DOCTOR OF PHILOSOPHY in CRIMINAL JUSTICE by wqs99947

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									     DOCTOR OF PHILOSOPHY

                    in

         CRIMINAL JUSTICE




School of Criminology and Criminal Justice
    University of Nebraska at Omaha
       Doctoral Student Handbook
                  2008
UNIVERSITY OF NEBRASKA AT OMAHA
College of Public Affairs and Community Service
School of Criminology and Criminal Justice




                           PH.D. STUDENT HANDBOOK




                         University of Nebraska at Omaha
                     School of Criminology and Criminal Justice
                                       CB 218
                                6001 Dodge Street
                          Omaha, Nebraska 68182-0149
                                  (402) 554-2610
                        www.unomaha.edu/criminaljustice




                         Graduate Chair: Dr. Robbin S. Ogle
                                Revised: July 2008
                              TABLE OF CONTENTS



Overview of the Program                                                1

Admission Requirements                                                 2

Program Structure                                                      4

Supervisory Committee and Program of Studies                           5

Program of Studies for the Ph.D. in Criminal Justice                   6

Comprehensive Examination and Admission to Candidacy                   9

The Dissertation                                                       13

Final Oral Examination                                                 15

Residency Requirement                                                  16

Summary: Steps in the Process and Important Deadlines                  17

Tentative Schedule of Graduate Courses 2006-2007                       19

Student Teaching Practicum                                             21

Expectations for Ph.D. Graduate Assistants with Research Assignments   22

School Policy Regarding Awarding of Graduate Assistantships            23

Faculty in the School of Criminology and Criminal Justice              25
                         OVERVIEW OF THE PROGRAM

     The School of Criminology and Criminal Justice of the University of Nebraska at
Omaha offers a program leading to the Ph.D. in Criminal Justice. This program
emphasizes criminal justice theory, research, and policy. The program is designed to
produce highly skilled criminal justice faculty and agency researchers and
administrators.

The criminal justice Ph.D. program is organized around four components:

      (1) A core of required courses in theory, research, methods, teaching, and
      statistical analysis;
      (2) Elective courses in criminal justice and related fields;
      (3) A comprehensive examination; and
      (4) A dissertation.

A minimum of 92 credit hours are required to complete the degree. This includes 30
hours earned in a master's degree at UNO or another university. Satisfactory
completion of the 9 hour teaching practicum is also required.

There are 8 required courses: (24 Credit Hours)

The student must take 6 Elective Courses: (18 Credit Hours)
(One of these elective courses must be a 3 hour diversity course which can be fulfilled
by CJUS9030, CJUS8130, or a master’s level or higher course from another
department as approved by the Supervisory Chair and the Graduate Chair).

Comprehensive Examination (0 Credit Hours)

Dissertation (20 Credit Hours)

Students are expected to complete the 42 Credit Hours of course work within 2 years,
except in extraordinary circumstances. This will require that students take either 12
hours in two of the semesters or work in 6 credit hours during summer semesters.

Elective courses may include graduate courses in criminal justice and related disciplines
(e.g., sociology, political science, public administration, psychology). Students will take
a comprehensive examination and will write a dissertation that reflects original
scholarship and contributes to the body of knowledge on criminal justice theory,
research, and policy.




                                            1
                         ADMISSION REQUIREMENTS


       Admission to the program is governed by the requirements specified by the
University of Nebraska at Omaha's Graduate College. In addition to the basic
requirements established by the Graduate College, the School of Criminology and
Criminal Justice requires the following:

1.    An earned Master of Arts or Master of Science degree in Criminal Justice from
      an accredited institution is required for unconditional admission into the program.

2.    Applicants with a Masters Degree in an allied field (Sociology, Political Science,
      Public Administration, etc.) and who lack substantial course work in criminal
      justice may be granted conditional admission. They will be granted unconditional
      admission upon successful completion of 18 hours of criminal justice courses
      from the core curriculum.

3.    Outstanding applicants who have completed a baccalaureate and wish to be
      considered for the doctoral program may be provisionally admitted but must
      complete the requirements for the master's degree prior to unconditional
      admission into the Ph.D. program.

4.    A combined score of at least 1,000 on the verbal and quantitative sections of the
      Graduate Record Examination is required. Students demonstrating exceptional
      academic potential may be considered with a GRE score below 1,000.

5.    Applicants must present two letters of reference from academics.

6.    Applicants must present a statement of intent, not exceeding five typewritten,
      double spaced pages, describing the applicant's prior education, relevant
      professional experience, career goals, and the specific relationship of the Ph.D.
      degree to the achievement of these goals.

7.    Applicants must submit a sample of scholarly writing. This might be a chapter
      From a masters thesis, a published article, or a manuscript written in a scholarly
      style.

8.    International students seeking admission to the program must meet UNO
      Graduate Faculty requirements governing the admission of international
      students. In addition to these requirements, all ESL students are required to
      submit scores from the “ILETS” or the “Internet TOEFL” (the paper version of the
      TOEFL will not be accepted). Minimum required scores are as follows:



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      ILETS – minimum score of 7.5 is required and we prefer an 8.0. (OR)
      Internet TOEFL – minimum of 21 in each of the four areas and a minimum of 95
      overall.

