Articles of Incorporation for Nonprofit in Florida Template by bvu64416

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									1.      NATIONAL ADMINISTRATION, COORDINATION, MONITORING

        A.      Institutional Organization and Overall Management

       Immigration and Refugee Services of America (IRSA) is a national, nonprofit, nonsectarian
organization with a ninety year history of providing services to refugees, immigrants, and other people
in migration both in the United States and abroad (see Articles of Incorporation, Attachment A). The
United States Committee for Refugees (USCR) is the public information and advocacy arm of IRSA.
IRSA is the national office for a network of thirty-five Partner Agencies and two Allied Organizations
located throughout the United States. All the Partner Agencies and Allied Organizations are
independent, non-profit, community-based agencies with their own boards of directors, with one
exception: Colchester, Vermont is an IRSA field office under direct oversight from the national
headquarters. Twenty-nine Partner Agencies currently have sub-contractual agreements with IRSA to
provide Reception and Placement (R&P) services to newly arrived refugees sponsored by IRSA
through a Cooperative Agreement with the Department of State (#SC004CA004PRM-01041). The
locations of IRSA Partner Agencies are listed below; asterisks indicate Partner Agencies with IRSA
subcontracts for provision of R&P services.

                 Akron, Ohio*                    Houston, Texas*
                 Albany, New York*               Jersey City, New Jersey*
                 Atlanta, Georgia                Kansas City, Missouri*
                 Binghamton, New York*           Lawrence, Massachusetts*
                 Boston,                         Los Angeles, California*
                 Massachusetts**
                 Bowling Green,                  Lowell, Massachusetts*
                 Kentucky*
                 Bridgeport, Connecticut*        Miami, Florida*
                 Buffalo, New York*              Milwaukee, Wisconsin*
                 Chicago, Illinois*              New York City, NY
                                                 (Brooklyn)*
                 Cincinnati, Ohio*               New York City, NY (Queens)
                 Cleveland, Ohio*                Oakland, California*
                 Colchester, Vermont*            Philadelphia, Pennsylvania*
                 Columbia, Maryland*             Providence, Rhode Island*
                 Detroit, Michigan*              St. Louis, Missouri*
                 Erie, Pennsylvania*             St. Paul, Minnesota*
                 Falls Church, Virginia          San Francisco, California*
                 Fresno, California*             Seattle, California*
                 Honolulu, Hawaii*               Twin Falls, Idaho*
**The International Institute of Boston has a refugee resettlement sub-office in Manchester, New Hampshire.

       IRSA, through its network of affiliates, has sponsored and provided R&P services to more than
151,000 refugees since 1975. During the period January 1, 2001 – December 31, 2003, 11,050
refugees were resettled by IRSA. In addition, since January 2001, over 6400 Cuban entrants
primarily in Miami have been reception and placement-like services through the Matching Grant
program.

       IRSA is primarily an urban-based structure deeply rooted in and funded by the communities in
which its Partner Agencies are located. IRSA agencies are multi-service centers serving a broad
range of community needs with in-house staff to provide case management, employment, education,
counseling, and immigration services. The structure itself compliments the aim of the Matching Grant
Program since IRSA can readily provide the ancillary services necessary to support and promote
early self-sufficiency. IRSA is philosophically committed to providing refugees, asylees, and Cuban-
Haitian Public Interest Parolees concentrated and integrated up-front services, including maintenance
assistance services, during an intensive and accelerated search for employment. Our network of
agencies provides continued social adjustment and support services to assure long-term success for
new arrivals.

       The national office provides guidance to the network on refugee resettlement, including the
Matching Grant Program, through written memoranda, e-mail, the use of a website with a “virtual
private network” for IRSA Partner Agencies, frequent telephone contacts, including regular
conference calls, national and regional meetings and on-site monitoring visits and training.

        IRSA’s National Programs division administers all of IRSA’s domestic reception and integration
programs as well as its Training Center, which provides training programs around the United States
for institutions and individuals working with new arrivals.


B.     Administrative Relationship between National Office and Participating Local Affiliates

       IRSA proposes to continue the Matching Grant Program at its sixteen current sites and to add
two new sites to the Program. IRSA has consulted extensively with the eighteen local agencies
selected to participate in the Matching Grant Program to plan and coordinate services. IRSA will
continue to have extensive programmatic and financial oversight. Through these affiliates, IRSA plans
to provide services to 4,761 persons in calendar year 2004. Contacts with participating agencies will
be maintained as follows:

       Financial:

       IRSA will assume full fiscal and management responsibilities for the project. Affiliate sites will
be subcontractors to IRSA, receiving, through a voucher system, a monthly per capita pass-through,
to be spent in accordance with a budget submitted to IRSA (see section 5, Budget). This structure
has been successfully used for the Refugee Reception and Placement Program funded by the United
States Department of State's Bureau for Population, Refugees, and Migration, the current Matching
Grant Program, the IRSA Kurdish Reception and Placement Program funded by the federal Office of
Refugee Resettlement (ORR), among others. In each of these programs the IRSA national office
was the award recipient and demonstrated its ability to comply successfully with both fiscal and
programmatic requirements on behalf of its participating affiliates.

       In addition, IRSA's Chief Operating Officer, Accounting Manager, and Grants Analyst are very
familiar with Matching Grant federal requirements, and will manage the funds and account for them in
accordance with these requirements. IRSA meets the financial management standards required in
45 CFR, Part 74, and Subpart H.

       Monitoring:

      Program Officers who work with the MG and R&P programs conduct an on-site joint monitoring
to MG participating agency every two years. Additional trips will be scheduled as needed by the
IRSA MG Program Officer, with approval from IRSA’s Director of National Programs. A team
comprised of the MG Program Officer, R&P Program Officer and/or Grants Analyst will monitor each
new agency participating in the Matching Grant. As the need arises, additional program, finance
personnel and/or database personnel will join the team for on–site monitoring and technical
assistance. Agencies that have participated in earlier years will be monitored using the above-
mentioned team approach bi-annually. Agencies that operate multiple programs with IRSA or have
large programs may be monitored annually. Performance standards and the CY2004-monitoring
schedule are detailed in Section F. IRSA has developed a joint Matching Grant and R&P Monitoring
Protocol, a MG Site Visit Guide (Attachment B), an IRSA Case file Review Checklist (Attachment C),
an IRSA Home Visit Questionnaire (Attachment D), and a Matching Grant Report Template
(Attachment E) to assist in on-site monitoring, and has standardized Matching Grant tracking forms to
assure accurate documentation of services performed (Attachments F-P). The tracking forms are
included in the IRSA Matching Grant Program Handbook which is posted on the IRSA website. The
site visit guide and monitoring template will be revised to incorporate changes in the CY2004
guidelines. The IRSA MG Training manual was attached to the CY99 Annual report submitted to ORR
in March 2000 and is also posted on our website.

      Reporting:

       Regular oversight of Matching Grant operational, financial, and progress reports and records is
provided by IRSA's Matching Grant Program Officer, who maintains regular telephone and written
contact with participating agencies and works with a division team comprised of a Senior Program
Officer, a Program Assistant, a Grants Analyst, and a Director of Information Systems Management.
In CY2000, the National Programs division developed a financial tracking tool to allow the National
Programs division to manage national expenditures more efficiently. refer to (Attachment Q). Since
October 2000, IRSA’s established financial protocols with its Matching Grant affiliates have required
the submission of a monthly payment report see (Attachment QR). IRSA has established a record for
timely submission of programmatic and financial reports with its funders. It will adhere to this
standard for Matching Grant programmatic and financial reports.

      Data Collection:

       IRSA's Matching Grant Program Officer maintains systematic semi-weekly telephone contact
with each participating agency. New sites and sites needing additional technical assistance will
receive at least daily contact. The MG Program Officer is responsible for monitoring the affiliate’s
enrollment of appropriate MG candidates, approves monthly pass-through grant amounts, and
ensures the compilation of information for Matching Grant program progress reports. The MG
Program Officer, with the assistance of a MG Program Assistant, ensures the accuracy of reported
data and that it has been submitted in a timely manner. IRSA’s monitoring of program reporting
requirement has been greatly enhanced by the MG Database which allows for daily monitoring of
program enrollment, caseload status and case related financial expenditures.

      Technical Assistance:

       The IRSA Director of National Programs, Senior and Match Grant Program Officer, and Grants
Analyst will be the primary point persons to provide technical assistance for all aspects of the
Program as well as administrative and grant requirements. This will be done through written and
telephone communications and through on-site training sessions. The Program Assistant will provide
additional administrative and programmatic back up. The Director of Information Management
Systems will also be available to train sites on the Match Grant database and trouble shoot the
computer software and hardware.

       IRSA will provide a three-day Matching Grant new site and database-training workshop for
new sites and new staff from old sites in San Francisco, California in late May or early June 2004. In
May 2004 during the IRSA National Network Meeting we will conduct a number of sessions focusing
on Employment Services, bringing together staff from all eighteen sites.
     Specific details on technical assistance follow in Section G.

C.   National Management of the Matching Grant Program

     IRSA is proposing 8.28 Full Time Equivalencies (FTEs) for the Matching Grant Program. National staff
     that will be allocated to the IRSA Matching Grant Program include the following at the indicated
     percentages of time:


     Director of National Programs (39% $21,424) the director the National Programs will be in charger of
     the overall activities of the project including supervision of program staff and the preparation of sub-
     contracts.


     Program Officer (279% $107,329): The program officers will be responsible of the implementation of
     the program including program development, monitoring and coordinating regional partners,
     documentation, reporting and technical assistance.


     Program Assistant (280% $69,986): The program assistants will provide administrative assistance
     under the direct supervision of the Program Officer. The program assistant duties will include but not
     limited to: Mailing, filing, correspondence, logistical assistance, data processing, maintenance of the
     MG Database system and website.


     Program Assistance Database (35% $7,872): The program assistant will provide MG Database
     administrative assistance, maintenance and technical support under the direct supervision of the
     Program Officer. The program assistant duties will include but not limited to: Correspondence,
     logistical assistance and data processing


     Grants Analyst (50% $15,747): The Grants Analyst will be responsible for reviewing local agency MG
     budgets and expenditure reports, prepares SF269, responsible for payments to MG sites and assists
     with providing financial training, technical assistance, and monitoring services to MG sites.


     Director of Management Information Systems (MIS)( 40% $20,196): Manages the Server and the
     redundancy systems required for hosting the MG Database application and conducts the technical
     maintenance for integration of the MG Database with other IRSA information systems and responsible
     for maintenance of data and system security.


