Conflict Resolution The Skill that Makes the Difference by vdy11062

VIEWS: 84 PAGES: 14

									                 Beth A. Ferrara, M.A.



Edge Training Systems, Inc.
            Conflict Resolution: The Skill that Makes the Difference

                                                  Contents

COURSE DESCRIPTION ............................................................................................... 1
   EXERCISE: RETHINKING PAST CONFLICTS .................................................................. 2
   EXERCISE: IDENTIFYING AND RESOLVING CONFLICT ................................................ 3
   EXERCISE: FINDING THE UPSIDE OF CONFLICT .......................................................... 4
   GUIDELINE: DISTINGUISHING FACT FROM OPINION ................................................... 5
   SELF QUIZ: FACT FINDING ........................................................................................... 6
   EXERCISE: TURNING OPINIONS INTO FACTS ............................................................... 7
   GUIDELINES: DETERRING DEFENSIVE REACTIONS ..................................................... 8
   ROLE-PLAY: DETERRING DEFENSIVE REACTIONS ...................................................... 9
   ROLE-PLAY: LISTENING TO UNDERSTAND ................................................................. 10
   ROLE-PLAY: BRAINSTORMING FOR CREATIVE SOLUTIONS ...................................... 11
   EXERCISE: MANAGING CONFLICT BETWEEN OTHERS ............................................. 12




                                                                                               Instructor’s Guide
           Conflict Resolution: The Skill that Makes the Difference

                            Course Description
Purpose:              This course is designed to help participants become better
                      managers of conflict so that they can build productive
                      relationships in the workplace. Participants have an opportunity
                      to learn and practice their conflict resolution skills in a variety of
                      different ways.

Audience:             This class is designed for employees at all levels of development.

Class Size:           Approximately 24 to 28 participants.

Prerequisite          None.
Material:

Materials/            The following materials are recommended for this course:
Equipment:                   ♦   Video: Conflict Resolution: The Skill that Makes the
                                 Difference
                             ♦   Flipchart stand and paper or dry erase board
                             ♦   Notepaper
                             ♦   Tent cards or name tags


Organization:         The instructor’s guide is designed to be used with the supporting
                      Participant Worksheets and the video titled Conflict Resolution:
                      The Skill that Makes the Difference.



Duration:             2 to 4 hours.




Instructor’s Guide                                                                             1
           Conflict Resolution: The Skill that Makes the Difference

INSTRUCTOR INFORMATION


                        Exercise: Rethinking Past Conflicts

Purpose:                                         Instruct participants to read the worksheet
                                                 titled Rethinking Past Conflicts.
To reflect on a past conflict in order to
identify opportunities where the conflict
could have been managed in a more
constructive manner.

Individual Instructions:

Instruct participants to follow the directions
outlined on their corresponding worksheet.




2                                                                         Instructor’s Guide
           Conflict Resolution: The Skill that Makes the Difference

INSTRUCTOR INFORMATION


                     Exercise: Identifying and Resolving Conflict

Purpose:                                      Instruct participants to read the worksheet
                                              titled Identifying and Resolving Conflict.
To teach participants to encourage others to
explain their side of a conflict and follow
other guidelines for conflict resolution.    Guidelines for Managing Conflict:
                                              ♦ Encourage Others to Explain Their
Partner Instructions:                           Side
                                              ♦ Listen to Understand, Not Respond &
Have participants fill out the corresponding    State Your Understanding
worksheet according to the directions given ♦ Build on the Other Person’s Position
for the scenario. Then form partners and      ♦ Explain Your Own Position
have participants role-play their responses   ♦ Focus on Creative Solutions
with their partner. Partners should offer
suggestions for improving the exchange.

Whole Class Option:

Ask for volunteers to read their responses.
Discuss any differences between responses.