      All ESL students will be required to take a proficiency assessment examination at
      UNO upon admission. That assessment will help determine if further assistance
      is required.

      The Admissions Committee of the Criminal Justice Graduate Program will make
recommendations for student admissions during the spring semester. Newly admitted
students will begin taking courses in the fall semester of each year. If more students
than the School can reasonably handle apply for admission in any given year, the
Committee will admit those most qualified.




                                          3
                            PROGRAM STRUCTURE


      Administratively, the program leading to a Doctor of Philosophy in Criminal
Justice is located in the School of Criminology and Criminal Justice, which is a unit of
the College of Public Affairs and Community Service. General supervision of the degree
is the responsibility of the Criminal Justice Graduate Program Committee, whose
members are appointed by the UNO Dean of Graduate Studies and Research. The
Director recommends (to the Dean of Graduate Studies and Research) one of the
members of the Graduate Program Committee to serve as chair of the committee.

        The Criminal Justice Graduate Program Committee has two major functions.
First, the committee is the primary source of faculty to serve on doctoral student
supervisory committees. A second function of the Criminal Justice Graduate Program
Committee is to provide general supervision of the degree program, including admission
of students, implementation of policy, and general administration of the degree.




                                           4
       SUPERVISORY COMMITTEE AND PROGRAM OF STUDIES


      Each student in the criminal justice doctoral program will be required to form a
supervisory committee. The student is responsible for selecting the “Chair” of their
supervisory committee and the outside member. The two remaining members will be
assigned by the Graduate Chair, one will be the originally assigned advisor and the
other will be selected from the pool of the eligible graduate faculty members taking into
account current graduate advisory responsibilities and workload. The “Appointment of
Supervisory Committee for the Doctoral Degree” form is available online through the
Graduate College website.

       Doctoral students will be assigned an advisor by the Graduate Chair. These
assignments will be made on a rotational basis including all Omaha & Lincoln faculty
with consideration given for the number of advisees each faculty member has at the
time of assignment in order to balance workload.

       Masters students will be assigned to Omaha faculty only, so that they have ready
local access to their advisors without traveling to Lincoln. These assignments will be
made with attention to the number of advisees each Omaha faculty member has at the
time of the assignment in order to balance workload.

      The supervisory committee is appointed by the Dean of Graduate Studies, upon
recommendation of the Graduate Chair. The committee typically will be appointed after
the student has completed one semester of doctoral course work. The supervisory
committee will be responsible for overseeing the student's progress until the
appointment of the Dissertation committee (see Dissertation section of the handbook).

       Within three weeks of its appointment, the supervisory committee will meet to
approve the program of studies for the doctoral degree. [It is the student’s responsibility
to arrange the time and place for the meeting.] Following approval of the program of
studies, the student files the "Criminal Justice Doctoral Plan of Study” (which is
available on-line through the Graduate College website) with the Office of Graduate
Studies and Research. This document lists all course work that will be used to meet the
requirements of the Ph.D. degree. It must be submitted before incomplete, pass, or
letter grades have been received in more than half (i.e.; 46-47 hours, including hours
credited for the master’s degree) of the minimum requirements for courses and
dissertation research. Any subsequent change in the program of studies or in the
area of research for the dissertation must be approved by the supervisory
committee and reported to the Office of Graduate Studies.

        During each subsequent spring semester, the supervisory committee will meet
with the student to review the student’s progress toward the degree. The student will


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prepare an “annual progress report” and will provide a copy of the report to all
committee members prior to the meeting. This report will contain information directly
related to student’s overall progress, progress since last meeting, and future plans and
timeline for completing degree.

       All course work must be completed within three years from the time a student’s
program of study is approved by the Dean for Graduate Studies. Once the program of
studies is approved, the student has eight years to complete the degree.




    PROGRAM OF STUDIES FOR THE Ph.D. IN CRIMINAL JUSTICE

       The Ph.D. in Criminal Justice requires a minimum of 92 hours of successfully
completed graduate course work beyond the baccalaureate (successful completion
means a grade of “B-“ or higher in each class. Should a student receive a “C” in a
graduate class, they will be notified that their status is in jeopardy and they will not
receive credit for that course, a second “C” in any graduate course would result in their
automatic dismissal from the program). Each student is must complete the 24 hours of
required course work. Elective courses (18 hours) comprise the remainder of the
course work required for the Ph.D.

       A student entering the program with a master’s degree from another university
(or a master’s degree from another program at UNO) may, with the approval of the
supervisory committee, substitute courses taken for the master’s degree for the four
required 8000-level courses. The student must provide the supervisory committee with
a syllabus for the course he/she wants to substitute. If the substitution is approved, the
student must indicate on the program of studies that the course substitutes for one of
the eight required graduate level courses.