     Webmaster (35% $11,667): Responsible for designing and maintaining IRSA’s website,
     www.refugeesusa.org, which contains comprehensive program information in a password protected
     area, accessible only by IRSA Partner Agencies.
       Production Supervisor (25% $10,712): The Production Supervisor will assist in the development and
       design of MG program training materials, staff development resources and IRSA MG database user’s
       manual and user training materials, and curriculum. All materials will be designed so as they can be
       posted to IRSA’s website.


       LAN Administrator (45% $16,068): Responsible for the day to day operation of IRSA’s LAN system.




Staff Qualifications

       The IRSA Senior Program Officer is Kate Hilton-Hayward. She has been involved in the
refugee resettlement program for more than eleven years and was the Matching Grant Program
Officer for more than seven years. She has had significant experience managing IRSA’s resettlement
programs. She has monitored and evaluated Partner Agency refugee resettlement programs on-site,
including the Department of State’s Reception and Placement program, ORR’s Matching Grant and
Preferred Communities programs, and the INS Cuban Parolee Resettlement Program. In addition,
she is a skilled trainer familiar with adult learning needs and is on the faculty of IRSA’s Training
Center. Not only has she trained IRSA Partner Agency staff in the Matching Grant Program, but has
offered the New Sites Training Program to other Voluntary Agencies, as they implemented their new
programs, and was a key trainer at LIRS’ Matching Grant conference in 1999. The Senior Program
Officer will continue to be very involved in the IRSA MG program design and implementation and
leads IRSA’s strategic plans to help the IRSA network become more informed and involved in early
self-sufficiency and cash assistance alternatives.

The Matching Grant Program Officer is Michael Taylor. He joined IRSA in November 2000 and for
the previous three years he has been involved with the Matching Grant program initially as a program
assistant and since April 2003 in his current position as the MG Program Officer. Prior to joining
IRSA he served 20 years in the U.S. Navy in a variety of administrative and training positions.

See job descriptions for Senior Program Officer, Program Officer and Program Assistant and
resumes for Kate Hilton-Hayward and Michael Taylor (Attachments RVS-W).

D.     Coordination of Matching Grant Services with State-administered Program Services

        Within 90 days of the grant award, affiliates will inform their respective State Refugee
Coordinators of their involvement in the Program, the number of refugees expected to be served, the
services to be provided, and the Matching Grant contact person at their agency. Matching Grant staff
receive in-depth training from IRSA on which services Matching Grant clients can and cannot access
and are responsible for monitoring client access to appropriate services. A guide to Matching Grant
Eligible Expenses was developed as by IRSA as a reference tool and it is an appendix to the
Matching Grant Training Manual. In addition, local affiliates coordinate with the local welfare office to
assure that Matching Grant clients do not access public assistance (see Part 2. General Program
Design, Section D).

      Matching Grant services will be coordinated in-house at IRSA agency affiliates. In large
agencies the lead person will be the designated Matching Grant Coordinator; in smaller agencies it
will be the professional case managers who coordinate services and assistance to clients through a
single multi-service center. Since most Matching Grant services will be provided in-house at local
agency affiliates, the Case Manager can readily oversee and monitor provision of Matching Grant
mandated services. Case managers will be responsible for establishing case files and differentiating
R & P and Matching Grant reporting. Special forms are in place to track Matching Grant expenditures
and in-kind services. Local sites may design and use their own tracking forms with the prior approval
of IRSA.

       The majority of the IRSA MG Partner Agencies also hold State Employment and Social
Service contracts. Local agencies have created programs that coordinate and clearly distinguish the
two programs. The MG employment and case management services are delineated programmatically
by targeting those employable individuals that are most likely to achieve self-sufficiency within the
four-month period. Therefore the MG employable refugees are put on a track of a very short term,
concentrated, and accelerated nature. After four months have been completed, MG refugees may
then access state services that are designed to serve the functions of job upgrade or developing and
implementing long range career planning.

      For an agency that does not have state-funded employment services in-house, case
managers are responsible for the coordination and oversight of job development, counseling and
placement services. Case managers will assure that follow-up with the employee and employer is
conducted within two weeks after the refugee has started work and will continue follow up activities
with MG clients throughout their first 180- days in the United States.

Coordination for specific agencies where Match Grant programs are operated in conjunction with
several state-administered programs is attached (Attachment WY)

E.    2003 Monitoring of Matching Grant Sites

All IRSA MG sites have been monitored within the past three years. A team comprised of IRSA
Program Officers, Program Assistants and/or Finance personnel conducted on-site program
monitoring. IRSA monitored its MG affiliates’ performance against the goals contained in the
agency’s annual goal plan and reviewed case files. Quality of service was further assessed by home
visits to MG clients. Monitors also reviewed written program and financial reports submitted by the
affiliates, maintained frequent telephone, electronic and written communication, and met with both
program and finance staff.

      January 27- 29, 2003        Youth Co-Op, Miami, Florida
      March 26 – 28, 2003         International Institute of New Jersey, Jersey City, New Jersey
      April 14 – 16, 2003         International Institute of Buffalo, New York
      April 24 – 26, 2003         International Institute of Los Angeles, California
      June 14 – 16, 2003          YMCA International Services, Houston, Texas
      July 16 – 17, 2003          Nationalities Service Center, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania
      August 6 – 8, 2003          International Institute of Rhode Island, Providence, Rhode Island
      September 15 – 17, 2003     Heartland Alliance for Human Needs and Human Rights, Chicago, Illinois
      November 17-18, 2003        Don Bosco, Nationalities Service Center and Jewish Vocational Services,
                                  Kansas City, Missouri

All site visits proposed for the CY2003 program year have been completed, with the exception of
Church Avenue Merchants’ Block Association (CAMBA) and the International Institute of Boston,
which are scheduled to be monitored during June and July 2004 respectively. A summary of findings
during monitoring visits follows:

Youth Co-Op, Miami, Florida:
The Youth Co-Op was monitored January 27 – 29, 2003. The agency currently with the largest
caseload within the IRSA network, they continue to maintain a model program and enjoy a well
earned reputation for providing quality services and excellent case management. The agency is in
full compliance with all the MG Guideline requirements.

The agency continues to maintain its strong outreach to the community as exhibited by its achieving
106% of its enrollment goal for CY2002. The effectiveness of its employment services was
demonstrated by the 87% employment rate for clients participating, with 86% of clients able to obtain
full-time employment.

In CY2002 89% of clients were self-sufficient at 120th day and their self-sufficiency retention rate at
the 180th day was 100% demonstrating the effectiveness of their client assessment, and case
management procedures.

The Miami area continues to provide opportunities for good employment however the agency’s
employment/job development staff is continuously challenged to find employers that offer health
benefits and improve the average hourly wage for their clients.


International Institute of New Jersey, Jersey City, New Jersey:

The International Institute of New Jersey was monitored on March 26 – 28, 2003. The agency
strengthened its outreach and community relations as exhibited by its 178% (116 vice 65) increase in
client enrollment for CY2002. IINJ joined the IRSA MG network in CY2001 and experienced an
improvement in all of it program outcomes in CY2002.

IINJ continues to improve its case management and service delivery. During home visits monitors
were able to assess through client interviews that the agency is providing a level of service as
required by program guidelines. However the monitors did note that the agency needed to improve it
record keeping and case file documentation. IRSA monitors provided technical assistance to the MG
Coordinator and the case management staff in the areas of: proper use of IRSA tracking forms, the
development of local forms, recording of financial expenses; and documenting client contacts.

IRSA staff also reviewed the requirements for providing $50 per week / $200 per month to each adult
client with the staff. Monitors recommended the agency review and revise their financial procedures
in order to ensure that all client payment transactions were allowable and accounted for.

Monitors also noted the need for closer coordination of service between case management and
employment staffs. In CY2004 64% of the clients accessing employment services were employed
full-time, this was a slight improvement over CY2001 however monitors felt that the caseworkers and
employment staff were not always working in tandem. IRSA recommended that the case
management and employment services staffs meet regularly to review the client caseload in order to
identify priority clients.


International Institute of Buffalo, Buffalo, New York:

The International Institute of Buffalo was monitored during the period March 14 – 16, 2003. The
downturn in the U.S Refugee Resettlement Program resulting from the events of September 11, 2000
has had a significant impact on the Agency’s MG program. II of Buffalo experienced a sharp decline
in MG program enrollment during CY2002, new enrollments fell to 20 (31%) compared to a total of 64
in CY2001 the decrease in client enrollments could be traced to a number of factors which included;
the lower than expected number of refugees resettled by the agency, a high out migration rate of the
Iranian refugee community, and a number of potential clients electing to access public assistance
benefits.

IRSA monitors during their home visits with clients found housing to be suitable in affordable. The
agency has developed a network of landlords adequate to meet its clienteles housing requirements.

The case file review revealed good case management services, with the need for improvement in
documenting follow up activities and better documentation of volunteer services performed in support
of MG clients.

There were no major findings during the monitoring visit and IRSA monitors found the agency to be in
compliance with program guidelines.


International Institute of Los Angeles, California:

The International Institute of Los Angeles (IILA) was monitored during the period April 24 – 26, 2003.
IILA has participated in IRSA MG program since CY2000. Despite low refugee arrivals the agency
experienced an increase in its caseload. The result of its excellent outreach to the local asylee
community, 163% increase in client enrollment (108 for CY2002 compared to 66 in CY2001). When
compared to its CY2000 and CY2001 outcomes, despite the slow economy and impact of September
11, 2001, IILA reported significant increases in CY2002 measurable outcomes.

IILA enrolled 5 refugees and 103 (44 Chinese and 30 Colombians) asylees in CY2002. The home
and work place visits conducted by IRSA monitors indicated that clients were well served, and happy
with the level of agency support provided and had received adequate referrals to other programs and
services.

The case files reviewed revealed good case management services being provided, with the need for
improvement in documenting client barriers/obstacles to achieving program goals, follow up activities
addressing barriers, volunteer services performed in support of the program, ESL (when required)
attendance and financial payments to clients.

With the exception of the above recommendations, there were no major findings during the
monitoring visit and IRSA monitors found the agency to be in compliance with program guidelines.


YMCA International Services, Houston, Texas:

IRSA staff visited YMCA International Services, Houston on June 14 -16, 2003, to monitor
implementation of the Reception & Placement and Matching Grant Programs.

The Director of YMCA International reported that Houston’s economy was still depressed following
the collapse of Enron one of the areas largest employers and that a significant number of employers
were located in the suburban areas not accessible via public transportation.

