Formal Research Vs. Business Proposal by mdv94274

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									Association   Document Number   Document Type




   SSPA        SSPA-SI-09-007   Service Insight




   TPSA        TPSA-DV-09-009     DataView
                    AFSMI-SI-09-004
AFSMI, SSPA, TPSA    SSPA-SI-09-005   Service Insight
                    TPSA-SI-09-005




     AFSMI          AFSMI-SI-9-005    Service Insight
AFSMI, SSPA, TPSA   SRII-AS-09-001      DataView




      SSPA          SSPA-SI-09-003    Service Insight




                    AFSMI-SI-09-003
AFSMI, SSPA, TPSA    SSPA-SI-09-004   Service Insight
                    TPSA-SI-09-004
   TPSA       TPSA-DV-09-001      DataView




  AFSMI       AFSMI-SI-09-002   Service Insight




AFSMI, TPSA   AFSMI-SI-09-001   Service Insight




   SSPA       SSPA-SI-09-001    Service Insight
                    AFSMI-SI-09-001
AFSMI, SSPA, TPSA    SSPA-SI-09-001   Service Insight
                    TPSA-SI-09-001




      TPSA           None assigned    Service Insight




      SSPA           None assigned    Service Insight
      SSPA          None assigned   Service Insight




  AFSMI, SSPA       None assigned     DataView




AFSMI, SSPA, TPSA   None assigned   Service Insight
AFSMI   AFSMI-EI-08-002   Executive Insight




AFSMI   AFSMI-EI-08-003   Executive Insight




TPSA    TPSA-DV-08-006       DataView




TPSA    TPSA-DV-08-005       DataView
SSPA   None assigned   Service Insight




SSPA   None assigned   Service Insight




SSPA   None assigned   Service Insight
SSPA   None assigned   Technology Review




SSPA   None assigned     Service Insight
TPSA   TPSA-DV-08-003       DataView




SSPA   None assigned      Service Insight




SSPA   None assigned    Technology Review
SSPA   None assigned      DataView




SSPA   None assigned    Service Insight




SSPA   None assigned   Executive Insight
AFSMI, SSPA   AFSMI-SI-08-013    Service Insight




   TPSA       TPSA-PSI-08-005    Service Insight




  AFSMI       None assigned     Executive Insight
SSPA   None assigned     DataView




SSPA   None assigned   Member Spend




SSPA   None assigned   Service Insight
SSPA   None assigned     Recommended Service Practice




TPSA   TPSA-PSI-08-003          Service Insight




SSPA   None assigned     Recommended Service Practice
   TPSA       TPSA-PSI-08-001   Service Insight




   TPSA       TPSA-MV-08-001      DataView




AFSMI, SSPA   AFSMI-SI-08-009     DataView
   SSPA        None assigned     Service Insight




  AFSMI        None assigned    Executive Insight




AFSMI, SSPA   AFSMI-SI-08-010    Service Insight




   TPSA       TPSA-MV-07-004       DataView
SSPA   None assigned          Service Insight




SSPA   None assigned            DataView




SSPA   None assigned        Technology Review




SSPA   None assigned   Recommended Service Practice
TPSA   TPSA-PSI-07-008          Service Insight




TPSA   TPSA-PSI-07-007          Service Insight




SSPA    None assigned    Recommended Service Practice




TPSA   TPSA-MV-07-003             DataView
AFSMI, SSPA   AFSMI-SI-08-015   Service Insight




   TPSA       TPSA-PSI-07-006   Service Insight




   SSPA       None assigned     Service Insight




AFSMI, SSPA   AFSMI-SI-08-008   Service Insight
   SSPA       None assigned     Recommended Service Practice




AFSMI, SSPA   AFSMI-SI-08-016          Service Insight




   TPSA       TPSA-PSI-07-005          Service Insight




   TPSA       TPSA-PSI-07-004          Service Insight
SSPA   None assigned     Service Insight




SSPA   None assigned     Service Insight




SSPA   None assigned   Technology Review
AFSMI, SSPA   AFSMI-EI-08-004   Technology Review




   SSPA       None assigned       Service Insight




   SSPA       None assigned         DataView
TPSA   TPSA-MV-07-001      DataView




TPSA   TPSA-MV-07-002      DataView




SSPA    None assigned      DataView




TPSA   TPSA-PSI-07-002   Service Insight
   SSPA       None assigned       DataView




AFSMI, SSPA   AFSMI-SI-08-011   Service Insight




   SSPA       None assigned       DataView
SSPA   None assigned   Service Insight




SSPA   None assigned   Service Insight




SSPA   None assigned   Service Insight
SSPA   None assigned     Service Insight




SSPA   None assigned     Service Insight




SSPA   None assigned   Technology Review
SSPA   None assigned   Service Insight




SSPA   None assigned     DataView




SSPA   None assigned     DataView
SSPA   None assigned   Technology Review




SSPA   None assigned     Service Insight




SSPA   None assigned       DataView
TPSA   TPSA-PO-06-001   Recommended Service Practice




SSPA   None assigned         Technology Review




SSPA   None assigned           Service Insight
SSPA   None assigned   Technology Review




SSPA   None assigned     Service Insight




SSPA   None assigned     Service Insight
SSPA   None assigned   DataView




SSPA   None assigned   DataView




SSPA   None assigned   DataView
SSPA    None assigned          Executive Insight




TPSA   TPSA-PSI-06-007   Recommended Service Practice




TPSA   TPSA-MV-06-003             DataView




TPSA   TPSA-MV-06-002             DataView




TPSA   TPSA-PSI-06-004          Service Insight
TPSA   TPSA-PSI-06-005   Service Insight




TPSA   TPSA-PSI-06-006   Service Insight




TPSA   TPSA-PSI-06-002   Service Insight




TPSA   TPSA-PSI-06-001   Service Insight




TPSA   TPSA-MV-06-001      DataView
TPSA   TPSA-PSI-06-003          Service Insight




TPSA   TPSA-PSI-05-002          Service Insight




TPSA   TPSA-PSI-05-003   Recommended Service Practice




TPSA   TPSA-MV-05-001             DataView




TPSA   TPSA-PSI-05-001          Service Insight
     Category                              Research Title              Publication Date




 Customer Support       Driving Self-Service Success with Rich Media       June-09




Professional Services   The Professional Services Charter                  June-09
Service Strategy   The Services Dashboard                                   June-09




 Field Service     Field Engineers: The Service Business Stimulus Package   June-09
  Service Innovation   The Services Innovation Gap           May-09




  Customer Support     2009 SSPA Member Technology Heatmap   April-09




Knowledge Management   Service Convergence Begins with KM    April-09
   Industry Data        The Service 50 Q4 2008                                            March-09




                        Field Service’s Role in the Green Enterprise, How to Cut Costs
    Field Service       and Improve Service with Green Service
                                                                                          March-09




Professional Services   Professional Development in a Downturn                            March-09




 Customer Support       Building a Business Case for Communities                         February-09
Customer Support, Field
Service, and Professional   Practices and Results                         January-09
         Services




 Professional Services      Trends in Professional Services Automation    January-09




   Customer Support         Member Collaboration: Support Ratios         December-08
Customer Support, Field
Service, and Professional   VC Funding for Service Automation Slows      December-08
         Services




   Customer Support         Recognized Innovator Awards: Green Edition   October-08




Customer Support, Field
Service, and Professional   What I Heard: Service Technology Trends      October-08
         Services
                        Driving Field Service Productivity: Do You Keep Your Economic
    Field Service       Benefits Flowing? Part 1
                                                                                         October-08




                        Driving Field Service Productivity: Do You Keep Your Economic
    Field Service       Benefits Flowing? Part 2
                                                                                         October-08




                        Service 50 2Q 2008: Analyzing the Profitability High
   Industry Data                                                                        September-08
                        Performers




                        Benchmarking PS Compensation: TPSA 2008 Multi-
Professional Services                                                                    August-08
                        Member Study Highlights
                           Preparing for the Future: Building a Support
    Customer Support                                                      July-08
                           Succession Plan that Works




Customer Support and Field Servicing the SMB Marketplace: Discovering
                                                                          July-08
         Service           Goldmines and Landmines




                           The ROI of Knowledge Management: Building a
    Customer Support                                                      July-08
                           Business Case for KM Investments
                   SSPA Research Product Comparison: Remote
Customer Support   Support Platforms: Axeda, Bomgar, Cisco WebEx,      June-08
                   Citrix Online, LogMeIn and NTRglobal




                   Blurring Boundaries Complicate Tool Selection:
Customer Support   Emerging Trends from the 2008 SSPA Best Practices   June-08
                   Conference
                        PS Professional Development: Member Survey
Professional Services                                                           June-08
                        Results




                        The Challenges of Tech Support via Email: Linksys
 Customer Support       Ends Email Support, Successfully Migrating Traffic to   June-08
                        Forums




                        SSPA Spring 2008 Recognized Innovators: Usability,
 Customer Support                                                               May-08
                        Voice of the Customer and Root Cause Analysis
Customer Support   2008 SSPA Member Technology Survey                   May-08




Customer Support   SSPA Spring 2008 Recognized Innovators               May-08




                   Talent Management in Emerging Markets: Best
Customer Support   Practices for Attracting, Developing and Retaining   May-08
                   Talent in India
                        Exempt Status for TSEs: Navigating FLSA:
 Customer Support       Organizations Move to Reclassify Support Techs as         April-08
                        Non-Exempt




                        Navigating 97-2: Setting VSOE Revenue Recognition,
Professional Services                                                             April-08
                        Part 2




                        Differentiation vs. Standardization: Is Standardization
    Field Service       Conflicting with Our USPs?
                                                                                  April-08
                           2008 SSPA Member Technology Heat Map:
Customer Support and Field
                           Significant Gains in Adoption in Multiple Areas of      March-08
         Service
                           Support Technology




                             Partner 2008 Intent to Purchase Report
 Customer Support, Field
 Service, and Professional                                                         March-08
                             Note: Pricing for this report per the then-current
          Services
                             AFSMI|SSPA|TPSA Partner Program Overview.




