Ventilation Program Development Osan Air Base, ROK

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					   Ventilation Program Development
          Osan Air Base, ROK
                       12-23 January 2004




Consultative Letter # AFIOH-DO-BR-CL-2004-0010

                          Prepared by:
               Detachment 3, AFIOH/CD
              Kadena AB, Okinawa Japan

                                                                                27 February 2004
      Distribution Statement: Approved for public release; distribution unlimited
                           DEPARTMENT OF THE AIR FORCE
                     DETACHMENT 3, AIR FORCE INSTITUTE FOR OPERATIONAL HEALTH
                                           (AFIOH) (AFMC)
                                          APO AP 96368-5213




                                                                                27 February 2004

MEMORANDUM FOR 51 AMDS/SGPB
                 Attention: Capt Searcy

FROM:      Detachment 3, AFIOH/CD
           Unit 5213
           APO AP 96368-5213

SUBJECT: Consultative Letter, AFIOH-DO-BR-CL-2004-0010, Ventilation Program
         Development, Osan Air Base, Republic of Korea

1. Scope: At the request of your office, Detachment 3, of the Air Force Institute of Operational
Health (Det 3, AFIOH) completed a base-wide ventilation program assessment, evaluating 38
ventilation systems located throughout 21 industrial work areas at Osan AB. Information
gathered from this effort was utilized to create a Bioenvironmental Engineering Management
Action Plan and update the routine surveillance program.

2. Background: Effective industrial ventilation systems are valuable in controlling exposures
to a variety of workplace materials. Bioenvironmental Engineering offices are faced with a
variety of problems when considering the management and usage of these systems. Current
guidance provides some program framework, but much of the detail is left to the
Bioenvironmental Engineer. Proper program implementation requires a thorough management
action plan with consistent application. Due to recent efforts by Detachment 3 in this arena,
assistance was requested.

3. Personnel Contacted:
Capt Stanley Searcy, Bioenvironmental Engineering Flight Commander
TSgt Michael Miranda, NCOIC, Industrial Hygiene
SSgt Suzanne Hickmon, Outgoing BEE Ventilation Manager
SSgt Ryan Fictum, Incoming BEE Ventilation Program Manager

4. Detachment 3 Team Members:
Maj Gregory Frick, Chief, Occupational Health Consultant
SSgt Mark Florendo, Occupational Health Consultant

5. Process Description: Upon team arrival, Osan AB BEE personnel provided a listing of 21
work centers monitored under the base ventilation program. Day 1 was spent reviewing shop
information, scheduling shop visits, confirming project scope, and familiarizing team personnel


                                                1
with the base layout. Over the course of 4 days, all 21 shops were visited. During each visit,
each system was photographed and supervisors/personnel were asked to provide information
about all ventilation systems and any processes that utilized those systems. No ventilation
measurements were taken during any of the shop visits. On the final day, an informal outbrief
with the ventilation program manager and the NCOIC of industrial hygiene was conducted to
briefly discuss information gathered during casefile review and shop visits.

6. Discussion:

6.1 Ventilation Management Action Plan: Utilizing the procedures and logic behind the
development of ventilation management action plans at Hickam AFB (Consultative Letter
AFIERA-DO-BR-CL-2003-002) and Elmendorf AFB (AFIOH-DO-BR-CL-2003-010), a base-
specific plan was created (attachment 1).

6.2 Ventilation System Surveys: During the casefile reviews and shop visits, a variety of
information was accumulated for each system. This data, along with a summary of current
system status and proper surveillance frequency, is detailed in attachment 2. Five processes were
identified for specific corrective actions as outlined below.

6.2.1 Welding Operations (004A Metals Tech, 028A Allied Trades, 047A Structures): Although
these shops have existing ventilation systems, their usage and appropriateness is questionable.
Additional information is needed on welding materials and tasks to create baseline hazard
assessments in these shops. From this, the need for ventilation systems and surveillance
frequency can be determined. Corrective action: Conduct baseline assessment of welding
operations in these shops. Based upon materials being used and scope of tasks, determine if
further actions are necessary (i.e. air sampling, controls, etc.) Use the flow rates from the
baseline ventilation surveys to establish a standard to be used for future scheduled monitoring.

6.2.2 Corrosion Control (006A): The baseline ventilation survey for the hangar paint booth was
accomplished with an aircraft (A-10) inside the hangar and velocity readings were taken around
the top and bottom of the aircraft. Although acceptable, it is generally more practical to conduct
ventilation surveys in an empty hangar. Corrective actions: Conduct a baseline ventilation
survey of the hangar paint booth with the hangar empty. Coordinate the ventilation survey with
representative air sampling. Use the baseline flow rates as the new standard for future scheduled
monitoring.

6.2.3 Conventional Maintenance (036A) & Munitions Equipment Maintenance (048A): Current
surveillance practice for these paint booths involves measurements at the face of the filters.
Values obtained at the filter face are highly variable and can be heavily influenced by
obstructions in the filter system. Proper surveillance protocol is to average values obtained at the
booth mid-point; a location representative of airflow patterns throughout the paint booth.
Corrective actions: Perform new baseline ventilation surveys at the booth midpoint.
Coordinate the ventilation surveys with representative air sampling. Use the baseline flow rates
as the new standard for future scheduled monitoring.

6.2.4 General Purpose Vehicle Maintenance (111A): Additional ventilation systems have been
added since the most recent baseline survey. Corrective actions: Conduct a new baseline
ventilation survey on the four vehicle exhaust systems in this shop.


                                                 2
6.2.5 Auto Crafts (224A): The current system is not functioning properly and there is a work
order pending for this system to be completely replaced. Corrective actions: Conduct a new
baseline ventilation survey once the new system is installed.

6.3 Ventilation System Inventory: A system inventory spreadsheet was developed incorporating
all of the recommendations from this effort (attachment 3). This spreadsheet can be used to
schedule all routine surveillance and represents a current inventory of all ventilation systems on
Osan AB.

7. If you have any questions concerning this survey, please contact me at DSN 634-2634 or e-
mail me at ignacio.florendo@kadena.af.mil. I appreciate the opportunity to provide assistance
on this project and would like to extend my gratitude to all of the professionals in your shop for
their cooperation and support.

                                              Prepared By:




                                              IGNACIO M. FLORENDO, SSgt, USAF
                                              NCOIC, Consultant Division

                                              Reviewed and Approved By:




                                              GREGORY A. FRICK, Maj, USAF, BSC, CIH
                                              Chief, Occupational Health Division

3 Attachments:
1. Ventilation Management Action Plan
2. Ventilation System Review
3. Ventilation System Scheduling Spreadsheet




                                                 3
BY ORDER OF THE COMMANDER                                51 AMDS/SGPB INSTRUCTION 48-1
                                                                         27 February 2004

                                                                                           Controls

                                                           INDUSTRIAL VENTILATION
          COMPLIANCE WITH THIS INSTRUCTION IS MANDATORY
OPR: DET 3/AFIOH (Maj Frick)       Certified by: 51 AMDS/SGPB (Capt Searcy)
                                                                  Pages: 8

This instruction implements Air Force Instruction (AFI) 48-145 and Air Force Occupational
Safety and Health (AFOSH) Standard 161-2. This instruction prescribes policy and procedures
for the design, selection, testing, and management of industrial ventilation systems used for the
control of workplace hazards throughout Osan AB and associated properties.


1. SCOPE

Engineering controls are implemented for a variety of reasons in Air Force workplaces. One
form of control often chosen to minimize workplace hazards is an industrial ventilation system.
It is clear that Bioenvironmental Engineering plays a key role in the design and testing of these
systems. However, confusion often arises surrounding periodic monitoring of ventilation
systems and the designation of a ventilation system as a ”Control System”. AFOSH STD 161-2
clearly states that control systems are only those systems that are necessary to reduce a
workplace exposure to below its current occupational exposure limit (OEL) or are in place to
control a fire and explosion hazard. This definition is clearly echoed in the OSHA regulation
entitled ventilation (29 CFR 1910.94) that states a local exhaust system is only required when
employee exposures exceed permissible exposure limits. Obviously, the vast majority of
ventilation systems found on Air Force bases do not meet this threshold. Realistically, the
question that needs to be asked is, “If the flow rate of this system was cut in half, what would be
the effect?” In many cases, the answer is “not much.” In fact, at worst, the most likely result is a
call from the shop supervisor letting you know that the system isn’t working properly. This
instruction discusses the ventilation system types found on Osan AB, provides guidance for
baseline and periodic surveillance, and details proper documentation of ventilation-related
surveys.

