NEW DENMARK SCHOOL NEWSLETTER

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					                      NEW DENMARK SCHOOL NEWSLETTER
                                 May 2008
                            DATES TO REMEMBER:
- Thursday and Friday – May 1st and May 2nd no school for students. May 1 st is a Branch
Meeting and May 2nd is provincial PD meeting.
- Friday, May 9th, students from New Denmark school will be traveling to the Hartland
Community school at 9:30 AM to participate in the Drama Festival and be performing “The
Balloon Tree”. As it is going to be part of our school curriculum all students will be participating
and have a part. We have gone over the play and discussed with all students the roles (both
speaking and acting parts as well as leading and supportive roles) and have matched students up
with the parts they felt comfortable playing. We are presenting at 1:20PM. We will send out a
voicemail to let parents know when we will be returning back to the school, and are asking
parents to please pick up your child there. We are planning to order pizza for everyone to eat
there for dinner, however children should still have a packed snack for the morning break.
Parents, please call Joanne and let her know if you are planning on going with us.
- Speeches are for grade 3,4,5 here at the school will be Tuesday, May 13th.
- Thursday, May 15th at 7PM we will be having a meeting here at the school for an overview of
the Intensive French Program for grades 4/5. Janice Gagnon will be here from School District to
present a power point presentation. Everyone is welcome to attend. Refreshments will be
served.
- Monday, May 19th – No school Victoria Day.
- Tuesday, May 20th – Brag night for students to perform for family at 7PM everyone
welcome.
- Wednesday, May 21st NDS will be hosting the speeches for this part of the District.
- Thursday, May 22nd - students from New Denmark school will join kids across Canada in It’s
Toss Up – Retro Style. Students will be moving by participating in a massive, fun filled activity
from 12:30 to 1 PM. We welcome everyone to join us.
- Monday, May 26th students from grades 3,4, and 5 will be traveling to Falls Brook Center for a
2 hour presentation 10-12. They will be leaving the school at 8:30 AM and should be back in
time for the 2:20 run.
- Friday, May 30th French enrichment activity. All students will be traveling to the Richelieu
Building in Grand Falls for a presentation by the Star Academie. These are students from the
Grand Falls area who are singing with Myriam Dionne. The cost will be $2.00 which comes out of
student fees.
- We will be having a yard sale for students at the school to raise money for
Muscular Dystrophy on June 3,4, and 5. While doing your spring cleaning you might
come across items which you would like to donate towards this cause, we will send
more information on this when we receive it.

AS OF MONDAY, MAY 5 th THERE WILL NO LONGER BE ANY HEATED
LUNCHES. STUDENTS ARE ASKED TO PACK A LUNCH THAT IS READY
TO EAT. PICNIC TABLES HAVE BEEN SET UP OUTSIDE AND IN NICE
WEATHER STUDENTS WILL BE ABLE TO EAT OUTSIDE IF THEY
CHOOSE.
It’s Confusing! Energy drinks vs. Sports Drinks
          Contain…        Used as …
Sports Sugar and          Replace fluids lost during exercise
Drinks electrolytes
Energy Sugar,             Increase mental and physical stimulation for short periods of
Drinks caffeine, some time
          vitamins and
          various herbal
          ingredients

Water is sufficient for thirst from activities lasting one hour or less. Athletes who
exercise more than an hour may benefit from a sports drink.
Caution:
    Little is known about the long-term effects of taking energy drinks.
    Energy Drinks should not be used to quench thirst after exercise because sweating
     and fluid loss from the caffeine may lead to water loss, affect the heart, and cause
     vomiting.
    Energy drinks are not recommended for children, pregnant or nursing women, or
     those sensitive to caffeine.




Every good book deserves a great home, and our owl “Compass” believes that our
local schools is the direction for great books to go. The Owl Book & Gift Shop are
pleased to announce the,
                               ADOPT A BOOK SALE!
                          st
For the week of May 21 through May 26th, you can purchase a book at the Owl
Book & Gift Shop for 20% off, and then select the school you’d like the book
donated to. We will place a bookplate in front of the book with your name on it, or
in memory of someone of your choice. Upon completion of the sale we will deliver to
the schools all the books you adopt for them. Let’s get on board, and make this an
adoption to remember!
Teaching Your Child to Resist Peer Pressure
―No child is immune to peer pressure.‖ —Kathi Hudson, author Every day, your children
make decisions based on what the kids around them say and do. Sometimes they make
good decisions. They go along with positive peer pressure and make good choices, which
helps them become better individuals. But, sometimes, they give in and do something
bad that they typically wouldn’t do. How can you help your kids say yes to positive peer
pressure and no to negative peer pressure? Try these ideas.