The Texas Public Private Partnership (PPP) has been in place for one year and has proven to be a
successful program. Singles and childless couples receive benefits under this program which has
resulted in more of them electing to participate in PPP vice MG. IRSA monitors noted the decrease in
client enrollment, 197 as compared to 470 for CY2001. YMCA also reported decreases in CY2002
measurable outcomes for employment.

As part of the site visit IRSA monitors reviewed case files, conducted home visits with client families
and interviewed agency staff. IRSA monitors commended YMCA International staff on their efforts to
document all in-kind matches and volunteer services in the case files. They have developed a model
system for tracking donated goods and services. The case files reviewed revealed good case
management and other services being provided.

There were no significant findings other than those stated above and IRSA monitors found the
agency in compliance with all the requirements of the MG program guidelines.


Nationalities Service Center, Philadelphia, PA:

IRSA staff visited Nationalities Service Center (NSC), Philadelphia on July 16 – 17, 2003 to monitor
implementation of Reception & Placement and Matching Grant Programs.

IRSA monitors found that refugees resettled through the agency were provided with the financial
support and services as outlined in the program guidelines. The monitors commended the staff for
their follow up and implementation of recommendations from IRSA’s previous monitoring visit in
August 2002. They included the development of written protocols for client assessment; creating a
systematic approach to maintaining the client caseload; holding weekly case management meetings;
translation of orientation materials into client languages; improved case file documentation
procedures; and the implementation of staff development training.

There were no significant findings and IRSA monitors found the agency in compliance with all
requirements of the MG program guidelines.


International Institute of Rhode Island, Providence, Rhode Island:

IRSA staff visited International Institute of Rhode Island (IIRI) on August 6 – 8, 2003, to monitor
implementation of the Reception & Placement and Matching Grant Programs.

During our three day site visit IRSA monitors made five home visits, reviewed a sampling of refugee
and asylee case files, met with staff both individually and collectively.

IIRI has implemented an excellent system for maintaining client case files. Their record keeping
procedures and case file documentation were noted as among the best in IRSA’s MG network. They
have developed a model system for entering client case notes which they have been asked to share
as a best practice with the rest of our MG network.

IRSA monitors recommended that the Institute might benefit from a strengthening of its volunteer
services program with increased emphasis on the reporting of volunteer services by client families,
with the development of a system similar to that being utilized for tracking cash and in-kind donations.

There were no major findings during the monitoring visit and the agency is in compliance with all the
requirements of the MG program guidelines.


Heartland Alliance for Human Needs & Human Rights, Chicago, Illinois:
IRSA monitors visited Heartland Alliance for Human Needs & Human Rights on September 15 – 17,
2003. During the visit the monitors interviewed staff of Heartland Alliance, conducted home visits and
interviews with refugees and asylees resettled by the agency and reviewed case files.

Due to a low number of refugees arrivals the agency has strengthen its outreach efforts to the
Chicago area asylee population. At the time of our monitoring visit the agency had enrolled 51
asylees, 21 refugees and 3 victims of trafficking into the MG program resulting in non refugee clients
as 72% of the program enrollment. The agency reported that the Chicago economy was sluggish and
that a number of employers had implemented tougher employee screening program, which has
resulted in an increase of the number of man hours performed by employment services staff in finding
client job placements. The review of the case file indicated a need for agency staff to focus more on
documenting services.

Overall, the monitors found the agency to be in compliance with the requirements of the MG program
guidelines.


Don Bosco Nationalities Service Center and Jewish Vocational Services, Kansas City,
Missouri:


IRSA monitors visited both the Don Bosco Nationalities Service Center and Jewish Vocational
Services (JVS) on November 17-18, 2003 in order to assess their plans for transitioning Matching
Grant Program services. Don Bosco ended its participation in the Reception & Placement Program
as of September 30, 2003. Jewish Vocational Services joined IRSA’s R&P Program network on
October 1, 2003 and is proposing to participate in IRSA’s CY2004 MG Program.

IRSA monitors conducted New Director training with the Executive Director of JVS; this training was
also attended by the JVS Financial Manager and Director of Resettlement & Immigration Services.
The monitors also met with jointly with the resettlement staffs of both agencies to review the R&P
Cooperative Agreement and MG Program guidelines. The monitors conducted home visits and
reviewed a sampling of case files for clients enrolled during CY2002 and CY2003.

The current program transition plan calls for Don Bosco to administer program services for the
CY2003 caseload up until December 31, 2003. At which time most of the current Don Bosco
Resettlement & MG program staff will be hired in January 2004 by JVS. Don Bosco will subsequently
enter into a contractual agreement with JVS, in which JVS will provided MG program services and
case management for the remainder of the program year.

IRSA monitors found Don Bosco to be in compliance with the requirements of the MG program
guidelines, and support the agencies plan for the transition of MG program services from Don Bosco
to Jewish Vocational Services.
F.    2004 Plan for Programmatic and Financial Monitoring

        IRSA will monitor the programmatic and financial aspects of the Program by conducting on-site
monitoring visits, reviewing written program and financial reports submitted by the affiliates,
maintaining frequent telephone and written communication, responding to ORR monitoring reports,
and by meeting with local Matching Grant staff while conducting the on-site monitoring. IRSA will
monitor its Matching Grant affiliates’ performance against the goals contained in the agency’s annual
outcome goal plan and thorough case file review. Quality of services is further assessed by home
visits to MG clients and visits to employers where MG clients work.

      Monitoring materials:

      In CY2000, IRSA revised its Site Visit Guide, a Matching Grant Case file Review, Home
      Checklist and Monitoring Report Template. IRSA has also revised all reporting formats to
      assist in on-site monitoring, and have standardized and revised Matching Grant tracking forms
      to assure accurate, complete and uniform documentation of services performed (for the details
      of revised forms, please see Attachments F-P). IRSA monitoring protocol is shared with the
      MG participating agencies so that they know what to expect when a monitoring visit is
      scheduled. It is also beneficial to partner agencies as they conduct their own internal
      monitoring periodically to make sure that they are implementing the terms and agreements of
      the Match Grant program.

      On-Site Monitoring:

        IRSA utilizes a monitoring protocol, which adopts the standards for Matching Grant activities
set forth in the ORR Voluntary Agency Matching Grant Services Guidelines and the IRSA Matching
Grant Handbook. A month prior to the trip, IRSA notifies the affiliate of the upcoming visit. An IRSA
Match Grant Site Visit Guide (Attachment B) is sent to the affiliate, which IRSA requests to have
returned in advance, so that it can be reviewed and questions prepared for the entrance interview.
Other preparation includes: reading prior IRSA site visit reports and affiliates' responses to
recommendations; contacting State Refugee Coordinator's Office; reviewing semi-annual financial
expenditure reports; Program Progress Reports and Matching Grant Rosters for family self sufficiency
and the agency’s individual Annual Goals Plan. The monitor also reviews the affiliate's timeliness of
submitting required reports.

         The IRSA monitor spends one to three days on-site. An entrance interview is conducted to
review the IRSA site visit guide and to discuss how the MG program is going at the local level and if
any significant changes have occurred since the last monitoring. A case file review of at least 10-
20% of the Matching Grant candidates enrolled within the last twelve months is then conducted. For
new sites, the majority of the files are reviewed to ensure the agency is implementing all aspects of
the program accurately. The monitor meets with all Matching Grant staff, including job developers,
and devotes time for Q & A and training. Since 1998, home visits have been conducted as part of the
official Matching Grant monitoring. In addition, MG monitoring trips are routinely conducted in
conjunction with an R&P monitoring and in those cases two-three home visits per program are
routinely conducted. The monitor usually requests that one or more of these home visits are with a
non refugee Matching Grant case. In addition, the affiliate usually arranges a trip to an employer
where Matching Grant clients find initial employment. Whenever possible, the monitor attends local
activities to grasp the character of the local resettlement environment and participate in acculturation
activities.

       The monitor performs an exit interview to review what was observed on site, assess the
strengths of the program, and make recommendations for areas in need of improvement. If a delay in
writing the monitoring report is expected, a letter summarizing those recommendations is sent to the
site. A complete monitoring report is generated containing a review of the statistics, financial data,
staffing patterns, and program service delivery and case files. Recommendations are made in the
body of the text and are summarized at the end of the report. IRSA requires that each
recommendation be addressed by the affiliate, and frequently requires that corrected case file
documentation be included with the affiliate's formal response. The monitor checks the affiliate's
response to each recommendation, point-by-point. Follow-up continues until all recommendations
are addressed. If serious management or service delivery problems were revealed, IRSA may elect
to re-visit that affiliate within the next six to twelve months to ensure that the problems have been
corrected appropriately.

        IRSA staff will continue to have extensive programmatic and financial oversight. A team comprised
of the MG Program Officer and the Senior Program Officer or another Program Officer/Monitor will
conduct on-site monitoring visits. As the need arises, finance personnel and/or database personnel will
join the team for on–site monitoring.

       The two new agencies participating in the Matching Grant will be monitored during the CY2004.
The sites that are currently participating in the Matching Grant program will be monitored every other year
except Miami, which will be monitored again this year since 48% of IRSA’s total MG caseload will be
served at Youth Co-op in CY2004. In CY2004, IRSA will be conducting a total of twelve On-Site
Monitoring visits: ten monitoring visits with current MG participating agencies and the two new sites.

The proposed schedule for 2004 monitoring is as follows:

       International Institute of New Jersey                    February 2004
              Jersey City, New Jersey
       Youth Co-Op Inc., Miami, Florida                         March 2004
       International Institute of Los Angles, California        March 2004
       International Institute of Akron, Ohio                   May 2004
       Church Avenue Merchants Block Association                June 2004
              Brooklyn, New York
       International Institute of St. Louis, Missouri           June 2004
       Pacific Gateway Center, Honolulu, Hawaii                 July 2004
       International Institute of Boston, Massachusetts         July 2004
       International Institute of East Bay                      August 2004
              Oakland, California
       International Institute of Milwaukee, Wisconsin          August 2004
       Jewish Vocational Services, Kansas City, Missouri        September 2004
       YMCA International Services, Houston, Texas              October 2004

G.     Technical Assistance and Training

         The Senior Program Officer and Matching Grant Program Officer, with the assistance of the
Program Monitor and Program Assistant provide technical assistance through telephone, e-mail, fax,
and memoranda. Semi-weekly contact, at a minimum, is maintained with each Matching Grant
affiliate. Additional training and assistance is provided on-site during monitoring visits and through
the IRSA Matching Grant Handbook.