2. REFERENCES

2.1 29 CFR 1910.94, “Ventilation Systems”

2.2 29 CFR 1910.106, “Flammable and Combustible Liquids”

2.3 29 CFR 1910.107, “Spray Finishing Using Flammable and Combustible Materials”

2.4 29 CFR 1910.108, “Dip Tanks Containing Flammable or Combustible Liquid”

                                          Attachment 1
                          Ventilation Program Management Action Plan
                                               1-1
2.5 29 CFR 1910.252, “Welding, Cutting, and Brazing”

2.6 AFI 48-145, “Occupational Health Program”

2.7 AFOSH STD 48-8, “Controlling Exposures to Hazardous Materials”

2.8 AFOSH STD 91-10, “Civil Engineering”

2.9 AFOSH STD 91-17, “Interior Spray Finishing”

2.10 AFOSH STD 91-20, “Vehicle Maintenance”

2.11 AFOSH STD 91-25, “Welding, Cutting, and Brazing”

2.12 AFOSH STD 91-110, “Nondestructive Inspection and Oil Analysis Program”

2.13 AFOSH STD 91-501, “Air Force Consolidated Occupational Health Standard”

2.14 AFOSH STD 161-2, “Industrial Ventilation”

2.15 AFIERA Fact Sheet, “Industrial Ventilation (Non-Medical Systems)”, Sept 2002

2.16 AFIERA CL-1998-0096, “Medical Facility Ventilation Requirements for Infection and
Contaminant Control”

2.17 Technical Order 1-1-3, “Inspection and Repair of Aircraft Integral Tanks, And Fuel Cells”,
Aug 2002

2.18 Military Handbook 1028/1C, “Aircraft Maintenance Facilities”

2.19 Military Handbook 1028/8A, “Design of Pest Management Facilities”

2.20 OSHA Guidelines For Workplace Exposures, “Anesthetic Gases: Guidelines for
Workplace Exposures”, May 2000

2.21 American Conference of Governmental Industrial Hygienists (ACGIH), “Industrial
Ventilation, A Manual of Recommended Practice, 24th Edition”

2.22 National Fire Protection Agency (NFPA) 91, “Standard for Exhaust Systems for Air
Conveying of Vapors, Gases, Mists, and Noncombustible Particulate Solids”, 1999

2.23 NFPA 664, “Standard for the Prevention of Fires and Explosions in Wood Processing and
Woodworking Facilities”, 2002




                                        Attachment 1
                        Ventilation Program Management Action Plan
                                             1-2
3. RESPONSIBILITIES

3.1 The Bioenvironmental Engineering Flight Commander will:

3.1.1 Assign a qualified individual as Ventilation Coordinator and provide guidance as required.

3.2 The Bioenvironmental Engineering Flight Industrial Hygiene Program Manager will:

3.2.1 Determine periodic surveillance frequency for all ventilation control systems.

3.2.2 Review all designs for new systems, conduct acceptance testing, and determine if the
system qualifies as a control system.

3.2.3 Act as final approving authority on any changes to ventilation system documentation in
shop casefiles.

3.2.4 Review calculations and provide guidance on applicability of standards.

3.3 The Ventilation Coordinator will:

3.3.1 Track all ventilation systems requiring periodic surveillance.

3.3.2 Schedule all periodic surveillance using the Command Core System (CCS) Suspense
Management Module, ensure periodic surveillance is completed on time, and report status of
periodic surveillance completion during weekly flight meetings.

3.3.3 Conduct all periodic surveillance of ventilation control systems or assign it to
appropriately trained BE technicians in coordination with flight team leaders.

3.3.4 Review all documentation of periodic surveillance, including Command Core entries and
AF Form 2754 entries, for consistency.

3.3.5 Coordinate corrective actions with the Flight Industrial Hygiene Program Manager when a
system fails to meet its periodic check parameters.

3.3.6 Review all changes to shop ventilation systems identified during periodic industrial
hygiene surveys and discuss these changes with the Flight Industrial Hygiene Program Manager.

3.3.7 Conduct an annual inspection (see Section 7) of the ventilation program in January and
brief inspection results at the last flight meeting in February.

3.3.8 Train or assist supervisors to train all technicians on the proper methods and equipment
necessary for evaluation of ventilation systems.

3.3.9 Coordinate with the flight equipment program manager to ensure equipment is calibrated
during months when periodic surveys are not scheduled.


                                          Attachment 1
                          Ventilation Program Management Action Plan
                                               1-3
3.3.10 Coordinate new equipment requirements with the equipment custodian and the flight cost
center manager.

3.4 BE Technicians will:

3.4.1 Perform periodic ventilation surveillance when assigned by the Ventilation Coordinator
and document the survey in Command Core and on the AF Form 2754 in the appropriate
casefile.

3.4.2 Notify the ventilation program manager of any system failing to meet its periodic check
parameters.

3.4.3 Review all ventilation systems during industrial hygiene surveys, compare the systems
with existing shop documentation, and inform the Ventilation Coordinator of any changes
affecting shop ventilation.

3.4.4 Notify the Ventilation Coordinator if they have not received training or are unsure of the
proper procedures to accomplish periodic ventilation surveillance

4. EVALUATION AND SURVEILLANCE PROCEDURES

In order to properly evaluate ventilation systems, it is important to follow a routine process.
Most ventilation systems will be pre-existing and may not have been designed for their current
use. As such, several questions should be asked prior to taking any measurements or entering
any data into Command Core. Information contained in this management plan can be used as a
guide when determining the questions to ask and the level of evaluation necessary. If a system
qualifies as a ventilation system, but is not a control system and will not be routinely monitored,
then an AF Form 2763 should be generated and the information, along with photos of the system,
is entered into Command Core. If a system is determined to require initial monitoring, either
because it is a new system or it qualifies as a control system for a new process or chemical, a
baseline survey must be accomplished.

4.1 Measurement Equipment

There are many different types of ventilation system monitoring equipment available. Currently,
the office has flow meters for monitoring face velocity, pitot tubes for monitoring duct velocity,
and a balometer for monitoring volumetric flow. All of the ventilation systems on base can be
evaluated using these three pieces of equipment. The balometer and the flow meters require
calibration and are monitored through the Bioenvironmental Engineering instrumentation
program. This equipment is needed quarterly (Jan, Apr, Jul, Oct), so every effort should be
made to ensure its availability. All technicians using this equipment will be thoroughly trained
in its use and will demonstrate competence prior to performing any surveys.




                                         Attachment 1
                         Ventilation Program Management Action Plan
                                              1-4
4.2 Baseline Survey

A baseline survey is the initial documentation of system information. It typically involves
gathering data about the system, creation of system drawings, photos, and measurements. If the
system is new, acceptance-testing requirements will drive the baseline survey. The AF Form
2763 should be used as a guide when gathering system data. Important information includes
materials controlled, system operating parameters, and system condition. Next, a system
drawing detailing all of the measurement locations should be created. For existing systems,
measurement locations should be selected using the guidance in Chapter 9 of the ACGIH
Industrial Ventilation Manual, using requirements outlined in the relevant AFOSH STD, or by
mimicking the measurement locations from a similar system already evaluated on base. For new
systems, measurement locations will often be provided in the manufacturer’s documentation.
Based upon the type of measurements taken, a key parameter is established. The key parameter
is used during subsequent periodic surveys to verify system performance. Individual
measurements are usually not chosen as the key parameter since there can be a large variation in
these values over time. In most cases, the average of several measurements is a more replicable
indicator of system performance. For this reason, most local exhaust systems utilize average
face velocity or average cross-sectional velocity as the key parameter. Photos should be taken to
document the configuration of the ventilation system, show current system condition, and
identify key components of the system that should be verified during routine and periodic
surveillance. It is wise to take several photos from a variety of different locations so that future
technicians will be able to verify the baseline condition and setup of the system. Finally,
measurements are taken with calibrated ventilation equipment. If the system is new and is being
evaluated against a design standard, measurements should be taken exactly as outlined in the
contract or manufacturer’s literature and applied to that criterion. If it is an existing system,
measurements are taken in the locations determined above. The usage of these measurements is
more complex. If air sampling was accomplished and the chemical exposures monitored were
below established limits, then the system is functioning adequately and the measurements can be
used directly as the standard for the system. If air sampling was not accomplished, it is a
judgment call as to whether the system is operating properly. It is not proper to apply design
criteria against existing systems.

