Garrett County School Improvement and Title I School Wide

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					                                                  Garrett County School Improvement and
                                                     Title I School Wide Program Plan
                                                      [NCLB Section 1114 (b)(1)(A-J)]

                                                        2009 – 2010 SCHOOL YEAR

                                          School: Yough Glades Elementary        Number of Students: 260

No. of Staff: 13 classroom teachers                             1.5 days/wk. - speech teacher             1 pre-kindergarten assistant
              2.5 math resource teachers                        2.5 days/wk. - school enrichment teacher 1 head start assistant
              1 head start teacher                              2.0 days/wk. - guidance counselor         2 kindergarten assistants
              1.5 reading intervention teachers                 3.0 days/wk. - physical education teacher 1 media assistant
              1 ICT facilitator /reading intervention teacher   3.5 days/wk. - music/band/chorus teacher 1 sp. ed. assistant
              1 special education teacher                       3.5 days/wk. - art teacher                2.5 custodians
              1 math intervention teacher                       1 school health nurse, 1 secretary        1 principal

Special Programs for School: Math Initiative Program                Academic Intervention Program    Instructional Consultation
                             Accelerated Reader and Math            Title I School Wide Project      Learning Links Parent Program
                             School Enrichment Program              Overlook Judy Center Partnership School Community Centers Program
                             STAR Discipline Program                PIERS ( Green School )           Science Explorers Club

Uniqueness of School: Yough Glades is located on a wetland area that is conducive to environmental studies. The nature area consists of a wild
flower meadow, a pond, and a trail with a boardwalk leading to the wetland habitat where students have been engaging in plant identification and
animal studies. In 2010, Yough Glades will apply for its’ fourth recognition as a Governor’s Green School. Through an environmental grant
with the University of Maryland Appalachian Laboratory (PIERS) and The Chesapeake Bay Trust, we have: revitalized our pond area; added
perennial gardens that accent our entrance; created an outdoor classroom; planted several native trees; installed benches to our existing trail;
planted a wildflower garden and meadow that consists of native plants and grasses; and created a map guide for our nature trail identifying
several plants and trees native to Garrett County and a wetland area. All of these resources are used to enhance our classroom instruction.
   In 2009, we were re-validated through MSDE and continue to be a Judy B. Hoyer Center School. Yough Glades provides an effective early
readiness program to the community. A “Gator of the Month” Club recognizes students for exhibiting the character trait for that month. We are
a Maryland Character Education School. We have received four years of monetary awards for showing progress on the Maryland State
Assessment. Our staff and students participate in many community charity activities such as Rotary Christmas Tree Project, Warm the Children,
United Way, American Red Cross, and Relay for Life.

School Improvement Team Members: Keith Harvey- Principal          Sue Hillen - Gr. 2 Rep. Mary Ann Friend – K Rep.
                                 Robyn Nazelrod- Gr. 4 Rep. Cynthia Shaffer- Math Resource Rep.
                                 Jim Morris - BOE Rep.            Connie Murray –Parent   Angie Harrison - Pupil Service Rep.
                                 Jill Wakefield - ICT Facilitator/Rdg. Intervention        Cathy Helbig - Title I Parent Liason
                                 Melanie Cooper - Overlook Judy Center Rep.
                                                              NEEDS ASSESSMENT – Component 1

A comprehensive needs assessment of the entire school based on information, which includes the achievement of children in relation to the State academic content
standards and the State student academic achievement standards

    Core          Assessment Used          Assessment Data Profile by              Identified Needs             Root Causes Within Our            Factors Contributing
   Subject                                          Grade                    (Include gender and subgroup              Control                     to the Root Causes
                                                                                         gaps)
Reading           Stanford 10 – Gr. 2   Gr. 2:                               • Weak content areas: Spelling   • Weak understanding of            • Behavioral issues
                   MSA – Gr. 3,4,5      National Percentile Rank for Total   • The percentage of males          sight words                         among several
                  Results from 08-09    Reading was 74.                         were lower in spelling                                              students prevented
                                                                                (F- 66. M – 44)                                                     quality instruction
                                                                                                                                                 • Format of assessment
                                                                                                                                                 • Spelling in the
                                                                                                                                                     Harcourt Trophies
                                                                                                                                                     series is more
                                                                                                                                                     phonetic based than
                                                                                                                                                     sight word based
                                        Gr.3:                                • Comprehension of               • Limited ability to analyze and   • Lack of reading
                                        All Students: 16.7 % advanced          Literary Text                    evaluate narrative elements,        interest
                                                      62.5 % proficient      • Fewer males scored               elements of poetry, literary     • Intervention lab
                                                      20.8 % basic              proficient than females (M-     text features, elements of          focuses mainly on
                                                                                78.6,F-80.0)                    drama, and the use of               informational text
                                         FARMS:       13.8 % advanced         Fewer FARMS scored               language                         • Lack of prior
                                                      55.2 % proficient         proficient than Non-FARMS     • Limited ability to explain          knowledge
                                                      31.0 % basic              (FARMS – 69.0, Non-             meaning of content               • Students inability to
                                                                                FARMS – 94.7)                 • Limited understanding of the       read and comprehend
                                         Sp. Ed.:      40 % advanced                                            organizational structure of        grade level text
                                                       20 % proficient                                          literary text                      due to learning delays
                                                       40 % basic                                                                                  in development
                                                                                                                                                 • Behavioral issues
                                                                                                                                                    of several
                                                                                                                                                    students interferred w/
                                                                                                                                                    quality instruction


                                        Gr. 4:                               • General Reading Processes      • Limited understanding of         • Students inability to
                                        All Students: 26.3 % advanced        • Comprehension of                 phonics, weakness in               read and comprehend
                                                      63.2 % proficient        Informational Text               comprehension and inability        text on their grade level
                                                      10.5% basic            • Fewer males scored               to read text fluently              due to learning delays
                                                                                proficient than females (M-   • Developing/expanding               in development
                                        FARMS:        15.8 % advanced           85.7,F-94.1)                    student understanding of the     • Lack of prior
                                                      68.4% proficient                                          organizational structure of         knowledge and

                                                                                                                                                                         2
                                                   15.8 % basic                                               informational text                  reading interest

                                   Sp. Ed.:        14.3 % advanced
                                                   85.7 % proficient
                                                     0 % basic
                                   Gr. 5:                                  • Comprehension of                • Limited ability to analyze and   • Lack of reading
                                   All Students:   48.6 % advanced            Literary Text                    evaluate narrative elements,        interest
                                                   48.6 % proficient       • Fewer males scored proficient     elements of poetry, literary     • Intervention lab
                                                    2.9 % basic              than females (M-93.8, F-100)      text features, elements of          focuses mainly on
                                                                                                               drama, and the use of               informational text
                                   FARMS:          43.8 % advanced                                             language                         • Lack of prior
                                                   56.3 % proficient                                         • Limited ability to explain          knowledge
                                                     0 % basic                                                 meaning of content               • Students inability to
                                                                                                             • Limited understanding of the       read and comprehend
                                   Sp. Ed:          66.7 % advanced                                            organizational structure of        grade level text
                                                     33.3 % proficient                                         literary text                      due to learning delays
                                                     0 % basic                                                                                    in development
                                                                                                                                                • Behavioral issues
                                                                                                                                                   of several
                                                                                                                                                   students interferred w/
                                                                                                                                                   quality instruction