       The School of Criminology and Criminal Justice has adopted the following
guidelines regarding “Incompetes”.

      a.            A student will have no longer than twelve months following the
                    receipt of an incomplete to finish the remaining course work. This
                    time period has been reduced to two semesters. Each semester,
                    the Graduate Director will notify any student who has an incomplete
                    less than a semester from grade change. It will be the student’s
                    responsibility to contact the professor and arrange for a grade or an
                    extension prior to the end of the second semester at which point,
                    the grade automatically changes to an “F”.
      b.            A student may request an extension in cases of extenuating

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                    circumstances. Instructors will determine whether a student’s
                    request for an extension is warranted.

      Both 8000- and 9000-level courses are offered by the School of Criminology and
Criminal Justice and can be included in the program of studies. A maximum of six
hours of dual-level (4000/8000) courses can be included in the program of studies.

Course Work

The following section gives the details of course work for the Ph.D. in criminal justice
assuming that the student has a Masters degree:

Required Courses (24 hours)

1. CJUS9020         Seminar on Theories of Crime
2. CJUS9080         Advanced Statistical Applications (Statistics 2)
3. CJUS9090         Special Problems in Research Methods (either Quant or Qual)
4. CJUS9100         Special Problems in Statistical Analysis (Statistics 3)
5. CJUS9000         Academic Writing
6. CJUS9000         Program Evaluation and Policy Analysis
7. CJUS9700         Teaching at the College Level
8. CJUS9800         Advanced Research Design


Elective Courses (18 hours)

CJUS8040            Seminar on Police and Society
CJUS8050            Seminar on Corrections
CJUS8060            Seminar on the Criminal Court System
CJUS8070            Seminar on Law and Criminal Procedure
CJUS8080            Seminar on the Juvenile Justice System
CJUS8090            Seminar on Theoretical Criminology
CJUS8100            Criminal Justice Organization and Management
CJUS8110            Criminal Justice Planning and Change
CJUS8120            Independent Study in Criminal Justice and Criminology
CJUS8200            Special Problems in Criminal Justice and Criminology
CJUS9000            Theory II and Theory Construction
CJUS9010            Seminar on Law and Social Control
CJUS9030            Seminar on Minorities & the Criminal Justice System
CJUS9040            Comparative Criminology and Criminal Justice Systems
CJUS9090            Special Problems in Research Methods (either Quant or Qual)
CJUS9110            Seminar on Police Organization and Management
CJUS9120            Seminar on Police Effectiveness
CJUS9130            Advanced Research Topics on Policing
CJUS9150            Special Topics in Criminal Justice Research

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CJUS9160             Seminar on Community Based Corrections
CJUS9170             Seminar on Institutional Corrections
CJUS9180             Court Processing and Sentencing
CJUS9200             Seminar on Violent Crime and Criminal Behavior
CJUS9350             Computer Applications in Criminal Justice and Public Affairs
CJUS9980             Directed Readings in Criminal Justice
CJUS9990             Dissertation Hours

NOTE: A maximum of seven hours of CJUS9980 (Directed Readings in Criminal
Justice) may be included in the 42 hours of course work required for the degree. After
completing 42 hours, a student may register for additional hours of directed readings.
Students may use directed readings hours to examine a substantive area where the
school does not offer a regularly scheduled graduate course (e.g., victimology) or to
enhance their knowledge of a specialized topic within a substantive area (e.g., social
learning theory or sentencing reform). Directed readings are not to be used to prepare
for the comprehensive examination.

Comprehensive Examination (0 hours)

Dissertation (20 hours)

A 20-credit-hour dissertation is required of all students.


              SUMMARY OF MINIMUM REQUIREMENTS

                           Required Course work 24 hours

                        Specialty Area/Electives = 18 hours

                                Dissertation = 20 hours

               Minimum Total Hours Beyond Master’s Degree = 62

             Minimum Total Hours Beyond Bachelor's Degree = 92




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  COMPRHENSIVE EXAMINATION AND ADMISSION TO CANDIDACY


Philosophy

        One of the principal goals of the criminal justice doctoral program is to help
students develop specializations within criminal justice and criminology. The criminal
justice doctoral program uses a combination of methods to develop student expertise in
substantive areas within criminal justice and criminology. These methods include
general and specialized courses and seminars, directed readings, independent study,
research, and informal mentoring. It should be noted that the development of
specialized knowledge does not rely solely on course work.

Comprehensive Examination Policy

         Following completion of all course work, doctoral students take                  the
comprehensive examination. The purpose of the comprehensive exam is to                   give
doctoral students an opportunity to demonstrate their ability to integrate               core
knowledge, to document their expertise in a specialty area, and to demonstrate           their
ability to execute and defend an independent research project.

      A faculty committee selected by the student shall administer the comprehensive
examination. The committee shall be composed of at least three graduate faculty
members in the School of Criminology and Criminal Justice. A record of the
committee’s composition shall be filed with the Graduate Program Chair when the
committee is constituted. The committee must be formed no later than the beginning of
the student’s fourth semester of enrollment following admission to the doctoral program.

      The committee must approve the subject of the student’s examination. The
committee shall determine how to assess the student’s proficiency, and will conduct the
assessment. All examinations shall include:

   1. demonstration of critical understanding of relevant literature, in written form;
   2. completion of a proposal for a research project; and
   3. An oral presentation and defense of both the literature review and the research
      proposal to the comprehensive examination committee.