4.3 Periodic Surveys

Some ventilation systems require periodic surveillance. Periodic surveillance usually involves
repeating the baseline survey measurements and verifying continued proper operation of the
system. In some cases, a scaled down version of the baseline can be accomplished as long as the
measurements are still representative. As a rule of thumb, the results of a periodic survey should
be within 35% of the baseline measurements unless it has been demonstrated that a smaller
deviation will result in significant health impact. Note that while AFOSH Standard 161-2
requires “action” after 10% change from baseline, Detachment 3/AFIOH recommends 35% as a
more practical number. This ensures that measurement differences are not attributable to
environmental or personnel factors, but instead are actual changes in system performance. This
viewpoint is validated in the CCS vent module where acceptable performance is based on
engineer judgment. Periodic measurements outside of the 35% range will be reported to the
Ventilation Coordinator for corrective action as outlined in Section 4.4. Surveillance frequency


                                          Attachment 1
                          Ventilation Program Management Action Plan
                                               1-5
is, in most cases, at the discretion of the Bioenvironmental Engineer Flight Commander. A
decision matrix for determining surveillance frequency is shown in Table 1.

Table 1: Periodic Surveillance Frequency Decision Matrix
 Ventilation System Type                   Frequency1        Reasoning
 Control System (AFOSH 161-2)              Quarterly         AFOSH Requirement
 Infection Control System                  Semi-Annual       AFIOH Guidance
 OSHA Expanded Standards Chemical By Regulation Federal Requirement
 Pesticide Storage                         Annual            AFIOH Recommendation; generally accepted
 Hazardous Material Storage                Annual            AFIOH Recommendation; generally accepted
1- Note that systems require surveillance when there is a major alteration

Occasionally, ventilation systems can be evaluated using static pressure. Static pressure is a
surrogate measurement that is taken at the same time as other baseline measurements. As long
as the static pressure remains relatively constant, the system is assumed to be working properly.
Typically, a manometer is used to measure static pressure. In some cases, manometers can be
mounted directly to the ventilation system, thus making periodic surveillance relatively easy.
Caution must be taken when using static pressure measurements. It is critical that the
measurement be taken in the correct location and it is only appropriate in systems with a single
hood or duct. Often, manometers are mounted to the exterior of paint booths and it is assumed
these are measuring the static pressure of the booth when in fact they are measuring the pressure
drop over the filters on the booth. This is a good method to determine when filters need to be
changed, but it does not provide information about the ventilation of the booth. The Ventilation
Coordinator, in consultation with the Flight Industrial Hygiene Program Manager, will determine
the appropriate use of static pressure and/or manometers during periodic surveillance.

4.4 Corrective Actions

There are several actions necessary when a ventilation system fails periodic surveillance. These
actions are related to potential hazard and are outlined in Table 2.

Table 2: Corrective Actions
 Ventilation System Type               Corrective Action                                        Consider RAC?
 Control System (AFOSH 161-2)          Implement interim control measures to control hazard,          Y
                                       contact CE to have system repaired, notify workers of
                                       potential for overexposure
 Infection Control System              Work with Hospital Facility Management and the                   N
                                       Infection Control Officer to repair the system
 OSHA Expanded Standards               Implement interim control measures to control hazard,            Y
 Chemicals                             contact CE to have system repaired, notify workers of
                                       potential for overexposure, follow federal regulations
                                       for additional actions
 Pesticide Storage                     Work with shop supervisor and CE to repair system                N
 Hazardous Material Storage            Work with shop supervisor and CE to repair system                N

Control systems that are not working properly or systems that are used for control of OSHA
expanded standards chemicals require immediate attention and will be elevated through the chain
of command. Any systems under periodic surveillance with complete or near complete failure
(no airflow) should also be assessed for potential hazard and possible interim control measures.

                                              Attachment 1
                              Ventilation Program Management Action Plan
                                                   1-6
5. COMMAND CORE SYSTEM DATA ENTRY

All ventilation systems used on Osan AB will be entered into the Command Core System. If a
system does not require baseline measurements, it will be entered as a single piece of equipment,
assigned against any shops that use it, and relevant data and pictures will be entered on the
Ventilation Pre-Survey “Description” Tab (electronic AF Form 2763). If the system does require
baseline measurements, the system will be entered as single or multiple pieces of equipment, the
equipment will be assigned against any shops that use it, the equipment will be grouped if it
contains more than one piece, relevant data and pictures will be entered on the Ventilation Pre-
Survey “Description” Tab, measurements and drawings will be entered on the Ventilation Pre-
Survey “Design Criteria” Tab (electronic AF Form 2764/2765), and a survey frequency will be
assigned in the appropriate baseline measurement forms linked from the Ventilation Pre-Survey
“Measurements” Tab. Additionally, if the system is determined to be a control system as defined
in AFOSH STD 161-2, it will be listed as a control in Command Core against any processes that
use it. If the system is a dilution ventilation system, a few additional actions must be taken. The
current version of Command Core (4.4) requires that all dilution systems have both supply and
exhaust fans. In many cases, buildings will only have a one or the other. To overcome this
problem, measurements taken for a supply only system must be duplicated and entered as
dummy values in the exhaust section of the computer form. This also applies for systems that
only have an exhaust.

6. VENTILATION SYSTEM DESIGN SUPPORT

Ventilation system design is necessary when the Bioenvironmental Engineering shop determines
the need for a new control system. Typically, initial design will be accomplished by civil
engineering personnel or outside contractors using criteria provided by the BEE. The
Bioenvironmental Engineer in charge of design reviews will ensure that civil engineering is
aware of their role and will coordinate in all phases of the design process. Many resources are
available in the shop and online to ensure ventilation systems are properly designed with
appropriate flow rate criteria. The Bioenvironmental Engineer in charge of design reviews will
consult with the Ventilation Coordinator to determine if a measurement device should be
designed into the system for simple, accurate periodic surveillance. The Chief of
Bioenvironmental Engineering must clear all ventilation system designs. Once the system is
installed, Bioenvironmental Engineering will be the single approval authority for system
acceptance. While not an exhaustive list, the references in Section 2 and the system type
overview in Attachment 2 should be reviewed to ensure all requirements for a new system are
considered.

7. ANNUAL PROGRAM INSPECTION

The program inspection is used to examine program execution and determine compliance with
Federal regulations and Air Force requirements. The Ventilation Coordinator will examine
every aspect of the ventilation program and prepare a summary report 30 days prior to the annual
flight management meeting. As a minimum, the inspection will utilize the current ESOHCAMP
checklist to determine compliance with regulatory issues. In addition, the inspection report will
address:


                                         Attachment 1
                         Ventilation Program Management Action Plan
                                              1-7
7.1 Periodic Surveillance: Were all checks made? Were there any changes to surveillance
frequencies? If so, why? Were any systems identified as needing repair or replacement? Were
appropriate individuals notified?

7.2 System Changes: What systems have been added since last year? What systems were
subtracted since last year?

7.3 Equipment: Is all necessary equipment available and in good working order? Does any
equipment need to be replaced? If so, what and by when?

7.4 Training: Provide a summary of training level of all technicians in shop and when last
training session was conducted.

7.5 Command Core: Provide a summary of the extent of data entry into Command Core.

7.6 Regulatory Changes: Provide a summary of any significant regulatory changes in the past
year that impacted this program.