In addition to regular ongoing contact, IRSA plans to provide the following training opportunities in
2004:
1. New Site/Database Training: New site training is held annually shortly after the Matching
   Grant letter of award has been received. IRSA most recently conducted new site training in
   CY2001 in Providence, Rhode Island (Attachment Z). In CY2004, new site training will be
   held in San Francisco, California. IRSA National staff will provide a thorough overview of
   the program and will review IRSA’s Match Grant training manual. Both financial and
   programmatic aspects of the program will be discussed. IRSA’s standardized forms and
   reporting formats will be discussed. Special focus will be given to review the Annual Goals
   Plan and to the GPRA requirements of the program. IRSA recommends (and proposes to
   fund) four employees of the new agencies (one program coordinator, one data entry
   person, one finance person and one MIST person). The current MG participating agencies
   may send their new employees who haven’t participated in the previous MG trainings.
   During this New Site Training, there will also be training on the new Matching Grant
   database. One MG data entry and one Information Systems Management person for each
   agency will attend. The IMS person is expected to train the Match Grant team in the
   agency. IRSA’ MG Program Officer and MIS personnel will provide this training. The
   Director for National Programs, the Senior Program Officer, two Program Officers, a
   Program Assistant, IRSA IMS and finance personnel will actively participate in this training.
   Staff from the two proposed new sites and two existing sites will be in attendance.

2. On-Site Training: During each site's monitoring visit an additional 1/2 to a full day of on-site
   Matching Grant-specific training is conducted on an as-needed basis by the IRSA
   monitor(s).

3. Technical Assistance Visits: Will be conducted with partner agencies as required during
   CY2004 for the express purpose of providing financial, programmatic, and/or technology
   technical assistance as requested by partner agencies or as IRSA program monitoring
   indicates the need for such trainings:

4. Written Materials: IRSA provides continuous technical assistance through written
   directives, instructions, and manuals for affiliates. IRSA regularly revises materials such as
   the Site Visit Guide for Matching Grant monitoring, program tracking tools and the Matching
   Grant Handbook was completely revised in January 2000. The Handbook is used to assist
   with training new sites and to clarify procedures for already participating sites and also
   used as a training tool by Partner Agency MG coordinators to train their new employees
   assigned to the Matching Grant. The changes in the CY2004 Matching Grant Guidelines
   will be incorporated in the Handbook at the beginning of the new project year. IRSA plans
   to prepare a template for brochure to be used by agencies to educate their Matching Grant
   clients about the program. This template will be translated into six of the major languages
   MG clients speak.

5. Web Page: The IRSA MG training manual, reporting forms and summary about the MG
   program is already on the Web site. ORR guidelines, letter of agreements, training
   materials and ORR directives and correspondences will be incorporated into Partner
   Agency area of the Web Site. A MG Frequently Asked Questions (FAQs) section will also
   be added to the new IRSA Web Site. The MG database user’s manual is posted on this
   Web site. The Matching Grant monitoring protocol will also be availed. This Web page is
   one important means of sharing information with our affiliate agencies and other MG
   partners.

6. E-mail and Electronic List Service: IRSA made it clear to its MG participating agencies that
   e-mail is a requirement to participate in the IRSA Matching Grant program. Currently all MG
   participating agencies are using e-mails for correspondence with IRSA staff. With the
          launch of the Web Site, IRSA will also be introducing a MG E-mail List Serve for use
          among participating IRSA agencies to discuss the MG program management.

       7. Conference Calls: There are eight MG conference calls planned for the CY2004
          (Attachment BB). The topics that will be covered during these calls will be: annual report,
          financial reports, Annual Goal plans, changes in the MG Guidelines, MG database, serving
          asylees and entrants. The purpose of the calls is to elicit an idea exchange among IRSA
          participating agencies and to encourage peer-to-peer training. The calls will be moderated
          either by Senior Program Officer or MG Program Officer

       8. Peer-to-peer exchanges: IRSA plans to continue its peer-to-peer exchange program in
          CY2004: two new agencies and new staff from two older sites will visit two experienced
          host agencies.

       9. Special Technology Projects: IRSA will assist participating local MG agencies to advance
          technologically. Funds will be available to purchase upgraded computers, access email
          and website services, consult with local computer consultants to review and computerize
          reporting requirements. Starting in CY2001, IRSA has required all local agencies to be
          able to send and receive data, reports and written directives via e-mail. This funding will
          allow local agencies to meet this goal.

In CY2003, in addition to written directives, e-mail, regular conference calls, and peer-to-peer
exchanges, IRSA provided the following additional training opportunities:

       1. National Network Meeting: In April 2003, IRSA held a National Network Meeting in
          Washington, DC. The NNM is held bi-annually and brings together IRSA Partner Agency
          staff. A Match Grant “nuts and bolts” track provided workshops on managing a MG
          program. IRSA will hold a NNM again in May 2004.

       2. Executive Director Retreat: At the Executive Director’s Retreat, held in February 2003, the
          Matching Program Officer moderated a session at on cash assistance alternatives:
          Executive Directors from IRSA Partner Agencies presented on their MG programs as well
          as Wilson Fish and Alternative Grants. This session was a good opportunity to orient
          Executive Directors on the benefits of early employment cash assistance alternative
          programs.
2.     GENERAL PROGRAM DESIGN

A.     Selection and Characteristics of Matching Grant Participants

       Rationale:

        IRSA and its affiliates place clients into the Matching Grant program on a case-by-case basis
utilizing the following general principles with regard to client characteristics and selection. In addition,
IRSA and its affiliates always make an effort to target new or relatively new refugee groups, for
example, Sudanese (including the youth from Kakuma camp), Somali Bantu, Afghans, Iranians,
Burmese, Hmong, Cuban-Haitian entrants, and asylees. This strategy has often been successful
because our affiliates report that new groups are often more willing to participate in programs that are
alternatives to the existing welfare system.

       Characteristics:

       1. Employability: Each case will have one or two potential wage earners; employability
          potential will strongly be taken into consideration.

       2. Case Size: Case size is not a major determining factor in selecting Matching Grant clients;
          some sites prefer to work with large families while others prefer singles and small families.
          This is taken into account during allocation and pre-arrival assessment for each Matching
          Grant site (described below). A general rule of thumb used in selection is no more than1-3
          persons per employable family member.

       3. Motivation: Prospective participants should express a receptive attitude toward the
          program goal of self-sufficiency and early employment; indicate their willingness to
          cooperate with avoidance of public assistance; and show a willingness to work closely with
          agency staff to achieve a mutually developed resettlement/self-sufficiency plan.

       4. Health/Mental Health: Cases should not present major health or mental health problems,
          which would interfere with job placement plans.

       5. Free Case vs. Relative Reunion Cases: IRSA affiliates do not exclude refugees from
          Matching Grant consideration because of their status (free case, family reunion, singles or
          families), but rather consider the potential and willingness of the entire family to become
          self-sufficient within the 120-day period.

       Selection Process:

       IRSA's selection process for placement of refugees into the Matching Grant Program will take
place in three stages:

       1.     Allocation to Matching Grant site:

       IRSA staff will select cases for allocation to a Matching Grant site based on information
contained in biographical material received prior to arrival, taking into consideration the ethnic
capabilities at each site. The Matching Grant agency will be consulted before the case is assured.
This constitutes the initial assessment and decision.

       2.     Pre-arrival assessment:
      When the biographical information is received by the local agency, the Matching Grant staff will
reassess the case information in light of appropriate local job opportunities and make a second-stage
determination for placement in the Matching Grant Program.

       3.     Arrival assessment:

        The prospective Matching Grant participant will be interviewed in one or more meetings to
assess the factors listed above (employability, case size, motivation and health/mental health) and to
explain the goal, level of services, and requirements of the Matching Grant Program. Mutual
agreement between the Case Manager and the candidate must be reached in order for the person to
be enrolled in the Matching Grant Program. The refugee then signs a letter of agreement to
participate in the Matching Grant Program. Copies of the letter are maintained in the case files.

B.     Resettlement Model Utilized

       Sponsorship Arrangements: IRSA affiliates directly sponsor all refugees that they resettle,
including family reunification cases. IRSA holds affiliates, and affiliates only, responsible for the
provision of all required and otherwise necessary resettlement services. Paid, trained affiliate staff
provide services to new arrivals, augmented by the efforts of anchor relatives and other volunteers.
IRSA does not use "co-sponsors" in either the traditional sense or as defined in the Cooperative
Agreement.

       When planning for the arrival of a family reunification case, IRSA affiliates use a written
"anchor relative agreement" form as a planning tool when discussing with anchor relatives how they
can help in the upcoming resettlement process. The form typically lists the services, which will be
required. As part of the planning process, the relative indicates on the form, which services he/she
expects to help with, and the caseworker indicates which services the affiliate expects to provide.
This is very useful in making clear to the anchor relative that the affiliate will be responsible for any
service that the relative is not able to complete, regardless of indications on the form.

       Volunteers, mentors, and role models are used in resettlement and Matching Grant activities,
under the direction and guidance of local agency staff. Volunteers from MAA's and ethnic
communities are used to help facilitate services, socialization, and acculturation. Under the auspices
"adopt a family" programs have occurred, through interested individuals, associations, or churches.

       This system of holding professional staff responsible for resettlement services, augmented by
volunteers and family members, has served IRSA and refugees it has resettled well.

      IRSA Resettlement Practice: The IRSA resettlement model is founded on intensive case
management occurring through the auspices of a multi-service center. A single staff person (the case
manager) assesses a client's needs and abilities, manages and coordinates the provision of services
and assistance to the client, and facilitates movement of the individual through the necessary steps
toward achieving mutually agreed upon self-sufficiency goals.

       Case management will be provided by each affiliate using trained, experienced staff beginning
as soon as the refugee is identified as a potential Matching Grant candidate during the pre-arrival
period in the selection process. (The selection process is described above in section 2.a.)
Commencing case management early assures continuity of assessments and planning. Case
managers will be responsible for monitoring progress toward self-sufficiency, follow-up, and providing
ongoing support during the 180-day period. Case management will be provided in conformity with the
standards and requirements set forth in the Matching Grant guidelines and will continue after job
placement or until termination from the Program.

        Case managers, along with other local staff providing direct services in the Matching Grant
Program, will receive specific training for the Program. Appropriate bilingual and bicultural capability
will be built into the case management process at each site.

