti
McKenzie used the palm tree metaphor to call preachers back to the original values needed for
ministry.


                     Defining Voices: American Female Oratory 1890-1906

           Andre Johnson, Robyn Wolfe, Olivia Price-Griffin, Beverly Honeywood,
                   and Brittany Pieraccini (Communication), Presenters

        During the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries, women still found it quite difficult
to discover their voices in the public arena. Even when women did discover and use their voices
they faced the challenge of ―defining voice.‖ By defining voice, we mean the way these women
used rhetorical strategies to shape and design appeals for equality and justice. This poster session
will examine the words of Ida B. Wells, Frances Ellen Watkins Harper, Frances Willard and Mary
Church Terrell during this time period to highlight ways in which these women defined their voice.


                    The Song-Books of Paul Laurence Dunbar and the Battle
                            of Subjectivity in Early Black Theatre

                             Melonee D. Griggs (English), Presenters

        My poster presentation will highlight the song-book covers of Paul Laurence Dunbar‘s
librettos. Many scholars and students of higher education do not know about Dunbar‘s career as a
minstrel song writer for early Black theatre in the 1890s. Many of these early plays were centered
on minstrel themes and antics and Dunbar attempted to enrich a form of entertainment that had been
dominated by White writers and actors who governed the genre with racist subjectivity. This poster
presentation will enlighten and inform many who may not be knowledgeable of early Black




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dramatic forms and the struggles to define a culture that had long been delineated as inferior and
savage.


LIFE AND HEALTH SCIENCES
     The Soluble and Polymeric Tubulins in the Ovary, Oocyte and Embryo of Zebrafish:
                Megadalton Soluble Tubulin Complexes and Gamma Tubulin

                                Jianxiong Liu (Biology), Presenter

        Tubulin dynamics is important for microtubule (MT) cellular functions in zebrafish. The
majority of α-tubulin in zebrafish oocytes was present in the soluble and not the polymer pool.
Soluble α-tubulin was found to be associated with large molecular wight complexes (>2MDa).
Unlike MT fragments, the tubulin complexes were freeze-thaw resistant and stable in high salt.
Two different anti-γ-tubulin monoclonal antibodies, GTU 88 and TU 30, revealed the existence of
γ-tubulin in both zebrafish oocytes and embryos. Soluble cx-tubulin and γ-tubulin of zebrafish
ovaries, oocytes and embryos were co-localized in fractions from three different columns:
Sephacryl-200, DEAE and Superose-6b. Ovarian soluble cx-tubulin was co-immunoprecipitated
with γ-tubulin. Immunofluorescent microscopy revealed discreet γ-tubulin foci in centrosomes and
diffuse labeling in blastomere cytoplasm in early embryos. Injection of anti-sense oligos to γ-
tubulin resulted in A-P axis defects. In situ hybridization with γ-tubulin oligo revealed diffuse label
in oocytes, with a marked localization to the blastodisc upon maturation. Ovary and eggs showed
similar patterns of tubulin gene product expression while differing from day 4 larva using
microarray. These findings suggest that γ-tubulin protein complexes may be involved in regulating
tubulin dynamics during zebrafish oogenesis and embryogenesis.


            Temperature Effects on Leaf and Root Surface Areas in Cucurbita pepo

              Cheri L. Kimes, Melissa Lee, and Karla Gage (Biology), Presenters

        Temperature affects the growth of plants. Present study tested the effects of the temperature
on the surface areas of the leaves and roots of the early golden summer crookneck squash,
Cucurbita pepo. Results indicated that temperature affected both leaf and root surface areas.
Growing days were also an important factor affecting surface areas in both leaves and roots.
Simultaneous seeding and harvest also displayed quantitatively significant role of growth time on
the surface area of the leaves and roots.


                                   Plant Traits and Environment

                        Melissa Lee and Karla Gage (Biology), Presenters

      Traditionally, plant performance has been assessed by quantification of dry mass. However,
measurements of leaf and root surface areas may better reflect plant well-being. Plant trait response


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18 t h Annual Student Research Forum

to treatments was evaluated in four species: Cucubita pepo, Rumex crispus, Salix nigra, and
Spartina alterniflora. Principal factor analyses indicated that variance in leaf and root surface areas
dominate plant response to environmental factors. Single-trait plant analyses do not to capture the
complexity of the multivariate nature of plant responses and fail to account for indirect effects of
surface areas on other plant traits.


              Environmental Gradient and Edge Effect: a Quantitative Approach

     Karla Gage, Melissa Lee, Margaret Cirtain, and Shari Hudson, (Biology), Presenters

        For plant populations and communities the environmental gradient between core habitats is
a product of interactions of several environmental factors such as light availability, temperature, and
soil moisture. These are the most critical resources affecting plant growth and development. A
survey of edges surrounding ―milpa‖ slash-and-burn agro-ecosystems in Belize, Central America
indicated that light, temperature, and soil moisture in a forest edge gradient are not independent.
The Principal Components Analysis indicated that light and temperature are significantly correlated,
accounting for 42.9 % of the variance. Soil moisture, however, was significantly affected by local
geology and soil texture.


       Hidden Stop Codon Bias Analysis is a Powerful Tool for Microbial Classification.

                             Sanjit M. Fernandes (Biology), Presenter

        The three nucleotide sequences (TAA, TGA, and TAG) were universal stop codons for
protein expression. These sequences were also found within the gene, termed ―Hidden Stop Codon‖
(HSC). HSC would become functional in event of a frameshift mutation. Computational analysis of
over 315,000 genes in 70 bacterial genomes suggested that the distribution of HSC were highly
bias. Phylogenic analysis of HSC distribution correlated well with the modern method of microbial
classification. We proposed the bias usage of a particular HSC was related to the physiology of the
microbe. This universal genetic marker could improve our understanding on molecular evolution.