                             Creating Personalized Customer Experiences: Three
    Customer Support         Steps toward Offering Unique and Differentiating     February-08
                             Support Interactions
                        Assisted Support Best Practices: Which Metrics to
 Customer Support                                                           February-08
                        Track and How to Calculate Them




                        Opportunities in Service Innovation: Where the
Professional Services                                                       February-08
                        game will change




                        Asking Applicants the Right Questions: SSPA
 Customer Support       Members Share Best Practices for Support Rep        January-08
                        Interviews
                        Professional Services in a Downturn: Surviving
Professional Services                                                         January-08
                        Management Expectations




                        The TPSA Service 50 Q407: Revenue Mix and
   Industry Data                                                              January-08
                        Profitability




                        Web Self-Service 2008 Trends: Self-Service Success
 Customer Support                                                            December-07
                        Continues to Decline; How Web 2.0 Can Help
                   2007 in Review--Support Technology Trends:
Customer Support   Customer Support Communities, Analytics                   December-07
                   Everywhere, Proactive Support




                   Selling the Service Experience: Are We Finally Becoming
  Field Service    Customer-Centric?
                                                                             December-07




                   Online Communities Give Voice to Customers:
Customer Support   Leveraging Web 2.0 to Improve Collaboration With          November-07
                   and Among Customers




                   TPSA Service 50 Q307: Understanding the Principles
  Industry Data                                                              November-07
                   of Growth and Profitability in IT Services
                   Getting The Most Out Of Vendor References: Tips
Customer Support   for The Customer Reference Process and What        October-07
                   Questions to Ask




                   OmniChannel Update: Volumes Still Climbing:
Customer Support   Service Levels Up: Response and Resolution Times   October-07
                   Improve for All Channels




                   SSPA Fall 2007 Recognized Innovators:
Customer Support   Globalization, Interaction Quality and Proactive   October-07
                   Support




                   Staffing Night and Weekend Shifts: SSPA Members
Customer Support                                                      October-07
                   Offer Their Own In-House Best Practices
Professional Services   Driving Global Alignment in a PS Organization          October-07




                        The TPSA Playbook: Leveraging Analyst Relations for
Professional Services                                                          October-07
                        Technology Professional Services




                        Right Channeling: Interactions by Value: Providing
 Customer Support       Unique Customer Experiences Based on Account          September-07
                        Value




                        Service 50 Q207: Software Companies Driving the
   Industry Data                                                              September-07
                        Up-Tick in Financial Performance
                        Building a Business Case for Remote Support:
 Customer Support       Improvements in Key Operational Benchmarks         August-07
                        Create Reliable ROI Model




Professional Services   Sourcing Solution Architects                       August-07




                        Constructing the 360° View of the Customer: SSPA
 Customer Support       Members Make Progress in Mastering Critical CRM     July-07
                        Concept




                        Improving Service with the 360° View: How CRM
 Customer Support       Software Enables Contextual, Personalized           July-07
                        Interactions
                        Ten Best Practices to Increase ERMS Success: Top 10
 Customer Support       Tips to Maximize the Effectiveness of Email           July-07
                        Response Management




                        Deflecting Routine Customer Emails: Leveraging
 Customer Support                                                             June-07
                        Email Response Management Systems to Cut Costs




Professional Services   Calculating Utilization                               June-07




                        Essentials of Global Resource Management in
Professional Services                                                         June-07
                        Technology Professional Services
                   Top Knowledge Management Trends: Globalization,
Customer Support   KM 2.0 and Evolving Customers Top Member Issues   June-07
                   List




                   Preparing For Knowledge Management 2.0: Online
Customer Support   Communities Force Changes to Support’s KM         May-07
                   Strategy




                   Spring 2007 SSPA Recognized Innovators:
Customer Support   Analytics/Business Intelligence, Web 2.0, Offer   May-07
                   Management
                   Market Overview: Voice Self-Service: Leveraging
Customer Support   Voice Technology to Automate Customer                  April-07
                   Interactions




                   Increasing Effectiveness of Voice Self-Service: Best
Customer Support   Practices to Increase Accuracy and Customer            April-07
                   Adoption




Customer Support   Market Overview: Reporting and Analytics               April-07
   Industry Data        Service 50 Trends: Q405 – Q406                       April-07




   Industry Data        The Service 50, Q1 2007                              April-07




                        Creating Effective In-Home Service Programs:
    Field Service       Results from the SSPA Consumer Services Survey for   March-07
                        Home Office, Theatre




Professional Services   Profiles in PS Leadership                            March-07
                   2007 Consumer Electronics Spending Trends:
Customer Support   Results from the SSPA Consumer Services Survey for   February-07
                   Home Office, Theatre




                   Analytics' Role in Value-Added Support: Leveraging
Customer Support                                                        February-07
                   Technology to Unlock Business Intelligence




                   Hottest In-Home Service Options and Drivers:
Customer Support   Results from the SSPA Consumer Services Survey for   February-07
                   Home Office, Theatre
                   2007 Service and Support Technology Trends:
Customer Support   Consolidation Accelerates; Open Source and          January-07
                   OnDemand Reach Critical Mass




                   Best Practices to Increase Offer Accept Rates:
Customer Support   Successfully Incorporating Upsell/Cross-Sell into   January-07
                   Inbound Support




                   Leveraging Web 2.0 for Margin Improvements:
Customer Support   Effectively Incorporating Forums into Web Self-     January-07
                   Service
                            2007 Service and Support Industry Trends: Support
   Customer Support                                                                 January-07
                            “Crosses the Chasm” from Tactical to Strategic




                            2006 Year in Review: Vendor Consolidation:
   Customer Support         Significant Acquisitions within the CRM and eService   December-06
                            Markets in 2006




Customer Support, Field
                            SSPA Recognized Innovators: Fall 2006: Technology,
Service, and Professional                                                          December-06
                            Customer Experience and Optimization Innovators
         Services
                            Adding Upsell/Cross-Sell to Web Self-Service:
    Customer Support        Successful Revenue Generation Using Unassisted    November-06
                            Channels




                            Field Service Offer Accept Rates Nearly 100%:
       Field Service        Extended Warranties, Additional Products and      November-06
                            Services Prove Easy to Sell




                           2006 SSPA Functional “Heat Map”: Member
Customer Support and Field
                           Adoption of Service and Support Technology in 21   November-06
         Service
                           Product Areas
                   Deriving BI from Recorded Interactions: Trends in
Customer Support                                                           October-06
                   Quality Monitoring




                   Highly Personalized Self-Service Microsites: Web 2.0
Customer Support   Raises Consumer and Enterprise Expectations for         October-06
                   Self-Service




                   Satisfied, But Not Dazzled by Technology:
Customer Support   Preliminary Results from 2006 SSPA Support             September-06
                   Technology Survey
Professional Services   Five Steps to the Annual PS Forecast                September-06




                        Best of Breed, End-to-End Field Service: The
    Field Service       Merging of Enterprise Software, SaaS and             August-06
                        Outsourced Services




                        Field Service Optimization Market Overview: Field
    Field Service       Service Next In Line for the Customer Experience     August-06
                        Spotlight
                   Cut Field Service Costs by Leveraging KM: France’s
  Field Service    Darty Increases Satisfaction and Lowers Cost with    August-06
                   Kaidara




                   Calculating The Cost of Multi-Vendor Support:
Customer Support   Support: Impacts To The Customer Experience And       July-06
                   The Bottom Line




                   Leveraging Technology to Battle MVS Woes: Short
Customer Support   and Long Term Strategies to Streamline MVS Issue      July-06
                   Resolution
                   2006: The Year of the Omni-Channel: Creating
Customer Support                                                          July-06
                   Identical Customer Experiences Across Channels




                   Increased Complexity Takes Its Toll: Resolution Time
Customer Support                                                          July-06
                   Averages Increase across Channels




                   Multi-Channel Adoption Trends: eChannel Volume
Customer Support                                                          July-06
                   Overtakes Phone in 2006
                        Executive Trends from Top Technology Firms:
 Customer Support                                                           July-06
                        Discussions from the 2006 SSPA CSE Summit