The committee will report to the Graduate Program Chair and the Chair of the student’s
Supervisory Committee regarding its assessment of the student’s performance on the
comprehensive exam. A majority of the committee members must deem the student’s
performance to be acceptable on each part of the exam for the student to pass the
comprehensive exam. In the event an examining committee reports that a student has

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failed the comprehensive exam, or in the event that the student has disbanded his or
her committee, the student may petition the Graduate Program Committee to be
allowed to form a new committee and to take a new examination. A student who is
allowed to take a new examination and who fails that examination will be dismissed
from the program.

Comprehensive Examination Procedures

Composition of the comprehensive exam committee
Students are strongly encouraged to select faculty by specialty area and not by campus.
A list of faculty specialty areas is included in the handbook. Comprehensive exam
committees will not have a chair; each faculty member is an equal participant.
However, for efficiency one member should serve as an administrative facilitator for
purposes of reporting and communication between committee members.

Reading list
Students should consult with faculty to develop a comprehensive reading list.

Literature review contents
The estimated length of the written examination is 40-80 pages, including the Evaluative
Strategies, described in the above policy as a proposal. The literature review should
include:

   •   Historical overview
   •   Major theoretical perspectives
   •   Major empirical findings, if any
   •   Critical evaluation of literature (i.e., strengths and weaknesses of the theory and
       empirical findings, if any)

Evaluative Strategies (should be 10-20% of total length)
This section should suggest future research strategies in light of questions that have not
been answered and inconsistencies in the existing research.

Process Issues
   • The committee should have at least two weeks to review the literature
     review/proposal to decide if an oral defense should be scheduled.
   • If the committee decides to schedule an oral defense, the literature
     review/evaluative strategies of the examination is considered to be a pass.
   • If the committee declines to schedule an oral defense, the examination is
     considered to be a failure, and the student may petition the Graduate Program
     Committee for another committee/exam. Note: per the comprehensive
     examination policy, students who fail a second comprehensive examination will
     be dismissed from the program.
   • Students should be aware that a new committee might require that the student
     change the topic for the comprehensive exam.

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Oral Defense

A one-hour oral defense is scheduled, open to faculty and graduate students, and
consists of three stages.

   •   In the first, students will be expected to complete a half hour presentation that
       provides highlights from the different sections of the literature review defined
       above and demonstrates clear understanding of the proposal and the suggested
       techniques.
   •   In the second, students will be expected to satisfactorily answer questions posed
       during the oral defense.
   •   In the third, the committee will vote on overall performance on the exam.

Acceptable topics

Students should be advised that their chosen topic should not be too narrow (e.g.,
community policing in Chicago) or too broad (e.g., the root causes of crime).

Examples of acceptable topics:

Too Broad                  Just Right                  Too Narrow

Policing                   Community Policing          Community Policing in Chicago
Corrections                Institutional Corrections   Corrections in Nebraska
Courts
Women & Crime
Criminological Theory

Course credit

No course credit will be provided for the comprehensive examination. Students are
encouraged to pursue course credit by further developing their work toward publication
as an independent study.

Expectations for the Comprehensive Examination

Students are expected to complete the literature review and evaluative strategy
independently. This means the product is an original work produced only for the
comprehensive examination (students are not permitted to submit a literature review
from a master’s thesis, previous course work or other previously completed work). The
comprehensive examination committee will review a reading list with the student;
however, the committee will not review drafts and will not review outlines. Students are
not permitted to ask non-committee members for assistance. Students completing this
process are expected to comply with the Academic Integrity policies of the University.

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Comprehensive exams may “overlap” with dissertation work. The expectation is that
comprehensive examinations will be broader in scope than dissertations. Students
should not expect that a completed comprehensive examination could be used as a
prospectus for the dissertation requirement.

Timeline of Comprehensive Examination Process

Students may form a committee if they are taking courses in the 4th semester, provided
there are no outstanding incomplete grades in any courses.

                    Tasks to be Completed
                       • Decide on topic
                       • Assemble committee
  4th Semester
                       • Refine topic
                       • Create/revise reading list
    Summer             • Write literature review & evaluative strategies
  Fall Semester        • Schedule oral defense

Expectations

   •   The literature review should be completed in one semester.
   •   The defense should be held the next semester.
   •   Failure to meet these deadlines will result in a failure of the examination, unless
       the student can provide proof of unusual circumstances making the deadline
       impossible to meet. In this event, the student will need to petition the Graduate
       Program committee for a one-semester extension.

Admission to Candidacy

       After passing the comprehensive examination, the student files the "Application
for Admission to Candidacy for the Doctoral Degree" (which is available on-line through
the Graduate College website) with the Office of Graduate Studies and Research. This
application must be filed at least seven months prior to the oral defense of the
dissertation.

      After admission to candidacy, the student must maintain continuous
enrollment until he/she receives the degree. Students not in residence must
register for a minimum of one semester hour credit of dissertation research.
Failure to register during each semester of each academic year will result in
termination of the candidacy. This would require the student to start over at the
comprehensive examination point.