The Protein Phosphatase Inhibitor Okadaic Acid Stimulates Oocyte Maturation and Inhibits
                               Egg Activation in Zebrafish

                             Ravikanth Nathani (Biology), Presenter

        In vitro treatment of fully grown immature zebrafish oocytes with dihydroxyprogesterone
(DHP) resulted in germinal vesicle migration (GVM) and breakdown (GVD), ooplasmic clearing,
yolk proteolysis, osmoregulation, and blastodisc formation. The DHP-matured oocytes were
activated upon transfer to double distilled water as evidenced by the formation of a perivitelline
space. Experiments were conducted to study the effect of okadaic acid (OA), a specific inhibitor of
protein phosphatase PP-2A, on zebrafish oocyte maturation, egg activation and early embryonic
development. Microarray data indicated the presence of PP-2A regulatory subunit mRNA



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inoocytes and anti-PP-sA regulatory subunit antibodies labeled a ~65KDa band upon
immunoblotting. Immature oocytes treated with OA (1µg/ml) alone, showed GVM and GVD,
clearing, yolk proteolysis, osmoregulation and blastodisc formation. The time course for maturation
with OA was delayed relative to DHP-induced maturation. In compared to DHP. OA and DHP
were synergistic in promoting oocyte maturation. However, upon transfer to double distilled water,
the OA-matured oocytes failed to form a perivitelline space indicating their inability to activate.
DHP treatment did not rescue the OA-treated oocytes and they remained inactivatible. OA also
inhibited the water-induced activation of DHP-matured oocytes. OA had no demonstrable effect on
zebrafish early embryonic development at the dosages tested. Our data suggest the presence of PP-
2A in zebrafish oocyte and its role in oocyte maturation and egg activation.


             Cigarette Smoking Exacerbates Exercise-Induced Oxidative Stress in
                             Young Healthy Men and Women

                     Andrea Creasy (Health and Sports Science), Presenter

       Smoking and strenuous exercise increase oxidative stress (OS). Purpose: Compare OS
before and following exercise in smokers and nonsmokers. Methods: Smokers (n=8) and
nonsmokers (n=14) performed a graded exercise test to exhaustion. Blood protein carbonyls (PC)
and malondialdehyde (MDA) were determined. Results: PC increased 62% from pre to
postexercise for smokers and 42% for nonsmokers (p=0.003). MDA increased 26% from pre to
postexercise for smokers and remained unchanged for nonsmokers (P=0.02). Correlation between
MDA and cigarettes smoked daily approached significance (P=0.068/r=0.466). Conclusions:
Smokers experience exaggerated exercise-induced OS. Findings have implications related to
diseases associated with cigarette smoking.


       Food Deprivation Affects Social Memory of Female But Not Male Meadow Voles

                   Andrew Pierce and Ashley Vaughn (Biology), Presenters

       Over-marking is a ubiquitous behavior in terrestrial mammals, occurring when one
individual places its scent mark atop a previously deposited scent mark. Vagaries of environmental
cues may affect memory formation for particular individuals. We investigated how food
deprivation affected the formation of memories for over-mark donors in meadow voles. Ad lib-fed
voles showed preferences for top-scent mark donors over bottom-scent mark donors. Females that
were food deprived for 6h prior to the exposure or during the interval between exposure and testing
showed no preference for top-scent mark donors. Males that underwent similar food deprivations
showed preferences for top-scent mark donors.




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MATH AND COMPUTER SCIENCE
             Semi-Supervised Learning to Discover the Topic-Specific Deep Web

                       Rajesh Ramanand (Computer Science), Presenter

        Our research work proposes the use of semi-supervised focused crawlers to locate, discover
and maintain topic-specific information in the deep web. Semi-supervised learning algorithms
improve upon existing algorithms by using a large amount of unlabeled data, together with some
labeled data, to build more robust focused crawlers. Once topic-specific pages are identified, a
query interface extractor extracts information from the page to discover deep web databases. Our
anecdotes suggest that using semi-supervised learning along with query interface extraction gives
higher accuracy and requires less human effort for building high-quality collections of topic-
specific resources from the deep web.


   Studies on the Memory Capacity and Robustness of Chaotic Dynamic Neural Networks

                          Igor Beliaev (Computer Science), Presenter

        A dynamical neural model that is strongly biologically motivated is applied to learning and
retrieving binary patterns. This neural network, known as Freeman‘s K-sets, is trained with Hebbian
rule and habituation to memorize the input patterns by associating them with attractors formed in
the state space. After the patterns are memorized noisy input is given to the network to recover the
original. We show capacity of the dynamical system exceeds that of the Hopfield network and the
noisy recall degrades at a slower pace as the number of the patterns is growing.



            Modeling Hybrid Multiobjective Evolutionary Algorithm Performance

                          Deon Garrett (Computer Science), Presenter

        This work aims to develop tools to better understand the affect of problem structure on the
performance of multiobjective evolutionary algorithms incorporating different hybridization
strategies. Currently, we are studying multiobjective variants of two well-known combinatorial
optimization problems: the quadratic assignment problem and the generalized assignment problem.
Empirical analysis techniques such as random walk analysis help to understand how different search
operators navigate complex combinatorial spaces. Using these techniques and others, we hope to
move toward a better understanding of the design of hybrid evolutionary algorithms for
multiobjective optimization problems.




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                      Lexical Syntactic Patterns Generate Good Questions

                        Sai Revanth Kolli (Computer Science), Presenter

        Among the numerous aspects of Language Processing is the task of ‗Question Generation‘
(QG). In our operational definition QG can be defined as: given and English sentence what
questions can be asked. A drawback of current Question Answering (QA) systems is the assumption
that the user‘s question is asked at the intended or optimal level of specification. Whenever a user is
given a QA system and a task to perform (with the aid of a QA system), there is the unrealistic
assumption that the user will know exactly what questions to ask and in what order. Users need to
be trained in asking good questions and we address this need by developing a QG. We briefly
present a Question Generation system and then discuss work that we performed to adapt this system
to generating open-domain, factual questions. Results of experiments on a set of 200 questions from
National Institute for Standards and Technology‘s TREC-QA data set are presented.