                                            STANELY SEARCY, Capt, USAF, BSC
                                            Bioenvironmental Engineering Flight Commander




                                         Attachment 1
                         Ventilation Program Management Action Plan
                                              1-8
                       OSAN AB VENTILATION SYSTEM REVIEW

The purpose of this attachment is to outline the types of ventilation systems at Osan AB and the
Detachment 3, AFIOH decision logic applied to determine their classification and control
requirements. While individual systems may change from this January 2004 baseline, this
overview should be used to support decision making for control requirements of existing and
new systems during routine and special industrial hygiene surveillance.

DILUTION VENTILATION SYSTEMS

Dilution ventilation provides hazard control through the supply or exhaust of air from a
workspace. Typically, it is not as desirable as local exhaust systems, but in some cases it will
satisfy ventilation requirements at a much lower cost than a comparable local exhaust system.
The most common areas where these systems are seen on Air Force bases include
flammable/combustible material storage areas, battery charging rooms, pesticide storage areas,
and in medical facilities.

Flammable/Combustible Materials Storage Areas

Flammable/Combustible materials storage is regulated by 29 CFR 1910.106 and AFOSH STD
91-501. According to these references, areas that store Class I liquids shall be ventilated at a rate
of not less than one cubic foot per minute per square foot of solid floor area. Both regulations
discuss the need for a dilution system to provide a complete change of air within a flammable
storage room at least six times per hour. No monitoring frequency or designation of agency of
responsibility is given, but annual monitoring is generally accepted as the norm for these rooms
and meets the OSHA definition of periodic monitoring. These rooms can generally be
considered as reducing the risk of a fire hazard, so it is appropriate for the Bioenvironmental
Engineering function to monitor them periodically.

Battery Charging Rooms

Ventilation of wet cell battery charging rooms is required due to the potential release of
hydrogen gas. Utilizing the number of battery cells being charged and the amperage required to
charge them, the theoretical hydrogen gas formation can be calculated (See AFIERA Fact Sheet
“Industrial Ventilation”). Using this value and the room volume, a ventilation rate in air
changes per hour can be found. Since these systems are utilized to control the generation of a
potential fire/explosive atmosphere, they qualify under the fire hazard portion of AFOSH STD
161-2.

The recent advent of T.O. 8D2-3-1,”Operation, Service, and Repair of Nickel Cadmium Storage
Batteries”, has created a requirement for ventilation in NiCad charging rooms. According to this
document, charging areas will be mechanically ventilated to provide 3-4 air changes per hour to
ensure the removal of hydrogen gas generated.




                                           Attachment 2
                                    Ventilation System Review
                                                2-1
Pesticide Storage Areas

Pesticide storage areas have a recommended dilution ventilation requirement of 6 ac/hr (MIL-
HDBK 1028/8A). The purpose of these vents is to minimize build-up of airborne pesticide dust
and vapors; however, they are generally not likely to be needed to prevent exposures above the
OEL. These are not control systems as defined under AFOSH STD 161-2 and there are no
surveillance requirements. Although there is no regulation driving the monitoring of these
rooms, annual checks of the ventilation are typically accomplished by the Bioenvironmental
Engineering function similar to flammable material storage areas.

Infection Control Systems

Hospital and Veterinary Clinic infection control systems are designed to control the potential for
the spread of infectious agents through the use of room dilution and removal of contaminated air.
In some cases, they are also used for product protection such as in sterile supply rooms. In
general, these systems have no periodic monitoring requirements, but airflow and pressure
requirements, specific to each room type, can be found in AFIOH guidance on the subject.
Semi-annual checks of the systems are essential to ensure proper flow rates and pressure
relationships are maintained.

LOCAL EXHAUST VENTILATION SYSTEMS

Local exhaust systems are used in many shops to reduce exposures. While many of these
systems assist with the reduction of contaminants, they cannot be defined as control systems
since they do not reduce the level of exposure from above an OEL or PEL to below one. Instead,
they simply assist with lowering already low exposure levels. In many cases, the determination
of whether a system is defined as a control system is left to the Base Bioenvironmental
Engineer’s judgment since shutting down a ventilation system and sample the atmosphere to find
out for sure can pose other concerns (environmental, compliance w/OSHA control guidance,
etc). Systems that qualify as local exhaust ventilation, but may or may not be control systems,
include wood working, welding, paint booths, media blasting booths, parts cleaning tanks,
overhead exhaust systems, purge systems, lab hoods, and pesticide mixing hoods.

Wood Working/Wood Dust Capture Systems

Wood dust capture systems can be found in practically every wood shop in the Air Force.
Although there is a potential health hazard associated with the inhalation of wood dust, the fact
of the matter is sampling results have been universally quite low throughout the Air Force. This
is mostly due to limited usage of the systems since workers are typically multi-tasked. The
NFPA has placed requirements for wood dust control that are based upon the potential for an
explosion hazard. However, this is not an issue with Air Force systems since it takes a
concentration roughly 8,000 times the PEL to reach the wood dust lower explosive limit (NFPA
664, 2002). In reality, these systems are vacuum cleaners that serve to capture wood dust and
collect it for disposal. The performance of these devices is regulated in AFOSH STD 91-10 that
states only that machines that generate dust, vapors, or mists will be connected to an effective
industrial exhaust vent system. The measure of effectiveness is simply whether the systems


                                          Attachment 2
                                   Ventilation System Review
                                               2-2
adequately vacuum up the dust. For these reasons, most wood dust collection systems do not
qualify as control systems under AFOSH STD 161-2 and monitoring is unnecessary.

Welding Systems

Welding ventilation requirements are driven by 29 CFR 1910.252 and AFOSH STD 91-25. The
federal regulation requires the use of mechanical ventilation when welding is conducted in areas
smaller than 10,000 ft2 or when the room has a ceiling height less than 16 feet. Additionally, it is
required if exposure levels are above the OEL or PEL. Local exhaust ventilation is never
prescribed, but is offered as an option. There were only three systems identified at Osan AB that
are used for welding operations. Air sampling results from all three shops were generally low
however; proper evaluation and identification of the types of metals and rods welded were not
accomplished. This is the most critical aspect in determining what metals need air sampling.
Because of the wide variety of air sampling data indicating very low exposures at most
installations, these systems are typically not classified as control systems and usually require no
periodic monitoring under AFOSH STD 161-2. It is important to note that some metals used in
welding have OSHA specific standards (lead, cadmium, chromium, beryllium, etc.), potentially
requiring more stringent monitoring.

Paint Booths

A variety of paint booths can be found throughout most Air Force bases. Many of these booths
are used to apply some of the most hazardous substances still found in the inventory, including
chromium products and isocyanates. There are many instances where exposure monitoring of
these systems has demonstrated their ability to reduce exposures from above the OEL or PEL to
below it. Each system must be examined individually using available air sampling results.
When sampling during system operation is inadequate, the default should always be to assume
the system is a control system. The design and operating requirements for these systems are
outlined in 29 CFR 1910.94.

Media Blasting Booths

Abrasive blasting is specifically regulated under 29 CFR 1910.94. Inhalation hazards associated
with this task are from the dust generated by the blasting media and from the metals dust
generated off of the item being blasted. Typical metals found include lead, cadmium, zinc, and
chromium. It is difficult to quantify all of the potential exposures associated with blasting since
every different part being blasted could have different concentrations of a wide range of metals.
Additionally, samples without the blasting ventilation system running are impractical from a
health and safety standpoint. For these reasons, the assumption must be that the booth is
controlling exposures to hazardous materials as defined by AFOSH STD 161-2 and should be
monitored quarterly.

Solvent Tank Systems

Solvent tanks can be found in a variety of work areas ranging from aircraft maintenance to civil
engineering. The purpose of these tanks is to remove accumulated oil, grease, and grime from


                                          Attachment 2
                                   Ventilation System Review
                                               2-3
parts. Solvent usage in these tanks has evolved over the years from very hazardous to relatively
benign. Older solvents were highly volatile and the tanks required a ventilation system mounted
on the side and designed to capture rising vapors from the tank. Today’s solvents are either
citrus-based or paraffinic naphthas. Both of these products are minimally volatile and present
very minimal inhalation hazards. However, in most cases, since the tanks have remained in the
same locations, the ventilation systems have as well. These systems are not necessary to reduce
exposures below any occupational exposure limits and do not qualify as control systems under
AFOSH STD 161-2. It should be mentioned that in some cases, these systems are confused with
the dip tanks that are regulated under 29 CFR 1910.108. However, dip tanks are clearly for the
purpose of coating or treating and the regulations only apply if the materials being used in the
process are flammable.