Professional Services   Project Life Cycle Gaps                             July-06




   Industry Data        The Service 50, Q2 2006                             July-06




   Industry Data        The Service 50, Q1 2006                            May-06




                        Intellectual Asset Management: Glossary of Terms
Professional Services                                                      March-06
                        and Definitions
Professional Services   Revenue Recognition and VSOE: Part 1      March-06




Professional Services   The PS Hourglass: The Changing PS Model   March-06




Services Marketing      Demand Generation: A Case Study           January-06




Professional Services   Services Engineering                      January-06




   Industry Data        The Service 50, Q4 2005                   January-06
Professional Services   Why PS Part 1: The Case for Professional Services    January-06




Professional Services   Leasing Professional Services                       November-05




Professional Services   The Professional Services Business Model            November-05




   Industry Data        The Service 50, Q3 2005                             November-05




Services Marketing      The Services Marketing Mix                          November-05
# Pages                                            Overview
          With economic turmoil forcing companies to find creative ways to cut operational
          costs, many support organizations are looking for ways to migrate more assisted
          support interactions to Web self-service. Unfortunately, self-service success is at an
          all-time low, with a disappointing industry average of 40%. The reasons for this
          range from outdated knowledgebase technology to increasing product complexity,
          and until now the fix has been an expensive one. One emerging approach to
  8       improving success of Web self-service involves adding rich media to the
          knowledgebase: sound, graphics, video, etc., to better illustrate a
          procedure or provide step-by-step instructions to a novice customer. In this report,
          learn how SSPA Member Adobe Systems added video elements to knowledgebase
          articles with great results: self-service success rose 9%, 68% of customers surveyed
          preferred video to plain text articles, and the rich media also helped cut training
          time for new support
          TPSA has devoted considerable energy to understanding the service strategy
          profiles of PS organizations. White papers, conference presentations, blog entries,
          and member benchmark assessments are all replete with uses of this incredibly
          useful and powerful framework. The construct is based on a simple principle, one
          that has been demonstrated over and over again to be accurate, which is
          technology product companies generally settle into one of three patterns in terms
          of the amount of revenue contributed by their professional services organizations:
          (1) product providers, with less than 10% of revenue
          coming from PS; (2) product extenders, with 10% to 35% of revenue coming from
          PS; and (3) solution providers, with 35% or greater revenue contribution from PS.
          Focusing on this single factor and these three patterns has helped us organize our
          thinking about the differing roles of PS organizations and has provided us with an
  22
          extremely useful lexicon that has become embedded in much of what we do.
     A common request we receive from AFSMI, SSPA, and TPSA members is for
     guidance on how to establish a “services dashboard.” A business dashboard is a
     graphical summary that allows managers to monitor the contribution and health of
     the departments in their organization. To gauge exactly how well an organization is
     performing, a dashboard captures and reports critical data points from each
     department within the organization, thus providing a snapshot of overall
     performance. By having the right dashboard in place, a management team can
     better monitor the performance of the services organization and identify areas that
     need attention.
17




9




     In this AFSMI Service Insight we discuss the concept of customer-facing field
     resources as one of your greatest assets—a key to brighter outcomes in these trying
     times and a means to protect your precious contract revenue base. Hear ideas
     about strategic initiatives that use field engineers as a resource and share some
     thoughts about how you should approach maximizing their unique positioning with
     your customers.
     Technology companies are under enormous pressure to improve the performance
     of their service businesses. And this pressure could well increase over time. The
     simple truth is that as technology firms become more services-centric, they will be
     less able to meet overall company and shareholder expectations without making
     serious, systematic investments in services research innovation. Yet, technology
     companies appear to be doing anything but. Results from an industry survey
     focusing on services research and innovation, sponsored jointly by the Service
     Research & Innovation Institute (SRII), the Association for Services Management
27
     International (AFSMI), the Service & Support Professionals Association (SSPA), and
     the Technology Professional Services Association (TPSA), demonstrate that a clear
     services innovation imperative is being confronted tepidly and tentatively, if at all,
     by most technology companies.




     In 2007 SSPA Research introduced the Member Technology Heat Map, showing the
     level of member adoption for the major categories of customer support technology.
     The results of the 2009 survey are in, and multiple functional categories showed
     increases in member adoption year over year, including community-related and
     quality monitoring technology. Also, a new category, Proactive Support, was added
     for the 2009 survey, due to the popularity of this innovative technology enabling
4    many Value-Added Support programs within member companies. Support
     organizations considering additional technology investments should identify areas in
     which peers have already adopted solutions in order to avoid losing a competitive
     edge due to lack of technical sophistication.




     Service convergence means that all areas of service and support, including
     professional services, technical support, field service, and customer education
     services, are looking for areas in which consolidating people, processes, and/or
     technology will improve service levels and cut operating costs. Association members
     and partners report that knowledge management has emerged as an initial area
     targeted by convergence roadmaps due to three reasons: content authored by each
     arm of service and support is highly applicable to other areas; minimizing the
     number of knowledgebases and search tools cuts expenses; and concern over losing
5    valuable IP because of economic downsizing is driving new knowledge capture
     initiatives. Association members should understand the benefits and challenges of
     consolidating knowledge management practices across service lines. With an eye
     toward consolidation, a thorough assessment of existing tools and processes should
     take place as an initial step toward the creation of a service convergence roadmap.
     This TPSA DataView summarizes the Q408 Service 50 results. Continuing a theme
     that we introduced in the previous Service 50 analysis, we again explore the
     “Service Stars” for lessons within their ability to achieve high financial performance
     despite the worsening economy. In the second part of the paper, we take an in-
     depth look at the primary categories in the Service 50—hardware, software, and
12
     services—so that we can better understand their performance and trends between
     Q407 and Q408. This analysis shows, yet again, that the software companies are
     leading the way in the technology services sector.



     Technology companies are under increasing pressure to go Green. With Wall Street,
     environmental groups, as well as customers, stockholders, and employees all
     pushing Green issues with corporate executives, the trend is hard to ignore. But so
8
     far, the bulk of the attention has been on manufacturing facilities, disregarding the
     Green impact of other areas of the company, including service and support.



     We know technology companies charter their professional services (PS) businesses
     with the critical objectives of increasing customer intimacy and securing continued
     product revenues. During a down economy, these strategic goals become even
12   more important. This AFSMI Service Insight discusses how building the skills of PS
     staff can be a key tactic for sustainable competitive advantage when capital
     spending is under duress and if done well, leveraging these soft skills leads to
     revenue and margin growth.

     Customer communities and discussion forums have emerged over the last two years
     as a popular new support channel: adoption of customer discussion forums by SSPA
     members grew from 36% in 2007 to 49% in 2008. Unfortunately, there has been too
     much emphasis by community platform vendors on the trendy aspects of social
     networking and insufficient messaging on the business value of an implementation.
     As a result, companies that are about to kickoff off a community project, or are in
     the early stages of an implementation, are being pressured by management to cost
     justify the project before proceeding. Return on investment (ROI) for communities
8    comes from both hard and soft metrics, but few guidelines to realistic results exist.
     Companies implementing an online community or discussion forum need to make
     realistic ROI estimates before continuing, and ensure all the report elements and
     required integrations are in place to enable accurate ROI analysis when live.
     Service management teams are constantly on the hunt to identify “best practices”
     they can implement to improve performance. Service organizations also need to
     benchmark current performance against relevant industry data to determine how
     well the organization is currently performing. These two activities, practice
     improvement and benchmarking results, can be powerful tools to improving the
     overall performance of a services organization. However, if the services
     management team does not have a common framework for applying both practice
     and results data to their organization, these activities can quickly become
16
     ineffective. This Services Insight provides services management teams with a
     framework for effectively applying both practice and results data from the industry
     to drive performance improvement. This content is relevant to any organization
     determined to improve performance by clearly understanding current industry
     performance.




     Based on inquiries from TPSA members and briefings with TPSA partners, the push
     to better understand resource utilization and identify profitable (or unprofitable)
     projects up front is making adoption of “best of breed” professional services
     automation (PSA) tools a priority for more PS organizations. Multiple TPSA members
     report that their homegrown approaches to PSA are no longer meeting needs,
     especially with the economic recession driving requirements for more proactive,
6    intelligent insights. PS organizations should stay abreast of the latest developments
     in PSA suites to understand how technology such as real-time analytics, Web
     collaboration, enterprise search, and community platforms can lower operating and
     delivery costs and boost productivity and revenues.