       Principal activities in case management include the following:

       1.     Explaining the Matching Grant Program to potential candidates, and counseling during
              the selection process regarding participation;

       2.     Assessing and registering selected candidates;

       3.     Developing a resettlement plan for each and every member of the case, using IRSA's
              Resettlement Plan (Attachment H, 1-3);

       4.     Maintaining and documenting regular and frequent contact with, and monitoring
              progress of adult members of the case throughout the full 180-days of the Match Grant
              program;

       5.     Creating and maintaining case files which contain all required documents and extensive
              case notes logging the purpose and outcomes of that contact and client’s progress in
              achieving the resettlement plan;

       6.     Identifying and coordinating services needed and delivered to participating refugees;

       7.     Monitoring referrals to assure that the refugee receives the needed service and that it
              leads to an appropriate outcome;

       8.     Counseling and assisting participating refugees throughout the Matching Grant period
              and beyond, if possible;

       9.     Sanctioning when necessary (see section F.) but never abandoning a case;

       10.    Supervising case management services, including case conferences, intervention and
              progress charting;

       11.    Determining the status of the case at the end of the Matching Grant period and if clients
              are not self-sufficient by the end of the first 120 days, continue to work with clients or
              otherwise facilitate the transition to TANF or other services for clients.

       Although each site will adhere to the Matching Grant case management requirements and the
above principal elements, there will be some variations at each site due to differences in agency
structure, local resources and anticipated client needs.
C.     Differentiation of Charges for Cooperative Agreement and Matching Grant Programs

      IRSA has developed a "guide to Matching Grant eligible expenses", which clearly delineates
MG and R&P expenses (see Attachment XDD). The guide forms an appendix to the IRSA Matching
Grant Handbook. In addition, specific training sessions are regularly conducted, both on site and at
Annual MG Meetings on differentiating MG and R&P expenses.

        Matching Grant and R & P programs are assigned different accounting numbers within affiliate
accounting systems to ensure program integrity. In large centers R & P and Matching Grant staff are
funded separately, with staff dedicated solely to Matching Grant. In smaller agencies a percentage of
staff time is charged to Matching Grant. In some cases, administrative and supervisory staff is
charged according to the percentage of the total agency budget attributable to each program. Other
costs (housing, food, medical) are charged to Matching Grant only after the refugees' first 30 days in
the United States.

      Local staff has a clear understanding concerning differentiation of services and have
developed policies and tracking systems for this determination. Case files reflect provision of R&P
Core Services with separate paperwork for documenting the enhanced services provided under the
Matching Grant, with specific forms developed for this purpose. Differentiation of charges for
Cooperative Agreement and Matching Grant Program are closely monitored during on-site visits by
IRSA national staff.


D.     Differentiation of charges for services funded by the Alternative Projects, and by
       Wilson/Fish projects from those provided through the Matching Grant Program.

        IRSA’s Partner Agencies participate in three alternative projects nationally, in Idaho, Maryland,
and Vermont. Currently agencies in these three locales do not operate Match Grant Programs. IRSA
participates in two Fish-Wilson projects, in Massachusetts and in Kentucky. IRSA’s Partner Agencies
in both these locales operate Match Grant programs.

       1. Boston – International Institute of Boston

            In order to ensure that Matching Grant funds do not fund services to be provided under other
       agreements, an accounting code was developed to specifically track Matching Grant cash
       disbursements and local administrative costs (bi-monthly cash assistance, transportation,
       incentives for employment and job retention at 120 days, postage, supplies, telephone). Once a
       requisition has been made to our accounting department on a yellow sheet, copies are made on
       yellow sheets and then filed in a binder solely for these requests. After the request has been made
       to the accounting department, the information is put into a database specifically designed to track
       the following: case, # in case, ethnicity, DOA, date enrolled, date employed, FT/PT, employment
       incentive/date paid, spouse employment incentive/date paid, transportation expense/date paid,
       transportation incentive, employment incentive 90 days/date incentive paid, bi-monthly
       maintenance checks, date paid, value of volunteer hours, value of in-kind goods, total cash
       expenditures, and total in-kind cash expenditures. The information that is contained in the database
       is then linked to an access file that gives us one form with all of the total cash, total volunteer, and
       total in-kind hours that is placed in the client's file with all of the appropriate yellow sheets.

       Another policy is that the Resettlement Manager is the only person who can sign Matching Grant
       Requisition Forms that are requested from Case Managers. For purpose of accountability, the
      Resettlement Manager is the only person who is maintaining the database until another person is
      hired/trained to work on this task.

      We have established another database that distinguishes between R& P essential items and in-
      kind non-essential items. Once we have worked out the technical details, the database will provide
      us with costs associated with R&P and in-kind items for refugees in the Wilson-Fish Program and
      the Matching Grant Program.

      2. Bowling Green – Western Kentucky Refugee Mutual Assistance Association

         Matching Grant services are kept separate from services to non-Matching Grant
      participants. The ESL attendance sheet has a column showing the program that person is
      enrolled in. The caseworkers are part of the decision when a client is enrolled in Matching
      Grant. The caseworker has the choice of using the computer or a case note form. Either
      method has a place to check which program that service is to be charged to. At the end of the
      month the report is printed out. It shows the totals for each of the contracts.


E.    Procedures to Ensure That Refugees will not Access Public Cash Assistance During
      Their First Four Months

      Matching Grant clients will not utilize public cash assistance. IRSA affiliates will provide
      adequate maintenance assistance and assist employable refugees in obtaining employment as
      quickly as possible. In addition, the close involvement of case managers with Matching Grant
      clients will alert them to problems arising during the 120-day period, which can then be
      addressed promptly. Affiliates will also establish procedures with local public assistance
      offices involving Matching Grant refugees, and will provide to local public assistance offices the
      names of Matching Grant participants. Affiliates will inform public assistance staff of the goals
      of the Matching Grant Program and of the maintenance assistance available to Matching Grant
      clients. IRSA intends in this way to ensure that public cash assistance is not needed and will
      not be utilized by Matching Grant participants.

      Each participating affiliate has developed specific procedures to prevent the utilization of public
      assistance by Matching Grant refugees. They are described below.

AKRON: Refugees participating in the Matching Grant Program will sign an agreement not to access
public assistance for the first four months in the United States. Support will be provided from
Matching Grant funds to sustain participating refugees for the Match Grant period. Case managers
will monitor to assure that clients do not access public assistance.

BOSTON: Refugees participating in the Matching Grant Program will sign an agreement not to
access public assistance for the first four months in the United States. Support will be provided from
Matching Grant funds to sustain participating refugees for the Match Grant period. Case managers
will monitor to assure that clients do not access public assistance.

BOWLING GREEN: The state of Kentucky does not offer Refugee Cash Assistance (see Local Site
Description). Refugees participating in the Matching Grant Program will sign an agreement not to
access K-TAP (Kentucky Transitional Assistance Program) or the Wilson-Fish program for the first
four months in the United States. Support will be provided from Matching Grant funds to sustain
participating refugees for the Match Grant period. Case managers will monitor to assure that clients
follow their resettlement plan and early employment opportunities preclude the need for public
assistance.
BUFFALO: The Institute has established close working relationships with the Erie County
Department of Social Services as well as Catholic Charities of Buffalo, which holds the State contract
for refugee services in Western New York. At present, all ORR-sponsored refugees who apply for
public assistance in Erie County are assigned caseworkers within DSS and turned over to a single
part-time case manager within the Employment Division of DSS.

       The Institute's case management team has become familiar with the case managers at DSS
and will explain the details of the Matching Grant Program to them. They will also be given names of
Matching Grant clients and instructed to call the Institute if these names ever show up on an
application for public assistance

CHICAGO: Refugees participating in the Matching Grant Program will sign an agreement not to
access public assistance for the first four months in the United States. Support will be provided from
Matching Grant funds to sustain participating refugees for the Match Grant period. Case managers
will monitor to assure that clients do not access public assistance.

ERIE: Matching Grant participants will reside in housing provided by the IIE, when available. The IIE
has a good working relationship with the local assistance office, which has made the commitment to
obtain sponsorship information and an accompanying letter for IIE clients before their application can
be processed. Since January 1994, a single welfare caseworker assists all refugees in Erie for their
first eight months in the US. The Refugee Coordinator at IIE arranges all appointments with welfare,
and the welfare office will not make appointments with refugees without IIE's knowledge or without an
IIE caseworker present. Furthermore, the welfare worker actually comes to IIE 3-4 times a week or
as needed to meet with refugees and their caseworkers. The close communication between welfare
and IIE makes it virtually impossible for a MG client to access Public Assistance during the MG
period. This is the major change that has taken place at IIE and has helped make implementation of
the MG program a success.

      IIE Matching Grant participants will not utilize public assistance for a variety of reasons:

             1.     Intensive case management
             2.     Agency financial support
             3.     Utilization of agency housing
             4.     Intensive employment services
             5.     A well-established relationship with the local assistance office
             6.     Use of the food, clothing and furniture banks
             7.     In-kind donations
             8.     Pennsylvania regulations permitting utilization of medical cards and food stamps
                    independently of the case assistance program
             9.     Sanctioning procedures
             10.    Careful selection process
             11.    Supportive counseling and sensitive staff sanctions.

HONOLULU: Case managers will inform all Matching Grant participants of their rights and
responsibilities when participating in the program. Participants sign an agreement of compliance with
the Matching Grant program. Case managers will do continuous follow-ups, which includes home
visits to make sure the participants are meeting all the Matching Grant program requirements and are
not applying for Financial Assistance from the Department of Human Services. Immigrant Center will
work closely with the Department of Human Services caseworkers to check and ensure participants
are not receiving Financial Assistance while participating in the Matching Grant program.
HOUSTON: Matching Grant participants will reside at the Welcome Center. The combined value of
housing, food, and other resources available to Welcome Center residents makes them ineligible for
public assistance benefits.

       The YMCA has explained the Matching Grant Program to staff of the local public assistance
department with whom it already has an effective working relationship. Currently, public assistance
workers contact the YMCA office when refugees apply for public assistance in order to determine
what financial and in-king assistance is being given to the applicants. YMCA Matching Grant staff will
thus be informed in the event participants apply for public cash assistance.

JERSEY CITY: Refugees participating in the Matching Grant Program will sign an agreement not to
access public assistance for the first four months in the United States. Support will be provided from
Matching Grant funds to sustain participating refugees for the Match Grant period. Case managers
will monitor to assure that clients do not access public assistance.

KANSAS CITY: Refugees participating in the Matching Grant Program will sign an agreement not to
access public assistance for the first four months in the United States. Support will be provided from
Matching Grant funds to sustain participating refugees for the Match Grant period. Case managers
will monitor to assure that clients do not access public assistance.