   Core     Assessment Used         Assessment Data Profile by                 Identified Needs               Root Causes Within Our             Factors Contributing
  Subject                                    Grade                       (Include gender and subgroup                Control                      to the Root Causes
                                                                                     gaps)
Math        Stanford 10 – Gr. 2   Gr. 2:                                 Weak Content area:              • Limited understanding of the          • Behavioral issues
            MSA – Gr. 3,4,5       National Percentile Rank for Total       • Geometry and                   application of geometric and           among several
            Results from 08-09    Math was 74.                               Measurement                    measurement concepts                   students interfered w/
                                                                         • Fewer males scored            • Limited understanding and use of        quality instruction
                                                                            proficient than females        terminology                           • Method of
                                                                            (F – 77.0, M – 76.0)                                                   assessment
                                                                                                                                                 • Lack of applying
                                                                                                                                                   previously learned
                                                                                                                                                   skills
                                                                                                                                                 • Limited real world
                                                                                                                                                   applications
                                  Gr.3:                                  • Geometry and Measurement      • Limited understanding of the          • Behavioral issues
                                  All Student: 10.4 % advanced           • Processes of Mathematics         application of geometric and           of several
                                               66.7 % proficient         • Fewer males scored               measurement concepts                   students interfered w/
                                               22.9 % basic                proficient than females       • Limited understanding and use of        quality instruction
                                                                           (F – 85.0, M – 71.4)            terminology                           • Lack of applying
                                  FARMS:       10.3 % advanced                                           • Limited ability to comprehend the       previously learned
                                               62.1 % proficient                                           questions in order to explain an        skills

                                                                                                                                                                       3
             27.6 % basic                                           answer in verbal and written        • Limited real world
                                                                    form                                   applications
Sp. Ed:        0 % advanced                                                                             • Students inability to
               60.0 % proficient                                                                          read and comprehend
               40.0 % basic                                                                               grade level text due to
                                                                                                          learning delays in
                                                                                                          development

Gr. 4:                             • Statistics and Probability   • Limited understanding of the        • Lack of applying
All Students: 23.7 % advanced      • Algebra, Patterns and           application of geometric and          previously learned
              65.8 % proficient      Functions                       measurement concepts                  skills
              10.5 % basic          Geometry and Measurement     • Limited understanding and use of    • Limited real world
                                   • Fewer males scored             terminology                            applications
FARMS:       26.3 % advanced         proficient than females      • Developing/expanding the ability    • Students inability to
             57.9 % proficient       (F – 94.1, M – 85.7)            to analyze and interpret data        read and comprehend
             15.8 % basic                                         • Limited understanding of              grade level text due to
                                                                     algebraic process                    learning delays in
Sp. Ed.       14.3 % advanced                                                                             development
              71.4 % proficient
              14.3 % basic
Gr. 5:                             • Processes of Mathematics     • Limited ability to comprehend the   • Limited
All Students: 14.3 % advanced      • Algebra, Patterns and          questions and answer in verbal or      understanding of
              74.3 % proficient      Functions                      written form                           math vocabulary
              11.4 % basic         • Fewer males scored           • Limited understanding of            • Lack of applying
                                     proficient than females         algebraic process                     previously learned
FARMS:       18.8 % advanced         (F – 89.5, M – 87.5)                                                  skills
             62.5 % proficient                                                                          • Limited real world
             18.8 % basic                                                                                  applications
                                                                                                        • Students inability to
Sp. Ed:          0 % advanced                                                                             read and comprehend
               66.7 % proficient                                                                          grade level text due to
               33.3 % basic                                                                               learning delays in
                                                                                                          development
                                                                                                        • Introduction of the
                                                                                                           quantity of new skills
                                                                                                           that do not provide
                                                                                                           time for mastery




                                                                                                                              4
PUPIL SERVICE
       Area                          Finding                              Identified Needs                 Root Causes Within Our       Factors Contributing to
                                                                                                                  Control                    Root Causes

School Climate       1. Office referrals increased from 58 in    • Decrease office referrals and         • Improper social behavior   • Behavior issues of a few
                        2008 to 72 in 2009.                        alternative structure placements      • Behavior concerns in an      students
                                                                 • Although there were four                unstructured environment   • Inconsistent discipline
                     2. Alternative Structure Placement            suspensions in 2009, there is still                                  procedures of some bus
                        increased from 34 in 2008 to 62 in         concern of bus and classroom                                         drivers
                        2009.                                      behavior
                                                                 • The number of male discipline
                     3. The number of suspensions increased        referrals were higher than
                        from 1 in 2008 to 4 in 2009.               females

Student Attendance   1. Student AYP attendance decreased         • Although we are maintaining an        • Habitual unexcused         • Parental failure to submit
                        from 96.2% in 2008 to 96.0% in 2009.       excellent standard in attendance,       absences                     absence notes
                     2. The amount of our unlawful absences        there is still a concern about
                        increased from 0.02 in 2008 to 0.03 in     absences especially those in the
                        2009.                                      unlawful category

Parent Involvement   1. Data regarding the amount of days the    • Maintaining opportunities for         • Sustaining parent          • Inconsistent use of volunteer
                        volunteers work in our school              volunteering during the                 participation rate           “check in” booklet
                        increased from 181 days in 2008 to       instructional
                        192 days in 2009. Days volunteered         day
                        were based on 7 ½ hours.




                                                                                                                                                                     5
                                                                                Component 2
Priority Needs, Goals, Objectives, and Milestones - Reading
NOTE: Reproduce this section for math needs, goals, objectives, and milestones.
List the Reading/Language Arts Priority Need(s): The needs should align with the needs assessment.
 Students need to improve comprehension of literary and informational text, general reading processes and spelling. MSA – males are the weaker gender, SAT10- Males are
the weaker gender in spelling.
Reading/Language Arts Goal: ( Include each subgroup aligned in the needs assessment.)                                 Reference District’s Master Plan:
The SAT10 national percentile rank for Gr. 2 students will increase from 74 in 2009 to 75 in 2010 for total reading.  Response to Intervention (RTI) 1.1.26 J (09) is our
The percentage of students scoring proficient on MSA Reading will increase from:                                      ICT Program
ALL STUDENTS: 87.1% in 2009 to 88.0% in 2010 (91.0% in 2011, 94.0% in 2012, 97.0% in 2013, 100.0% in                  Data Driven Leadership 1.1.43e (09)
2014)                                                                                                                 Institutionalize Vocabulary Instruction 1.1.44b (09)
FARMS: 81.3% in 2009 to 82.0% in 2010 (86.0% in 2011, 91.0% in 2012, 96.0% in 2013, 100.0% in 2014)                   EPA Grant/Explorers Club 1.1.37i(09)
SP. ED: 81.3% in 2009 to 82.0% in 2010 (86.0% in 2011, 91.0% in 2012, 96.0% in 2013, 100.0% in 2014)
The AMO for 2010 in reading is 81.2% proficiency.