Overhead Vehicle Exhaust Systems

Overhead exhaust systems are used in vehicle maintenance areas to remove vehicle exhaust from
engines that must be run indoors. These systems are outlined in AFOSH STD 91-20. The key
issue with these systems is the manner in which they are used and the amount of usage. Due to
the cold winter conditions in Korea, the systems are occasionally utilized. There are times
during the winter season when temperatures drop enough that warrant the use of some systems
during vehicle run-ups. Each case must be evaluated individually to determine whether the
system is a control system.

Fuel Tank Purge Systems

Purge systems are used to ventilate confined areas prior to entry. In most cases, an entry permit
or technical order drives their usage. The measure of effectiveness is typically atmospheric
monitoring that demonstrates the presences of adequate oxygen and the absence of harmful
atmospheres. In most cases, these systems are portable and their flow rate is variable. Fixed
systems are found in aircraft fuel tank maintenance facilities. These systems look much like the
overhead exhaust systems detailed above. They can be supply or exhaust driven and their usage
is regulated by T.O. 1-1-3. Their purpose is to ensure that the fuel tank atmosphere is not
explosive prior to personnel entrance, so it is appropriate for the Bioenvironmental Engineering
function to monitor them periodically.

Lab Hoods

It is difficult, if not impossible, to determine if a lab hood is a control system. Lab hoods are
used for a huge variety of processes and quantifying all of the potential exposures for a given
hood can be daunting. Couple this with the fact that you can’t turn the hood off and monitor the
processes without it and you are basically stuck with a control system. If work inside a lab hood
involves chemicals with an exposure limit less than 100 ppm and the chemicals have some
degree of volatility, you are left with no other choice than to consider the hood a control system
under AFOSH STD 161-2 and monitor quarterly.




                                          Attachment 2
                                   Ventilation System Review
                                               2-4
Biological Safety Cabinets, Grossing Tables, & Laminar Flow Hoods

Three common hospital local exhaust systems are biological safety cabinets, grossing tables, and
laminar flow hoods. Biological safety cabinets have an enclosed design that is similar to a lab
hood. However, these cabinets include HEPA filters that are used to control exposure to
biological organisms. Due to the presence of the HEPA filters, the typical Bioenvironmental
Engineering shop does not have the equipment or training to survey these systems, so they are
usually contracted to outside agencies. Grossing tables are utilized to control preservative
chemical (e.g. formaldehyde) vapor and odor during tissue dissection. They are normally
surveyed according to manufacturer’s procedures and air sampling drives the need for routine
surveillance. Laminar flow hoods are utilized in the pharmacy to preserve the cleanliness of
drugs during dispensing and offer product protection only. At Osan AB, Det 3 AFIOH certifies
all biological safety cabinets and laminar flow hoods annually and the Bioenvironmental
Engineering office maintains copies of the reports.

Pesticide Mixing Hoods

Most Pest Management facilities have a pesticide mixing hood for the mixing of small amounts
of pesticides in 5-10 gallon sprayers. These systems differ from the indoor mixing rooms that
are used for mixing of large quantities to be loaded into vehicle-mounted sprayers. In some
cases, these hoods can control exposures to pesticides, although adequate air sampling and a
move to minimally hazardous pesticides typically mean this is not the case. Flow rates are
driven by requirements in MIL HDBK 1028/8A. Based upon air sampling and pesticide usage,
these hoods may or may not be designated as a control system under AFOSH STD 161-2 and
monitoring depends upon the judgment of the industrial hygiene program manager.

OTHER VENTILATION SYSTEMS

In many cases, there is confusion surrounding the designation of ventilation systems for the
control of workplace hazards. When visiting work areas, HVAC systems and other engineering
controls are often called ventilation. In order to address this and help bioenvironmental
engineering personnel understand the true nature of these systems, a summary of other systems is
presented. If additional shops are found to contain these types of systems, it is important to
document their existence in the appropriate casefile. However, it is generally not necessary to
evaluate these systems as ventilation systems.

Bead Blasting Glove Boxes

These systems are commonly used in maintenance operations. Unlike the media blasting booths
discussed above where a worker is inside the enclosure, these units are designed so the worker is
outside of an enclosed system, applying the blasting media using a set of gloves built into the
box. These systems have many administrative requirements outlined in 29 CFR 1910.94 that can
be evaluated during periodic industrial hygiene surveillance. Even though these systems are
ventilated, the control portion of the system is the box containing the blasting media and not the
ventilation. Therefore, these are not control systems as defined under AFOSH STD 161-2 and
require no periodic monitoring.


                                          Attachment 2
                                   Ventilation System Review
                                               2-5
Chlorine Gas Storage Rooms

The use and storage of chlorine gas and its ventilation requirements are regulated in AFOSH
STD 91-10. Chlorine gas is typically found on Air Force bases in water treatment areas and in
pool facilities.

Irritating Odor Dilution Systems

It is common for HVAC systems and other dilution vents to be used in hangar facilities for
removal of fumes typically related to aircraft run-ups outside of the hangar. Bioenvironmental
Engineering shops may also receive requests for evaluation of HVAC systems with respect to
odors being brought in from outside office areas, normally caused by vehicles or other mobile
sources locating near building air intakes. HVAC systems are not designed to be ventilation
control systems and should never be evaluated as such. These are indoor air quality issues and
should be addressed in that vein.

Fans

Mobile and fixed fans are used in a variety of situations to provide comfort ventilation. In some
cases, they are located in shops to aid with odor control. Fans simply stimulate air movement in
this regard and do not qualify as ventilation systems since they are not diluting the air or
removing contaminated air from the room (e.g. in NDI areas, fans are used to provide comfort
inside of inspection booths). There is no requirement to evaluate these systems as ventilation
systems.

Anesthetic Gas Scavenging Systems

These systems are used to capture waste anesthetic gases exhausted from the patient’s mouth and
pump it outside of the operating room. In humans, these systems have a relatively constant
exhaust flow and a recommended minimum flow rate of 45 liters per minute. The anesthetist
using the calibrated flowmeter on the side of the system can verify this value. While a properly
operating system limits anesthetic gas release to occupied areas, it is primarily designed and
operated as a treatment delivery device, not a worker health control. For this reason, no survey
of this unit is necessary.

Soldering and Bench Grinding Vacuum Systems

Soldering and bench grinding systems are found in many Air Force shops. Dental laboratories
use these systems during denture and crown construction, communications shops use these
systems during computer and telephone repair, and aircraft avionics/systems branches use them
during repair of electronic equipment. These types of operations have been sampled repeatedly
throughout the Air Force and periodic exposures are low. In fact, these systems are simply
vacuums to aid with the clean up of waste materials. There is no reason to evaluate these
systems as any more than this unless the operations involve the use of specifically regulated
chemicals.


                                          Attachment 2
                                   Ventilation System Review
                                               2-6
                                             004A
SHOP: Metals Tech                             WPID: 0689-FAWE-004A
DATE: 16 Jan 2004                             SQUADRON: 51 MXS




Casefile Review Notes:

One system – 2 flexible welding ducts. Baseline values used during quarterly surveys were
taken from AFOSH STD 161-2. Conflicting quarterly surveys results; 23 Jul 2003 survey
indicated system failed, 12 Nov 2003 survey indicated system passed. Values measured during
both of these surveys were similar. Air sampling results in the early 1990’s were below OEL,
but results were not used to establish a negative risk assessment.

There is no documentation in the casefile identifying the types of metals and rods being welded.
As a result, previous air sampling may not be appropriate based on the actual inventory in the
shop.

Recommendations: Conduct baseline assessment of welding operations in the shop. Based upon
materials being used and scope of tasks, determine if further actions are necessary (i.e. air
sampling, controls, etc.) Monitor quarterly until completion of baseline assessment.