                                            12
                               THE DISSERTATION


        A 20-credit-hour dissertation is required of all students. The dissertation must
reflect original scholarship and contribute to the body of knowledge on criminal justice.
The dissertation topic must be approved by the student's dissertation committee. The
dissertation prospectus and the dissertation itself must be approved by the dissertation
committee. Students may not register for dissertation hours until the semester in which
the comprehensive examination will be taken. Students who plan to take exams during
two consecutive semesters may not register for dissertation hours until the semester in
which the second comprehensive examination will be taken.

The Dissertation Committee

       After passing the comprehensive examination, the student is to form a
dissertation committee. The committee consists of at least four Graduate Faculty
Members, one of whom must be from a discipline other than criminal justice. Two of the
committee members, excluding the Chair, are listed as "Dissertation Readers"; the
readers will read and approve the dissertation and the abstract (see below) prior to the
final oral examination (defense of the dissertation).The readers also sign the final
"Report on the Doctoral Degree."

       The dissertation committee must be established no later than the end of the
semester in which the comprehensive examination is successfully completed; it cannot
be established prior to successful completion of the comprehensive examination. To
establish the dissertation committee, the student fills out the "Appointment of
Dissertation Committee for the Doctoral Degree" form (which is available on-line
through the Graduate College website). A copy of the form is to be provided to all
members of the committee; the chair of the committee should file a copy of the form in
the student's file.

       The dissertation committee may or may not include members of the student's
original supervisory committee. If the two committees are different, the chair of the
dissertation committee should inform the Graduate Chair, who will then notify the Office
of Graduate Studies.

The Dissertation Topic

       When the student is ready to begin his/her dissertation, he/she should schedule
a meeting with the dissertation committee to approve the dissertation topic and the
general research design and methodology that will be used to address the topic.
Following this meeting, the student submits the "Approval of Dissertation Topic" form
(which is available on-line through the Graduate College website) to the Graduate

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Chair. The Graduate Chair will signoff on the form and advise the student to make a
copy for the student’s file and to send the original to the Graduate Studies College.

The Dissertation Prospectus

      After the dissertation topic has been approved, the student will present a
prospectus of the dissertation to the dissertation committee for its approval. The
prospectus will consist of the first three chapters of the dissertation:

      (1) A statement of the problem;
      (2) A comprehensive literature review; and
      (3) A detailed discussion of the research design/methodology.

The prospectus should be given to committee members for review at least two weeks
prior to the prospectus defense.

      The student will meet with the dissertation committee for a formal defense of the
prospectus. All members of the committee will read the prospectus and attend the
defense. Because preparation of the prospectus will involve extensive work, the student
is encouraged to meet informally with members of the committee in advance of the
defense. The committee can either approve the prospectus as submitted or require the
student to make revisions prior to approval. Upon approval, the chair of the dissertation
committee files the "Approval of Dissertation Prospectus" form (which is available in
school files) with the Graduate Chair. A copy of the approved prospectus and of the
approval form is to be placed in the student's file.

       The approved prospectus is considered a "contract" with the student regarding
the dissertation. Significant changes in an approved prospectus will require the
preparation of a formal prospectus addendum and subsequent review and approval by
the dissertation committee.




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                         FINAL ORAL EXAMINATION


       A preliminary copy of the dissertation and the abstract (which cannot
exceed 350 words in length, including the title) must be approved by the
dissertation committee chair and the two readers prior to filing the "Application for
Final Oral Examination or Waiver" form (which is available on-line through the
Graduate College website) with the Office of Graduate Studies. This form, along
with the preliminary copy of the dissertation and the abstract, must be submitted
to the Office of Graduate Studies and the Dissertation Committee at least three
weeks prior to the final oral examination. [At this time the Office of Graduate
Studies will review the dissertation to ensure that all published requirements are
being met.] The form must be signed by the two dissertation readers and must
indicate the time and date of the final oral examination.

       The final examination is oral. It is given by the dissertation committee after
the dissertation has been approved by the committee chair and the two readers.
The dissertation committee also determines its character and length. The
examination may be devoted to the special field of the dissertation and/or to the
student’s general knowledge of the field. The final oral examination over the
dissertation shall not be held unless all members of the supervisory committee
are available for the examination. A committee member may waive his/her right
to attend.

       The oral examination may be waived only with the unanimous consent of
the dissertation committee and only in extremely unusual circumstances.

      The dissertation committee reports the results of the final oral examination
or the reason for its waiver to the Office of Graduate Studies. In the event that
members of the committee are not unanimous regarding the passing of a
candidate, the student is to be approved for the degree if only one committee
member dissents. The dissenting member of the committee must file a letter of
explanation with the Office of Graduate Studies.

      If a student fails to pass the final oral examination, the committee will file a
report on the failure in the Office of Graduate Studies and indicate what the
student must do before taking another examination. Another examination may
not be held during the same term in which the student failed.