Strategies and Activities for Reading
NOTE: Reproduce this section for math strategies and activities.
                                                                 Reading/Language Arts Strategies/Activities
School Wide Reform Strategies for All Students:
    1.
        Display and incorporate academic vocabulary words.
    2.
        Implement strategies from the Instructional Consultation Framework such as: Word Search, Rainbow Words, Pocket Words, etc.
    3.
        Incorporate daily activities in which students will correct misspelled sight words.
    4.
        Use County Formative Assessment Results and Inform data management system to analyze data to make instructional decisions.
    5.
        Utilize the work sampling results of the MMSR to enhance and individualize instruction in Pre-K and K.
    6.
        Continue to include quality BCRs and ECRs in writing portfolios.
    7.
        Implement instructional tips for boys when planning lessons such as: step-by-step checklist, pairs rather than small groups, etc.
    8.
        Use differentiated instructional strategies to meet student needs such as: leveled texts, literacy centers, flexible groups, fluency assessments, etc.
    9.
        Provide time once a week for students in grades 2-5 to learn keyboarding to assist with the MSA and MOD-MSA testing.
    10.
        Provide test preparation activities for SAT10 assessment with emphasis on sight words, phonics, etc. on a weekly basis.
    11.
        Provide test preparation activities for MSA with emphasis on analyzing literary and informational texts.
    12.
        Create and implement MSA style questions in daily activities and assessments.
    13.
        Include more literary text selections and the study of literary elements in daily reading instruction.
    14.
        Use Accelerated Reader to increase comprehension and promote interest in reading literary text.
    15.
        Promote the reading of all genres for exposure to the different types of literature.
    16.
        Use flexible grouping to ensure that all students are reading text on their reading level each day.
    17.
        Consistent use of county curriculum and assessment limits as a guide for instruction.
    18.
        Two weeks prior to the MSA, review test - taking strategies.
    19.
        Incorporate reading activities in the Science Explorers Club that address reading indicators.
    20.
        Provide a video snapshot of effective reading strategies that can be used at home with homework.


                                                                                                                                                                         6
Academic Interventions for “At Risk” Students:
   1. Differentiate instruction with Special Education support and use of inclusion.
   2. Implement strategies from the Instructional Consultation Framework. This framework will serve as our R.T. I. model
   3. Use scientifically based reading intervention programs such as: Early Reading Intervention, Read Naturally, Foundations and Voyager Passport with K-5 students to
      improve literacy skills and obtain grade level performance.
   4. Provide an intervention program for students who scored basic and/or a scale score of 400 or less on the MSA
   5. Provide an intervention program for students who scored below the 50th percentile for Total Reading on the SAT 10.
   6. Two weeks prior to the MSA, review test - taking strategies.

Behavior and Social Reform Strategies for All Students:
  1. Incorporate “Second Step” lessons on social interactions.
  2. Use de-escalation strategies from CPI in an effort to prevent crisis situations.
  3. Implement mini lessons on a variety of social issues as needed.
  4. Incorporate motivational activities to model positive behavior such as: Interact, Character Ed. Assemblies, etc.
  5. Use the Behavior Support Teacher to provide strategies and behavior plans to assist with struggling students.
  6. Continue having monthly pupil service meetings for targeted students.
Evaluations of Strategies - Formative:

        1. Pre-K: • According to the Concepts About Print Inventory, did 85% of the students score at the “emerging understanding” performance level by
                       Jan. 2010?
                  • According to the second term report card, did 80% of the students receive a “doing well” mark in Language and Literacy Development?
                       (6 out of 13 indicators)
                  • According to the MMSR Work Sampling “Fall Data”, did 85% of the students receive a composite score (2 in process) in Language
                        and Literacy?

        2. K:       • According to the Concepts About Print Inventory, did 85% of the students score at the “developed understanding” performance level by
                         Jan. 2010?
                    • According to the second term report card, did 85% of the students receive a composite score of 26 points in Language and Literacy
                          Development? (39 points possible when receiving 3ʼs)
                    • Based on Sept. – Jan. DIBELS results, did 50% of the kindergarten students who were intensive increase to strategic and 50% who were
                          strategic increase to benchmark in initial sound fluency? ( Student goals increase with each assessment period.)

                    • Based on Sept. – Jan. DIBELS results, did 50% of the kindergarten students who were intensive increase to strategic and 50% who were
                         strategic increase to benchmark in letter name fluency? ( Student goals increase with each assessment period.)

                    • According to the MMSR Work Sampling “Fall Data”, did 85% of the students receive a composite score (3 proficient) in Language
                         and Literacy?

        3. Gr. 1:   • Based on Sept. – Jan. DIBELS results, did 50% of the first grade students who were intensive increase to strategic and 50% who were
                         strategic increase to benchmark in Phoneme Segmentation? (Student goals increase with each assessment period.)




                                                                                                                                                                      7
      4. Gr. 2   • Based on Sept. – Jan. DIBELS results, did 50% of the second grade students who were intensive increase to strategic and 50% who
                      were strategic increase to benchmark in oral reading fluency? (Student goals increase with each assessment period.)
                 • Based on DIBELS Oral Reading Fluency, did 50% of students read at least 68 words per minute?

      5. Gr. 3    • Based on Sept. – Jan. DIBELS results, did 50% of the third grade students who were intensive increase to strategic and 50% who were
                       strategic increase to benchmark in oral reading fluency? ( Student goals increase with each assessment period.)
                 • Based on DIBELS Oral Reading Fluency, did 50% of students read at least 92 words per minute?

      6. Gr. 4   • Based on DIBELS Oral Reading Fluency, did 50% of students read at least 105 words per minute?

      7. Gr. 5   • Based on DIBELS Oral Reading Fluency, did 50% of students read at least 115 words per minute?

     8. Gr. 3-5 • According to the Oct. and Jan. County Formative Assessment results, did 50% of the students score at 70% or higher on each
                     assessment?

Summative:

     1. Pre-K:   • According to the Concepts About Print Inventory, did 95% of the students score at the “emerging understanding” performance level?
                 • According to the fourth term report card, did 90% of the students receive a “doing well” mark in Language and Literacy Development?
                      (6 out of 13 indicators)
                 • According to the MMSR Work Sampling “Spring Data”, did 85% of the students receive a composite score (3 proficient) in Language
                      and Literacy?
                 • Based on the May DIBELS results did 50% of the pre-kindergarten students attain benchmark in initial sound fluency?
                 • Based on the May DIBELS results did 50% of the pre-kindergarten students attain benchmark in letter name fluency?

      2. K:      • According to the Concepts About Print Inventory, did 100% of the students score at the “developed understanding” performance level?
                 • According to the fourth term report card, did 95% of the students receive a composite score of 26 points in Language and Literacy
                      Development? (39 points possible when receiving 3ʼs)
                 • Based on Jan.-May DIBELS results, did 40% of the kindergarten students who were intensive increase to strategic and 40% who were
                      strategic increase to benchmark in initial sound fluency? (Student goals increase with each assessment period.)
                  • Based on Jan.-May DIBELS results, did 40% of the kindergarten students who were intensive increase to strategic and 40% who were
                      strategic increase to benchmark in letter name fluency? (Student goals increase with each assessment period.)
                 • According to the MMSR Work Sampling “Spring Data”, did 100% of the students receive a composite score (3 proficient) in Language
                      and Literacy?

     3. Gr. 1:   • Based on Jan.-May DIBELS results, did 40% of the first grade students who were intensive increase to strategic and 40% who were
                      strategic increase to benchmark in phoneme segmentation? (Student goals increase with each assessment period.)
                 • Based on Jan.-May DIBELS results, did 40% of the first grade students who were intensive increase to strategic and 40% who were
                      strategic increase to benchmark in nonsense words? (Student goals increase with each assessment period.)
                 • Based on DIBELS Oral Reading Fluency, did 60% of students read at least 40 words per minute?