     Everybody asks: what is the average ratio of support engineers to customers? Until
     now, SSPA Research has been unable to provide much guidance to this frequently
     asked question, but thanks to a recent member collaboration and survey, the ratio
     of support engineers to customers is now available, as well as the ratio of
     knowledge workers to support engineers. Though ratios are not an exact science,
5    and many factors such as product complexity and customer maturity influence
     staffing requirements, these ratios serve as a good “back of the envelope” guide
     when estimating staffing for new products or when merging support organizations.
     Venture Capital firms place bets on startup companies with infusions of cash in
     exchange for equity. Tracking the types of companies receiving funding is a good
     way to identify technology trends, but it also helps companies understand in what
     specific areas to expect innovative advancements in the months and years to come.
     Unlike a decade ago, when a large number of startups were receiving funding to
     create service and support automation, the list of Q3 2008 Silicon Valley VC
     investments show few bets being placed on solutions that impact the customer
     experience, with the majority of funding being put towards Green Energy and
5
     Biotech solutions. However, there were significant investments made to enterprise
     and internet searching, Web collaboration and increased mobility, which can be
     leveraged to improve customer service levels. Innovation-minded companies should
     be familiar with hot technology areas in order to plan and prioritize where future
     investments should be made.




     For the Fall 2008 Recognized Innovator Awards, AFSMI and SSPA Research focused
     on a boardroom level topic: Going Green. Though the bulk of corporate Green
     initiatives involve cutting electric consumption in data centers, these awards
     recognize technology that change support processes in three categories, impacting
     a company’s overall carbon footprint. Virtual support center technology allows
     support employees to work from home, keeping commute traffic off the roads.
10   Technology to eliminate onsite visits not only cuts operating expenses, but
     eliminates repair vehicle traffic. Technology to streamline field service schedules
     maximizes the number of appointments per shift and minimizes the number of
     miles driven by field engineers.




     Though the economic recession may have dominated conversations at the 2008 Fall
     Conference co-hosted by AFSMI, SSPA and TPSA, tools and technology remained a
     hot topic. Though some belt-tightening is already evident, service and support
     technology’s proven and easily documented return on investment potential means
     that significant investments are still being made. The three high-level service and
     support technology trends that emerged from member discussions are B2B
     functional gaps in customer support suites, a lack of packaged applications that
7
     meet the needs of converged service organizations, and the Greening of support.
     Companies evaluating technology for a 2009 purchase should understand these
     trends and plan for their impact early in the evaluation/selection process.
     The pressure to increase productivity—among customers/end-users, service
     managers, and administrators alike—is an ongoing challenge for companies of all
     sizes. The abundance of online information and enterprise applications available to
     employees today ultimately improves productivity, potentially providing a
23
     competitive advantage in the market. But mastering the pretty much intangible
     business of a high-tech services organization is a complex and daunting task, often
     accompanied by specific government mandates.



     The pressure to increase productivity—among customers/end-users, service
     managers, and administrators alike—is an ongoing challenge for companies of all
     sizes. The abundance of online information and enterprise applications available to
     employees today ultimately improves productivity, potentially providing a
18
     competitive advantage in the market. But mastering the pretty much intangible
     business of a high-tech services organization is a complex and daunting task, often
     accompanied by specific government mandates.


     This TPSA DataView analyzes the most profitable companies in the Q208 Service 50
     with a view toward uncovering the key traits and behaviors that make them tick.
     This detailed analysis concludes with some compelling data about how high
     performers are allocating investments in Sales & Marketing and G&A. The key
     lesson of this analysis appears to be that highly profitable companies invest more in
     Sales & Marketing and far less in G&A and the average IT firm. In other words, they
     make strategic investments in areas they add to the top line and minimize overhead
19
     in ways that help them realize high financial performance in the bottom line.




     TPSA recently completed its second Multi-Member Study on the subject of
     compensation in technology professional services. Participating member companies
     provided thousands of data points related to compensation and compensation
     policies for 12 PS positions and 15 countries. The study yielded an unprecedented
     view of PS compensation in general and a particularly rich understanding of the
17   drivers of variable compensation. . This TPSA DataView shares just some of the key
     highlights and general findings of this study. The full details of the research are
     available only to the study participants and subscribers at this time.
     Running a technical support business is all about taking action and getting things
     done. Although, with little time set aside for planning, we tend to focus primarily on
     support budgets and technology acquisitions. However, there is one future plan
     that—if done right—will have significant pay offs for your organization--succession
     planning. Simply put, succession planning is the art and science of grooming high-
     potential managers for top executive positions; allowing them to become an
     internal pool of potential executive talent. Succession planning does not just
3
     happen—it is a focused, ongoing effort—but the benefits will become evident the
     first time you lose a VP and don’t have to go outside the company to find a
     replacement. It’s all about developing a formal plan that allows your brightest
     managers to gain the skills necessary to become VP’s and beyond.




     A common theme in SSPA Research has been growing technical complexity and how
     this Servicing the small to midsize business (SMB) market is a hot topic today for
     most SSPA members. These customers sit somewhere between the consumer and
     enterprise customer set and offer a really big opportunity for both sales and service
     revenues. Our friends at Warrillow & Company tell us that there are 27 million firms
     out there that are in need of technology products and services, so it makes sense
     that most companies are trying to find a way to expand their current offerings and
2    reach these buyers. Also, this segment is growing rapidly while the enterprise
     customers are shrinking due to consolidation. So what is the big deal with the SMB
     marketplace? Why is there a gold rush to acquire these small and medium
     customers? And most importantly, what are the challenges in supporting them?




     Measuring the impact of knowledge management (KM) initiatives is critical in order
     to understand the benefits received by the technology and to verify you are
     leveraging the implementation to receive the maximum return on investment (ROI).
     Though increasing support technician productivity is one of KM’s biggest selling
     points, there are other important impacts as well, including changes to interaction
     volumes and cost, customer satisfaction, and even product revenue and repurchase
     cycle.. When starting a new KM project, support organizations should benchmark
     their current performance against the performance of their peers and identify the
17   specific operational metrics needing improvement. Armed with this prioritized list,
     work with SSPA Research and your technology providers to understand which
     specific functionality has a proven track record of impacting these metrics, and build
     an implementation plan that will ensure the biggest “bang for your buck” early in
     the project.
     The remote support market, addressing functionality such as remote control and
     remote diagnostics, is becoming increasingly important as companies look for ways
     to more quickly and accurately resolve customer technology problems, as well as
     reduce onsite visits in the interest of both cost savings and Green initiatives.
     Selecting a product is not easy: as this market and its available platforms mature,
     the identification of core differences between vendors and products becomes more
     complex. . SSPA Research has surveyed the leading providers of remote support:
     Axeda, Bomgar, Citrix Online, LogMeIn, NTRglobal and WebEx, and found that key
14   differences remain in breadth of suite, supported platforms, and deployment
     models. Companies making investments in remote support technology should
     identify all customer platforms for which remote support access is required,
     understand leading-edge functionality available, and discuss deployment options
     with your IT department before making a final selection.




     As customer service technology vendors expand their suites, either through internal
     development or acquisition, the boundaries between formerly distinct application
     areas are blurring. This creates problems for companies trying to fill a specific
     functional hole, who end up with a ‘short list’ of vendors with wildly different core
     competencies, and varying abilities to ultimately solve the company’s business
     problem. Add to this the current trend of vendors pitching platforms, not
     applications, and it becomes difficult for buyers to even dig deep into functional
8    capabilities during the sales cycle. Support management must do a better job of
     understanding the complete suites offered by incumbent vendors before shopping
     for a niche solution, and create a long-term roadmap for support technology that
     enables purchases to be made with future plans in mind.
     TPSA Research surveyed member organizations in February and March 2008
     regarding a variety of policies and practices related to the training and development
     of PS professionals. While commitment to professional development amongst
     TPSOs is typically rather modest, this study suggests a correlation of commitment to
     professional development and financial performance in the PS business. This TPSA
     DataView summarizes the results of the survey and offers guidance for PS
     organizations on the basis of the results.
12




     Technical support via email is a difficult proposal. Customers rarely include all the
     required information in the first email, stretching even some simple problems into a
     long email dialogue before resolution. With email response and resolution times
     much higher than for the phone channel, interaction cost and customer satisfaction
     with email are also issues. According to SSPA Member Linksys, a division of Cisco, if
     email is not an effective way to handle your support interactions, stop offering it.
9    This year Linksys stopped supporting customers through email with surprising
     results: not only were there no customer complaints, but the majority of email
     volume was transitioned to an unassisted channel—discussion forums—with zero
     impact on phone volume.




     For the Spring 2008 Recognized Innovator Awards, SSPA Research selected three
     categories that embody the conference theme: Essential Elements of Support.
     Usability is at the root of many technology project successes and failures: if an
     application is not simple and intuitive, employees and customers will never adopt at
     the desired levels. Technology to enable Voice of the Customer initiatives
     streamlines the capture of customer feedback as well as delivering actionable
     customer intelligence. Root Cause Analysis should be a core part of every technical
6
     support operation, making sure you aren‘t treating just the symptoms of a larger
     issue. Companies should stay abreast of innovations to customer support products
     and services and integrate these new approaches into their technology roadmap.
     SSPA Research has completed its second annual member survey of service and
     support technology, tracking budgets for new technology, as well as chronicling
     which functional components are finding adoption by SSPA members, which
     vendors’ technology is in place, and how satisfied members are with their
     technology purchases. According to the survey, SSPA members as a whole are
     spending an estimated $994M to buy, customize and maintain support technology
     in 2008; small and medium sized SSPA members have an average support
18   technology budget of $1.8M, compared to $10M for >$1B members. Satisfaction
     with existing technology is up this year, with an average score of 3.55 (on a five
     point scale) compared to 2.99 in 2007. Not surprisingly, Web 2.0 leads the list of
     planned purchases for 2008, with large and small members reporting budget for
     discussion forums, Wikis and Web collaboration.