                                         Attachment 2
                                  Ventilation System Review
                                              2-7
                                            006A
SHOP: Structural Maintenance (Corrosion Control)      WPID: 0689-FASR-006A
DATE: 16 Jan 2004                                     SQUADRON: 51 MXS




Hangar Paintbooth                             Fiberglass Workroom


2 Systems; 1 Large Hangar Paint Booth, 2 freely suspended ducts

Baseline survey on the hangar paint booth was accomplished in March 03 and readings were
taken from the middle of paint booth. The baseline survey was accomplished with an aircraft
(A-10) inside the hangar and velocity readings were taken around the aircraft. This is
inappropriate since the conditions during scheduled monitoring cannot deviate from the
conditions during the baseline survey. This would mean that an aircraft of exactly the same type
and model must be inside the hangar during quarterly ventilation surveys. Quarterly surveys also
conflict with baseline survey, wrong units were used (CFM vs. FPM) to document quarterly
survey results. Volumetric flow (CFM) was documented in both quarterly surveys instead of
velocity rate (FPM). Based on the documents reviewed, it is apparent that velocity readings
were taken and averaged during two previous quarterly checks but it was documented in CFM
units in the casefile. System met design criteria during acceptance testing but failed during
baseline survey. Air sampling for HDI and chromates were below OEL but no vent survey
accomplished to coincide with sampling. Freely suspended hood used during fiberglass
activities, minimal grinding or sanding.

Recommendation: Re-accomplish baseline ventilation survey with the hangar empty and take
readings at the midpoint of the hangar. Use the flow rates from this baseline ventilation survey
as the new standard to be used on future scheduled monitoring and monitor quarterly thereafter.
Maintain freely suspended ducts on quarterly schedule until a risk assessment of fiberglass
activities proves otherwise.




                                         Attachment 2
                                  Ventilation System Review
                                              2-8
                                            015A
SHOP: Pest Management                                      WPID: 0689-CEEN-015A
DATE: 16 Jan 2004                                          SQUADRON: 51 CES




Insecticide Storage Room        Herbicide Storage Room          Slot Ventilation

3 systems; 1 Slot hood, 2 open ducts

Slot hood used to control exposures during pesticide/insecticide mixing. Hood is on quarterly
monitoring schedule. Most pesticide/insecticide mixing is accomplished outdoors, infrequently
and in relatively small amounts. AF Form 2758 dated 16 April 2003 stated air sampling needs to
be accomplished to evaluate effectiveness of the slot hood but no air sampling has occurred.

The criterion for airflow in pesticide storage rooms is covered in MIL-HDBK-1028/8A, which is
set at 6 AC/HR. Although the storage rooms are on a quarterly monitoring schedule, the
handbook do not specify monitoring frequency on these systems. These systems are generally
not likely to be needed to prevent exposures above the OEL. These are not control systems as
defined under AFOSH STD 161-2 and there is no surveillance requirement.

Recommendations: Downgrade storage rooms and the slot hood to annual monitoring.




                                         Attachment 2
                                  Ventilation System Review
                                              2-9
                                             028A

SHOP: Allied Trades                              WPID: 0689-TRAT-028A
DATE: 16 Jan 2004                                SQUADRON: 51 LRS




Paint Booth                                    Welding Hood


2 systems; 1 welding hood, walk-in paint booth

Hood is used to control metal fumes while welding vehicle parts. There is a RAC assigned to
this hood citing that this is the wrong type of system for welding operations. 29 CFR 1910.252
requires the use of mechanical ventilation if exposure levels are above the OEL or when welding
is conducted in areas smaller than 10,000 ft2 or when the room has a ceiling height less than 16
feet. Local exhaust ventilation is never prescribed, but is offered as an option. Previous air
sampling results were below the OEL. There were no documentation in the casefile identifying
the types of metals being welded and the types of rods used. Current system drawing (AF Form
2764) filed in the casefile does not match the way the system is actually configured in the shop.
Casefile documentation identifies this system as a flexible duct, but it is a canopy hood.

Walk-in paint booth used during vehicle sanding and painting. No current air sampling
available. Previous vent readings were taken at the center of the paint booth.

Recommendations: Conduct baseline assessment of welding operations in the shop. Based upon
materials being used and scope of tasks, determine if further actions are necessary (i.e. air
sampling, controls, etc.) Monitor quarterly until completion of baseline assessment.
Documentation in casefile should corrected to reflect actual type of welding ventilation system in
the shop (canopy). Maintain both systems on quarterly monitoring schedule until negative risk
assessment is accomplished.




                                          Attachment 2
                                   Ventilation System Review
                                              2-10
                                             029A
SHOP: Material Handling (Special Purpose)         WPID: 0689-TRVM-029A
DATE: 22 Jan 2004                                 SQUADRON: 51 LRS




Overhead Exhaust System #1                    Overhead Exhaust System #2

2 systems; two sets of 4 freely suspended hoods

Systems used during special purpose vehicle run-ups in the winter months. Shop personnel
stated that both systems used a combined 6 times daily in the winter while conducting opacity
testing.

Systems were last surveyed (baseline) in September 1999 and reflected in the ventilation master
listing as being on annual survey schedule. Systems have not been surveyed since 1999.

Recommendations: Remove from program




                                         Attachment 2
                                  Ventilation System Review
                                             2-11
                                             030A
SHOP: Refueling Maintenance                   WPID: 0689-TRFF-030A
DATE: 22 Jan 2004                             SQUADRON: 51 LRS




1 system, overhead vehicle exhaust

System used during refueling truck run-ups in the winter months. Shop personnel stated that the
system is rarely used. Refueling truck run-ups are conducted outdoors due to the high levels of
noise generated by the trucks.

Annual survey results have been passing on a consistent basis.

Recommendation: Remove from ventilation program




                                         Attachment 2
                                  Ventilation System Review
                                             2-12
                                              036A
SHOP: Conventional Maintenance                 WPID: 0689-FAMU-036A
DATE: 22 Jan 2004                              SQUADRON: 51 MXS




1 system, 1 paint booth

Paint booth used to control exposures resulting from munitions reconditioning. Air sampling
was accomplished in 1997 and 2000 but air sampling for lead and cadmium is needed for two
sanding activities. Paint booth doesn’t seem to have been used in some time and appears to be
used as a storage room. The current survey location in the walk-in paint booth is being taken at
the face of the filters. Taking measurement readings at the face of the filters is not appropriate
due to interruptions in airflow pattern that may occur farther away from the filter face and
throughout the paint booth. Measurements should be taken at the mid-point of the walk-in paint
booth; this area is more representative of airflow patterns throughout the paint booth. Air
sampling for lead and cadmium needs to be accomplished during sanding jobs.


Recommendations: Air sampling for lead and cadmium needs to be accomplished. Re-
accomplish baseline ventilation survey at the conclusion of the air sampling and take readings at
the midpoint of the paint booth. Use the flow rate results from this ventilation survey as the new
standard to be used for future scheduled ventilation surveys.




                                          Attachment 2
                                   Ventilation System Review
                                              2-13
                                           038A
SHOP: Aerospace Ground Equipment Maintenance WPID: 0689-FAAG-038A
DATE: 23 Jan 2004                            SQUADRON: 51 MXS




2 overhead exhaust systems, each with 4 over head ducts

System has been disconnected by CES in Jan 2004, work order SMYU A V6017. AGE run-ups
accomplished outdoors because high noise levels when accomplished in the bay area.

Recommendation: Remove from ventilation program.




                                        Attachment 2
                                 Ventilation System Review
                                            2-14
                                             039A
SHOP: Fuel Systems Maintenance                   WPID: 0689-FAFS-039A
DATE: 16 Jan 2004                                SQUADRON: 51 MXS




Exhaust System                                 Wall Exhaust Fan


2 systems, 2-set exhaust ducts and 2 wall exhaust fans

Exhaust ducts are used to purge aircraft fuel cell before and during personnel entry. The exhaust
duct did meet flowrate criteria in T.O. 1-1-3. Air sampling results accomplished in Aug 2000
were above the OEL but inappropriately used as a representative sample for all shop activities.
Both systems are monitored quarterly but there is no requirement to monitor wall fans.

Recommendations: Maintain exhaust ducts on quarterly monitoring schedule. Remove wall fans
from ventilation program.