                                                                                                                                                          8
4. Gr. 2:   • Based on Jan.-May DIBELS results, did 40% of the second grade students who were intensive increase to strategic and 40% who were
                 strategic increase to benchmark in oral reading fluency? (Student goals increase with each assessment period.)
            • Based on DIBELS Oral Reading Fluency, did 60% of students read at least 90 words per minute?
            • According to Stanford 10 results, did the students meet the 75th national percentile rank for reading?

5. Gr. 3    • Based on Jan.-May DIBELS results, did 40% of the third grade students who were intensive increase to strategic and 40% who were
                 strategic increase to benchmark in oral reading fluency? (Student goals increase with each assessment period.)
            • Based on DIBELS Oral Reading Fluency, did 60% of students read at least 110 words per minute?

6. Gr. 4    • Based on DIBELS Oral Reading Fluency, did 60% of students read at least 118 words per minute?

7. Gr. 5    • Based on DIBELS Oral Reading Fluency, did 60% of students read at least 124 words per minute?

8. Gr. 3-5 • According to MSA results, did the “All Students Group” achieve an 88% proficiency rate in reading?
           • According to MSA results, did the “FARMS Group” achieve an 82% proficiency rate in reading?
           • According to MSA results, did the “Sp. Ed. Group” achieve an 82% proficiency rate in reading?




                                                                                                                                                 9
                                                                     Component 2

Priority Needs, Goals, Objectives, and Milestones - Math
NOTE: Reproduce this section for math needs, goals, objectives, and milestones.
List the Math Priority Need(s): The needs should align with the needs assessment.
Students need to improve performance in the following concepts: Processes of Mathematics, Geometry and Measurement, Statistics / Probability and Algebra, Patterns and
Functions. MSA – Males are the weaker gender. SAT 10 – Males are the weaker gender.
Math Goal: ( Include each subgroup aligned in the needs assessment.)                                              Reference district’s Master Plan:
The SAT10 national percentile rank for Gr. 2 students will increase from 74 in 2009 to 75 in 2010 for total math. Institutionalize Vocabulary Instruction 1.1.44b (09)
The percentage of students scoring proficient on MSA Math will increase from:                                     Academic Intervention in Math (Stimulus Funding
ALL STUDENTS: 83.6% in 2009 to 85 in 2010 (89.0% in 2011, 93.0% in 2012, 97.0% in 2013, 100.0% in 2014)           /RTI) 1.1.26J (09)
FARMS: 78.1% in 2009 to 80.0 in 2010 (85.0% in 2011, 90.0% in 2012, 95.0% in 2013, 100.0% in 2014)                Inquiry Based Math Instruction 1.1.45a (09)
SP. ED: 68.8% in 2009 to 80.0 in 2010 (85.0% in 2011, 90.0% in 2012, 95.0% in 2013, 100.0% in 2014)               Data Driven Leadership 1.1.43e (09)
The AMO for 2010 in math is 79.4% proficiency.                                                                    EPA Grant/Explorers Club 1.1.37i(09)

Strategies and Activities Math

NOTE: Reproduce this section for math strategies and activities.
                                                                          Math Strategies/Activities
School Wide Reform Strategies for All Students:
   1. Sustain the Growing with Mathematics program in Pre-K – Gr. 5.
   2. Use County Formative Assessment Results and Inform data management system to analyze data to make instructional decisions.
   3. Display and incorporate academic vocabulary in daily activities.
   4. Maintain previously learned skills through Accelerated Math, centers, projects, daily math warm ups, etc.
   5. Provide a “Math Night” for students and families to engage in enrichment activities and provide information about the math program.
   6. Implement instructional tips for boys when planning lessons such as: step-by-step checklist, pairs rather than small groups, etc.
   7. Use of computation activities for memorization of number facts such as: mad minutes, etc.
   8. Use differentiated instructional strategies to meet student needs such as: graphic organizers, centers, manipulatives, etc.
   9. Utilize the work sampling results of the MMSR to enhance and individualize instruction in Pre-K and K.
  10. Provide test preparation activities for SAT10 assessment with emphasis on geometry and measurement.
  11. Provide test preparation activities for MSA with emphasis on Geometry and Measurement, Processes of Mathematics, Statistics / Probability and Algebra, Patterns
      and Functions.
  12. Create and implement MSA style questions in daily activities and assessments.
  13. Implement a program in which classroom teachers will team teach with the math teachers for 2 days a week.
  14. Consistent use of county curriculum and assessment limits as our guide for instruction.
  15. Two weeks prior to the MSA, review test - taking strategies.
  16. Incorporate math activities in the Science Explorers Club that address math indicators.
  17. Provide a video snapshot of effective math strategies that can be used at home with homework.

Academic Interventions for “At Risk Students”:
   1. Provide an academic intervention teacher to assist struggling students in math.
   2. Use differentiated instruction with Special Education support and the use of inclusion.
   3. Implement strategies from the Instructional Consultation Framework and use the framework as our R.T.I model.
   4. Two weeks prior to the MSA, review test - taking strategies.
   5. Provide an intervention program for students who scored basic and/or a scale score of 400 or less on the MSA
                                                                                                                                                                        10
   6. Provide an intervention program for students who scored below the 50th percentile for Total Math on the SAT 10.

Behavior and Social Reform Strategies for All Students:
   1. Incorporate “Second Step” lessons on social interactions.
   2. Implement mini lessons on a variety of social issues as needed.
   3. Incorporate motivational activities to model positive behavior such as: Interact, Character Ed. Assemblies, etc.
   4. Use the behavior support teacher to provide strategies and behavior plans to assist with struggling students.
   5. Continue having monthly pupil service meetings for targeted students.
   6. Use de-escalation strategies from CPI in an effort to prevent crisis situations.

Evaluations of Strategies - Formative:

      1. Pre-K:     • According to the second term report card, did 80% of the students receive a “doing well” mark in Mathematical Development?
                         (4 out of 8 indicators)
                    • Did 85% of the students score 70% or higher on a teacher developed math assessment in Jan.?
                    • According to the MMSR Work Sampling “Fall Data”, did 85% of the students receive a composite score (2 in process) in Math?

       2. K:        • According to the second term report card, did 85% of the students receive a composite score of 20 points in Mathematical Development?
                         (30 possible points when receiving all 3ʼs)
                    • Did 85% of the students score 70% or higher on the “Growing With Math - Initial Assessment Interview” given by the end of Oct.?
                    • According to the MMSR Work Sampling “Fall Data”, did 85 % of the students receive a composite score (3 proficient) in Math?

       3. Gr. 1: • Did 85% of the students score 70% or higher on the “Growing With Math - Initial Assessment Interview” given by the end of Oct.?

       4. Gr. 2: • Did 75% of the students score 70% or higher on the “Growing With Math - Initial Assessment” given by the end of Oct.?

       5. Gr. 1-5: • Did 70% of the students score 70% or higher on a teacher developed computation test with mixed operations?
       6. Gr. 3-5 • According to the Oct. and Jan. County Formative Assessments, did 70% of the students score 70% or higher
                        on each of the assessments?

Summative:

       1. Pre-K:    • According to the fourth term report card, did 90% of the students receive a “doing well” mark in Mathematical Development?
                          (4 out of 8 indicators)
                     • Did 85% of the students score 70% or higher on the “Growing with Math - Comprehensive Assessment Interview”?
                     • According to the MMSR Work Sampling “Spring Data”, did 90% of the students receive a composite score (3 proficient) in Math?