     For the Spring 2008 Recognized Innovator Awards, SSPA Research selected three
     categories that embody the conference theme: Essential Elements of Support.
     Usability is at the root of many technology project successes and failures: if an
     application is not simple and intuitive, employees and customers will never adopt at
     the desired levels. Technology to enable Voice of the Customer initiatives
     streamlines the capture of customer feedback as well as delivering actionable
     customer intelligence. Root Cause Analysis should be a core part of every technical
6
     support operation, making sure you aren’t treating just the symptoms of a larger
     issue. Companies should stay abreast of innovations to customer support products
     and services and integrate these new approaches into their technology roadmap.




     With a few notable exceptions, best practice talent management policies and
     processes from North America apply fairly well in India. With as estimated 1.2
     million graduates with technical degrees being minted annually in India, the
     technical support industry needs better positioning to attract, manage and retain
     the best and brightest for Indian support operations. This paper will define the best
     practices identified through surveys of the top technology companies with large
43   Indian product support centers, as well as provide recommendations for improving
     the Talent Management Lifecycle in emerging markets.
     The United States Fair Labor Standards Act (FLSA) requires that employers classify
     jobs as either exempt or nonexempt. One of the primary differences is in overtime
     pay: exempt positions are excluded from overtime regulations; nonexempt
     employees are not. Though FLSA provides an exemption for technology workers, a
     1998 ruling states that technical support roles are not eligible for this exemption.
     Companies with exempt support engineers performing management functions less
3
     than 50% of the time should contact their human resource department and/or legal
     counsel and verify the validity of the exempt status. Companies out of compliance
     with FLSA are at risk of employee lawsuits for lost overtime wages.




     Ever since AICPA SOP 97-2, PS managers within software companies have been
     forced to arm wrestle with both internal accounting staff and external auditors
     regarding revenue recognition policies for service engagements that are bundled.
     with software and support offerings. Now, hardware companies that are bolting in
     value added software products are being forced to navigate 97-2. In March 2006,
     TPSA published an article titled Revenue Recognition Part 1 which provided an
15
     overview of the revenue recognition issues faced by software companies and
     specifically defined the pain points in establishing VSOE for professional service
     offerings. This Professional Services Insight (PSI) takes the discussion to the next
     level.



     Services account for over 60 percent of the economic activities in the U.S. and the
     European Union. For this reason, the promotion and advancement of the services
     sector has become a top priority for the European region. As with any industry that
     pays heed to the competition, there are forces that can shape its attractiveness, its
22
     competitive position, and their underlying causes. This drive for appealing
     distinction more or less opposes the drive for standardization caused by the need
     for more cost-efficiency.
     In 2007 SSPA Research introduced the Member Technology Heat Map, showing the
     level of member adoption for 21 categories of customer support technology. The
     results of the 2008 survey are in, and multiple functional categories showed a sharp
     increase in member adoption year over year. The 2008 survey also introduced three
     additional categories: Enterprise CRM, Wikis and Intelligent Search, and all three
     proved popular with member companies. Companies considering additional
     technology investments should identify areas in which peers have already adopted
4    solutions in order to avoid losing a competitive edge due to lack of technical
     sophistication.




     SSPA Research has completed its second annual member survey of service and
     support technology, tracking budgets for new technology, as well as chronicling
     which functional components are finding adoption by SSPA members, which
     vendors‟ technology is in place, and how satisfied members are with their
     technology purchases. According to the survey, SSPA members as a whole are
     spending an estimated $994M to buy, customize and maintain support technology
     in 2008; small and medium sized SSPA members have an average support
13   technology budget of $1.8M, compared to $10M for >$1B members. Satisfaction
     with existing technology is up this year, with an average score of 3.55 (on a five
     point scale) compared to 2.99 in 2007. Not surprisingly, Web 2.0 leads the list of
     planned purchases for 2008, with large and small members reporting budget for
     discussion forums, Wikis and Web collaboration.




     A “one-size-fits-all” approach to service doesn‟t recognize what is unique about
     each customer. Tailoring support interactions to fit the specific circumstances of an
     account can not only increase customer satisfaction, but will also increase revenue
     by giving special attention to accounts at certain sales milestones (renewals,
     pending deals) and by extending highly contextual upsell/cross-sell offers when
     appropriate. Companies hoping to introduce more elements of personalization to
5    support interactions must increase the relationship aspects of technician training,
     create an agent desktop making all relevant customer details easily accessible, and
     invest in technology for personalized offers and account guidance.
     Operational metrics are the foundation of a support organization. The SSPA’s
     Benchmark Database provides valuable insight into best practices for technical
     support metrics, but to take advantage of this tool, you must be accurately tracking
     and monitoring your own metrics. For assisted support, support organizations
     should track customer interaction metrics for automated call distribution, incident
     handling and resolution, and escalations, across phone, Web, email and Chat
8
     channels. This document outlines key assisted support metrics, how to calculate
     them, as well as providing insight into best practice results to enable you to gauge
     your performance against your industry peers.




     Service innovation is the theme for the 2008 TPSA spring summit. For the summit,
     we are defining service innovation as “the embodiment, combination, and synthesis
     of knowledge that accelerates the creation and delivery of original, relevant, and
17   valued services.” This article provides a practical assessment of the sources for this
     service innovation in the next three to five years.



     In a recent collaboration among our SSPA SMB (small and medium sized businesses)
     members, the topic was, “What are „best practice‟ behavioral questions to ask
     when interviewing technical support representative candidates?” As always,
     members were willing to share ideas, specific interview questions, and in one case,
     an entire document on preparing for, conducting, and scoring support
     representative interviews. Behavioral questions help assess applicant potential in
     many areas key to support representative success, including problem solving skills,
6    communication skills, teamwork, cultural fit, and tolerance for stress. While
     identifying technical aptitude and diagnostic abilities remain important, according to
     members there is renewed focus on recruiting strong customer service skills and a
     good attitude—something difficult to instill with training.
     As we enter 2008, there are strong indications the U.S. economy may experience an
     economic slowdown. The economic slowdown could be mild or severe—TPSA will
     leave it to the economic experts to predict and track this. In a severe economic
     downturn, professional service organizations are called upon to help their
     companies weather the rough seas. Specifically, priorities are shifted from product
     adoption to customer retention and cost control. This shift places new expectations
10   on PS performance; expectations that are often challenging to meet. Hopefully,
     2008 will present nothing but a mild slowdown in continued economic growth. But
     to be on the safe side, this article outlines the priorities for a professional services
     organization that will help it weather both the economic and management storms
     created in a downturn.



     This report is a companion to the TPSA Service 50 Q407 webcast. This TPSA.
     MarketView examines revenue mix and profitability trends among the Service 50
     with a special emphasis on hardware and software companies. This analysis
     documents an interesting set of relationships between revenue mix and profitability
     and raises questions about what this mix should be. For the complete Service 50
     Q407analysis, TPSA members should refer to the original webcast presentation.

11




     According to the SSPA Benchmark Database, successful visits to Web self-service
     declined 4% in 2007 to 40%. When considering investments to improve Web self-
     service adoption and success, clearly just updating traditional knowledgebase and
     search tools is not enough. The Web 2.0 approach to self-service can eliminate
     some core problems of traditional knowledge management: information is available
     on a wider range of topics, content is more frequently and easily updated, and
     recommendations are vouched for by both internal and external experts. In 2008,
5
     look for major providers of customer support technology to emphasize discussion
     forums as the hottest emerging customer channel, and expect to see signs that
     wikis and tagging will ultimately replace the traditional knowledgebase.
     Looking back over 2007, several key trends emerge related to customer service and
     support technology and these trends will continue to drive spending in 2008 and
     beyond. The three trends are: the emergence of online customer communities and
     discussion forums as a new and separate customer support channel; business-user
     targeted analytics and business intelligence reporting imbedded in enterprise
     applications; proactive monitoring and problem resolution for both hardware and
     software. Companies wanting to prove competitive differentiation based on
6
     excellent support experiences should evaluate how these trends, and the related
     technology platforms, can be leveraged to increase service levels, drive down
     reactive support costs, and create new premium service offerings.




     This members-only publication serves to address the requirements of marketing,
     the strategic thinking process, the role of marketing, the measurement of the right
21
     metrics, and the selling and management of services solutions.


     An important step toward Value-Added Support is establishing robust customer
     communication mechanisms: collecting timely feedback from customers, enabling
     collaboration with customers on key issues, and promoting dialogues between
     customers to create sense of community. Though most support organizations were
     initially interested in online communities and discussion forums as a new channel of
     self-service, the same Web community established for self-service can easily serve
5
     double duty as a primary way to collaborate with, and encourage collaboration
     among, customers. Companies should evaluate existing customer collaboration
     processes and identify practices that can be recreated, and in most cases improved,
     by leveraging Web 2.0.