Try it... For all parents

           Know your children’s friends—and their enemies. Even if you haven’t met them all
            in person, find out their names and what your children like (or don’t like) about
            them. Find out what kind of influence they have on your kids.

           Talk about values. What’s important to you? Do you want your child to succeed in
            school; be caring and helpful toward others; not use tobacco, alcohol, or drugs;
            and not have sex? Be clear about your values and why you have the values that
            you do. Kids can’t resist negative peer pressure if they don’t know what’s right—
            and what’s wrong.

           A key part of growing up well is learning how to resist and make up your own
            mind. The first place your child gets to practice this is at home. So when your
            child wants to make a decision that’s different from yours, respect that choice (as
            long as it’s not harmful). If your child can gradually learn to stand up to you, he or
            she will learn to stand up to others.

 Starting at the early elementary ages, talk about the cost of saying no. (And continue to talk
 About this issue as kids get older.) It is hard to say no most of the time because it costs kids
something: a friendship, social status, or something else that means a lot to them. Talk about
how you don’t really have values until they’re tested, you’re willing to stand up for them, and
you’re willing to deal with the costs. Take the costs seriously so your child knows you
understand how big a deal it can be. It is not as easy as adults sometimes think to say no to
all the things we want kids to say no to.

          For parents with children ages birth to 5

           When your child starts making a bad choice or is influenced negatively by another
            child, distract your child with another activity that’s more positive.

           If your child will not be distracted, give short explanations as to why something is
            harmful and what’s a better choice instead. For example, ―We don’t use swear
            words. When we’re angry, we say that we’re mad.‖ Then find out where your child
            is learning the swear words.

           Read aloud the picture book No, David! by David Shannon and talk about why
            David always seems to get into too much trouble.

      For parents with children ages 6 - 9

         Periodically invite your child’s friends over to play. Get to know your child’s friends
          and observe how they influence each other. Intervene if behaviors get out of hand.
     Get to know the parents of your child’s friends as well. Get to know the adults in your
Neighborhood and tell all these adults the values you want reinforced for your child.
Download the free 12-page summary of the Grading Grownups research report at
http://www.search-institute.org/downloads. Scroll down to the2002 Grading Grownups report
and click on the 12-page summary.
   Point out when your child is making good decisions regarding friendships and
       positive choices.

         Ask your children which kids they admire at school (and why) and who they don’t
          (and why). This helps them discern which traits are admirable and which are less
          desirable. When you do this, focus more on the behaviors than on individual
          children.

          For parents with children ages 10 - 15

           This is the age when peer pressure gets intense and more difficult for even the
            most resistant child to deal with. Talk at least weekly about the pressures your
            children witness (and experience) at school. At this age, some kids will be more
            likely to talk about what they see than what they may be experiencing, so be
            patient.

           Teach (or continue to teach) your child to think and speak in terms of ―I
            messages,‖ which is a way to help kids state what they are feeling and what they
            want to have happen as a result. For example, ―I am angry. I don’t like it when
            Billy swipes my cell phone and won’t give it back. I want Billy to stop doing that.‖

           Talk about the pressures of parties, sex, alcohol, and drug use, which start at
            earlier and earlier ages for kids today. Be clear that your young teenager should
            not be having sex, using alcohol, drugs, or attending parties that are
            unsupervised or have alcohol or drugs. For more ideas, read Preventing Teenage
            Drug Use, a free Search Institute publication at http://www.search-
            institute.org/archives/ptdu.htm.

           Role-play different ways to say no. Sometimes just walking away (and not saying
            anything) can be even more effective than using words.

Teach your children a bailout signal for times when it’s hard to say no. For example, if they’re
 with friends who start pressuring them to do something they don’t want to do, tell them that
they can say they’re getting a headache or stomachache and that they need to go home right
   away. Or say they can blame you by saying, ―My parents would kill me if I did that. So I
  can’t.‖ Make sure you’re always accessible (or know another adult who is) so that you can
                          pluck them out of a high-pressure situation.
Happy Birthday to everyone celebrating in May: Tyler Clark 11 th, Jayden
Lester 28th and Ethan Bellefleur on the 29th we hope you all have a great day!