        2. K:       • According to the fourth term report card, did 95% of the students receive a composite score of 20 points in Mathematical Development?
                         (30 possible points when receiving all 3ʼs)
                    • Did 85% of the students score 70% or higher on the “Growing with Math - Comprehensive Assessment Interview”?
                    • According to the MMSR Work Sampling “Spring Data”, did 90% of the students receive a composite score (3 proficient) in Math?

        3. Gr. 1-5: • Did 80% of the students score 70% or higher on a teacher developed computation test with mixed operations?


                                                                                                                                                          11
        4. Gr. 1-2: • Did 85% of the students score 70% or higher on the “Growing With Math Comprehensive Assessment”?
        5. Gr. 2:   • According to Stanford 10 results, did students meet the 75th national percentile rank for total math?
        6. Gr. 3-5: • According to the May County Formative Assessments, did 80% of the students score 70% or higher?
                    • According to MSA results, did the “All Students Group” achieve an 85% proficiency rate in math?
                    • According to MSA results, did the “FARMS Group” achieve an 80% proficiency rate in math?
                    • According to MSA results, did the “Sp. Ed. Group” achieve an 80% proficiency rate in math?

                                                                               Component 2

Priority Needs, Goals, Objectives, and Milestones - Pupil Service
NOTE: Reproduce this section for math needs, goals, objectives, and milestones.
List Pupil Service Priority Need(s): The needs should align with the needs assessment.
Continue to implement STAR surface management strategies in maintaining a positive classroom atmosphere which will decrease discipline referrals for males.
Continue to encourage families to provide a written note for student absences. Continue to encourage families to volunteer in the school/classrooms during the student day.
Pupil Service Goal: ( Include each subgroup aligned in the needs assessment.) The goals should align with the           Reference district’s Master Plan:
priority needs. To implement a positive and safe school environment by decreasing the total number of office            Behavior Intervention 2.1.12a (09)
referrals from 72 to 65, total number of alternative structure placements from 62 to 58 and total number of             On Time Graduation 1.1.46 (09)
suspensions from 4 to 0. To maintain or exceed our AYP attendance rating of 96.0. To maintain or exceed parent
volunteer days of 192.
Strategies and Activities for Pupil Service
NOTE: Reproduce this section for math strategies and activities.
                                                                      Pupil Service Strategies/Activities
School Wide Reform Strategies for All Students:

1. Develop positive behavior intervention strategies:
          • continue providing guidance to students who are potential alternative structure placements – this is done with the principal
          • communicate behavior concerns with parents through the use of planners, phone calls, conferences, etc.
          • incorporate character ed. traits within our monthly pep assemblies and on morning announcements
          • character education activities will be implemented by the classroom teachers
          • conduct conflict resolution lessons to promote positive social behavior
          • recognize positive student behaviors daily such as: Gator Can participation, Classroom Helpers
          • recognize students chosen as Gator of the Month, Mathematician of Month and PE Student of the Month
          • continue using the STAR program and it’s surface management strategies such as: antiseptic bounce, proximity control, etc.
          • develop behavior plans for “at risk” students
          • use de-escalation strategies from CPI in an effort to prevent crisis situations.

2. Promote Excellent Attendance for All Students:
         • recognize students with monthly / yearly perfect attendance at the pep assemblies
         • send home a certificate and letter to students who were absent 5 days or less for the school year
         • display student names on a monthly perfect attendance board
         • contact parents of students who have 5 or more absences and/or 3 unlawful absences
         • continue sending official letters home to parents when students have been absent 8 days or more



                                                                                                                                                                          12
3. Promote Parent / Community Involvement for All Families:
        • encourage families to attend PTG meetings by having student programs and forums on harassment, internet safety, Title I Program, etc.
        • invite parents to attend school activities such as: pep assemblies, plays, etc.
        • Pre-K and Kindergarten parents will attend a STAR and Second Step training during “Phase In” days at the beginning of the school year. This training
               will familiarize them with the programs and how to incorporate the strategies at home.
        • maintain a family / community bulletin board
        • provide a “Back to School Night” prior to the opening of the school year
        • encourage parents to attend our first and second term parent conference sessions and book fair
        • encourage families to visit the school’s web site for information and event listings
        • distribute Judy Center activity calendars and other resources
        • update and utilize the parent directory of interests and talents
        • continue Learning Links ( Title I Parenting Program ) to promote community involvement and conduct topics suggested by parents
        • continue providing community services to our students through programs such as: Garrett Mentors, Mental Health, Dove Center, Judy Center, Warm
               the Children, United Way, etc.
        • continue conducting PTG fundraisers and class field trips to keep parents involved in their child’s education
        • continue promoting the use of service learning hours for school activities
        • encourage parents to assist teachers in and out of the classrooms
        • participate in the “School to Careers” Program by allowing high school students to work in our classrooms
        • display “Gator Happenings” sign that relays upcoming events
        • send home monthly newsletters to communicate information to parents
        • provide a “Math Night” to share activities and the framework of the program
        • provide the Fresh Fruit and Vegetable Program to encourage good nutrition
        • encourage parents to utilize materials in the parent library

Evaluation of Strategies - Formative:

      1. Pre-K - 5:    • Was the number of office referrals less than 32, total number of alternative structure referrals less than 25 and 0 suspensions?
                       • Was the average daily attendance at least 96.0% for the first semester?
                       • Did the number of parent volunteer hours total at least 700 for the first semester? (One day is equivalent to 7 hours 30 min.)

Summative:

       2. Pre-K - 5:    • Was the number of office referrals less than 65, alternative structure referrals less than 58 and 0 suspensions?
                        • Was the average daily attendance at least 96.0% for the school year?
                        • Did the number of parent volunteer hours total at least 1,440 for the school year? (One day is equivalent to 7 hours 30 min.)




                                                                                                                                                                 13
                                                                     Component 3
TEACHERS and Instruction by highly qualified teachers
                  2009-2010 Classroom       Number Highly Qualified & Number of Teachers
                        Teachers                    Certified in        Rated Satisfactory
  Grade Level      (Teacher of Record)         Reading/Language Arts                               2009-2010 Years of Experience




                                                                                             0-3       4-10           11-15        16+
Pre-K             Sue Lear                 1                           1                                                           X


Kindergarten      Mary Ann Friend          2                           2                                                           X
                  Amy Azzi                                                                                              X


1st               Tammy Ewing              2                           2                                                           X
                  Debbie Piper                                                                                                     X



2nd               Sue Hillen               2                           2                                                X
                  Dara McGettigan                                                                        X

3rd               Kelli Frantz             2                           2                     X
                  Patti Shreve                                                                                                     X

4th               Robyn Nazelrod           2                           2                                 X
                  Glenda Newcomb                                                                                                   X

5th               Debra Hinebaugh          2                           2                                                           X
                  Linda Martin                                                                                                     X




                                                                                                                                         14
Instructional         Cynthia Shaffer- Math        12                               12                                               X
Resource              Melissa Paugh-Math                                                                                             X
                      Mary Streets – Rdg/Math                                                                                            X
                      Lori Bicehouse – Sp. Ed.                                                                                       X
                      Pam Trautwein - Speech                                                                                             X
                      Aaron Hordubay – PE                                                                                            X
                      Ronni DiGioia – Art                                                                                                X
                      Heather Poe – Music                                                                                            X
                      Linda Goodrich – SEP                                                                                               X
                      Jill Wakefield – IC/ Rdg.                                                                                          X
                      Amy Harvey – Rdg                                                                                                   X
                                    Intervention                                                                                         X
                      Amanda Schmidt – Math                                                                       X
                                   Intervention
                      Tim Watson - Counselor                                                                                             X