     This report is a companion to the TPSA Service 50 Q307 webcast. This TPSA
     MarketView examines growth and profitability trends among the largest IT services
     providers and concludes with insights aimed at helping professional services
     organizations understand the “natural” limitations and advantages for companies
     with mixed portfolios. For the complete Service 50 Q307 analysis, TPSA members
12
     should refer to the original webcast presentation.
    When shopping for customer service or customer relationship management (CRM)
    software, talking to each vendor’s customer references is a critical step in making
    the right decision. During the sales cycle, it is very easy to get drawn into marketing
    messages and swayed by demonstrations of prototype products, customized for
    each demonstration. Customer references are the only way to determine what
    functionality actually exists, how easy it is to implement, how the vendor supports
3
    its customer base and how well it manages the overall relationship. This document
    outlines how to approach references and questions to ask when meeting with
    vendor references.




    In 2006 the SSPA published a report on the importance on an OmniChannel view of
    service. As more customers adopt non-phone channels, inconsistencies between
    service levels across phone, email and Web are problematic: customers preferring
    non-phone channels feel penalized, and customers are rewarded for using the most
    expensive channel: phone. In this report, an update on incident volumes, multi-
    channel adoption and service levels is provided. According to SSPA Benchmark
7
    metrics, incident volumes continue to climb at an alarming rate, but member
    companies focusing on productivity enhancing tools and processes are making
    progress: service levels for all channels improved in 2007.




    For the Fall 2007 Recognized Innovator Awards, SSPA Research selected three
    technology categories integral to Value-Added Support. Globalization allows
    companies to effectively meet the needs of customers around the world.
6   Monitoring and improving Interaction Quality, always a concern for support centers,
    is becoming more complex with increased adoption of non-phone channels and
    Web 2.0 communities. A core concept of Value-Added Support, Proactive Support,
    is a goal of most technology companies, yet many service organizations have had to
    build their own technology as few vendors exist specializing in this emerging
    Customer support personnel are often required to handle problems after normal
    business hours and may be required to carry a pager or to be the designated on-call
    person for a period of time. Support employees often view these responsibilities as
    the least attractive part of their jobs, and in competitive job markets, shift work or
    after-hours support will complicate employee recruitment. One solution is to give
    bonuses for after-hours work, but there are legal issues involved with such a
    decision. Before making commitments to employees or making any changes to
6
    existing policies or to programs for after-hours compensation, work with your
    human resources (HR) professional to verify that no corporate, state, or federal
    guidelines conflict with the new program. This report also includes feedback from
    multiple SSPA members on how their companies approach the sometimes thorny
    issue of after-hours support.
     The third summit TPSA hosted was on the topic of the annual PS planning process.
     At the summit, attendees indicated that one of the most difficult aspects of driving
     a global PS business plan is negotiating that plan with each of the individual
     geographies within the PS organization. In a following PSE Roundtable, members
22   discussed tactics to better align the corporate and geographic aspects of a PS
     organization. This PS Insight itemizes seven key metaplays management teams can
     use to better align the PS organization on a global basis.



     Many PS organizations either under-utilize or eschew industry analyst relations (IAR)
     altogether. This is driven in part by the persistence of misconceptions of what IAR is
     and is not and what is required to achieve valuable results. TPSA believes that a
     focused, targeted IAR program should be beneficial for most TPS organizations. This
     TPSA PS Insight outlines the basics of the IAR “play” using the TPSA Playbook
22   structure that has formed the basis for previous PS Insight research documents.




     Any time you have a hold queue, someone is at the end of it. Ideally, the customer
     at the end of the queue should not be your most highly valued account. Right
     Channeling means routing and handling inbound interactions differently depending
     on paid support tier, churn propensity, or actual or perceived account value. A long
     time ‘best practice’ in the communications industry, more technology companies
     are adding intelligence to the routing of inbound interactions to maximize profitable
     relationships. Companies should look for easy ways to route interactions based on
6
     existing tiers or value metrics, and as more complex profitability metrics are
     available down the road, consider more robust solutions to further differentiate the
     experience for customers of all value levels.




     This report is a companion to the TPSA Service 50 Q207 webcast. Based on a
     comparison of Q206 and Q207 data, this TPSA MarketView examines key growth
     trends in the services market and concludes with insights aimed at helping
     professional services organizations understand the opportunities inherent in the
10
     current IT services market.
     No company today will approve expenditures for new service and support
     technology without an understanding of the return on investment (ROI) for the
     project. Luckily, companies with strong metrics programs in place will find building
     the business case for productivity-enhancing software a straightforward process.
     Remote support platforms offer a compelling ROI story, with impacts to multiple
     core metrics such as first contact resolution, incident handling time and customer
15   satisfaction. Companies evaluating a remote support purchase should evaluate
     customer case studies to arrive at metric improvement goals, and then calculate the
     cost savings of those improvements. Armed with this information, the RFP process
     can commence with a realistic budget in mind.




     Solution architects have become the critical path to a PS organization’s ability to
     successfully scale the business. This TPSA PS Insight thoroughly defines the role. of
     the solution architect, discusses the factors to consider when sourcing and
18
     developing solution architects, and presents several industry benchmarks related to
     this increasingly important role.

     Creating the 360° View of the customer is one of the basic tenants of CRM, and one
     of the hardest to achieve. With customer data stored in multiple systems and
     databases across the enterprise, consolidating sources to create a single view of the
     customer remains a stretch goal for some members. Progress is being made,
     however, and according to a recent member poll, 18% of member companies have
5    attained a single customer master; an additional 41% have five or fewer customer
     databases. This report provides a basic overview of the 360° View, and looks at
     member adoption and planned 2007 spending for this core CRM concept.




     SSPA members continue to make major investments in CRM software, but
     according to discussions at SSPA conferences, getting value from CRM is not a slam
     dunk. While CRM projects tend to rightly focus on process in the beginning, the
     underlying value proposition of CRM is collecting a 360° View of the customer and
     leveraging that view to provide highly personalized and profitable interactions.
6
     Service organizations that have completed CRM implementations should now
     examine how to strengthen the 360° View, prioritize additional data sources, and
     leverage this information to improve productivity, accuracy and revenue.
     SSPA Benchmark data shows that customer email volume has increased while the
     service levels of email incidents have declined. Email Response Management
     Systems, currently used by 45% of SSPA >$1B members, can improve service levels
     for customer emails by auto-responding to repetitive questions, auto-suggesting
     replies to agents to streamline email processing, and auto-routing inbound emails to
8
     the correct person or group, eliminating manual reviews and routing. In this
     document, SSPA Research recommends 10 Best Practices to maximize the
     effectiveness of an ERMS, increasing the ROI for a new or existing ERMS
     implementation.

     The average monthly email volume for SSPA members has increased 101% in the
     last three years, showing that customers have adopted the email channel in a big
     way. Email Response Management Systems (ERMSs) have been around for over a
     decade, and while adoption is high for consumer contact centers, in the B2B
     support world, emails are usually processed manually: less than half of >$1B SSPA
     members have automated email response software. With improved intelligence,
     today’s ERMSs have higher accuracy and more flexibility than early versions,
8
     allowing even technical support centers to automate the handling of a slice of
     issues. Members without an ERMS should investigate what today’s ERMS
     classification engines are capable of, and consider a trial to test the technology for a
     segment of your customer emails.




     This PS Insight provides the TPSA recommendation for the most effective way to
     calculate utilization across multiple geographies. This PS Insight also introduces a
     recommended practice for calculating utilization. Finally, this paper reviews existing
10   TPSA benchmark data regarding utilization targets and services mix.




     During the past decade, the growth of services as part of the revenue and profit mix
     of technology companies has changed how these companies must think about
     managing human capital. Getting the right person in the right place at the right
     time, effectively and efficiently, has become mission critical. To help technology
     companies better understand how to deal with the rapidly changing dynamics of
     Global Resource Management (GRM), RTM Consulting and TPSA have collaborated
19
     to create a framework to focus this dialogue. This white paper introduces the many
     facets of GRM and how to effectively perform GRM in a rapidly transforming
     marketplace.
    Knowledge management (KM) is always a hot topic with SSPA members, and the
    recent SSPA Best Practices Conference was no exception, with a KM-focused track
    and standing-room only sessions. Based on member and partner conversations at
    the event, trends and top issues for KM in 2007 include how to effectively provide
    content for global customers; how Web 2.0 and KM 2.0 are forcing changes to
    traditional knowledge base strategies; and in a related trend, how to exceed
9
    requirements from tomorrow’s more demanding and Web 2.0 savvy customers.
    With Web 2.0 as a disruptive influence, companies must look beyond long held
    attitudes about knowledgebases and customers to create a KM plan addressing
    changes to people, process and technology.