LOS ANGELES: Refugees participating in the Matching Grant Program will sign an agreement not to
access public assistance for the first four months in the United States. Support will be provided from
Matching Grant funds to sustain participating refugees for the Match Grant period. Case managers
will monitor to assure that clients do not access public assistance

MIAMI: To ensure that refugees do not access public cash assistance, Youth Co-Op maintains
constant communications with the local Health and Rehabilitation Services office and provides them
with the names and social security numbers of Matching Grant clients. Youth Co-op will not issue the
HRS required letter of income verification the individuals, precluding them from obtaining cash
assistance. When a client is scheduled to go to HRS, Youth Co-op will make a phone call to the
supervisor to let him/her know that the participant is going to their site to apply for benefits (other than
cash assistance). Then a letter will be given to the client to present to the caseworker explaining
what was said on the telephone and instructions to call Youth Co-op when the client applies for
benefits. This system helps Youth Co-Op ensure that MG clients do not access cash assistance when
they apply for Medicaid and food stamps.

NEW YORK CITY (CAMBA): Refugees participating in the Matching Grant Program will sign an
agreement not to access public assistance for the first four months in the United States. Support will
be provided from Matching Grant funds to sustain participating refugees for the Match Grant period.
Case managers will monitor to assure that clients do not access public assistance.

PHILADELPHIA: Case managers will inform all Matching Grant participants of their rights and
responsibilities when participating in the program. Participants sign an agreement of compliance with
the Matching Grant program. Case managers will do continuous follow-ups, which includes home
visits to make sure the participants are meeting all the Matching Grant program requirements and are
not applying for Financial Assistance from the Department of Human Services. Immigrant Center will
work closely with the Department of Human Services caseworkers to check and ensure participants
are not receiving Financial Assistance while participating in the Matching Grant program.

PROVIDENCE: Refugees participating in the Matching Grant Program will sign an agreement not to
access public assistance for the first four months in the United States. Support will be provided from
Matching Grant funds to sustain participating refugees for the Match Grant period. Case managers
will monitor to assure that clients do not access public assistance.

ST. LOUIS: Access to public cash assistance will be discouraged by a system already in place that
involves close coordination between our St. Louis affiliate and the local public assistance office.
When refugees apply for public assistance in St. Louis, they are referred to the International Institute,
which is the state refugee employment and English language services provider. Refugees cannot be
found eligible for public cash assistance without a referral from the Institute indicating that
employment and English assessments were done. The public assistance office provides monthly lists
of refugee cash assistance recipients to the Institute. This coordination with the public assistance
office will ensure that refugees do not access public cash assistance without the knowledge and
cooperation of the Institute.

    Experienced case workers at the Institute will courage refugees to accept employment through
employment counseling, emphasizing that they will be assisted by intensive case management
services, extensive volunteer contact, in-kind donations, and agency support. The Institute will ensure
by these means the refugees will not access public cash assistance benefits during their first four
months in the United States.

MILWAUKEE: The International Institute of Milwaukee will develop policies similar to those described
above. As a part of new site training and orientation, the IRSA MG Program Officer will meet with
International Institute staff and the County Welfare supervisor to review the Matching Grant program
guidelines in order to make sure welfare workers understand and cooperate with the program's goals

OAKLAND: The International Institute of East Bay will develop policies similar to those described
above. As a part of new site training and orientation, the IRSA MG Program Officer will meet with
International Institute staff and the County Welfare supervisor to review the Matching Grant program
guidelines in order to make sure welfare workers understand and cooperate with the program's goals


F.     Sanctioning Procedures

       Sanctioning is an integral component of the Matching Grant Program for each of the sixteen
current sites. At the time of the Match Grant orientation, clients will receive both verbal and written
sanctioning protocols in their own language. It serves as a last resort for encouraging Matching Grant
refugees to cooperate in the plans they have developed with their caseworker. Caseworkers will
make every effort to keep clients progressing toward self-sufficiency, adjusting the initial resettlement
plan as necessary to accommodate the evolving needs of clients.

        Sanctioning will be used when clients have discontinued the activities in which they agreed to
participate in order to achieve employment and self-sufficiency. Clients will be informed of
sanctioning rules and procedures during their initial Matching Grant orientation. Should a client begin
to show signs of non-cooperation, e.g. failing to keep job interviews or caseworker appointments and
missing English classes, clients will be reminded of their obligation to follow Matching Grant Program
procedures and goals.

       Early intervention is expected to resolve most problems that arise for clients. If it is necessary,
sanctioning will take place in the following steps:

              If a caseworker believes sanctioning is warranted, the reasons for doing so will be
              stated in writing accompanied by supporting documentation (e.g. ESL attendance
             reports, missing job interviews), and the information will be submitted to the
             caseworker’s supervisor for review and approval.

             The caseworker will then confront the client with the problem in a face-to-face meeting.
             An effort will be made to discover the reason for the non-cooperative behavior. Ways to
             resolve the problem will be discussed and efforts made to persuade the client to give his
             full cooperation to the resettlement program.

             If the initial intervention fails, a letter stating the problem and the possible sanction with
             a conference time will follow.

             If a refugee remains uncooperative, financial incentives will be discontinued for a period
             of time or the refugee will be terminated from the Matching Grant Program. If the case
             is terminated, appropriate referrals will be made so that the client is not left destitute or
             at risk.

       In our experience, the existence of sanctions based on thoroughly documented justification
together with an explanation of the consequences of continued uncooperative behavior, are sufficient
to regain a client's willing participation in the resettlement program.


G.    Describe the procedures for the enrollment of asylees and Cuban and Haitian entrants.

      Due to the decreasing number of refugee arrivals in the U.S. Refugee Resettlement Program
      since November 2001, all of IRSA’s MG Partner Agencies have established outreach
      programs for connecting with the non refugee (asylee, parolee, border crosser, etc.,)
      populations in their local communities. These outreach efforts for the most part have been
      highly successful as asylees have become an increasing percentage of the total of MG clients
      serviced each of the past three years. Asylees were 20.68% of the client population in
      CY2003. All agencies are aware that some asylees are not eligible to enroll in the MG
      program. They have received the CY2004 guidance, which indicates that asylees, who are not
      needy because they were paroled and working in the community prior to being granted asylum
      are not eligible for the MG program. The IRSA PAs propose to focus on serving asylees who
      have been released from detention centers and/or are secondary migrants following release
      from detention or the grant of asylum.

      The agencies have developed the following procedures:

      Potential non refugee clients are referred to the MG Coordinator who assesses eligibility for
      MG before enrollment in the program. Asylees will be enrolled in the MG program with in 30
      days of being granted asylum. The asylee is asked to sign an agreement form agreeing to
      comply with the requirements of the program. Priority is given to those who have no relatives
      to support them and to those who have recently been released from detention centers. Asylees
      who are granted by an Immigration Judge will be enrolled within 30 days after the BCIS appeal
      date expires. The agency will coordinate with and notify all other MG sites in the area of client
      enrollments to avoid duplication of services.

      Partner Agencies in the following cities also propose to serve entrants: Miami, New York City,
      and Jersey City.

      These agencies have developed the following procedures for serving entrants:
JERSEY CITY: For the Cuban Parolees—contact has been made with Church World Services in
Miami, whose staff provide orientation to arriving Cuban Parolees. IINJ has request that CWS
consider distributing flyers to those individuals who plan to come to New Jersey to join relatives to
alert them to their eligibility to enroll in the Match Grant Program (within their first 30 days in the US).
Locally, we will alert members of the Cuban community, by providing information on the Match Grant
program to civic associations, the Spanish newspapers and television station, whom we will ask to
provide public service announcements.

For Asylees- The Institute will work with local volunteers who visit detainees in the Elizabeth
Detention Center. They will distribute information to the detainees about the International Institute, the
Match Grant program, and who to call when they are released. In addition, the Institute staff may also
visit the detention center on an occasional basis to talk to detainees about the match grant program
and the services that will be available through the International Institute once they are released.
Although the INS does not allow the distribution of written material on resettlement to people while
detained, these face-to-face visitations will provide the necessary conduit for information. Once a
steady stream of asylees comes through the program, they will be a source of referral for future
asylees who are currently in detention.

MIAMI: Youth Co-Po’s well-established infrastructure permits us to serve individuals on a walk-in
basis. The agency employs an Eligibility Worker to carry out the intake process for the Matching
Grant Program and determines clients’ eligibility for participation in the program. The intake process
involves all family members. If friends or relatives accompany the clients they are also invited to
participate during the intake. The process includes an assessment of eligibility for program services,
orientation to the program, purpose, services to be provided and clients’ rights and responsibilities.

NEW YORK CITY (CAMBA): CAMBA has written standards and criteria for the selection of MG
participants (see local attachment A). After it is determined that the asylee or entrant is needy,
eligible, and properly documented for employment, she would be enrolled, as other R&P clients are
enrolled. However, we will provide all core R&P services to the client as part of MG case
management, such as orientation, counseling, Medicaid application, referral to health screening,
immunizations, Food Stamps, material needs assessment, etc. We would maintain the same type of
file documentation and utilize standard R&P forms where appropriate.


H.     Describe the criteria established for determining when a refugee is considered self-
       sufficient and will no longer be provided services/support under the Match Grant
       Program prior to the 120-day period.

       IRSA works extensively with all MG clients to ensure that a high degree of family self-
       sufficiency is achieved at the 120th day. It is IRSA’s practice to continue to serve clients
       throughout the full 180 days of the program regardless of whether self-sufficiency has been
       achieved. This time is used to continue follow-up with employers and MG clients in order to
       ensure job retention and client satisfaction, provide cash allowance/incentives for job retention,
       refer clients to other programs within the agency or the community, develop multiple
       employment strategies for secondary and tertiary employable on the MG case, and assist
       clients with job upgrade and on-going social adjustment needs. Agencies have developed
       criteria for assessing when a client can be designated self-sufficient for the program progress
       report:
AKRON: Records will indicate full-time employment with health benefits and no access to public
assistance.

BOWLING GREEN: Services to refugees will be provided by the organization until the 120th day
after the refugee’s arrival in the U.S. Follow-up and referral services may continue up to the 180th
day after arrival.

BOSTON: The established criteria for determining when a refugee is considered economically self-
sufficient can vary from one case to another depending on case-size, number of employable, earning
potential, and other factors. II Boston strives to ensure that every individual referred for employment
services is employed early on within their first 120 days full-time positions with benefits that include
health insurance. II Boston believes that it is important to ensure that all needs of the MG case have
been addressed before anyone is considered fully self-sufficient. Thus they work with clients well
beyond their first 180 days in the US to address case management and social adjustment needs.