                                         15
                        RESIDENCY REQUIREMENT



     The residency requirement for Ph.D. students follows University of
Nebraska at Omaha Graduate Council guidelines and is variable depending upon
admission status. Full-time students admitted with a master's degree are required
to complete 27 hours of graduate work within 18 months. Part-time students
employed in a criminal justice agency are required to complete 24 hours within
24 months. Not more than one-third, or 9 hours, of course work taken during the
summer can be used to meet the residency requirement.

       All course work for the degree must be completed within three years from
the time that a student's program of study is approved by the Graduate College.
The time limit on granting the Ph.D. is eight years from the time of filing the
student’s program of studies. Students are required to retake the comprehensive
examination if all course work to be counted toward the Ph.D. (including the
dissertation) is not completed within three years from the time the student is
admitted into candidacy.




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             SUMMARY: STEPS IN THE PROCESS
               AND IMPORTANT DEADLINES


1.   Student is admitted to Ph.D. program during the fall semester of the
     academic year.

2.   During the spring semester of the first year, the student establishes a
     supervisory committee and submits the appropriate paperwork to the
     Office of Graduate Studies. The committee is appointed by the Dean for
     Graduate Studies and Research.

3.   Within three weeks of the appointment of the supervisory committee, the
     committee meets to approve the student’s program of studies. The student
     files the “Criminal Justice Doctoral Plan of Study” with the Office of
     Graduate Studies.
             --IMPORTANT: At least 45 hours of the student’s doctoral course
             work (including the 20-hour dissertation) is to be completed after the
             approval of the program of studies.
             --IMPORTANT: Once the program of studies has been approved,
             the student has 8 years to complete the degree.
             --NOTE: The student is responsible for setting up the meeting and
             for communicating the date/time/place of the meeting to committee
             members.

4.   During the spring semester of each year, the supervisory committee meets
     to review the student’s progress toward the degree. The student prepares
     an “annual progress report” and distributes this report to committee
     members prior to the meeting.
            --NOTE: The student is responsible for setting up the meeting and
            for communicating the date/time/place of the meeting to committee
            members.

5.   After completion of all of the course work, the student is eligible to take the
     comprehensive examination. The student forms a comprehensive
     examination committee at the beginning of his/her fourth semester in the
     program.

6.   After passing the comprehensive examination, the student files the
     “Application for Candidacy for the Doctoral Degree.”
            --IMPORTANT: The application is due in the Office of Graduate
            Studies no later than 7 months prior to the final oral examination.
            --IMPORTANT: After admission to candidacy, the student must

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                    maintain continuous enrollment until he/she receives the degree.
                    --IMPORTANT: If the term of candidacy is extended beyond three
                    years, the student must pass another comprehensive examination.

       7.    The student establishes a dissertation committee by filling out the
             “Appointment of Dissertation Committee for the Doctoral Degree” form.
                   --IMPORTANT: The dissertation committee must be established no
                   later than the end of the semester in which the comprehensive
                   examination is successfully completed.

       8.    The dissertation committee meets to approve the dissertation topic; the
             student submits the “Approval of Dissertation Topic” form to the Graduate
             Chair.
                    --NOTE: The student is responsible for setting up the meeting and
                    for communicating the date/time/place of the meeting to committee
                    members.

       9.    The dissertation committee meets to approve the dissertation prospectus;
             the student submits the “Approval of Dissertation Prospectus” form to the
             Chair of the Graduate Program Committee.
                    --NOTE: The student is responsible for setting up the meeting and
                    for communicating the date/time/place of the meeting to committee
                    members.

       10.   At least one month prior to the final oral examination, the student submits a
             preliminary copy of the dissertation and abstract to the members of the
             dissertation committee.

       11.   At least three weeks prior to the final oral examination, the student submits
             a preliminary copy of the dissertation and abstract and the “Application for
             Final Oral Examination or Waiver” to the Office of Graduate Studies.

       12.   The dissertation committee meets for the student’s final oral examination.
                   --NOTE: The student is responsible for setting up the meeting and
                   for communicating the date/time/place of the meeting to committee
                   members.


The following figure is a graphic representation of the critical steps in the progress
toward the completion of the Ph.D. Program in Criminal Justice.




                                             18
               Tentative Schedule of Graduate Courses: 2008-2010


Year 1
                                                                Required/
Fall Semester, 2008                                             Elective

8010     Nature of Crime                                        RM
8950     Statistical Applications in CJ & PA (Stats I)          RM
9100     Special Problems in Statistical Analysis (Stats III)   RD
9020     Seminar on Theories of Crime                           RD
9800     Advanced Research Design                               RD
9030     Seminar on Minorities & the CJS                        E
8080     Seminar on Juvenile Justice                            E
9160     Seminar in Community Based Corrections                 E
8190     Independent Study                                      E
9980     Directed Readings                                      E
9990     Dissertation Hours                                     E


Spring Semester, 2009


8020     Administration of Justice                              RM
8030     CJ Research, Theory, and Methodology                   RM
9080     Advanced Statistical Applications (Stats II)           RD
9700     Teaching at the College Level                          RD
9000     Academic Writing                                       RD
9090     Special Problems in Research Methods (Quant)           RD/E
9000     Theory II and Theory Construction                      E
9200     Seminar on Violent Crime                               E
9170     Seminar in Institutional Corrections                   E
8190     Independent Study                                      E
9980     Directed Readings                                      E
9990     Dissertation Hours                                     E
8970     Capstone Course in Criminology and Criminal Justice    RMS