                                          Attachment 2
                                   Ventilation System Review
                                              2-15
                                                  047A
SHOP: Structures                                     WPID: 0689-CECA-047A
DATE: 16 Jan 2004                                    SQUADRON: 554 RHS




Crossdraft Table                     Portable Wood Dust System            Woodworking Shop


3 systems, 1 crossdraft, 10 wood dust hoods, 1 portable wood dust collection system

Crossdraft table is used for welding operations and on the quarterly schedule. Air sampling was
accomplished in 1994 to determine the system’s adequacy. There was no further documentation
in the casefile stating that the results were used for this purpose.

The woodworking system is listed on the ventilation master list but there is no documentation in
casefile.

Recommendations: Remove wood dust systems from ventilation program. Conduct baseline
assessment of welding operations in the shop. Based upon materials being used and scope of tasks,
determine if further actions are necessary (i.e. air sampling, controls, etc.) Monitor quarterly until
completion of baseline assessment.




                                              Attachment 2
                                       Ventilation System Review
                                                  2-16
                                            048A
SHOP: Munitions Support                       WPID: 0689-FAMU-048A
DATE: 22 Jan 2004                             SQUADRON: 51 MXS




Walk-in Paint Booth             Woodworking Ducts                Woodworking Collection

2 systems, 1 paint booth, 1 woodworking ducts (with 3 ducts)

Paint booth used for minor maintenance of munitions equipment (sanding, priming, painting) and
used quite frequently. The paint booth is monitored quarterly and previous survey readings were
taken at the face of filters. Previous air sampling during painting and sanding were below the
OEL, but needs lead and cadmium.

The ventilation for working is used for building crates and wooden containers. The system is
used frequently.

Recommendations: Air sampling of munitions (lead and cadmium) was identified for follow-up
during June 2003. Conduct a baseline ventilation survey for the walk-in paint booth
immediately after this air sampling and monitor quarterly. Use the flow rate results from this
ventilation survey as the standard to be used for future scheduled ventilation surveys. Remove
woodworking dust collection system from the ventilation program.




                                         Attachment 2
                                  Ventilation System Review
                                             2-17
                                           062A
SHOP: Allied Trades                          WPID: 0689-CEAT-062A
DATE: 22 Jan 2004                            SQUADRON: 554 RHS



               No Picture




Building burned down. New facility is due to be completed in Dec 2004.

Recommendation: Remove from ventilation program.




                                        Attachment 2
                                 Ventilation System Review
                                            2-18
                                            063A
SHOP: Clinical Laboratory                        WPID: 0689-HOCL-063A
DATE: 14 Jan 2004                                SQUADRON: 51 MDSS




Class II BSC                                  PCR Enclosure

2 systems, 1 PCR Enclosure and 1 Class II hood

Detachment 3, AFIOH conducts annual certification of these systems. Both systems are located
in Bldg 777, no surveillance is necessary by the Bio shop. The Bio shop should maintain copies
of the annual certification paperwork.

Recommendations: Remove all hoods from ventilation program. Biomedical Equipment Repair
personnel should not adjust airflow in these hoods, re-adjusting airflow will invalidate the
certification.




                                         Attachment 2
                                  Ventilation System Review
                                             2-19
                                              103A
SHOP: Fuels Laboratory                         WPID: 0689-SUFU-103A
DATE: 22 Jan 2004                              SQUADRON: 51 SUPS




1 system, 1 Laboratory Hood

Lab hood used during QC/QA of JP-8 fuel, on annual schedule. 16 face velocity readings are
taken during surveys. Air sampling was accomplished in 1995 and results were below OEL, but
only ½ of the normal workload was accomplished during air sampling.

There is no make up air in the room where the hood is located. There is a wall-mounted air
conditioner located on the opposite wall from the hood that is the sole supplier of air in the room.
The doors cannot be left opened while fuel testing is being accomplished to avoid contamination.
A significant negative pressure is created when the hood is operating, it took some force to open
the doors while with the hood on.

Recommendation: Monitor this system quarterly.




                                          Attachment 2
                                   Ventilation System Review
                                              2-20
                                            110A
SHOP: Heavy Equipment Maintenance            WPID: 0689-TRVM-110A
DATE: 22 Jan 2004                            SQUADRON: 51 LRS




Overhead Flexible Vehicle Exhaust Duct #1    Overhead Flexible Vehicle Exhaust Duct #2


2 systems, Overhead Flexible Ducts

The ducts are used extensively during the cold winter months while personnel accomplish heavy
equipment maintenance. Both systems have never had any problems meeting baseline criteria
established and documented in AF Form 2763 dated October 3, 1994.

Recommendations: Maintain on annual monitoring schedule




                                        Attachment 2
                                 Ventilation System Review
                                            2-21
                                              111A
SHOP: General Purpose Vehicle Maintenance          WPID: 0689-TRVM-111A
DATE: 22 Jan 2004                                  SQUADRON: 51 LRS




Overhead Flexible Vehicle Exhaust Duct 1        Overhead Flexible Vehicle Exhaust Duct 2




Overhead Flexible Vehicle Exhaust Duct 3        Overhead Flexible Vehicle Exhaust Duct 4

4 overhead flexible vehicle exhaust systems with 4-5 overhead ducts on each system

There are 2 systems opposite each other in each bay, each system independent. The casefile
identified the systems incorrectly by establishing 1 system in each bay, 2 systems combined into
one. Site visit identified these systems as independent systems, each row of flexible ducts have
its own dedicated motor.

Annual surveys consist of taking readings from all the ducts in each bay and averaged. This is
inappropriate since each row of ducts (5 ducts each row) are independent systems. Previous
surveys were taken with all ducts open. Worst case would be 2 overhead ducts used at one time.

Recommendations: Re-accomplish baseline using face velocity method and treat each row of
ducts as individual systems. Use flow rate results from this survey as the standard to be used for
future scheduled monitoring. Monitor annually.



                                          Attachment 2
                                   Ventilation System Review
                                              2-22
                                         114A
SHOP: Vehicle Maintenance                  WPID: 0689-CEVM-114A
DATE: 22 Jan 2004                          SQUADRON: 554 RHS




               No Picture




Building burned down.

Recommendations: Remove from ventilation program.




                                      Attachment 2
                               Ventilation System Review
                                          2-23
                                             124A
SHOP: Surgery/Central Sterile Supply                      WPID: 0689-HOSY-124A
DATE: 22 Jan 2004                                         SQUADRON: 51 MDG




Central Sterile                   Isolation Room                     Decon Room




Operating Room                    Operating Room                     Operating Room Vent


1 sterile supply room, 2 infection control rooms (OR), 3 isolation rooms, 1 Decon room

Contractor upgraded system in 2001. Ventilation system had history of failures before 2001. A
new baseline survey was accomplished after the completion of the upgrade and baseline results
met criteria IAW AFIERA Consultative Letter, AL-OE-BR-CL-1998-0096. The operating
rooms, isolation rooms, and the decon room are surveyed semi-annually by a contractor.
Although a contractor monitors these systems, BEF personnel are still conducting semi-annual
surveys on them.

Recommendation: Remove from ventilation program but retain copies of the ventilation survey
results from the contractor. Continue monitoring the central sterile supply room until it can be
added to the current contract. Semi-annual monitoring of these rooms must be restarted once
the contract has expired.




                                          Attachment 2
                                   Ventilation System Review
                                              2-24
                                            125A
SHOP: Bioenvironmental Engineering              WPID: 0689-HOBE-125A
DATE: 22 Jan 2004                               SQUADRON: 51 AMDS




PCR Enclosure                                 Class I Hood


2 systems, 1 PCR Enclosure and 1 Class I hood

Detachment 3, AFIOH conducts annual certification of these systems. Both systems are located
in Bldg 747, no surveillance is necessary by the Bio shop. The Bio shop should maintain copies
of the annual certification paperwork.

Recommendations: Remove all hoods from ventilation program. Biomedical Equipment Repair
personnel should not adjust airflow in the hoods, re-adjusting airflow will invalidate the
certification.