                    Towards a Base Noun Phrase Parser Using Web Counts

                          Sireesha Ravi (Computer Science), Presenter

         Syntactic parsing is an important processing step for various language processing
applications including Information Extraction, Question Answering, and Machine Translation.
Parsing base Noun Phrases is one particular parsing case that has not been addressed so far in the
literature. In this paper we addressed a base Noun Phrase parsing problem and showed how to
efficiently implement a base Noun Phrase parser based on a statistical model and web counts. Using
web counts, instead of manually annotated data, to induce the parameters of the statistical model
makes our method unsupervised.


                       Evaluation for Morphology Induction Approaches

                              Jie Wu (Computer Science), Presenter

        Morphology induction is a sub-problem of important tasks such as automatic learning of
machine-readable dictionaries and grammar induction for languages with complex morphology. It
is extensively used to identify the specialized terms in Machine-Aided Translation (MAT) tasks and
Information Retrieval (IR) engines.
        This study evaluates three common approaches for morphology induction: 1) a rule-based
lemmatizer, 2) unsupervised morphology learning and 3) a Latent Semantic Analysis (LSA) based
lemmatization. Two methods are proposed to combine the rule-based lemmatizer and LSA-based
lemmatizer. An evaluation of these approaches shows that the purely LSA-based approach achieves
highest precision of all.




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              Gaining Confidence and Courage from Agile Software Development

                           David Mills (Computer Science), Presenter

        Many modern software projects demand quick delivery, but are highly dynamic with
requirements continuously changing. Agile software development methodologies aim to facilitate
these requirements through practices that support communication and the ability to embrace change.
This work investigates the feasibility and effects of applying agile practices in an academic setting
with small teams. Two projects are being developed in collaboration between the departments of
Computer Science and Marketing and Supply Chain Management at The University of Memphis.
The author claims that disciplined application of selected practices will offer substantial benefits,
even in an environment that does not lend itself to full adoption of XP.


PHYSICAL AND APPLIED SCIENCES
  Near-Surface Structure in the Mississippi Embayment Derived from Waveform Inversion

                       Shu-Chioung Chi Chiu (Earth Sciences), Presenter

        Seismic wave propagation through the Mississippi Embayment is studied by analyzing
waveforms of local microearthquakes. Distinctive high frequency P and S wave resonance is used
to infer large soil lateral heterogeneity between receivers. The soil structure can be resolved by
constructing synthetic waveforms through a waveform inversion scheme for a parameterized
velocity structure. Not only the waveform inversion method can be applied to other interesting
seismological problems but knowledge of near-surface soil structure is essential for the assessment
of earthquake hazard potential in the New Madrid Seismic Zone.



              Change of Seismic Energy Release in the New Madrid Seismic Zone

                            Qingwen Miao (Earth Sciences), Presenter

        Seismic magnitude and location parameters for the central U.S. were collected for 5909
events occurring between 1974 and 2004. We computed elastic strain energy release from event
magnitude using Gutenberg‘s relation to investigate spatial and temporal changes of strain energy
release for the New Madrid Seismic Zone (NMSZ). The results show that strain energy release has
decreased with time for the NMSZ over the past 31 years, while the central U.S. as a whole,
maintained a nearly constant level. This can be interpreted as either the end of a decaying aftershock
sequence from the 1811-1812 New Madrid earthquakes and/or a period of strain hardening in
preparation for the next large New Madrid earthquake.




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18 t h Annual Student Research Forum

                     Extracting Earth Structure Out of Ambient Noise Data

                            Chuntao Liang (Earth Science), Presenter

        As an accumulation of random waves propagating in random directions, ambient ground
motion noise is a surprising data set that can be used to infer earth structure. Noise data recorded by
Seismic Networks monitored by CERI (earthquake center of UM) have been successfully used to
extract surface waves propagating between station pairs. Surface waves are then further studied to
yield new information for the studies of New Madrid and eastern Tennessee seismic zones. This
achievement remedies the shortcomings of traditional seismic imaging methods that highly depend
on the distribution of earthquakes or artificial sources.


                                Effects of Light on Cucurbita Pepo

                        Fatima Hall and Karla Gage (Biology), Presenters

        The effects of PAR quantum were studied in summer squash Cucurbita Pepo L.
(Cucurbitaceae) over 7 week period. Plant root and shoot surface areas, and biomass were
measured. Leaf and root surface areas were measured using digital image analyses. Results of
ANCOVA indicated that plant performance differed significantly among light treatments. Plants
grown in high light treatment had greatest leaf and root surface areas, had larger biomass, and
overall size. Plants grown in low light treatment had smallest biomass, leaf and root surface areas.
Light quantum has significant effects on plant parts, entire plants, and may affect changes at plant
populations and community levels.


                    Discovery of Bioactive Molecules Using Virtual Screening

                              James Fells, Sr. (Chemistry), Presenter

        Lysophosphatidic acid (LPA) is a bioactive lipid that produces various responses including
platelet aggregation, cell migration, proliferation, and survival. The responses are mediated by a
family of three G-protein coupled receptors (GPCR), LPA1-3. LPA plays both pathological and
physiological role. LPA is required for embryonic development but may aid in the spread of
various cancers including ovarian, prostate, and breast. Developing subtype specific antagonists
could assist in understanding the role of LPA in these diseases. This study uses virtual screening to
identify and prioritize potential antagonists for experimental screening. Virtual screening uses both
structural and computational information to help guide in which avenues to explore. We have
developed pharmacophore models for our LPA receptors that can be used to rapidly screen
databases for structurally distinct lead compounds. Elimination of hits matching pharmacophores
for different receptors provides us with a qualitative tool to identify selective antagonists. The
database hits are virtually screened using rigid docking; where they can be further qualitatively
analyzed for potential as new leads. Another data mining technique utilized is similarity searching.
This will assist in the combinatorial approach by identifying derivatives of experimentally




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18 t h Annual Student Research Forum

confirmed antagonists. To date we have identified eight antagonists, two of which are selective for
single LPA receptors.