                                                          HIGHLY QUALIFIED TEACHERS – Component 3

                                                                    Instruction by highly qualified teachers
Describe the strategies used by the school to ensure instruction is delivered by highly qualified teachers:

    1.   The Human Resource Office, School Principal and Elementary Director assign teachers to areas in which they are certified.
    2.   Teachers are offered the state required reading courses for certification purposes as determined by need.
    3.   Teachers are reimbursed for six hours of college classes per year to meet certification purposes.
    4.   Tenured teachers are formally observed a minimum of once each semester or school year and evaluated yearly.
    5.   Non-tenured teachers are formally observed a minimum of twice each semester and evaluated twice each year.
    6.   Central office staff, principals and teachers from other schools complete an Instructional Walk Through every other year.
    7.   Principal conducts a daily “walk abouts” to ensure proper instruction, etc.
    8.   Teachers display a daily “Today we will” agenda on their board that indicates the plans for the day.
    9.   The Intranet system is used as a communication tool to inform teachers of upcoming events and instructional issues.




                                                                                                                                             15
                                                          PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT – Component 4

High-quality and ongoing professional development for teachers, principals, and paraprofessionals, and if appropriate, pupil services personnel, parents, and other
staff to enable all children in the school to meet the State’s student academic achievement standards. (Component 4)
.
      Needs              High Quality              Audience              Person(s)                     Timeline                               Evaluation
  Assessment             Professional              Teachers,            Responsible
   Addressed        Development Activities Paraprofessionals,
                                                and Principals
Reading PDA: 1.Maryland Institute             Reading First          Anita Archer       June 17, 2009                           Evaluation forms are completed at
1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 7,  of Beginning Reading       Teachers, Coach,      Michele Goady,                                              the conclusion of each staff
12, 13, 14, 15,    Conference –               Assistants,           Director of                                                 development session. Data is
16, 17             “Effective Vocabulary Principal                  Reading First in                                            compiled and shared with the staff.
                   and Comprehension          K-3, Reading          MD.                                                         New strategies are implemented in all
Math PDA: 4, Instructional                    Instructional                                                                     classrooms.
7, 11, 12, 13,     Practices”                 Staff
14, 15, 16, 17                                                                                                                  Documentation of staff development
                   2. MD Beginning            Principal,            Stuart Greenberg    June 29, 2009                           is reported to Garrett College for
Pupil Service      Reading Conference         Primary Grade         Michele Goady,                                              Continuing Education credits.
PDA: 5, 6, 7,      “Implementing New          Teachers              Director of
8, 9, 10, 11, 12, Discoveries about                                 Reading First in                                            Reference to Master Plan : Utilize
14, 15, 16, 17     Reading and Reading                              MD.                                                         Behavior Intervention Strategies
                   Instruction in a                                                                                             2.1.12a (09) PowerSchool 1.1.48 (09)
                   Coherent Reading                                                                                             Inform 1.1.43e (09)
                   Plan”

                 3. Reading First          Principal            Michele Goady,       July 14-16, 2009
                 National Conference in                         Director of
                 Cincinnati, OH “                               Reading First in
                 Expanding SBRR in                              MD.
                 the Nation’s
                 Classrooms”

                 4.“Technology Update      TRT’s                Chuck Trautwein      August 2009
                 and Its Use in the
                 Classroom”

                 5. Teddy Bears            PreK, K teachers     Barb Baker, Dir.     August 2009
                 Workshop                                       Elem Ed.

                 6. PowerSchool            Principals /         County               August 17, 2009
                 Training                  Secretary            Technology Team

                 7. Kindergarten Conf.     PreK, K Teachers     Judy Center          Feb. 8-9, 2010
                                           All Staff            Mr. Harvey           August 25, 2009

                                                                                                                                                                16
8. “PowerSchool and       All Staff             Chuck Trautwein     August 26, 2009
Its’ Application to
Classroom Use” and
“Everything You Need
to Know for A
Successful School
Year”

9. County Wide Staff      All Staff             BOE Directors,      August 27, 2009
Development Day                                 Pupil Service,
                                                Nurse/Counselor

10. Pro Active                                  Peggy Gosnell and
Strategies to Present                           Mr. Daryl Walters
Negative Behaviors
and All You Need to
Know About Court
Summons”

11. “Effective Math       Math Resource         Sandy Atkins        TBA
Strategies for            Teachers and Pre-
Classroom Use”            K, K teachers

12. SIP Presentation of   All Staff             Mr. Harvey, SIT     Oct. 21, 2009
Testing Data and                                Members
Parental Involvement
Guidelines

13. PIERS Workshop        Gr. 5 Teachers        Abby Burke          Sept. 17, 2009

14. Team Work –           All Staff             Mr. Harvey          Once a year
Implementing
Successful Reading
and Math Strategies

15. MMSR Training         Pre-K and K           Barb Baker, Dir.    Oct, Nov. 2009
                          Teachers              of Elem. Ed.

16. Staff Development     All Staff             Mr. Harvey          March 2010
on Vocabulary &
Behavior

17. Various               Interested staff as   Mr. Harvey          Throughout School Year
Workshops with 150        long as it pertains
mile radius               to plan

                                                                                             17
NCLB Section 1116(a)(1)(D) The LEA shall review the effectiveness of the actions and activities the schools are carrying out with respect to parental involvement,
professional development, and other activities assisted under this


                                                                         Component 5

                          Strategies to attract high-quality highly qualified teachers to high-need schools

Describe the strategies used by the school to attract high-quality highly qualified teachers to high-need schools:

    1.   The county has a large pool of applicants that are willing to work in any Garrett County School. Garrett County is within close proximity to several universities
           such as: Frostburg State University, West Virginia University and Fairmont State.

    2.   Due to Garrett County’s geographic area and being a four-season resort, we are able to attract experienced employees seeking teaching positions. We start these
           employees on a scale based on the candidate’s experiences.

    3.   A four-year degree teacher, willing to gain classroom experience, may be hired as an instructional assistant if they do not receive a teaching position.

    4.   The School Principal and Human Resource Director attend job fairs at nearby universities to attract new employees and share attributes of our school system.

    5.   Garrett County is known for being one of the top counties in the State of Maryland for maintaining a high ratio of highly qualified teachers.

    6.   Garrett County offers a $1,000.00 signing bonus to first year teaching employees who have a high GPA average.




                                                                                                                                                                             18
                                             PARENTAL INVOLVEMENT – Component 6

Strategies to increase parental involvement such as family literacy services.
 Include strategies to promote effective parental involvement in the school Yough Glades Elem. School accepts the Garrett County School System family
involvement policy and has aligned its school-level parent involvement plan accordingly.

