Types of speeches OUTLINE by sarahjanebelonga

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									 Types of speeches &
      OUTLINE
  Outline for 1st major speech –
informative 2 – 5 min. due Thurs.
        Speech - Monday
    Reminder – field trip - $8 + parent note +
      excused form due Thurs., Sept. 18th
     IMPROMPTU SPEECH
• GIVEN ON THE SPUR OF THE
  MOMENT. You do not have time to
  prepare it before you deliver it.
      MEMORIZED SPEECH
• Begin with a coherent outline; then write
  the speech from the outline. The speech
  is committed to memory.

• Unless a lot of time is taken to memorize
  the speech, this can put a great deal of
  pressure on the speaker.
• This is a bad beginning or a speech
  student
     MANUSCRIPT SPEECH
• Written out on paper and read from the
  paper
• Value – can be timed. Also if you have to
  be very careful of your wording
• A speech read in a dull, lifeless manner is
  worse than no speech at all
• Preparation of manuscript
  – Large font – double or triple space
  – Always practice from the same manuscript –
    memory
  – Do not staple the pages together
EXTEMPORANEOUS SPEECH 
• Most often used & the one emphasized in this
  class
• The speech is well planned
• Speaker makes notes & arranged them in a
  logical, coherent manner. He/she makes a
  complete outline & delivers it from the outline.
• An extemporaneous speaker gets his opening &
  closing remarks firmly in mind, but he does not
  memorize this speech.
   Extemporaneous continued
• An extemporaneous speaker should know
  his outline very thoroughly. He should
  have complete mastery of his main ideas.
• Some speakers will use notecards – not in
  this class.
• Key to success – YOU HAVE TO THINK
  WHILE YOU SPEAK
Rehearse many times – aloud & standing up
                OUTLINE
• YOU NEED A TITLE
  – Catchy
  – Gives indication of topic
  – Do not underline or “ “ your own title
                         OUTLINE
• Introduction
• (1) Attention-getting statement - gain the
      attention of the audience by using a
      quotation, telling a brief story or
      humorous anecdote, asking a question,
      etc.
• (2) Purpose statement - state the specific
      purpose of your presentation here.
       • Preview statement - overview of all of your main
         points. Write out your main ideas as they appear in
         the body of the speech (may vary wording when
         you speak)
Transition sentence – write this out
                         OUTLINE
• Body
   – I. First main point
       • A. Subpoint
          – 1. Sub-subpoint
          – 2. Sub-subpoint
       • B. Subpoint
          – 1. Sub-subpoint
          – 2. Sub-subpoint
          – 3. Sub-subpoint

Transition sentence – write this out
                         OUTLINE
• II. Second main point
   – A. Subpoint
       • 1. Sub-subpoint
       • 2. Sub-subpoint
   – B. Subpoint
       • 1. Sub-subpoint
       • 2. Sub-subpoint
       • 3. Sub-subpoint
   – C. Subpoint

Transition sentence – write this out
                 OUTLINE
• The number of main points, subpoints and sub-
  subpoints you use will vary depending on how
  much information you have to convey and how
  much detail and supporting material you need to
  use. Subpoints and sub-subpoints are
  comprised of the supporting material you gather
  in your research.
• You should rarely have more than five main
  points in any presentation.
                 OUTLINE
• Conclusion
  – I. Summary statement - review all of your
    main points.
  – II. Concluding statement - prepare a closing
    statement that ends your presentation
    smoothly. (For closure – refer back to
    attention-getting statement in intro.
       6 steps in preparation
• 1) determine your general purpose or the
  general reaction you want from your
  audience
  – To inform 
  – To persuade – to influence your audience’s
    beliefs & actions
  – To entertain
       6 steps in preparation
• 2) Analyze your audience & occasion
  – Age, sex, interest, and attitudes of your
    audience
  – Occasion – serious, informal, dignified – suit
    your speech to it.
                      6 steps
• 3) Select & NARROW your topic
  – You decide your specific purpose
    • To determine your choice:
       – Topic – you should know something about the topic & be
         interested in it.
       – Select a topic you can discuss in the time given
       – DO NOT CHOOSE TOO BROAD A TOPIC
           » Example – cannot discuss animals in a 3 -4 min.
              speech.
           » Dogs – still too broad
           » Other topics
           » how to bathe a dog properly
           » teaching a dog 3 basic commands
           » training your dog to hunt
           » grooming of house dogs
                      6 steps
• 4) Gather material
  – Look at your prior knowledge
  – Observe
  – Converse with authorities
  – Research
    • Library
    • Internet – be careful
       – Try to avoid .com sites (anyone – idiot - can put up a
         commercial site– use .org (organization like
         www.redcross.org) or .edu (educational institution
       – Or .gov (government)
                       6 steps
• 5) Outline the speech
  – Arrange your ideas in the order you fel is best to suit
    your specific speech purpose & audience
• 6) Practice aloud & standing up
  – Begin with your outline in had & stand in front of a
    mirror, preferably a full length mirror.
  – Then put your outline aside & present your speech
  – One you feel more sure of your speech, concentrate
    on addition aspects
     • Gestures
     • Clear enunciation of words & speaking slowly enough – can
       use a tape recorder
  – Give your speech to someone in your family & get
    his/her response
    LEST WE FORGET 9/11
• On Monday, September 10th, 2001, there
  were people fighting against praying in
  school.
• On Tuesday, September 11th, you would
  have been hard pressed to find a school
  where someone was not praying.
• On Monday, there were people
  trying to separate each other by
  race, sex, color and creed.
• On Tuesday, they were holding
  hands.
• On Monday we thought
  we were secure.
• On Tuesday we learned
  better.
• On Monday we were talking about
  heroes as being athletes.
• On Tuesday we re-learned what
  hero really meant.
• On Monday people went to work
  at the World Trade Center and
  the Pentagon as usual.
• On Tuesday they were no more.
• On Monday people were upset
  that their dry cleaning was not
  ready on time.
• On Tuesday they lined up to give
  blood for the dying
• On Monday politicians argued
  about budget surpluses.
• On Tuesday, grief stricken,
  they sang, "God Bless
  America".
• On Monday some children had
  families intact.
• On Tuesday they were
  orphans.

								
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