   Computer Simulations of the Adsorption of Macromolecules on Heterogeneous Surfaces

                              Jesse Ziebarth (Chemistry), Presenter

        Adsorption of macromolecules on surfaces plays an important role in many technological
applications and in biological systems. Here, we investigate the adsorption of homopolymers on
heterogeneous surfaces using lattice Monte Carlo simulations. The on-off transition of polymers
adsorbing onto heterogeneous surfaces was found to depend greatly on the characteristics of the
adsorbing surface. Our numerical data closely fit a simple analytical equation, confirming
theoretical predictions. These results are useful for developing understanding of protein recognition
and other complex macromolecular adsorption processes.


              Investigation of Crustal Structure in the New Madrid Seismic Zone
                                Using Industry Reflection Data

                          Sharon Browning (Earth Sciences), Presenter

        The New Madrid seismic zone (NMSZ), located in the central United States, has
experienced at least three major prehistoric earthquakes in addition to three events estimated at M
7.8 to 8.1 in the winter of 1811-1812. Recent studies suggest seismicity does not extend beyond a
proposed eastern margin, leading to conjecture that the margin is accumulating strain, posing
unknown seismic hazards for the central U.S. Seventeen seismic reflection lines are located
adjacent to this margin and are being reprocessed to delineate crustal structure and fault geometry.
Results will potentially further insight into seismic hazards for the central U.S.



    Crustal Structure at the Southern Terminus of the Blytheville Arch, Eastern Arkansas

                            Juanjuan Cao (Earth Sciences), Presenter

        Line 61W and Line20A from reflection vibroseis data has been reprocessed to reveal crustal
reflectivity in the crust near the southern terminus of the Blytheville Arch. A velocity log of Dow
Wilson well #1 was combined with the refraction velocity model developed by Mooney et al.
(1982) to conduct velocity analysis to yield the final stack. The prominent reflectors include: the
contact of the upper Cretaceous with Paleozoic sediments; the presumed base of the Paleozoic and
crystalline basement contact; a ―transparent‖ upper crustal zone from 3-9 second two-way travel
time; and a highly reflective lower crust from 9-14 seconds.




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       Correlation of Potential Fields and Geology Data of the Mississippi Embayment

                             Ivan Rabak (Earth Sciences), Presenter

       The scientific goal is to correlate available potential field data and surface geology data for
   the Mississippi embayment and identify prominent features as viable scientific targets. A set of
   potential field maps is generated using GMT and available USGS data sets. Numerous filters for
   image manipulation available through Adobe Photoshop are used for a first-run analysis. The
   appropriate selection of a map color space is chosen not only to enhance already familiar
   anomalies of the region such as the well-known Bloom field pluton and the Missouri gravity
   low but also to highlight other, less famous, gravity and magnetic anomalies. The Bloomfield
   pluton, judging by the gravity maps, together with other anomalies seems to be a part of a larger
   system of intrusions propagating all the way to the Golf of Mexico. Several larger gravity
   anomalies, including the Bloomfield pluton, do have signatures on both maps of gravity and
   magnetics. However, this is not a wide spread phenomenon for all strong gravity and magnetic
   highs. Correlating the maps of the potential fields and geology, together with earthquake
   locations qualitatively reveals the complexity of the crust‘s structure and importance of proper
   visualization of the Mississippi embayment.


 P and S Wave Velocity Structure and Vp/Vs Ratios for the Eastern Tennessee Seismic Zone

                           Meredith Dunn (Earth Sciences), Presenter

        Earthquake arrival times are used to infer velocity structure in the eastern Tennessee seismic
zone (ETSZ). This method utilizes P and S wave arrival times from 671 earthquakes to find
velocity variations in the area that may be interpreted as geologic structures. The most significant
velocity anomaly imaged is a region of low velocity that trends parallel to the seismicity. The
imaged velocities and Vp/Vs ratios can be attributed to rock lithologies such as gneiss.
Anomalously high P and S wave velocities are associated with a prominent mafic intrusion in
eastern Kentucky and with portions of the crust in easternmost TN.


            Structural Modeling and Interpretation of the Mississippi Embayment

                            Ryan Csontos (Earth Sciences), Presenter

        Landmark and Arc three dimensional software models are currently being produced and
focus on the northern half of the Mississippi Embayment. These latest models integrate geologic
and geophysical data including surface topography DEM data, stratigraphic tops of the
Precambrian, Paleozoic, Cretaceous, Tertiary, and Mississippi River alluvial sections, faults, and
earthquake foci. This geologic model allows viewing and interpretation of the data from any
direction and provides the ability to observe and analyze the subsurface geology from a variety of
scales. Geologic interpretation within a 3-D environment promotes better interpretations of the
relationships among mapped faults, earthquake foci, Reelfoot rift structures, stratigraphic evolution,
and tectonic evolution of the northern Mississippi embayment.


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18 t h Annual Student Research Forum

                 Functional Characterization of Nanothin Films: Permeability
                           in Nanocapsules and Electrode Coatings

              L. Todd Banner and Benjamin T. Clayton (Chemistry), Presenters

        Our group has been developing methods for the directed synthesis of nanothin (1-3 nm)
polymer films with controlled permeability for applications in nanocapsules and nanofabricated
sensors. High throughput permeability characterization methods are important to this research. In
this presentation, we examine methods developed for studying the permeability of nanocapsules and
surface-mounted electrode coatings. Nanocapsule permeability is studied with dye efflux
experiments using a mixture of dyes varying in size. Electrochemical methods utilizing redox
markers are used for determining the permeability of surface-mounted films. Information obtained
from permeability studies drives the development of new fabrication methods.