 Strategies to increase/promote effective parental involvement (See                       Person(s) Responsible                                 Timeline
                                  page 15)
Maintain a resource directory to identify the available time and talents   Parent Involvement Action Team                     Sept. 2009
of parents and other volunteers to assist teachers and school staff
throughout the school year
Conduct a “Math Night” for fun and learning                                Math Resource Teachers                             Fall 2009
Conduct the Fresh Fruit and Vegetable Program to enhance good              Parent Involvement Action Team, Volunteers,        Throughout School Year
nutrition for all students and staff                                       Nurse, Principal
Encourage families to attend PTG meetings by conducting student            Principal and PTG Executive Members                Monthly
programs and topics such as: harassment, STAR program, Title I, etc.
Maintain a family / community bulletin board, school happenings sign       Principal and Volunteers                           Monthly
and monthly newsletter to display events.
Encourage families to visit the school’s web site and produce a            Principal via newsletter                           Newsletter - Monthly
homework video to assist parents                                           DVD – Mrs. McGettigan and Classroom Teachers       Video - Fall
Distribute Judy Center activity calendars and other resources. Conduct     Judy Center Staff, Pre-K and Kindergarten          Monthly and as needed
Judy Center sponsored assemblies such as: community walk, zoo              Teachers
babies, multicultural, and music appreciation
Continue Learning Links (Title I Parenting Program) to promote             School Staff                                       Once a month for 4 sessions
community involvement and conduct parent suggested topics
Continue providing community services to our students through Garrett      Guidance Counselor and Community Agencies          Yearly
Mentors, Mental Health, Dove Center, Judy Center, Warm the
Children, United Way, etc.
Encourage parents to assist teachers in the classrooms and                 Teachers                                           On going throughout the school year
communicate via student planners.
Encourage parents to attend: an evening parent-teacher conference          Teachers and Principal                             On going throughout the school year
session for first and second grading terms, Back to School Night prior
to the beginning of the school year, monthly PTG meetings with
student performances and PTG sponsored fundraisers, Pre-K and
Kindergarten registration and transition meetings from Head Start,
parent training on “STAR” and “Second Step”, book fair, classroom
parties such as: Christmas, Valentines, Birthdays

NCLB Section 1116(a)(1)(D) The LEA shall review the effectiveness of the actions and activities the schools are carrying out with respect to parental involvement,
professional development, and other activities assisted under this part.
What evaluation will determine the effectiveness of these activities?
     Documentation of parent attendance at meetings and school events, written comments from parents on activities, volunteer hours within the school, and completion of an
evaluation form for students involved in “Schools To Careers” program. A school climate survey is completed periodically for parent feedback on our programs.

                                                                                                                                                                        19
Describe how the school will provide written notice about the identification to parents of each student enrolled.

           Written notification to parents                        How was the information provided to parents?                          Timeline
                                                                   (Specify certified mail, posters, newspaper, etc.)
       Provide notification on school letterhead          1. Monthly newsletters                                        Monthly and as needed
               Example of Letterhead:                     2. Phone Calls
                                                          3. Student Planners and Communicator Folders
 YOUGH GLADES ELEMENTARY SCHOOL                           4. School’s Web Site
        70 WOLF ACRES DRIVE                               5. Communication with other agencies
     OAKLAND, MARYLAND 21550                              6. Radio Announcements
         TELEPHONE (301) 334-3334                         7. Local Newspaper Announcements
      (301) 334-3654 FAX (301) 334-6992                   8. Family Handbook
      KEITH D. HARVEY, PRINCIPAL                          9. PTG Flyers
                                                          10. Gator Happenings Sign and Family/Community Bulletin
                                                              Board




                                                                                                                                                   20
                                                                       TRANSITION – Component 7

Plans for assisting preschool children in the transition from early childhood programs, such as Head Start, Even Start, Early Reading first, or a State-run preschool
program, to local elementary school programs. (May also include transition from elementary school to middle school /from middle school to high school)
(Component 7)
Discuss the school’s plans for assisting preschool children in transition from early childhood programs to elementary school.

    1. Transition meetings are held at the beginning of the school year. Head Start Staff located at the Judy Center, Oakland Center and other public school centers share
       transition plans on incoming Pre-Kindergarten and Kindergarten students. Head Start students who will be attending our school in the following school year
       attend Judy Center sponsored assemblies, have lunch for one day in our cafeteria and attend one of our character education pep assemblies.

   2. A modified schedule is developed for incoming Pre-Kindergarten and Kindergarten students over the first 2 –3 days of school. Parents accompany their child on their
      first day of school. They attend an orientation meeting during the morning hours and have lunch in our cafeteria. During their orientation, the parent and child
      meet with the classroom teacher and receive information regarding classroom procedures and instructional expectations for the school year, learn about a STAR
      program and services of the Overlook Judy Center. Groups of 7-10 students and their parents attend the orientation sessions.

   3. Summer Camps, sponsored by the Judy Center, are held at the school for Pre-Kindergarten, Kindergarten and First Grade students to acquaint them with the school’s
      environment, teachers, their peers and the instructional program. This occurs in early August.

    4. Three - four assemblies are held each school year for Pre-Kindergarten and Kindergarten students. These assemblies are sponsored by the Judy Center and include
       topics such as community helpers, music appreciation, zoo babies and a multicultural program/activity.

    5. Transition meetings are held for each grade at the end of the school year for teachers to share strengths and weakness of students. Pre-Kindergarten meets with
       Kindergarten staff, Kindergarten staff meets with First Grade staff, First Grade staff meets with Second Grade staff, etc.

    6. Special Education and 504 transition meetings are held by the school’s IEP team with the parent(s) and the middle school’s PPW to plan student’s academic program
       for sixth grade.

    7. Our fifth grade teachers complete matriculation / academic cards that assist the middle school staff in placing incoming sixth graders from the elementary schools.

    8. Fifth grade students tour the middle school and participate in a summer session that allows them to receive their locker combination and schedule.




                                                                                                                                                                             21
                                                        TEACHERS AS DECISION MAKERS – Component 8

Measures to include teachers in the decisions regarding the use of academic assessments in order to provide information on, and to improve, the achievement of
individual students and the overall instructional program.

Discuss what measures are being taken to include teachers in decision-making regarding the academic assessments in order to provide information on and to improve the
achievement of students and the instructional program?

    1.   A needs assessment survey is completed at the end of each school year to plan for future staff development sessions.
    2.   Committee meetings are held bi-monthly to implement character education activities/assemblies, habitat lessons and school wide projects, create parent involvement
         activities.
    3.   Staff meetings are held bi-monthly to discuss upcoming events and present staff development information from previously attended workshops.
    4.   Instructional Consultation meetings are held weekly and/or bi-monthly for student’s referrals, documentation and discussion of student progress for those being
         served.
    5.   Grade level team meetings are held as needed to discuss student progress on County Formative Assessments, plan instructional modifications, and analyze assessment
         data.
    6.   The School Improvement Team, consisting of teachers and parents, meets at the beginning of the year to evaluate data and develop a working plan to enhance
          instruction. They also meet to determine the upcoming school budget.
    7.   Teachers have an opportunity to provide input on major curricular decisions.
    8.   Teachers are encouraged to participate in a variety of staff development activities during the school year and summer months.
    9.   Teachers are given guidelines for “what to teach” with flexibility in “how to teach” allowing them to apply their professional expertise.