                                         Attachment 2
                                  Ventilation System Review
                                             2-25
                                            209A
SHOP: Dental Lab                              WPID: 0689-HODL-209A
DATE: 22 Jan 2004                             SQUADRON: 51 MDOS




Lab Hood                        Canopy Hood                     Bench-Top Ventilation


3 systems, bench-top hood local exhaust vents (4), lab hood, and canopy hood

Permanent ducts (bench-top hoods) are used for nuisance dust generated from grinding and
buffing during dental lab activities. Ducts were removed from quarterly schedule per
Detachment 3 Consultative Letter, IERA-DO-BR-CL-2001-0019, Review and Update of
Basewide Industrial Ventilation Systems Program, dated 26 April 2001. Intent of the
consultative letter may have been to completely remove ducts from scheduled monitoring and
from the ventilation program. Lab hood is used for steam control/removal and surveyed
annually. The canopy hood is used to control/remove nuisance odor generated from baking
dental items.

Recommendations: Remove all systems from ventilation program.




                                         Attachment 2
                                  Ventilation System Review
                                             2-26
                                            224A
SHOP: Auto Crafts                              WPID: 0689-BAAH-224A
DATE: 22 Jan 2004                              SQUADRON: 51 SVS




Vehicle Exhaust System          Vehicle Exhaust System           Overhead Flexible Ducts


2 systems, 12 freely suspended overhead ducts and 3 overhead flexible ducts

The overhead ducts are used during the winter months to control vehicle exhausts and monitored
annually. Vehicle exhaust system is used extensively during the winter months. The established
flow rates used during annual ventilation surveys is 440 cubic feet per minute (CFM), this
volumetric rate is extracted from the American Conference of Government Industrial Hygienist
(ACGIH) for diesel exhaust. Although the volumetric flow rate from the ACGIH is used during
scheduled monitoring the prescribed method to accomplish the survey is not followed, instead
face velocity flow rates are taken. A work order has been submitted for a new system to be
installed. The overhead flexible ducts are no longer used and there are plans for these to be
removed from the shop.

Recommendations: Maintain on overhead vehicle exhaust system on annual monitoring
schedule. Conduct a new baseline ventilation survey once the new system is installed. Use face
velocity method and establish flow rate results as the new standard to be used during annual
ventilation surveys. Remove flexible ducts from ventilation program.




                                         Attachment 2
                                  Ventilation System Review
                                             2-27
                                             287A
SHOP: Golf Course Maintenance                  WPID: 0689-CEGX-287A
DATE: 16 Jan 2004                              SQUADRON: 51 SVS




Floor Exhaust                                  Pesticide Storage

1 system, herbicides storage room

Currently on quarterly schedule, baseline information adequate. Personnel accomplish minor
welding, identified during visit.

The criterion for airflow in pesticide/herbicide storage rooms is covered in MIL-HDBK-
1028/8A, is set at 6 AC/HR. Although this storage room is on a quarterly monitoring schedule,
the handbook does not specify monitoring frequency. This systems is generally not likely to be
needed to prevent exposures above the OEL. The dilution ventilation system in the storage room
is not control system as defined under AFOSH STD 161-2 and there is no surveillance
requirement.

Recommendations: Reduce to annual monitoring.




                                           Attachment 2
                                    Ventilation System Review
                                               2-28
                                               297A
SHOP: Dental Clinic                             WPID: 0689-HODX-297A
DATE: 22 Jan 2004                               SQUADRON: 51 DS




1 system, Dilution ventilation

There is dilution ventilation in the sterile room and is reflected on the ventilation inventory to be
monitored annually. Documents in the casefile indicate the system is being monitored semi-
annually. Detachment 3 Consultative Letter, IERA-DO-BR-CL-2001-0019, Review and Update
of Basewide Industrial Ventilation Systems Program, dated 26 April 2001 recommended for this
system to be removed from scheduled monitoring, the most recent survey was completed in July
2002.

Recommendation: There is no requirement to monitor this system, remove from ventilation
program.




                                           Attachment 2
                                    Ventilation System Review
                                               2-29
                                                                                                                       Current         Recommended
WPID   SQDRN                      SHOP NAME                        Bldg                 System Type                Survey Frequency   Survey Frequency
004A   51 MXS Metals Tech                                          1705 Flexible Welding Duct (2)                      Quarterly      Baseline/Quarterly
006A   51 MXS Structural Maintenance (Corrosion Control)           1707 Large Paint Booth (1)                          Quarterly          Quarterly
                                                                        Flexible Duct , Fiberglass (2)                 Quarterly          Quarterly
015A    51 CES   Pest Management                                    353 Slot Hood (1)                                  Quarterly           Annual
                                                                        Herbicide Storage Room (1)                     Quarterly           Annual
                                                                        Insecticide Storage Room (1)                   Quarterly           Annual
028A    51 LRS Allied Trades                                       1320 Paint Booth (1)                                Quarterly          Quarterly
                                                                        Canopy Hood (1)                                Quarterly      Baseline/Quarterly
029A   51 LRS    Material Handling (Special Purpose)               1326 Overhead Vehicle Exhaust Ducts (8)              Annual             Remove
030A   51 LRS    Refueling Maintenance                             1222 Overhead Vehicle Exhaust Ducts (3)              Annual             Remove
036A   51 MXS    Conventional Maintenance                          2429 Paint Booth                                    Quarterly      Baseline/Quarterly
038A   51 MXS    Aerospace Ground Equipment Maintenance                 Overhead Vehicle Exhaust Ducts (8)              Annual             Remove
039A   51 MXS    Fuel Systems Maintenance                          1104 Exhaust Ducts (2)                              Quarterly          Quarterly
                                                                        Wall Exhaust Fans (2)                          Quarterly           Remove
047A   554 RHS Structures                                               Crossdraft Table (1)                           Quarterly      Baseline/Quarterly
                                                                        Wood Dust Hoods (8)                             Annual             Remove
                                                                        Portable Wood Dust Collection System (1)         None               None
048A   51 MXS Munitions Support                                    2423 Paint Booth (1)                                Quarterly      Baseline/Quarterly
                                                                        Wood Dust Collection System (3)                 Annual             Remove
062A   554 RHS Allied Trades                                            Downdraft Table (1)                              None         Baseline/Quarterly
063A   51 MDSS Clinical Laboratory                                  777 Class II Biological Safety Cabinet (1)           None               None
                                                                        PCR Enclosure                                    None               None
103A   51 SUPS   Fuels Laboratory                                  1223 Laboratory Hood (1)                             Annual            Quarterly
110A    51 LRS   Heavy Equipment Maintenance                       1327 Overhead Vehicle Exhaust Ducts (4)              Annual             Annual
111A    51 LRS   General Purpose Vehicle Maintenance               1731 Overhead Vehicle Exhaust Ducts (20)             Annual         Baseline/Annual
114A   554 RHS   Vehicle Maintenance                                    Overhead Vehicle Exhaust Ducts                   None              Remove
124A   51 MDG    Surgery/Central Sterile Supply                    777 Operating Rooms (2)                           Semi-annual        Semi-annual
                                                                        Isolation Rooms (3)                          Semi-annual        Semi-annual
                                                                        Decon Room (1)                               Semi-annual        Semi-annual
                                                                        Central Sterile Supply (1)                   Semi-annual        Semi-annual
125A   51 AMDS Bioenvironmental Engineering                         747 Class I Enclosure (1)                            None               None
                                                                        PCR Enclosure (1)                                None               None

                                                                  Attachment 3
                                                   Ventilation System Scheduling Spreadsheet
                                                                       3-1
                                                                                                          Current       Recommended
WPID SQDRN                       SHOP NAME                   Bldg                 System Type         Survey Frequency Survey Frequency
209A 51 MDOS Dental Lab                                       777 Laboratory Hood (1)                      Annual          Remove
                                                                  Canopy Hood (1)                          Annual          Remove
                                                                  Bench-top Local Exhaust Vents (4)        Annual          Remove
224A   51 SVS Auto Crafts                                    1214 Vehicle Exhaust Ducts (12)               Annual       Baseline/Annual
287A   51 SVS Golf Course Maintenance                        2467 Pesticide Storage Room (1)              Quarterly         Annual
297A    51 DS Dental Clinic                                   777 Dilution Ventilation System (1)          Annual          Remove




                                                            Attachment 3
                                             Ventilation System Scheduling Spreadsheet
                                                                 3-2