            Quaternary Fault Exploration Beneath the City of Memphis, Tennessee

                            Thomas Deen (Earth Sciences), Presenter

        Previous investigations have identified potential seismic hazards in the N30oE trending
down-to-the-west Memphis and Ellendale faults in Memphis, Tennessee. Our current objective is
to better constrain the fault locations, identify other faults, and determine when the most recent
displacement occurred. Through shallow seismic reflection profiling using both P-wave and S-
wave techniques the Memphis and Ellendale faults have been imaged. A third fault, the Shelby
Farms fault, has now been imaged and it is believed to be parallel to the Ellendale and Memphis
faults. The Shelby Farms fault was imaged to a depth greater than 700 m and is a down-to the-east
normal fault that has been reactivated as a reverse fault. Through acquiring electrical conductivity
surveys and boreholes in the Quaternary alluvium of the Wolf River, paleoseismic trench targets
were identified and excavated on the Ellendale and Shelby Farms faults. Theses trenches revealed
minor earthquake liquefaction dikes, but no Holocene faulting. A shallow S-wave seismic
reflection line and electrical conductivity surveys acquired across the Memphis fault on the Wolf
River flood plain also suggest Quaternary displacement.



                              Ground Motions Induced by Thunder

                             Ting-Li Lin (Earth Sciences), Presenter

        A variety of atmospheric disturbances (e.g., sonic booms, meteoroid falls, and thunders) can
be detected by a seismograph on the ground if the acoustic pressure wave energy is sufficiently
strong. The main purpose of this research is to quantitatively define the hypothesis that different
kinds of near-surface soil layer structure will show different kinds of seismic responses excited by
thunder. We have been building an acoustic/seismic array since July, 2005 in Moscow, TN, which
provides observations to control thunder source and receiver properties. The acoustic/seismic array
has successfully recorded several thunder events and other acoustic sources.



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18 t h Annual Student Research Forum

             In Situ Characterization of Amplitude-Dependent Sediment Properties

                            Zack Lawrence (Earth Sciences), Presenter

        I present a technique to identify and quantify the amplitude-dependent (nonlinear) properties
of the near-surface sediments in terms of shear modulus reduction. The technique uses a large
Vibroseis (shaker) truck and a small array of accelerometers to characterize the subsurface in situ
and non-invasively. Shear modulus reduction is an important parameter for quantifying seismic site
response to strong ground motions in the context of seismic hazard analysis. Site specific shear
modulus reduction curves found through in situ methods will represent an improvement over
laboratory-based curves currently used which have a high degree of uncertainty.


                   Dynamics of Polymer Solutions Confined in Slit-Channels:
                         Dissipative Particle Dynamics Simulations

                               Wenhua Jiang (Chemistry), Presenter

        Polymer chain dynamics in confining geometries are significantly different from those in a
bulk solution. Understanding this confinement effect is of great value to applications of micofluidic
devices. We applied dissipative particle dynamics (DPD) to study chain dynamics of polymers
confined in a slit-channel with interactive surfaces. Our simulation results confirmed that DPD has
correctly accounted for hydrodynamic interactions within a polymer chain. For purely repulsive
surfaces, the dynamics and the static properties of polymers show a broad crossover from a free
solution to a confined solution. The attractive polymer-surface interactions were found to retard the
chain dynamics significantly.


    A Computational Investigation of the Mechanism of S-Ribosylhomocysteinase (LuxS)

                                Jennifer Seat (Chemistry), Presenter

        Recent advances in theory, algorithmic implementation, and available computational
resources have made computational studies of complex chemical systems more realistic and
achievable. S-Ribosylhomocysteinase (LuxS) is a bacterial enzyme that catalyzes formation of a
diketone that undergoes subsequent non-redox thioether cleavage in the synthesis of the bacterial
signaling agent Auto-Inducer II (AI-II), and LuxS is implicated in the expression of virulence
proteins in disease causing bacteria. A proposed mechanism in the literature contains unusual
transformations of the chelation modes of thecarbonyl oxygen atoms of the substrate and
questionable transition states. Also at issue is the identity of the metal center in the wild type active
site of LuxS. This presentation will describe the development of a model system and our
preliminary computational results into the mechanism utilizing density functional theory
calculations.




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18 t h Annual Student Research Forum

SOCIAL AND BEHAVIORAL SCIENCES
                        The Effect of Fathering on Life Satisfaction in Men

         Guler Boyraz (Counseling, Educational Psychology and Research), Presenter

        The purpose of the present study was to test a model that investigates the effects of fathering
on fathers‘ life satisfaction. We hypothesized that the perceived level of family cohesiveness,
adaptability, and flexibility will directly predict the level of life satisfaction of fathers mediating the
effects of conflict and hours spent with children. 255 fathers participated in this study. Path
analysis via GEMINI software was used to assess the relationships of interest among variables. The
results partially supported the hypothesized theoretical model. Family cohesiveness was found to
be the strongest variable in the model mediating the effects of all preceding variables on life
satisfaction.
                      Transitions: Preparing Hispanic Females for Adulthood

            Andrea Wheeler, Cynthia Quiroz, Kristen Walker, Ericka Midgett, and
                          Joelle Poston (Psychology), Presenters

        Increasingly, Hispanic/Latino adolescents are being involved in risk prevention programs.
While there are models for implementing such programs with some youth (e.g., African-
Americans), it is not clear exactly what these programs should entail for Hispanic/Latino youth.
Utilizing focus groups, Hispanic/ Latino women were interviewed about the kinds of experiences
Hispanic/Latino females need to successfully transition from childhood to adolescence to adulthood
as well as their perceptions of the components of a positive youth development program for
Hispanic/Latino youth. Results from these interviews and for utilizing this information in
developing culturally relevant youth development programs targeting Hispanic youth will be
discussed.


             Holland Code Comparison in Attitudes toward Help-Seeking Behavior
                             and Expectations of Counseling

      R. William Adams (Counseling, Educational Psychology and Research), Presenter

        This study compared the attitudes toward help-seeking behavior and expectations about
counseling of 93 internet respondents in an attempt to identify significant differences that might
warrant the need for different approaches with individuals with specific Holland personality codes.
Significant differences were not found between individuals based solely on their primary
personality type and their associated link to gender stereotypes. Implications for future research are
presented to address the complexity of understanding why certain populations underutilize
counseling and other forms of support services.