Year 2

Fall Semester, 2009

8010     Nature of Crime                                        RM
8950     Statistical Applications in CJ & PA (Stats I)          RM
9100     Special Problems in Statistical Analysis (Stats III)   RD
9020     Seminar on Theories of Crime                           RD
9800     Advanced Research Design                               RD
8040     Seminar on Police & Society                            E
8130     Seminar on Women & Crime                               E

                                                    19
8060   Seminar on Criminal Court System                         E
9150   Special Topics in Criminal Justice Research              E
8190   Independent Study                                        E
9980   Directed Readings                                        E
8970   Capstone Course in Criminology and Criminal Justice      RMS
9990   Dissertation Hourse                                      E


Spring Semester, 2010

8020   Administration of Justice                                RM
8030   CJ Research, Theory, and Methodology                     RM
9080   Advanced Statistical Applications (Stats II)             RD
9700   Teaching at the College level                            RD
9000   CJ Program Evaluation & Policy Analysis                  RD
9090   Special Problems in Research Methods (Qual)              RD/E
9010   Seminar on Law & Social Control                          E
9040   Comparative Criminology & Criminal Justice Systems       E
8190   Independent Study                                        E
9980   Directed Readings                                        E
8970   Capstone Course in Criminology & Criminal Justice        RMS
9990   Dissertation Hours                                       E




Offered every semester: Independent Study, CJ Internship, Thesis, Directed Readings, MS
Capstone Course, and Dissertation Hours.

Note:
RM = Required Masters level
RD = Required Doctoral level
E = Elective Masters & Doctoral level
EM = Elective Masters level
RMS = Required for the Master of Science




                                               20
                       STUDENT TEACHING PRACTICUM


       The criminal justice doctoral program has a requirement that all students
complete a teaching practicum. Exceptions are to be made only in unusual cases,
where there is reason to believe that the doctoral student will never teach as part of
his/her professional career. The goal of the practicum is to prepare students for full-time
teaching in criminal justice. The practicum will provide the student with structured
teaching experience, training in pedagogical techniques, and a portfolio of teaching
experiences that should facilitate career placement into a college or university faculty
position. The components of the program are outlined below.

1.    All doctoral students will complete a 9-hour teaching practicum, one 3 credit hour
      course on Teaching at the College Level and teaching at least 2 courses
      independently. The first year will generally be spent as a teaching assistant to a
      professor and the teaching year will be in the second year so that it does not
      interfere with the completion of the dissertation. The teaching practicum for part-
      time students will be spread out over two or three years.

2.    As part of the teaching practicum, students generally will teach CJUS1010 and
      one other course closely related to one of their specializations. Typically, this
      course would be CJUS2030, CJUS2110, CJUS2210, CJUS3370, or CJUS3350.
      Students with a law degree could be assigned to CJUS3310 or CJUS3510.

3.    When possible, students will teach on both the Omaha and Lincoln campuses.

4.    Doctoral students will be required to take CJUS9700 (Teaching at the College
      Level) and to participate in a minimum of four pedagogical workshops offered by
      the Center for Faculty Development or some other individual/agency. CJUS9700
      is to be completed prior to the student teaching independently.

5.    Faculty with responsibility for courses that will be taught by practicum students
      will be expected to advise those students on course content. These faculty
      members should also serve as teaching mentors for those students who are
      teaching courses that are also taught by the faculty member.




                                            21
          EXPECTATIONS FOR Ph.D. GRADUATE ASSISTANTS
                 WITH RESEARCH ASSIGNMENTS


      The UNO Graduate Catalog states that "Duties assigned to Graduate Assistants
should be directly related to and in support of graduate studies in their chosen field of
study. The individual Graduate Program Committee should be allowed to assign
graduate assistants research and/or teaching activities that they feel are appropriate as
long as the needs of the program and the Graduate Assistant are being met."

1.    Ph.D. graduate research assistants in the School of Criminology and Criminal
      Justice will be assigned to faculty members with on-going research projects.
      Faculty members will be required to describe, in writing, the project(s) on which
      the student will be utilized, as well as the duties that will be assigned to the
      student.

2.    Research assistants will be expected to play a major role in the development and
      implementation of the research project(s). In compliance with policies articulated
      by the Graduate College, research assistants "should not be utilized solely for
      clerical duties."

3.    Research assignments should lead to the preparation of papers to be presented
      at conferences or submitted for publication. Each student with a research
      assignment will be expected to prepare (either as the sole author or as a co-
      author) one paper for presentation at a criminal justice conference during his/her
      career as a doctoral student. Each student will be encouraged to submit one
      paper to a refereed journal.

4.    Where appropriate, students with research assignments should be involved in
      development of proposals for external funding.

5.    The research assignment should prepare the student for researching/writing the
      dissertation. The student should be assigned a variety of research tasks
      (developing procedures for selecting a sample, designing data collection
      instruments, collecting data, conducting interviews, entering/cleaning data,
      analyzing data, writing research results). Ideally, the student will utilize the data
      collected for the research project for his/her dissertation.