    Capturing, publishing and maintaining stores of tacit knowledge are ongoing
    challenges for support organizations, and Knowledge Management success
    continues to thwart many SSPA Members. And the challenges are about to
    increase. Web 2.0, with its burgeoning online communities of both experts and
    posers, will upset the KM apple cart for many companies, with reams of content
    offered to any customer or partner with a web connection. How can these new
5   content sources be mined, and the experts tapped, to improve service to
    customers? Companies should begin tracking Web 2.0 activity for your products
    and services, identifying community experts, and consider technology elements
    such as intelligent searching and Web collaboration that are heralding the next big
    ‘wave’ of knowledge management.



    For the Spring 2007 Recognized Innovator Awards, SSPA Research selected three
    technology categories integral to Value-Added Support. Analytics/Business
    Intelligence allows companies to leverage existing stores of customer interaction
    data to identify product and service trends. Web 2.0 opens up new channels for
    support, and offers tools for creating and sustaining customer loyalty. Offer
6   management enables intelligent upsell and cross-sell for both B2B and B2C
    environments. Companies should stay abreast of innovations to customer support
    products and services and integrate these new approaches into their technology
    roadmap.
     While customer adoption of non-phone channels (Web, email, chat) continues to
     grow, phone calls aren’t going away, and in fact volume via the phone channel
     increases each year. Offering voice self-service allows customers to continue to
     embrace this popular avenue for support, while deflecting live agent interactions.
     However, most companies have not evolved further than “press or say one” for
     voice self-service, forcing customers through universally disliked IVR trees. Newer
     voice applications enable a much larger range of customer issues to be solved via
10
     self-service, including technical support. Companies should take a look at additional
     voice applications to layer on top of existing IVRs to not only deflect more live agent
     interactions, but to create a stellar customer experience with voice self-service.




     While customer adoption of non-phone channels continues to climb, more incidents
     are opened, on average, by phone than any other channel. Though support
     organizations are embracing next-generation Web self-service, most companies
     have yet to evolve their voice self-service systems beyond basic IVR menus. Surveys
     show customers prefer using automated voice systems to waiting for an agent, yet
     satisfaction with many voice systems remains low. Increasing the effectiveness of
6
     voice self-service, through better testing, ongoing maintenance, and adoption of
     new voice applications, can allow a larger percentage of issues to be automated,
     further decreasing live agent interactions.




     Thanks to the CRM boom of the late 90s, companies have spent 10 years creating
     huge stores of customer interaction data. But according to SSPA members, most
     support organizations have yet to unlock the business intelligence contained
     therein. The tide is turning, however, as more service and support application
     vendors beef up their reporting modules with additional analytic capabilities to help
     companies identify actionable trends and perform more root cause analysis. This
     report will focus on what capabilities you should expect “out of box” in best of
13
     breed support software suites. Before adding on a 3rd party analytics application,
     companies should evaluate the business intelligence capabilities and roadmaps of
     their existing vendors, and buy pre-integrated modules with packaged reports when
     possible.
     This report is a companion to the TPSA Service 50 analyses and webcasts. Focusing
     on a comparison of Q405 and Q406 data, this TPSA MarketView investigates key
     growth trends in the global IT services market. The report places special emphasis
     on the performance of the Top 10 services providers and concludes with insights
     aimed at helping professional services organizations understand the opportunities
     inherent in the current IT services market.
12




     In April of 2007, TPSA took a snapshot of the publicly reported financial data for The
     Service 50. TPSA then hosted a public Webcast, on May 3rd, to review The Service
     50 and discuss key metrics TPSA tracks and trends from this public financial data.
     This document summarizes the results of this snapshot.
19




     The consumer electronics industry has been watching closely as retailers launch in-
     home consumer services with hopes of capturing marketshare for home theatre
     and home office purchases as well as create a new source for service revenues. In
     our first Consumer Home Services Survey, the SSPA surveyed 1,000 consumers
     about their in-home service attitudes and experiences, and we have identified price
7    points and technician profiles preferred by consumers planning electronics
     purchases in 2007. Companies considering a play for in-home services should be
     cautious about launching programs with unattractive pricing or field technicians
     whose pedigree is a mismatch with consumer expectations.



     This PS Insight discusses the changing requirements for Professional Services
     Executives within product companies and the fundamental differences between
     professional service executives that serve as general managers and those who
     simply steward the business.
13
     In our first Consumer Home Services Survey, the SSPA surveyed 1,000 consumers
     about past and future home office and home theatre purchases, purchase
     influencers, attach rates, and adoption of in-home services. Spending patterns
     emerged, with consumers spending more on home theatre than office; in-person
     purchases much preferred over online, and “big box” retailers emerging as the retail
12
     location of choice. This report details these spending patterns, examines purchase
     location influencers, and provides insight into buyer profiles for home office and
     home theatre in 2007.



     Companies interested in moving toward the Value-Added Support model have
     several goals in mind, including delivering exceptional multi-channel customer
     experiences and creating new revenue opportunities. But a crucial first step for
     many companies is changing the perception of the support organization from break-
     fix experts to strategic customer advocates, with their pulse on the business needs
     of customers. Analytics can play a large role in delivering customer business
6    intelligence to other departments within the company, particularly sales and
     marketing. Support management wanting more recognition for their strategic
     impact to long term customer value should invest in analytics to unlock business
     intelligence from captured customer interactions.




     As technical complexity grows, consumers are increasingly impacted. Particularly
     with the merging of home office and home theatre into a single multi-media
     installation, inhome service options increasingly prove a lucrative business for
     retailers and consumer electronics firms. In our first Consumer Home Services
     Survey, the SSPA surveyed 1,000 consumers about their in-home service attitudes
     and experiences, and has identified the top service options for both home office
     and home theatre, as well as barriers and influencers for in-home service. To
7
     increase in-home service revenues, as well as maximize lucrative upsell
     opportunities, consumer companies should stop downplaying complexity, instead
     pushing ‘best of breed’ technology and how to maximize value with professional
     installation.
    Whether you are embarking on a project to evaluate and select technology, curious
    what options may be available to address a new business problem, or wondering if
    there is a better alternative for one of your existing systems, it is important for
    customer service professionals to stay current on the technology trends impacting
    our industry. SSPA Research predicts the 3 biggest trends for service and support
5   technology and vendors in 2007: vendor consolidation accelerates, OnDemand
    becomes preferred deployment options, and Open Source customer service
    software finds adoption at the enterprise level.




    With more companies embracing the concept of Value Added Support, offer
    management is an increasingly hot topic as revenue generation becomes a goal for
    more inbound contact and technical support centers. Extending upsell and cross-
    sell offers to consumer customers is now a common practice, and although
    enterprise support has a number of issues making offer extensions problematic,
    there are clearly opportunities for technical support agents to increase customer
5   wallet share as part of a support interaction. This report will highlight best practices
    discovered while researching successful selling for inbound support in the consumer
    world, and make recommendations for how this can apply to the B2B world with
    excellent results.




    Welcome to a Web 2.0 world, in which we are more connected, more available, and
    can more easily find and distribute information than ever before. While consumer
    sites such as MySpace and LinkedIn receive most of the visibility when Web 2.0 is
    discussed, the increased appetite for social networking is impacting technical
    support, with moderated forums finding adoption in both B2B and B2C web self-
    service implementations. Online communities offer the potential for streamlining
5
    support operations and deflecting live agent interaction by allowing customers to
    solve each other’s problems, though there are risks involved and building a
    successful, cohesive community is not a slam dunk.
    In 2007, Value Added Support, i.e., strategically partnering with development,
    marketing and sales to increase revenues and drive product improvements, will
    enable customer service and technical support operations to claim their rightful
    place at the table for more discussions and decisions impacting customers.
    However, as support’s strategic influence within companies increases, service
7   organizations will lose ground in calling the shots on service interactions to ever-
    more demanding customers, who empowered by Web 2.0 infrastructure and
    applications, become a force to be reckoned with as never before.




    While there were no mergers or acquisitions within the service and support industry
    in 2006 on the scale of Oracle’s 2005 purchase of Siebel, there were a number of
    significant transactions that illustrate some key trends within the space. Standalone
    CRM at the enterprise level is no longer a viable business, and outside of Oracle and
    SAP, the only significant growth in CRM is centered on Software as a Service (SaaS)
4   vendors. Functionality paid a crucial role in acquisitions in 2006, with vendors
    buying analytics in order to offer better business intelligence, and one key
    transaction in which the leading provider of a new customer channel was
    purchased, giving one eService vendor an edge.



    Technological innovation is needed and expected in order to meet the evolving
    requirements of customers as well as the ongoing pressure to service customers as
    inexpensively as possible, and SSPA Research is dedicated to highlighting innovative
    software and services that help companies meet these challenges. The SSPA
    launched the first Recognized Innovator Awards at our Fall 2006 conference, held
    last month in Washington D.C., presenting awards and guiding tours of the
9   Technology Showcase to highlight partners who excel in providing innovative
    solutions in three categories: Technology, Customer Experience, and Optimization.
    Companies wanting to take service and support operations to a higher level of
    sophistication should evaluate these solutions and see if they belong on your
    technology roadmap.
     Inbound contact center and technical support agents are not the only avenue for
     generating incremental revenue from customer service issues: customers
     performing self-service via the Web can also be presented with upsell and cross-sell
     offers. The technological approach to automating online offer presentation ranges
     from manually created ‘also see’ links on knowledgebase content to fully
     automated offer management systems that suggest offers to customers based on
5
     their history and Web browsing habits. Even B2B companies are finding that upsell
     works when enterprise customers are shopping for new products, and adding offers
     to technical support self-service should be the next logical step.