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18 t h Annual Student Research Forum

     Reasons for Living Mediates the Relationship between Coping and Suicidal Behavior

      Mei-Chuan Wang (Counseling, Educational Psychology and Research), Presenter

        Positive psychological factors that help protect vulnerable persons from suicidal behavior
are vital in understanding resiliency and suicide prevention. The purpose of this study was to
examine whether positive factors including purpose in life, reasons for living, and coping styles
mediate the relationship between stressful events and suicidal behaviors among 416 college student
volunteers. Reasons for living inversely predicted suicidal behavior both directly and indirectly via
an inverse relationship with depression. Emotion-focused coping indirectly predicted suicidal
ideation and behavior both through a direct effect on depression and an inverse effect on reasons for
living. These results underscore the importance of augmenting reasons for living and purpose in life
among suicidal or potentially suicidal persons.


                            A Malaria Prevention Strategy in Uganda

                   Crystal Ton and Beth DeBlanc (Anthropology), Presenters

        In an area where malaria is a major threat to life as well as general health, an efficient way
to combat this infectious disease is through the dissemination of knowledge about preventative
behaviors. Based on previous malaria research conducted in Bushenyi District of Uganda, an
educational tool was constructed. The researchers traveled to Bushenyi District where the tool was
tested on a number of participants. After initial testing, the tool was reworked to clear up any
confusion then handed over to trained community leaders for further dissemination of knowledge in
the area.



    The Adaptation Process of Turkish Individuals in the U.S: An Integrated Framework

       Ayse Ciftci Uruk (Counseling, Educational Psychology and Research), Presenter

        The purpose of this study was to examine psychological and socio-cultural adaptation of
Turkish individuals living in the United States. In the first part of the study, 204 participants
completed online instruments about psychological well-being, socio-cultural adaptation,
acculturation strategies, social support, cultural distance, family adaptability and cohesion, and
certain demographic characteristics to examine Searle and Ward‘s (1990) psychological and socio-
cultural adaptation model and Berry‘s (1997) acculturation model. The second part of the study
included nine in-depth phone interviews examining acculturation process from a dialogical view. In
the discussion, results from quantitative and qualitative analyses are integrated.




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18 t h Annual Student Research Forum

            The Effect of Alcohol and Alcohol Expectancies on Gambling Behavior

                 Damon Lipinski and Trevor Watson (Psychology), Presenters

        This study was an investigation into the effects of alcohol consumption, alcohol
expectancies, and no alcohol on gambling behavior. Thirty-six male students were randomly
assigned to one of three experimental conditions (n=12 per condition) in which they received
alcohol, alcohol placebo, or no-alcohol beverages and then gambled on a computer roulette game.
Significant differences were found between conditions on gambling behaviors. Results showed the
alcohol placebo had a greater effect on gambling behaviors than consumption of alcohol or control
beverage. Those in the expectancy condition placed more bets, and bet in a less risky manner than
both the alcohol and control conditions. This suggests the significant role that personal and social
expectations of alcohol consumption may have on influencing gambling behaviors.


                Respiratory Rate of Listeners During Conversational Interaction

          Douglas F. Parham (Audiology and Speech-Language Pathology), Presenter

        Given the importance of the respiratory system to speech production, it is valuable to
consider respiration in any study involving dyadic interaction. Such studies should uncover effects
that speakers and listeners have on each other during communicative interaction. At the outset of
this study, it was hypothesized that the respiratory rate of the listeners would change in response to
experimental manipulation of conditions. The fact that such manipulations affected inspiratory
durations of listeners offered support to that hypothesis. However, differences in the participants—
not in the experimental conditions—accounted for most of the variance in listener respiratory
periods.


                         Adolescent Outcome Expectancies for Gambling

              Emerson M. Wickwire and Trevor Watson (Psychology), Presenters

         The current project was an effort to identify what adolescents expect to happen when they
gamble and how these outcome expectancies relate to their gambling behavior.
         Participants included 1076 adolescents (55.9% female, M age =16.2 years, SD = 1.07)
recruited from 4 urban high schools. Seventy-seven percent (n = 832) of the sample reported having
gambled at least once in their lives, and sixty-six percent (n = 714) reported having gambled in the
previous year. Twenty-six percent (n = 283) reported gambling regularly (weekly or daily
participation in at least one gambling activity). While a majority of participants (72.7%; n = 782)
reported no gambling problems, 14.6% (n = 157) of the sample was classified as ―At-risk‖
gamblers, and an additional 12.7% (n = 137) scored in the ―Problem‖ range.
         Exploratory factor analyses revealed a 5-factor solution including expectancies in the
following domains: grandiosity (―feeling high‖), financial (―win a lot of money‖), social (―make a
lot of friends‖), parental (―be punished by parents‖), and self-evaluative (―gain a great deal of self-
respect‖). These results were submitted to confirmatory factor analysis, and the dependent variables



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18 t h Annual Student Research Forum

of SOGS-RA score and gambling frequency were added to the model. Model fit was excellent.
Expectations of grandiosity and positive self-evaluation were positively related to SOGS-RA score,
and positive social expectancies were negatively related to SOGS-RA score. For gambling
frequency, grandiosity, parental, and self-evaluative expectancies displayed significant positive
relations with this dependent variable, and expectations of positive social outcomes displayed a
statistically significant negative relation to the dependent variable.


             Computers Versus Human’s Mind: How Humans Evaluate Linguistic
                           Dimensions Identified By Computers

                        Fang Yang and Lun Mo (Psychology), Presenters

        The multidimensional model of register variation presented by Biber has identified five
dimensions in a variety of texts: informational versus involved production, narrative versus non-
narrative concerns, elaborated versus situation-dependent reference, overt expression of persuasion
versus overt argumentation and persuasion, and abstract versus non-abstract style. The present study
provides experimental evidence to show that humans can identify some textual dimensions resulted
from computational methods. The result indicates that the computational output can be consistent
with human‘s cognitive activities. The study provides a unique way to build the bridge between
psycholinguistic and computational areas.