Instructor’s Guide                                                                      3
           Conflict Resolution: The Skill that Makes the Difference

INSTRUCTOR INFORMATION


                     Exercise: Finding the Upside of Conflict

Purpose:                                        Instruct participants to read the worksheet
                                                titled Finding the Upside of Conflict.
To teach participants to see the potential
benefits of conflict that is managed            Instructor Notes:
constructively.
                                                This exercise may be especially valuable
Small Group Option:                             for use with conflicts that are still
                                                unfolding. Encourage participants to
In small groups of three to five, have          describe present scenarios that have yet to
participants follow the instructions on their   be fully resolved. Doing so may help
worksheet.                                      change participants’ attitudes about the
                                                conflicts they are presently dealing with,
Whole Class Option:                             which will enable them to be better
                                                managers of conflict.
Instead of forming small groups, give
participants time to describe a past or         If completing the small group option,
present conflict in writing. Then ask for       participants may feel more comfortable
volunteers to read their descriptions. The      completing this exercise if grouped with
class should ask questions to better            people they do not work closely with.
understand the circumstances and help
identify potential value derived from the       Benefits of Conflict:
conflict.
                                                ♦   Conflict can improve relationships
                                                    between employees and groups by
                                                    enabling greater understanding and
                                                    appreciation for each other’s positions.
                                                ♦   Conflict can bring important issues to a
                                                    head so they may be resolved before a
                                                    crisis occurs.
                                                ♦   Conflict can result in new and creative
                                                    solutions to problems.
                                                ♦   Conflict can bring us new ways of
                                                    thinking about all that we do and about
                                                    everyone we work with.




4                                                                          Instructor’s Guide
           Conflict Resolution: The Skill that Makes the Difference

INSTRUCTOR INFORMATION

                     Guideline: Distinguishing Fact from Opinion

Purpose:                                       Instruct participants to read the worksheet
                                               titled Distinguishing Fact from Opinion.
To help participant learn to separate people
form the problem they are trying to
resolve. The guidelines given on this          Instructor Notes:
worksheet explain the difference between
facts and opinions.                            Facts are verifiable. Facts may include
                                               numbers, dates, testimony, etc. For
                                               example, "Joe retired after 30 years with
                                               the company" is a verifiable statement of
                                               fact. Opinions are judgments of the facts.
                                               For example, “Joe deserves a big retirement
                                               party after 30 years of service to the
                                               company” is a non-verifiable opinion.
                                               What Joe does or does not deserve is
                                               subjective and depends on how the
                                               evidence is interpreted.




Instructor’s Guide                                                                           5
           Conflict Resolution: The Skill that Makes the Difference

INSTRUCTOR INFORMATION


                                 Self Quiz: Fact Finding

Purpose:                                        Instruct participants to read the worksheet
                                                titled Fact Finding.
To test participants understanding of the
difference between facts and opinions.
                                                Answer Key:
Individual Instructions:
                                                Fact: The report that was due yesterday is
Instruct participants to take five or more      late.
minutes to fill in their answers to the quiz.
                                                Opinion: The memo needs revising so that
Whole Group Option:                             its implications will be easier to
                                                understand.
As you read the answer to each question
ask for volunteers to discuss why an            Opinion: The quality of Rita’s work has
answer is fact or opinion. Also for each        suffered this month.
“O” answer, ask how the opinion could be
rewritten as fact.                              Fact: Joe met his quota this month.

                                                Opinion: The client didn’t explain her
                                                expectations clearly enough.

                                                Opinion: His answer to the question was
                                                confusing and hard to follow.

                                                Fact: The group has met three times and
                                                has not reached consensus.

                                                Opinion: The contractor was disagreeable
                                                and stubborn.




6                                                                        Instructor’s Guide
           Conflict Resolution: The Skill that Makes the Difference

INSTRUCTOR INFORMATION


                      Exercise: Turning Opinions into Facts

Purpose:                                       Instruct participants to read the worksheet
                                               titled Turning Opinions into Facts.
To give participants practice revising
opinion statements into factual and
verifiable statements.

Individual Instructions:

Instruct participants to take ten or more
minutes to fill in their answers on the
worksheet.

Whole Group Option:

Ask for several volunteers to read their
revisions for each statement. Discuss
differences in each answer. Be sure to note
that there is more than one right answer for
each statement.




Instructor’s Guide                                                                       7
           Conflict Resolution: The Skill that Makes the Difference

INSTRUCTOR INFORMATION


                    Guidelines: Deterring Defensive Reactions

Purpose:                                       Instruct participants to read the worksheet
                                               titled Guidelines: Deterring Defensive
To teach participants to avoid triggers that   Reactions.
might needlessly escalate a conflict.
                                               Guidelines for Deterring Defensive
                                               Reactions:

                                               ♦   Give specific examples. Providing
                                                   specific and recent examples helps
                                                   clarify the issue. For instance if you
                                                   simply tell someone, “Your work wasn’t
                                                   completed last month,” you assume that
                                                   he or she knows how to correct the
                                                   problem when in fact there may be a
                                                   misunderstanding or a training gap that
                                                   goes unidentified.