                                            22
               SCHOOL POLICY REGARDING AWARDING OF
                    GRADUATE ASSISTANTSHIPS

Graduate assistantships are intended to support full-time students. The school attempts
to provide financial support to all full-time PhD students and as many full-time Master’s
students as resources permit. When this is not possible, the school uses the following
order of priority to provide funding to students. Of course, the continuation of support in
any of the following categories is always contingent upon the availability of funds and
the adequacy of the student’s performance as a graduate assistant.

1.    Students in the first priority are those to whom the school has assured funding
      upon admission. These students should understand that funding is conditional,
      evaluated each year by the graduate faculty as a whole. (See student portfolio
      requirements described below).

2.    The second priority is funding for students who are beyond their third year in the
      Doctoral program. Funding for the students in this category is reserved for those
      Who meet a specific teaching or research need in the school.

3.    The third priority is funding for students who do not fit the categories described
      above. These are students for whom the school has made no commitment.
      Students in this category must meet a specific teaching or research need in the
      school.

4.    Student “Portfolio” requirements.

      In order to be considered for funding the following year, students will be required
to submit a portfolio that documents their progress in the program and as a scholar.
These portfolios will be evaluated by the Graduate Faculty as a whole in order to make
funding decisions each year. Students should consult their supervisory committee
during the construction of the portfolio.

      Portfolios should include the following (if available):

             a.   Documentation of successful completion of course work (grades,
                  courses completed, evidence of work ethic, courses taken in other
                  departments, and documentation of independent reading in the
                  discipline), as well as comprehensive examination materials and
                  dissertation materials.
             b.   Documentation of participation in scholarly activities (evidence of
                  independent research, presentations at conferences, brown bags,
                  teaching seminars or training, grant writing seminars, teaching circles,

                                             23
                and other developmental activities).
           c.   Writing samples (with dates of completion), conference presentation
                materials/papers, teaching materials, manuscripts submitted,
                scholarly works in progress, and proposals for internal or external
                funding (not travel grants for conferences).

5.   The due date for student portfolios will be around Feb. 15 of each year. The
     student portfolio should be submitted through blackboard, such that all faculty
     have access to it and the Chair of the Graduate Program can acknowledge
     receipt of it and assign it to a faculty member for review.




                                        24
                 FACULTY IN THE SCHOOL OF CRIMINOLOGY
                         AND CRIMINAL JUSTICE


Amy Anderson       Pennsylvania State University. Juvenile Delinquency, Communities
                   and Crime, Advanced Research Methods

Candice Batton     Vanderbilt University. Criminological Theory, Violent Crime, Juvenile
                   Delinquency

Pauline Brennan    State University of New York at Albany. Court Processing and
                   Sentencing

Samantha
Clinkinbeard       University of Nevada at Reno, Social Psychology, Juvenile
                   Delinquency, Intersection between Psychology & Law

John Crank         University of Colorado. Police Culture, Organizational Theory,
                   Criminal Justice Education, Issues in Counter-Terrorism

Greg DeLone        University of Nebraska at Omaha. Organization and Administration,
                   Policing, Fear of Crime, Public Policy

Miriam DeLone      Florida State University. Race and Crime, Criminological Theory,
                   Political Economy of Social Control

Chris Eskridge     Ohio State University. Criminal Court Systems, Organized Crime,
                   Administration of Justice, Terrorism

Dennis Hoffman     Portland State University. Administration of Justice, Organized
                   Crime

Lori Hughes        Washington State University. Dynamics of Violence, Offender
                   Reintegration, Cyber Crime

Susan Jacobs       University of Nebraska at Lincoln. Criminal Law and Procedure,
                   Court Systems

Colleen Kadleck    University of Cincinnati. Policing, Quantitative Methods, Evaluation
                   Research

Chris Marshall     Iowa State University. Victimization, Social Control, Quantitative
                   Methods, Theory Construction

                                          25
Robert Meier       University of Wisconsin. Criminological Theory, Social Control,
                   White Collar Crime

Robbin Ogle        Pennsylvania State University. Women and Crime, Corrections,
                   Theory Construction, Organizational Structure & Culture

Lisa Sample        University of Missouri at St. Louis. Criminal and Juvenile Justice
                   Policy; Social Construction of Crime; Judicial Decision Making;
                   Quantitative and Qualitative Research Design

Jukka Savolainen University of Albany, SUNY, Life Course and Developmental
                 Perspectives, Crime Control and Prevention, Violence, Theory.

Pete Simi          University of Nevada at Las Vegas. Youth and Adult Gangs, Social
                   Movements and Collective Violence, Qualitative Methods

Rebecca Trammel University of California at Irvine, Violence, Corrections, Gender
                Differences in Prison Violence

William Wakefield South Dakota State University. Corrections, Comparative Criminal
                  Justice Systems, Juvenile Justice, Program Evaluation Research

Samuel Walker       Ohio State University. Police and Society, Administration of Justice,
(Emeritus)          Race and Crime




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