              The Siblings Beliefs Questionnaire: Assumptions and Expectations
                           About Children’s Sibling Relationships

                            Caroline Stanley (Psychology), Presenter

         The present research (University IRB approved) examines the psychometric properties of
the Siblings Beliefs Questionnaire (SBQ), a measure devised to assess adult beliefs about children‘s
sibling relationships. The SBQ was designed to examine assumptions (i.e., beliefs about the ways
siblings are) and expectations (i.e., beliefs about the ways siblings should be) about the positive
(e.g., sharing) and negative (e.g., quarrelling) aspects of children‘s sibling relationships. Results
suggest that the SBQ is a reliable measure for examining adult beliefs about children‘s sibling
relationships.


              Successes and Challenges of Providing Relief for Hurricane Katrina
                               Victims in Memphis, Tennessee

                           Elizabeth Pulver (Anthropology), Presenter

       An estimated 15,000 Hurricane Katrina evacuees took shelter in Memphis, Tennessee after
leaving their homes in New Orleans, Louisiana and coastal Mississippi. While many of these
evacuees resided with family and friends, a majority sought refuge in shelters facilitated by
churches and non-profit organizations. Based on in-depth interviews with participating



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administrators, staff, and volunteers, this paper will focus on the successful approaches and limiting
factors in providing disaster relief services and shelter. These challenges include insufficient
preparation time, lack of qualified personnel, limited funds, logistical problems, and bureaucratic
and regulatory issues. In such situations, organizations respond to these challenges with resourceful
solutions to meet the needs of their clients. The experiences and lessons learned from Memphis‘
response to Hurricane Katrina will help provide useful insight for disaster relief efforts on local,
national, and international levels in the future.


                   The Analysis of Associations in Multimodal Conversations

              Patrick Jeauniaux and Mohammed Hoque (Psychology), Presenters

       Multimodal conversations involve the occurrence of communicative events on various
channels, including speech, eye gaze and facial expressions. This study focuses on situations
involving pairs of participants, whereby one individual must guide another one through a map. We
address the question of the relation of events occurring across channels, within and between
individuals. A particular emphasis is put on finding relations between non-simultaneous events.
Among other results, eye gaze of the giver on the follower is shown to correlate with facial
expression denoting interest by the giver, as well as with the fact to ask a question to the follower.
The study sheds light on multimodal communication in humans and gives guidelines for
implementation in animated conversational agents.


                   Effects of Summary Knowledge of Results (KR) and Error
                                 Estimation in Motor Learning

                     Tiffany Liggins (Health and Sport Sciences), Presenter

         Research suggests motor skill learning is influenced by both external and internal factors
during practice. While most previous related studies have exclusively used performance outcome
(e.g., accuracy) measure, the present investigation used surface electromyography (EMG) to assess
how well a simple force production task was learned under summary KR (external) and error
estimation (internal) conditions. A data acquisition tool, BIOPAC-MP35, was incorporated
allowing for simultaneous analysis of force production and muscle activity using a hand
dynamometer. It is hypothesized that summary KR in conjunction with verbal error estimation
during initial training would enhance skill retention with increased performance accuracy.


     An Exploration of Gender, Income, and Dialect on Derived Word Stress Production

          Valentina L. Taran (Audiology and Speech-Language Pathology), Presenter

       Children‘s decoding ability is strongly related to accurate stress production of derived words
formed with stress-changing suffixes (e.g., -tion, -ic, -ity). Despite the well-established relationship
between oral language and reading, little is known about how dialectal differences between
speakers affect these skills. The present study extends this work by exploring whether socio-



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18 t h Annual Student Research Forum

demographic factors affect the production of stress in derived words. The socio-demographic
factors of interest were: the presence and degree of a non-mainstream dialect (i.e., African-
American English and Southern-American English), gender, and parental income. Results indicated
that the degree of non-standard dialect had an effect on stress production accuracy.


                Katrina 400 Miles Onshore: Providing Support and Combating
                            Compassion Fatigue in Care Providers

                    Laura Battle and Mardi Smith (Counseling, Educational
                            Psychology and Research), Presenters

        School counselors and teachers, as far as 400 miles inland from Hurricane Katrina, were
assessed for vicarious trauma and compassions fatigue symptoms experienced after counseling
evacuee students that had relocated and enrolled in their schools from the New Orleans area. Pre-
Katrina and Post-Katrina assessments were completed. Factors studied included changes in
Compassion Satisfaction and Compassion Fatigue. Risk factors associated with counselors and
teachers who show the highest indicators of compassion fatigue were identified. Actions are taken
to help alleviate compassion fatigue symptoms.


                  Comparative Risk Assessment in a Midsouth Superfund Site

                   Stasa Plecas and Beth DeBlanc (Anthropology), Presenters

        This project explored community perspectives on risk in a neighborhood bordering a
superfund site. The site was chosen for its grassroots environmental activism. Residents were
questioned about the comparative risks of pollution vs. lifestyle posed by living in this
neighborhood. Questions also explored demographics, length of residence in the site, social
networks, family and personal illness history, cognitive maps of community assets, and behaviors
that contextualize views about risk. Results were surprising, as most respondents expressed
ambivalence about the risks posed by environmental hazards.


     Winning the Fight for Title IX Compliance: Giving Women the Opportunity to Play

                                 Emily Bates (Sociology), Presenter

       This research examines the determinants of Title IX compliance through the measure of
substantial proportionality at 1,317 four-year colleges and universities in the United States for the
2003-2004 academic year. I identify a national level of compliance based on proportionality and
analyze the relationship and affect of specific institutional and athletic department characteristics on
the proportionality measure. Research findings suggest a national lack of gender equitable
opportunities in athletics and recognize certain institutional and athletic department characteristics
which have significant negative and positive effects on the measure of proportionality. Theoretical
reasoning behind these findings offer hope for future progress of gender equity in athletics.