ADDITIONAL ASSISTANCE TO STUDENTS AND EXTENDED LEARNING ACTIVITIES – Component 9
Activities to ensure that students who experience difficulty mastering the proficient or advanced levels of academic achievement standards shall be provided with
effective, timely ADDIITIIONAL ASSIISTANCE which shall include measures to ensure that students’ difficulties are identified on a timely basis and to provide
                  ADD T ONAL ASS STANCE
sufficient information on which to base effective assistance. (Component 9)


Note: THIS SECTION DOES NOT PERTAIN TO EXTENDED LEARNING TIME (before/after-school, summer school)

                 Grade level/subgroups                                    Activities to ensure                    Measures of Effectiveness                  Timeline
            (As indicated in Component 1 –                           proficient or advanced levels
                   Needs Assessment)                                            are met
Refer to Component 2 reform strategies
NCLB Section 1116(a)(1)(D) The LEA shall review the effectiveness of the actions and activities the schools are carrying out with respect to parental involvement,
professional development, and other activities assisted under this part.
What evaluation will determine the effectiveness of these activities?
    1. See Component 2 evaluations



                                                                                                                                                                        22
                                                       Title I BUDGET – Component 10

Coordination and integration of Federal, State, and local services and programs, including programs supported under this Act, violence prevention programs,
nutrition programs, housing programs, Head Start, adult education, vocational and technical education, and job training. (Component 10)

Using the budget, describe how resources are being coordinated and integrated.

Yough Glades Elementary School is allotted $ 277,011.52

1. Salary and Fixed Charges : $ 256,991.02 for 3 teachers
               1. Debra Hinebaugh – Gr. 5 Classroom Teacher
               2. Cynthia Shaffer – Gr. 2,3,4 and 5 Math Resource Teacher
               3. Mary Streets – Gr. 1 Math Resource Teacher, Gr. K-5 Reading Intervention Teacher

2. Academic Tutoring: $17,580.50 for 1 teacher
   Salary - $16,250.00
   Fixed Charges – $1,330.50

3. Community Service – 2009 - 2010 Parenting Program entitled “Learning Links”
   Salary – 56 Hours @ 25.00 per hour = $ 1,400.00
   Fixed Charges - $ 114.00
   Supplies and Materials - $580.00
   Refreshments - $346.00
   Total for Parenting Program - $2,440.00

  Learning Links is an after school program that is offered to our students and their families. This program provides an opportunity for families to create their agendas basic
on their interest. Previous topics include internet safety, homework help, activities involving our new math series, making crafts for local agencies, etc. A survey is sent
home to families giving them the opportunity to share their requests for topics shared during our Learning Links Program.




                                                      SCHOOL PARENTAL IINVOLVEMENT POLIICY
                                                      SC HOOL PA R EN TA L N V OLV EM EN T POL C Y

Section 1118 (b)(1)

    1.   Each Title I school shall JJOIINTLY DEVELOP WIITH PARENTS , a written PARENTAL IINVOLVEMENT P OLIICY , agreed on by parents that shall describe
                                     O N TLY D EV ELO P W TH PA REN TS                  PA R EN TA L N V OLV EM EN T P OL C Y
         the means for carrying out (1) parent involvement, (2) shared responsibilities for high student academic achievement, (3) building capacity for involvement, and (4)
         accessibility. Parents shall be notified of the policy in an understandable and uniform format and in a language parents can understand. Such policy shall be updated
         periodically to meet the changing needs of parents and the school.

                                                                                                                                                                             23
    2.   Documentation should be made available upon request:
            • Letters inviting parents and community to meet for this purpose.
            • Meeting dates, agendas, and sign-in sheets
            • The final approved school parental involvement policy


                                                               PARENT IINVOLVEMENT
                                                               PA R EN T N V OLV EM EN T
Section 1118 (c)(1-5)

    1.   Each Title I school shall convene an annual meeting inviting all parents of participating children, informing parents of their school’s participation in Title I and to
         explain the requirements of Title I and the rights of the parents to be involved;
    2.   Offer a flexible number of meetings (a.m., p.m.) and may provide with Title I funds, transportation, child care, or home visits related to parent involvement;
    3.   Involve parents in an organized, ongoing, and timely way, in the planning, review, and improvement of Title I programs, including the planning, review, and
         improvement of the school parental involvement policy and the joint development of the schoolwide program plan-includes adequate representation of parents of
         participating children;
    4.   Provide parents of participating children timely information about Title I; a description and explanation of the curriculum in use at the school, the forms of academic
         assessment used to measure student progress; and the proficiency levels students are expected to meet; and regular meetings to comment, make suggestions and
         participate in decisions relating to the education of their children if requested; and
    5.   If the schoolwide program plan is not satisfactory to the parents of participating children, submit any parent comments on the plan when the school makes the plan
         available to the LEA.
    6.   Documentation should be made available upon request:
              • Meeting dates, agendas, and sign-in sheets
              • Copies of information given to parents to inform, explain or describe
              • Any comments submitted by parents


                                                                   VERIIFIICATIION OF COMPLIIANCE
                                                                   V ER F C A T ON OF C OM PL A N C E

Section 1119 (i)(1)(2)

    1.  The principal of each school operating a program under 1114 (SW) or 1115 (TA) is required to ATTEST ANNUALLY in writing as to whether such school is in
        compliance with the qualifications requirements of teachers and paraprofessionals;
    2. Copies of attestations shall be maintained at each school operating a program under 1114 or 1115 and at the main office of the LEA; and
    3. Shall be available to any member of the general public on request.
(See copy of draft on next page)
                                                     YOUGH GLADES ELEMENTARY SCHOOL
                                            70 WOLF ACRES DRIVE, OAKLAND, MARYLAND 21550
                                      TELEPHONE (301) 334-3334 or (301) 334-3654 FAX (301) 334-6992
                                                        KEITH D. HARVEY, PRINCIPAL

VERIIFIICATIION OF COMPLIIANCE ATTESTATIION
V ER F C A T ON OF C OM PL A N C E A TTESTA T ON
To Whom It May Concern:
In keeping with the requirement of the No Child Left Behind Act of 2001 Section 1119 (i)(1)(2),

                                                                                                                                                                             24
    1.   The principal of each school operating a program under 1114 (SW) or 1115 (TA) is required to attest annually in writing as to whether such school is in
         compliance with the requirements of this section.
    2.   Copies of attestations shall be maintained at each school operating a program under 1114 or 1115 and at the main office of the LEA.
    3.   Shall be available to any member of the general public on request.




I hereby attest to the following:
                                                                            Teachers
    € All teachers hired to this school since the enactment of the No Child Left Behind Act of 2001 and supported with Title I funds are highly qualified.
                                                                         Paraprofessionals
    € All paraprofessionals working in a program supported with Title I funds, regardless of their hiring date, have earned a secondary school diploma or its recognized
         equivalent.
    € All paraprofessionals working in a program supported with Title I funds shall have:
           • Completed at least 2 years of study at an institution of higher education;
           • Obtained an associate’s (or higher) degree; or
           • Met a rigorous standard of quality and can demonstrate, through a formal State or local academic assessment, knowledge of, and the ability to assist in
                  instructing reading, writing, mathematics, or reading readiness, writing readiness and mathematics readiness.
    € Paraprofessionals working in a program supported with Title I funds may be assigned to:
          • Provide one-on-one tutoring for eligible students, if the tutoring is scheduled at a time when a student would not otherwise receive instruction from a
                  teacher;
              •   Assist with classroom management, such as organizing instructional and other materials;
              •   Provide assistance in a computer laboratory;
              •   Conduct parental involvement activities;
              •   Provide support in a library or media center;
              •   Act as a translator; or Provide instructional services to students working under direct supervision of a teacher.



Principal’s Signature: ____________________________________




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