BUFFALO: A MG participant is followed through and provided services/support for the full MG period
unless the client requests that services be terminated prior to 120 days. Requests for job upgrades may
be provided after the initial employment has been achieved, if available.


CHICAGO: Under the match grant, a refugee will be determined to be financially self-sufficient when
he/she is employed and has received two paychecks and/or is able to pay a month’s rent
independently. If employment falters, the match grant staff will work with refugee and employer to
increase stability and job retention. Follow-up and referral will continue through the 180th day and,
beyond that, all refugees and asylees are eligible for the state-administered program for adjustment
services through 18 months residency.

ERIE: This practice does not exist with the International Institute of Erie. Our staff believes each
refugee needs maximum support for at least 120 days to become truly self-sufficient.

HONOLULU: As with the II Erie, each refugee needs maximum support for at least 120 days to
become truly self-sufficient.

HOUSTON: A Matching Grant client is considered self-sufficient, if gainfully employed in a position
that pays at least the federally established minimum wage and provides at least 36 hours of work per
week. Support services and a cash allowance will be provided to the refugee through the 120th day to
insure the refugee remains self-sufficient beyond the120th. Follow-up and referral services continue
through to the 180th day.

JERSEY CITY: A Match Grant client who is employed in a job which provides sufficient income to
allow him or her (and their family) to live without further assistance from The International Institute will
be considered economically self-sufficient. The IINJ will continue to follow-up with clients for the full
180 days and the client will still be able to access other services through the International Institute
such as ELT classes, job upgrades and mental health services which are available to Match Grant
and non-Match Grant clients under other grants.

KANSAS CITY: A Matching Grant participant will be considered fully self-sufficient if the client is:
working full-time, found suitable housing, transportation issues eliminated, attending ESL or
vocational school to improve language and to acquire technical skills, and child care and other
barriers are eliminated. We believe that employment alone should not be the only gauge to determine
self-sufficiency.
LOS ANGELES: A Matching Grant participant will be considered fully self-sufficient if the client is:
working full-time, found suitable housing, transportation issues eliminated, attending ESL or
vocational school to improve language and to acquire technical skills, and child care and other
barriers are eliminated. IILA believes that employment alone should not be the only gauge to
determine self-sufficiency.

MIAMI: A self-sufficiency plan is developed for each individual and or family member. Caseworkers
monitor progress of the program participants over the period of four months and determine self-
sufficiency. Other factors include, but are not limited to wages earned which would make the family
ineligible for public assistance.

NEW YORK CITY (CAMBA): Our program is designed to provide support and services for
cooperating participants for a full 120 days regardless of the level of self-sufficiency achieved. Cash
support to asylees and entrants, if enrolled, would terminate between the 90th and 120th days
depending on when the case enrolled, with the possible exception of cash bonuses, which may be
issued afterwards. Follow-up and referral continues up to the 180th day.

PHILADELPHIA: Clients are referred to DPW for RCA and other services. NSC continues to provide
case management, counseling and ongoing employment services for the full Mg period regardless
whether those referred for employment services have entered employment.

PROVIDENCE: A refugee can be considered self-sufficient and no longer in need of services/support
prior to the MG 120 day period when:

          Secures full-time employment with a living wage;
          Retains employment for at least 60 days;
          Follow-up with employers indicate successful transition into workforce;
          Has decent and affordable housing;
          Has access to health care through employment or other sources.

ST. LOUIS: Clients enrolled in IISL’s Matching grant program receive $210 per person in their family
for the first three months, and then are eligible for bonus checks after that if they are working by the
120th day. We define self-sufficiency as working by the 120th day. Therefore we continue to provide
services/support for all clients up to the 120th day and beyond.

MILWAUKEE: A Match Grant client who is employed in a job which provides sufficient income to
allow him or her (and their family) to live without further assistance from The International Institute will
be considered economically self-sufficient. The IIM will continue to follow-up with clients for the full
180 days and the client will still be able to access other services through the International Institute
such as ELT classes, job upgrades and mental health services which are available to Match Grant
and non-Match Grant clients under other grants.

OAKLAND: A Matching Grant participant will be considered fully self-sufficient if the client is: working
full-time, found suitable housing, transportation issues eliminated, attending ESL or vocational school
to improve language and to acquire technical skills, and child care and other barriers are eliminated.
We believe that employment alone should not be the only gauge to determine self-sufficiency.


I.     Describe the procedures/strategies for refugees that have completed the MG period
       without attaining self-sufficiency or that request services after the MG period.
AKRON: If a refugee does not attain self-sufficiency prior to 120 days, employment services will
continue and clients are designated “remain-in-the-program” and self-sufficiency is re-evaluated at
the 180th day.

BOSTON: The refugees that have completed the MG period without attaining self-sufficiency will
continue to receive cash assistance through TAFDC or the Wilson-Fish program depending on their
eligibility. Wilson-Fish case management services are now available for all our clients (depending on
their circumstances) until it is absolutely clear that all core services and social services are in place
until the client is self-sufficient even if the client is employed. Employment is only one piece of case
management that assists in a client becoming self-sufficient and what is equally important is to
ensure that all of our clients are emotionally stable and are adjusting smoothly to life in the United
States.

BOWLING GREEN: Services may continue for more than 120 days so long as costs charged for
federal reimbursement remain within allowable limits. After completing the MG period (180-days),
refugees who still need jobs or other services will be served under Wilson-Fish or Preferred
Communities. We have never had a Matching Grant family who completed the MG period without
attaining self-sufficiency.

BUFFALO: If client does not attain self-sufficiency by no fault of their own, they will “remain in the
program’ and employment services continue to be provided. If, however, clients are out of compliance
(e.g. turning down jobs) during the MG period, services may be terminated and the case closed. As per
sanctioning protocols, the department of public welfare may be informed.

CHICAGO: If a refugee completes the match grant period without having attained self-sufficiency, the
refugee will be referred to the state-administered employment and adjustment services program. The
refugee will also apply to the Special Units Office of the Illinois Department of Human Services for a
cash grant, should he/she meet the criteria for such a grant.

ERIE: If refugees are not self-sufficient at the end of the 120 days, they may continue receiving
employment services through the Matching Grant program or may be referred to other programs,
such as the Department of Public Welfare office (for public cash assistance), state funded
employment program or other services and programs “as needed”.

HONOLULU: Refugees who completed the MG period without attaining self-sufficiency will be
allowed to remain in the program based on the availability of funds. Refugees who are not remaining
in the program are referred to other refugee service programs.

HOUSTON: Refugees who completed the MG period without attaining self-sufficiency will be allowed
to remain in the program based on the availability of funds. Refugees who are not remaining in the
program are referred to other refugee service programs.

JERSEY CITY: Individuals who have not achieved self-sufficiency by the 120th day will be eligible for
services under the Institute’s Refugee Resettlement Program (RRP). If there are Cubans who have
not achieved self-sufficiency by the 120th day they will also be eligible to access services under the
Institute’s Cuban Haitian grant. Services that currently provided under the state grant include
employment, ELT, counseling and supportive services. The client can be referred for public cash
assistance, as needed.

KANSAS CITY: We work closely with job placement to get them a job or a job upgrade. We continue
encouragement for self-sufficiency.
LOS ANGELES: Refugees that have completed the Matching Grant Program without attaining self-
sufficiency will receive on-going case management and job development assistance. The financial
need of the client will be addressed by providing an additional month of MG cash assistance or, if
resources are not available, they may be referred for public cash assistance. It is the policy of the
Institute to work with the clients until they find meaningful employment regardless of their Matching
Grant status.

MIAMI: Employment and case management services are intensified and extended beyond 120 days.
If necessary, case managers assist clients with transition to TANF or RCA programs.

NEW YORK CITY (CAMBA): CAMBA has a variety of state-funded refugee jobs, training and ESL
programs, and city-funded welfare to work programs that are accessible to any MG clients who have
completed the Match Grant period without achieving self-sufficiency or any clients who request or need
services after the 120th day. Clients enrolled in our MG ESL program have the option of continuing their
participation in these classes after the 120th day.

PHILADELPHIA: Clients are referred to DPW for RCA and other services. NSC continues to provide
case management, counseling and employment services.

PROVIDENCE: International Institute does not anticipate many refugees/asylees falling in this
category given the team approach and a significant screening process of candidates prior to their
enrollment in the program. Cases that are in compliance with the program requirements will be
allowed to “remain in the program” and will receive on-going individualized attention from staff until
self-sufficiency has been achieved.

ST. LOUIS: 98% of our clients attain self-sufficiency by the 120th day. The cases that don’t attain
self-sufficiency are referred to our two employment caseworkers that work closely with the client and
the job counselors to provide additional support. In addition, we have two clinical social workers on
staff that can provide assistance if there are mental health issues involved. In most cases these staff
have already been involved with the client prior to the 120th day. The matching grant caseworker
coordinates most of these services when needed.

We proposed to provide similar services to those above at the new sites.


J.     Outline policies concerning language assistance for limited English proficient persons
       in accordance with ORR State Letter #00-18.

       All IRSA agencies have been informed, in writing, of ORR’s State Letter regarding Title VI
       policies. IRSA’s agencies hire bi-lingual, bi-cultural staff to deliver MG services. If staff does
       not speak the language of the client being served, trained interpreters are used. IRSA has
       developed a sample MG Letter of Agreement, outlining MG clients’ rights and responsibilities,
       to sign at the time of enrollment in the program. This letter is translated into the major refugee
       languages. In addition, IRSA has developed written sanctioning protocols and many IRSA
       sites have developed written client selection criteria and MG benefits packages, which outline
       cash and incentives benefits per MG client. During CY2004, IRSA will be working closely with
       IRSA MG sites to ensure these materials are shared and translated into the major languages.
       In addition IRSA will provide technical training on Title VI to our partner agencies if applicable.

AKRON: In addition to bilingual staff, the Institute provides a language bank for the Institute services
to the community agencies, health care providers, and other community services and businesses.
Every effort is made to provide assistance when an interpreter is needed to resolve problems.
Further, the Institute is planning interpreter-training programs for Institute staff, staff of service
providers and interpreters to begin in spring.

BOWLING GREEN: Refugees will be assisted in enrolling in ELT according to their competency level
and previous English language training identified in the resettlement plan. English language training
will be concurrent with employment services and will be provided without cost. Classes will be
certified or taught by trained ELT instructors. Classes will be scheduled so as not to inhibit
employment search and employment; i.e., evening classes. They will gear toward early employment
and self-sufficiency.