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18 t h Annual Student Research Forum

PARTICIPANTS

UNDERGRADUATES

Afolabi, Titilola ......................................13           Russ, Clifton ............................................14
Bardakova, Valentyna ............................12                  Scott, Jacquelyn ....................................... 7
Benedetti, Robert .....................................9             Seward, Molly .......................................... 7
Brown, Karen ............................................7           Slakans, Bradley ...................................... 9
Callegari, Jonathan .................................12              Smith, Carlesia D. ................................. 11
Carpenter, Andrea ..................................10               Solis, Adrienne ........................................ 7
Combs, Amy ..........................................17              Spencer, Stephan ................................... 15
Crocitto, Dominique ..............................17                 Stamps, D. Sarah .................................... 15
David, Joe A..............................................8          Stillman, Fallon ....................................... 9
Delong, Natasha .....................................16              Strickland, Eddie ..................................... 9
Ensley, Trenton ......................................15             Tapp, Kristy .......................................... 16
Fienup, Katie .............................................7         Wallick, Angela ....................................... 7
Filsinger, Erik ........................................11           Webb, Christa A. ..................................... 7
Girsch, Laura M. .......................................7            Woolls, Heather ..................................... 10
Gopalakrishnan, Anusha ........................12
Griffis, John ...........................................14
Hauther, Christine ..................................11
Hillard, Laura ............................................7
Hochstein, Daniel .....................................8
Karl, Jeffrey G. ........................................8
Lee, Melissa ...........................................12
Liggins, Tiffany .......................................7
Magallon, Iranzu ....................................12
Nahmias, Zach .......................................13
Neeley, Nikita ........................................13
Nyindodo, Lillian ...................................12
Osibodu, Folarin ....................................14
Patel, Niki ...............................................16
Revalee, Joel ..........................................15
Roland, Donna .......................................18




                                                                47
18 t h Annual Student Research Forum


GRADUATES

Adams, R. William .................................41              Furxhi, Orges ........................................ 21
Allen, Brandon .......................................25           Gage, Karla ....................... 12,13,30,31,36
Allen, Jessica Lynn .................................28            Gandhi, Neel ......................................... 26
Banner, L. Todd ......................................39           Garrett, Deon ......................................... 33
Bates, Emily ...........................................46         Griggs, Melonne D. ............................... 29
Battle, Laura ......................................20,46          Hall, Fatima ........................................... 36
Beliaev, Igor ...........................................33        Hall, Micah ............................................ 21
Bordelon, Dwight ...................................25             Hamilton, Benjamin .............................. 21
Boyraz, Guler .........................................41          Helms, Laurel ........................................ 29
Brahmandam, Nayana ............................25                  Honeywood, Beverly ............................. 29
Browning, Sharon ..................................37              Hoque, Mohammed E. ..................... 23,45
Camp, Jonathan W. ................................28               Hudson, Shari ........................................ 31
Cao, Juan Juan .......................................37           Huey, Whitney Ellen .............................. 27
Chen, I-Jane ...........................................24         Jacob, Beth ............................................ 28
Chen, Jeff G. ..........................................19         Jeauniaux, Patrick ................................. 45
Chesnutt, Betsy ......................................22           Jiang, Wenhua ....................................... 40
Chiu, Shu-Chioung ................................25               Johnson, Andre ...................................... 29
Cirtain, Margaret ....................................31           Johnson, Kimberly P. ............................ 29
Clayton, Benjamin T. .............................39               Kimes, Cheri L. ..................................... 30
Clifford, Anna ........................................20          Kolli, Sai Revanth .................................. 34
Creasy, Andrea .......................................32           Lawrence, Zack ..................................... 40
Csontos, Ryan ........................................38           Lee, Melissa ..................................... 30,31
DeBlanc, Beth ...................................42,46             Liang, Chuntao ...................................... 36
Deen, Thomas ........................................39            Liggins, Tiffany ..................................... 45
DeWitt, Michaela ...................................29             Lin, Ting-Li ........................................... 39
Dunn, Meredith ......................................38            Lipinski, Damon .................................... 43
Fells, Sr., James .....................................36          Liu, Jianxiong ........................................ 30
Fernandes, Sanjit M. ..............................31              Liu, Ying ............................................... 26




                                                              48
18 t h Annual Student Research Forum

GRADUATES (cont’d)

LoSicco, Tino .........................................25           Vanteru, Bhanu Chander Reddy ............ 24
May, Maranja .........................................28            Vaughn, Ashley ..................................... 32
Medapati, Sudhir Reddy .........................26                  Walker, Kristen ..................................... 41
Miao, Qingwen ......................................35              Wang, Mei-Chuan ................................. 42
Midgett, Ericka ......................................31            Watson, Trevor ...................................... 43
Mills, David ...........................................41          Wheeler, Andrea ................................... 41
Mo, Laura ...............................................28         Wickwire, Jr., Emerson M. ................... 43
Mo, Lun ..................................................44        Wolfe, Robyn ........................................ 29
Narayanan, Nithya .................................21               Wu, Jie ................................................... 34
Nathani, Ranikanth ................................31               Yang, Fang ............................................ 44
Nguyen, Jennifer T. ................................23              Ziebarth, Jesse ....................................... 37
Niter, Jennifer ........................................28          Zook, Justin ........................................... 24
Noel, Scott ..............................................26
Norowski, Peter ―Drew‖ ........................22
Oldenburg, Christopher ..........................28
Otsuki, Amanda .....................................19
Parham, Douglas F. ................................43
Pieraccini, Brittany ................................29
Pierce, Andrew .......................................32
Plecas, Stasa ...........................................46
Poston, Joelle .........................................41
Price-Griffin, Olivia ...............................29
Pulver, Elizabeth ....................................44
Quiroz, Cynthia ......................................41
Rabak, Ivan ............................................38
Ramanand, Rajesh ..................................33
Ravi, Sireesha ........................................34
Richardson, Sir Walter ...........................21
Rozar, Diane ..........................................29
Seat, Jennifer ..........................................40
Shaik, Jahangheer Shareef .................24,27
Sharma, Shweta ......................................22
Smith, Mardi .....................................20,46
Smith, Webb ..........................................19
Stanley, Caroline ....................................44
Steinberg, Stephanie C. ..........................19
Sweeney, James .....................................20
Taran, Valentina L. ................................45
Ton, Crystal ............................................42
Tracy, Janet Patton ..................................28
Uruk, Ayse Ciftci ....................................42
Utturkar, Gangadhar ..............................23




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