RADIO COMMUNICATION PROCEDURES by hft13158

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									RADIO COMMUNICATION PROCEDURES




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                             INDEX


Introduction and General Information    pg. 3

Phonetic Alphabet                       pg. 4

VFR Radio Procedures (controlled)       pg. 5

   Departure                            pg. 5

   Arrival                              pg. 6

IFR Radio Procedures (controlled)       pg. 8

   Departure                            pg. 8

   Arrival                              pg. 9

Uncontrolled Procedures                pg. 11

Formation Radio Procedures             pg. 11




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               INTRODUCTION AND GENERAL INFORMATION

Proper radio communication is an important aspect to conducting safe and efficient
operations. This manual shall be used as a reference for all pilots of the Virtual
Canadian Air Force to ensure we are all communicating in a standardized
professional manner. This manual will also prove helpful for new pilot who wish to
improve their skills and confidence when communicating with virtual air traffic
controllers. The contents of the manual only cover standard radio procedures
during departure and arrival.

Be courteous to all other pilots and air traffic controllers. The controllers volunteer
their time to assist in truly making flight simulation as real it gets. Feel free to
thank the controllers when you are switched to a new frequency.




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          PHONETIC ALHABET


Alpha                        November

Bravo                        Oscar

Charlie                      Papa

Delta                        Quebec

Echo                         Romeo

Foxtrot                      Sierra

Gulf                         Tango

Hotel                        Uniform

India                        Victor

Juliet                       Whiskey

Kilo                         X-Ray

Lima                         Yankee

Mike                         Zulu




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                            VFR RADIO PROCEDURES

DEPARTURE

Note: Pilots shall read back to controllers all hold short instructions,
altitude and airspeed restrictions and any other information.

Prior to contacting the Ground Controller pilots shall be familiar with all current
information available relevant to the operation of the flight, including the
Automatic Terminal Information Service (ATIS) Report, where available.

The following is a template that can be used during radio communications for VFR
departure procedures at a controlled airport:

(Initial Contact with ground controller)
Aircraft: “Moose Jaw Ground, Apache 01, with information Alpha.”

Ground: “Apache 01 Moose Jaw Ground, go ahead.”

Aircraft: “Ground, Apache 01, is a Tutor on the main apron, request taxi
instructions for VFR departure to the north at 5,000 feet to 10,000 feet.”

Ground: “Apache 01, roger, winds are calm, altimeter 29.92, taxi via
taxiway Delta to runway 29R Squawk 0123 contact Moose Jaw Tower on
126.2 when holding short of 29R.”

Aircraft: “Squawk 0123 and contact tower on 126.2 holding short of 29R
on Delta.”

(On tower frequency)
Aircraft: “Moose Jaw Tower, Apache 01, is on Delta ready for departure
runway 29R.”

Tower: “Apache 01, cleared for takeoff runway 29R.”

Note: If instructed to taxi to position on the runway and wait, the pilot
shall read back this instruction and when in position await clearance for
takeoff.


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Aircraft: “Cleared for takeoff Apache 01.”

Tower: “Apache 01, you are clearing the zone 10 miles north, contact
Moose Jaw Terminal on 119.0.”

Aircraft: “Contacting Terminal on 119.0 Apache 01.”

(On Terminal Frequency)
Aircraft: “Moose Jaw Terminal, Apache 01 with you at 5,000 feet.”

Terminal: “Apache 01, Moose Jaw Terminal, you’re RADAR identified go
ahead your intentions.”

Aircraft: “Terminal, Apache 01, will be working to the north between
5,000 and 10,000 feet, VFR.”

Terminal: “Apache 01, roger notify when inbound.”

After you are on the terminal frequency they may clear you to en route frequency
should you leave their airspace. Prior to entering the airspace again you shall
contact the Terminal and state your intentions. Also it is important that any
changes to your planned operation be communicated with the appropriate ATS
agency.

ARRIVAL

(On Terminal Frequency)
Aircraft: “Moose Jaw Terminal, Apache 01.”

Terminal: “Apache 01, Moose Jaw Terminal, go ahead.”

Aircraft: “Terminal, Apache 01 is at 5,000 feet 15 miles north inbound.”

Terminal: “Apache 01 roger, contact Moose Jaw Tower on 126.2.”

Aircraft: “Contacting Tower on 126.2, Apache 01.”

(On tower frequency)
Aircraft: “Moose Jaw Tower, Apache 01 with information Bravo.”

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Tower: “Apache 01, Moose Jaw Tower, go ahead.”
Aircraft: “Tower, Apache 01 at 5,000 feet 12 miles north inbound to land.”

Tower: “Apache 01 roger, cleared right downwind runway 29R.”

Aircraft: “Cleared right downwind runway 29R, Apache 01.”

Aircraft: “Tower, Apache 01 is joining right downwind runway 29R.”

Tower: “Apache 01 roger, you are number 2 following a tutor on final.”

Aircraft: “Number 2 with traffic in sight, Apache 01.”

Tower: “Apache 01, cleared to land 29R.”

Aircraft: “Cleared to land 29R, Apache 01.”

Tower: “Apache 01 exit on taxiway Foxtrot and contact Ground on 121.8.”

Aircraft: “Over to Ground on Foxtrot, Apache 01.”

(On ground frequency)
Aircraft: “Moose Jaw Ground, Apache 01 is clear of 29R on Foxtrot,
requesting taxi instructions to the main apron.”