BOSTON: IIB staff is currently working on a new policy, which will be shared, with IRSA staff at the
December 2000 MG training.

BUFFALO: The International Institute of Buffalo has access to an in-house interpreting and
translating services. The case managers, manager of employment services and the social work
department may access these services, as needed.

CHICAGO: All clients are assigned caseworkers of their own ethnicity and language. In some cases it
is necessary for us to use volunteers or to hire part-time temporary interpreters.


ERIE: International Institute of Erie provides all services in refugees’ native language.

HONOLULU: Pacific Gateway serves only Vietnamese and Burmese refugees and, as such, is able
to provide all services in the refugees’ native language.

HOUSTON: MG services are provided by culturally and linguistically competent caseworkers. The
YMCA staff collectively speaks 20 languages. Volunteers and hired interpreters are used for a very
small number of refugees that the YMCA does not have the language capability with in the staff.

JERSEY CITY: A bilingual caseworker will be assigned to work with the Cuban Match Grant clients.
Many of the Asylee clients will speak English but for those who do not, the Institute’s Language Bank
can be accessed to secure a qualified and competent interpreter to insure that each client will not
encounter a language barrier while accessing services.

KANSAS CITY: Our policy includes an ELT program, which the refugees are required to attend as
long as they need it or until they are employed. Bi-lingual, bi-cultural staff provides all MG services to
clients.

LOS ANGELES: All clients are assigned caseworkers of their own ethnicity and language. In some
cases it is necessary for us to use volunteers or to hire part-time temporary interpreters.

MIAMI: Bilingual staff serves 99% of the MG refugee/parolee clients. Youth Co-Op staff is proficient
in Spanish, Creole, French, and Russian. Volunteers are used as needed for language assistance
with clients who speak languages other than those mentioned above.

MILWAUKEE: MG participant will have access to our ELT program, those that are assessed as
requiring ESL for employment will be required to attend as long as they need it or until they are
employed. Bi-lingual, bi-cultural staff provides all MG services to clients.
NEW YORK CITY (CAMBA): CAMBA is aware of the provisions outlined in ORR State Letter #00-18 and
CAMBA is in compliance with the law. All MG clients have equal access to services without regard to their
level of English proficiency.

OAKLAND: IIEB utilizes its bi-lingual staff to provide interpreting services to clients. IIEB also
provided ESL instruction through an arrangement with the Oakland Adult School system.

PHILADELPHIA: NSC utilizes its bi-lingual staff and language bank to provide interpreting services to
clients. NSC also refers clients who need English training to NSC’s ESL program.

PROVIDENCE: The Institute's Refugee Resettlement team works together to help refugees attain
the English language skills needed to get and retain employment. The Job Placement Specialist tests
all new employable arrivals to determine English language proficiency, vocabulary, and basic math
skills. Under the Matching Grant Program, the Institute shall provide English language and computer
classes free of charge to all refugees that need to upgrade English and computer skills and GED
classes to those who need a high school diploma. Appropriate referrals are made for those who need
training not provided on site. The Resettlement staff works closely with Education staff which is made
up of well-trained, culturally competent professionals with many years experience in teaching
immigrants and refugees the skills needed to become self-sufficient individuals in the United States.
The Institutes' classes are offered in the mornings, evenings, and weekends so that refugees can
access classes during hours that they are not working and continue to upgrade their skills and
advance in the workplace. Teachers enter student records (including attendance, test scores, and
progress reports) into a database, and maintain close contact with the Job Placement Specialist.
Under the Matching Grant Program, clients that are determined to need English language or
vocational training as part of their individual resettlement/employment plans but who choose not to
participate may be subject to reduced maintenance assistance.

ST. LOUIS: All clients are assigned caseworkers of their own ethnicity and language. In some cases
it is necessary for us to use volunteers or to hire part-time temporary interpreters.
3. OUTCOMES:
January 1 – December 31, 2003
                     Akron   Boston Bowling Buffalo Chicago CAMBA Erie        Honolulu Houston Jersey Kansas Los     Miami      Philadelphia Providenc
                                    Green                                                      City City     Angeles

Refugee Newly
Enrolled into
Program                21      36       14       12       56      108   25       4        54     157    77       68    1905         111          46
(cases)

Individuals                                               86      172
                       59      76       30       35                     59       4       166     243    170      88    3116         215          85
Completed 120
days (cases)           18      40       23       13       57      102   28       4        47     121    60       70    1543         106          22

Individuals                                               88      165
                       56      76       41       32                     73       4       142     175    142      98    2429         209          40
Self-sufficiency
(120 days)             16      15       21       10       27       84   20       4        37     63     55       70    1258         69           14
cases

Individuals                                               44      142
                       54      18       39       22                     59       4       115     100    135      98    2017         133          24
Employable                                                67      131
                       34      47       29       22                     30       4        63     134    81       78    1764         118          22
Entered
Employments –          27      30       29       15       33      100   24       4        49     66     73       76    1496         88           15
combined

Entered
Employments            27      16       29       12       29       83   16       4        48     55     72       67    1399         74           10
(FT)

Entered
Employments             0      14        0       3        4        17   8        0        1      11      1       9      97          14           5
(PT)

Average Hourly
Wage (FT)      $ 8.19         $8.84   $ 7.36 $8.53      $8.92    $8.52 $734   $ 8.05   $ 7.08   $ 7.08 $ 7.93 $ 8.75   $ 6.89      $ 7.66      $8.64
Entered
Employments
                       24      12       29       7        24       45   14       4        20     29     69       28    532          63           9
with Health
Benefits

Completed 180
                       26      19       27       10       27       72   29       4        58     75     53       70    1103         63           15
days cases

Individuals            88      23       53       16       41      120   75       4       145            130            1917         117
                                                                                                 103            100                              33
Those still Self-
sufficient (180        26      16       27       8        25       70   25       4        58     74     52       70    1089         63           12
days) cases

Individuals            88      17       53       14       35      118   63       4       145            130            1895         117
                                                                                                 101            100                              27
Remain in MG
Program
Services and            0       3        0       0        0        15   6        0        2      27      5       0     238          27           6
Cash Support
cases
Individuals             0       8        0       0        0        20   8        0        6              6             335          61
                                                                                                 39              0                               14

Self-sufficient of
those remained
                        1       6        0       1        8        8    3        0        0       3      3       0      80          10           2
in the program
cases

Individuals             1      10        0       1        16       8    3        0        0              9             115          15
                                                                                                  4              0                               9



                             Shaded areas denote the number of cases.
IRSA had established the following goals for the CY2003:

          1. 93% of participants who receive employment services will enter employment by the 120
             day

          2. 94% of the cases in the IRSA Matching Grant Program will be self-sufficient within 120
             days.

          3. 96% of the cases that are self-sufficient at 120 days will remain self-sufficient 60 days
             later.

          4. The average full time hourly wage will be $ 7.29

          5. 61% of entered employments will have health benefits.

From January 1, 2003 through December 31, 2003, IRSA Matching Grant agencies have produced
the following results:

               Of the participants who have completed 120 days, 81% of the participants who
               received employment services entered employment by the 120th day.

               For the participants who have reached 120 days, 80% of the families were self-
               sufficient.

               For the participants who have reached 180 days, 98% of the families remained self-
               sufficient two months later.

               The average full time hourly wage is $7.22. The hourly wage rate was slightly lower
               than those proposed on the Annual Goals plan because Miami, which comprises more
               than 60% of the total caseload, and employed MG clients at an average wage of
               $6.89. Wages are significantly lower that our national average because the
               competition for entry-level positions is so fierce in Miami-Dade county. However, it
               should be noted that this result is almost $.28 increase since this time last year.

               Of the 2031 full-time entered employments, 980 had health benefits available (48%).
               Again Miami results have a significantly impact on our networks overall outcomes in
               the last year: 38% of the 532 of 1399 full-time employments have health benefits as
               compared to 38.7% (523 of 1350) in CY2002. Youth Co-Op continues to explore
               innovative ways to seek higher paying positions with health benefits.

IRSA is very pleased with the performance of its local agencies to-date, particularly in that during this
period of economic recession IRSA affiliates were able to remain within sight of their program goals.
IRSA is confident that has the national economic picture improves we will subsequently see an
increase in our program outcomes.

IRSA has established the following goals for the CY2004 (please see attached Annual Goals Plan):

          6. 91% of participants who receive employment services will enter employment by the 120
             day



                                                    32
          7. 92% of the cases in the IRSA Matching Grant Program will be self-sufficient within 120
             days.

          8. 99% of the cases that are self-sufficient at 120 days will remain self-sufficient 60 days
             later.

          9. The average full time hourly wage will be $ 7.35

          10. 61% of entered employments will have health benefits.

Annual Outcome Goals and Continuous Improvement

        IRSA encourages participating sites to continue to improve on their excellent results, whenever
possible. The focus on “continuous improvement” has been discussed with participating agencies a
number of times in the last year: at a session for Matching Grant participants at the National Network
Meeting, held in April, 2003; at the on-site monitoring visits; through individual telephone contact; and
through group conference calls. IRSA reviews monthly MG rosters (which have been amended to
collect data on the new GPRA measurements) and individual site’s Program Progress Reports
submitted three times a year. As mentioned, as a network, IRSA is close to achieving the goals set in
the 2003 Annual Goals Plan. Should a particular site be experiencing less stellar results, the IRSA
MG Program Officer works closely with that site to analyze what local factors may be at play. Sites
that have excellent self-sufficiency results are working to improve such factors as average hourly
wage and the number of entered employments with health benefits.

       When results consistently remain over 90%, IRSA believes that local sites should feel
comfortable taking some risks at the cost of occasional losses in their self-sufficiency rates. For
example, IRSA encourages sites to work with new or challenging ethnicities rather than enrolling
cases, where self-sufficiency looks like a “sure thing”. In addition, most participating sites are working
toward expanding their MG caseload while overall refugee arrivals diminish or stabilize. This means
agencies encourage more potential candidates to enroll in the MG program and have therefore seen
a larger proportion of their caseload reap the benefits of the MG program. Several IRSA MG
agencies are adopting a model of enrolling all newly arrived employables and their families to the MG
program, while maintaining their high standards for program success. With the popularity of the MG
program, IRSA believes this offers more equity to those refugees settling in the particular locale.
IRSA would like to continue to develop this strategy and views it as another informal performance
measure.




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