                                               ♦   Describe behavior—Not the Person.
                                                   Calling someone unreliable or using any
                                                   other label is sure to provoke a defensive
                                                   response. Describing the behavior
                                                   instead of the person gives a less
                                                   personal and a more accurate
                                                   description.

                                               ♦   Don’t exaggerate. To say, “You’re
                                                   never on time” is probably untrue.
                                                   You’re less likely to cause an argument
                                                   if instead you say “last week you were
                                                   late three out of five days.”

                                               ♦   Start with “I” statements. Placing the
                                                   emphasis on how you perceive the
                                                   situation is more accurate and makes the
                                                   feedback easier to accept. For instance,
                                                   “I get distracted when you arrive after a
                                                   meeting has already started” is less
                                                   accusatory than, “You are often late for
                                                   meetings.”




8                                                                         Instructor’s Guide
           Conflict Resolution: The Skill that Makes the Difference

INSTRUCTOR INFORMATION


                     Role-play: Deterring Defensive Reactions

Purpose:                                          Instruct participants to read the worksheet
                                                  titled Role-play Deterring Defensive
To teach participants to revise language          Reactions.
that contains accusations, exaggerations,
and generalizations, in order to reduce the
risk of escalating conflict.

Partner Instructions:

Have participants form partners. Instruct
participants to revise the dialogue in the
role-play individually. Once each partner
is finished with his or her revisions, instruct
the groups to role-play the new language
with one partner playing Joan and the other
playing Jason.

Ask participants to offer suggestions for
improving their partner’s revised language.

Whole Class Option:

After each group has finished their partner
exercise, ask for volunteers to read their
language. Encourage the class to offer
constructive feedback to each role-play
presented.




Instructor’s Guide                                                                          9
           Conflict Resolution: The Skill that Makes the Difference

INSTRUCTOR INFORMATION


                         Role-play: Listening to Understand

Purpose:                                         Instruct participants to read the worksheet
                                                 titled Listening to Understand.
To teach participants to listen to and restate
another’s positions without judging,             Instructor Note:
debating, or skewing the content of the
message.                                         It may be helpful to model this exercise
                                                 before breaking the class into pairs. You
Partner Instructions:                            might restate a short excerpt from a
                                                 newspaper article. Ask the class to listen to
Form partners and have participants follow       your restatement of the author’s position
instructions on their worksheet.                 and point out any places where you seem to
                                                 judge the message, misrepresent the
                                                 author’s position, or interject your own
                                                 opinion.




10                                                                         Instructor’s Guide
           Conflict Resolution: The Skill that Makes the Difference

INSTRUCTOR INFORMATION


                 Role-play: Brainstorming for Creative Solutions

Purpose:                                        Instruct participants to read the worksheet
                                                titled Brainstorming for Creative
To expand on the Listening to Understand        Solutions; Inventing Options for Mutual
role-play by encouraging participants to        Gain.
brainstorm for creative solutions.

Partner Instructions:

Have participants stay with their same
partner from the Listening to Understand
exercise. Instruct groups to brainstorm for
mutually beneficial solutions or
compromises by creating a cluster diagram
as directed by the worksheet.

Whole Class Option:
                                                Instructor Note:
Once groups have completed the partner
instructions, ask for volunteers to share       Remind students that soliciting diverse
their solutions and their criteria to measure   viewpoints can bring fresh ideas.
success. Encourage the class to ask
questions and suggest alternative solutions
or measurements.




Instructor’s Guide                                                                        11
           Conflict Resolution: The Skill that Makes the Difference

INSTRUCTOR INFORMATION


                   Exercise: Managing Conflict between Others

Purpose:                                         Instruct participants to read the worksheet
                                                 titled Managing Conflict Between Others.
To give participants an opportunity to
resolve a conflict between co-workers            Principles for Managing Conflict:
using the Principles for Managing Conflict.      ♦ Separate the People from the Problem
                                                 ♦ Focus on Interests, Not Positions
Individual Instructions:                         ♦ Invent Options for Mutual Gain
                                                 ♦ Insist on using Objective Criteria
Instruct participants to follow the directions
outlined on their corresponding worksheet.

Whole Class Option:

Ask for volunteers to read their scripts.
Encourage the class to provide feedback to
help improve the language. This may be
repeated until all participants have read
their scripts.




12                                                                        Instructor’s Guide

								
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