Ground: “Apache 01 taxi Foxtrot to the main apron.”

Aircraft: “Foxtrot to the apron, Apache 01.”




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                           IFR RADIO PROCEDURES

DEPARTURE

Initial Contact where a Clearance Delivery exists shall be made on the published
Clearance Delivery frequency. Where a Clearance Delivery frequency does not
exist a departure clearance shall be requested on Ground frequency.

The following is a template that can be used during radio communications for IFR
departure procedures at a controlled airport:

Aircraft: “Clearance Delivery, Apache 01 is ready to copy IFR clearance to
Cold Lake.”

C.D.: “Apache 01, cleared to the Cold Lake Airport, Moose Jaw 4
departure, flight planned route, departure on 119.0 when airborne,
squawk 0123.”

Note: When a clearance is given for a Standard Instrument Departure (SID) the
pilot may read back just the squawk code. If any revision to the SID is given or a
flight routing is given the aircraft shall read back the entire clearance.

Aircraft: “Squawk 0123, Apache 01.”

C.D.: “Apache 01, read back is correct, contact Moose Jaw Ground on
121.8.”

Aircraft: “Contacting Moose Jaw Ground on 121.8, Apache 01.”

(On ground frequency)
Aircraft: “Moose Jaw Ground, Apache 01, with information Alpha, ready to
taxi.”

Ground: “Apache 01, Moose Jaw Ground taxi via taxiway Delta across
runway 21 to runway 29R, contact Tower on 126.2 when holding short of
29R.”

Aircraft: “Taxi via Delta across 21 to runway 29R, and tower on 126.2
when holding short, Apache 01.”

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(On tower frequency)
Aircraft: “Moose Jaw Tower, Apache 01 is on Delta, ready for departure
runway 29R.”

Tower: “Apache 01, contact Departure on 119.0 when airborne, cleared
for takeoff runway 29R.”

Aircraft: “Departure on 119.0 when airborne, cleared for takeoff, Apache
01.”

Note: If told to taxi to position and hold short, you must read back this instruction
and await further clearance for takeoff.

(On departure frequency)
Aircraft: “Moose Jaw Departure, Apache 01, is with you off of 29R,
climbing through 2,500 feet for 5,000 feet.”

Note: Always advise ATC of nearest 100 feet of passing altitude.

Departure: “Apache 01, RADAR identified climb and maintain FL240
proceed on course.”

Note: Any restrictions to altitude or heading instructions shall be read back and
followed until cleared to on course or for another altitude or heading.

Aircraft: “Climb and maintain FL240 proceed on course Apache 01.”

Further frequency transfers shall be made in a similar context.

ARRIVAL

(On arrival frequency)
Aircraft: “Moose Jaw Arrival, Apache 01, with you at 6,000 feet.”

Arrival: “Apache 01, Moose Jaw Arrival, roger. What are your intentions?”

Aircraft: “We’re looking for the ILS 29R, Apache 01.”



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Arrival: “Apache 01 roger, turn left heading 240, descend and maintain
4,000.”
Aircraft: “Left 240, descend and maintain 4,000, Apache 01.”

Arrival: “Apache 01, you’re cleared the ILS runway 29R, contact Moose
Jaw Tower on 126.2.”

Aircraft: “Cleared ILS 29R, contacting Moose Jaw Tower on 126.2, Apache
01.”

(On tower frequency)
Aircraft: “Moose Jaw Tower, Apache 01 with you cleared the ILS for
runway 29R.”

Tower: “Apache 01 roger, you’re currently number 2 following a Tutor on
2 mile final.”

Aircraft: “Number 2 following a Tutor, Apache 01.”

Tower: “Apache 01, traffic is exiting now on Foxtrot, you’re cleared to
land 29R.”

Aircraft: “Cleared to land 29R, Apache 01.”

Tower: “Apache 01, exit right on Foxtrot, contact ground on 121.8 on
Foxtrot.”

Aircraft: “Right on Foxtrot, and over to ground on Foxtrot, Apache 01.”

(On ground frequency)
Aircraft: “Moose Jaw Ground, Apache 01 is clear of 29R on Foxtrot looking
for taxiing instructions to the main apron.”

Ground: “Apache 01, taxi Foxtrot to the main apron.”

Aircraft: “Foxtrot to the apron, Apache 01.”




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UNCONTROLLED PROCEDURES

The main difference when flying in uncontrolled as opposed to controlled is there is
no controller to broadcast your intentions to or to give you clearances. All calls at
uncontrolled airports should be broadcast to the airports traffic, and should include
you’re intentions so they are aware of what you will be doing. Prior to departing
the pilot shall ensure the approach to the airport is clear and no traffic will present
a conflict. A pilot operating in uncontrolled airspace and looking to enter controlled
airspace shall contact the ATC in control of such airspace prior to entering and
establish communication or receive a clearance as required.

FORMATION RADIO PROCEDURES

Radio procedures during formation flight follow the same format as stated above.
The only difference to formation procedures is only one aircraft (the formation
lead) broadcasts communications for the formation. The lead aircraft should call
his callsign and at the end add “plus two (or number of other aircraft in
formation)” For example if Apache 01 was the lead aircraft of a formation with 4
aircraft including the leads aircraft, the pilot of Apache 01 would call, “Apache 01
plus three.”

Should the formation flight be cancelled and the aircraft separate ATC should be
informed by the lead aircraft prior to separation and then each aircraft should
check in on frequency with the controller.




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