     While technical support centers remain slow to adopt upsell and cross-sell for
     inbound customer calls, according to data from the SSPA’s Consumer Home Services
     Survey field service agents are having great success selling additional products,
     services and extended warranties to customers while onsite for home theatre or
     home office installations. While the examples are consumer, not enterprise,
     focused, B2B service organizations should look to their consumer counterparts for
7
     guidance, and recognize that revenue generation from inbound technical support
     calls is not only possible, offer extensions are perceived by customers as part of the
     service process when the offers are in context of the customer interaction.




     The results of the SSPA 2006 Member Technology Survey are in, showing member
     adoption of technology in 21 functional areas. Deciding where to invest in new
     service and support technology is not easy, with many types of products all claiming
     to cut costs through deflecting interactions from live agents and increasing agent
     productivity. Armed with this new information, members can benchmark
10   themselves against the SSPA membership to identify product areas where member
     adoption is high, suggesting if your company is not leveraging this technology, you
     may be missing an opportunity to further streamline and automate support
     processes.
    Growing from roots in high volume consumer call centers, QM (quality monitoring)
    software is employed to monitor multi-channel interactions, agent usage of
    technology, and deliver training to agent desktops in multiple industries. But
    increasingly, QM technology is delivering much more strategic results, including the
    identification of business intelligence (BI) about customers, products and
    competitors, as well as performing root cause analysis and pinpointing process
8
    logjams across the enterprise. With explosive growth of home based agents, QM
    can also play a key role in tracking skills and performance of remote agents, with
    two-way streaming video monitoring on the horizon.




    The focus of self-service is shifting from tactical (call deflection, increasing agent
    productivity) to strategic (improving the customer experience and increasing wallet
    share), and innovative vendors are addressing this shift with functionality to create
    highly personalized self-service “microsites”. Through the lens of the customer
    experience, the old eService paradigm of knowledgebase and search is not enough.
    Customers are expecting—and soon will be demanding—more individualized self-
8   service options. Companies should evaluate these next-generation products to
    provide highly personalized and targeted self-service experiences for B2B and B2C
    customers as a way of establishing further competitive differentiation, and to mine
    online browsing for additional revenue.




    SSPA Research has completed its 2006 technology survey, with responses from 126
    companies. 880 individual product ratings across 21 categories have been
    tabulated, and initial results show that with an overall satisfaction rating of 3.03, on
    a 5 point scale, companies are satisfied with their service and support technology,
    but not highly satisfied. In this report, the SSPA examines the mix of packaged and
    home grown software, and satisfaction with technology at the category and product
8   module level. Companies continuing to rely on legacy systems in product areas ripe
    with innovation should review packaged technology options to verify ‘home grown’
    products still offer adequate functional coverage and no opportunities for increased
    productivity or cost cutting are being ignored.
     This paper outlines a five-step process PS organizations can follow to help
     determine what revenue growth is possible for the PS organization in the upcoming
     year.


6




     In recent briefings with enterprise software vendors, a trend has emerged: ISVs are
     offering more than ‘best of breed’ software; they are partnering with outsourced
     service providers to create a complete end-to-end solution. This is particularly true
     with ServicePower’s new division, called Field Service Solutions (FSS), which
     leverages the vendor’s field service automation software, combined with innovative
     field equipment (rugged laptops, GPS enabled trucks), and a network of field service
     agents trained and certified to install and repair equipment for ServicePower’s
     customers. According to early adopter GE, the benefits are excellent: not only have
6    service levels and customer satisfaction risen sharply for GE’s appliance repair
     business, but the ServicePower project achieved 100% ROI in one year—2 years
     earlier than expected. Companies shopping for support software, whether for the
     field, the contact center or the tech support team, should investigate blended
     offerings and consider a pilot for an end-to-end solution.




     While technical support, contact centers and Web self-service continue to receive
     most of the attention when improving the customer experience is discussed, a key
     service channel, field service, is now finding itself in the customer experience
     spotlight, often for the first time. Driving costs out of field service operations
     continues to be the primary goal for most organizations, and more companies are
     realizing that field agents, with their face to face interactions with customers, have
13   a major impact on customer satisfaction and incremental revenue. In this report,
     the key processes of field service operations will be outlined, along with innovative
     technology components enabling next generation field service optimization.
    Cutting the operating expenses for a field service organization begins before a
    technician is ever dispatched. Darty, a $2.75B electronics retailer in France, has
    eliminated many field service visits, and ensured the required visits are fast and
    efficient, by leveraging knowledge management (KM) and diagnostic tools in the
    technical support center to correctly diagnose customer problems, solve the
6   problem on the phone if possible, and dispatch the right field tech with the right
    part when necessary. With a rapid, phased implementation covering 20,000+
    products, Darty’s case study offers important lessons in field service optimization.




    In conversations with customer service executives and frontline support managers,
    multi-vendor support (MVS) is often at the top of the list of ongoing challenges due
    to the high cost of supporting these issues effectively. More strategically, the way
    an MVS issue is handled has a critical effect on the customer experience, impacting
    long term customer value and wallet share. Treating issues like “hot potatoes,” such
    as rewarding agents for deflecting issues to another vendor, may cut support costs
    but ultimately impacts the ability to keep this consumer or business user as a
9   customer: the first priority should be solving the customer’s problem as quickly as
    possible. The SSPA recommends that companies begin calculating the actual cost of
    MVS issues, and include this cost in the budget for the technology partnership, not
    as a core operating cost for the support center.




    According to SSPA Benchmark data, nearly one third of incidents today involve
    products from another vendor, and these multi-vendor support (MVS) issues take,
    on average, 4 times longer to solve. Yet leading eService vendors report that rarely,
    if ever, do customers or prospects mention MVS challenges as a business problem
    to be solved with innovative eService technology. While ultimately MVS is best
    addressed with better supportability and interoperability, and stronger cooperation
6   between technology partners, service and support management should evaluate
    their current eService platform in light of MVS problem resolution, and determine
    where existing systems could be modified to better serve MVS challenges, and
    where incremental technology investments are warranted to streamline MVS
    resolution in the future.
    SSPA Benchmark data shows that the monthly average of incidents created via
    electronic channels (email, chat, web self-service) has caught up to phone incidents,
    and we expect this ‘eChannel’ volume to bypass phone by the end of 2006.
    However, the data shows that service levels are consistently lower for these newer
    channels, which are becoming the preferred channel for more customers. This high
    level of customer adoption for eChannels means that the technology industry must
9   step up support for non-phone channels to create an “omni-channel,” meaning an
    identical service experience is delivered for all channels offered to the customer. As
    this adoption curve continues, companies without an omni-channel strategy risk
    losing customers to more eChannel savvy competitors.




    The increased complexity of technology has created huge volumes of service
    interactions—with customers whose patience is low and frustration is high.
    Companies are continually investing in technology to streamline problem diagnosis
    and resolution to help address this tsunami of phone calls, emails and Web chats.
    Unfortunately, SSPA Benchmark data shows that service levels for both phone and
    electronic channels have declined in the last few years, meaning current processes
    and systems are not keeping up with the dramatic volume increases. Companies
6
    should audit their existing service and support organizational structure, policies and
    processes, as well as service and eService technology, to break this cycle and begin
    moving service levels where they belong: up and to the right.




    The technology services and support industry reached a critical step in customer
    interaction channel evolution this year, with the monthly average of electronic
    channel (email, chat, web self-service) volume catching up to phone volume for the
    first time. The SSPA expects this shift toward electronic channels, or eChannels
    (email, chat, web self-service) to continue, with eChannel volume bypassing phone
    by the end of the year. Total interaction volume, however, has increased
8   dramatically in the last 3 years, and though phone calls represent a smaller
    percentage of total interactions, phone volume increases persist. Companies must
    continue to invest in eservice technologies to meet the evolving needs of
    customers, as well as step up marketing efforts to encourage further adoption of
    unassisted channels.
     At the recent SSPA Chief Services Executive Summit held in New York, an invitation
     only gathering of CSEs from HP, IBM, Microsoft, Oracle, Cisco, BEA, EMC, SAP,
     Circuit City, Xerox, and other leading companies, the topic of discussion was the role
     of services in the technology industry of the future. Much of the conversations fell
     into two broad categories. First, how to best demonstrate the value of support to
     customers in order to improve service and satisfaction, as well as increase service
     revenues; and second, where will innovation occur in service and support
9
     technology, and how can it be used to both increase service levels as well as drive
     down costs. In this article, the SSPA outlines the concerns, ideas and suggestions
     from the executive panel, as well as provides some recommendations on how to
     leverage this information in future-proofing your service and support organization.




     The TPSA Industry Task Force on Intellectual Asset Management (IAM) outlined and
     discussed specific challenges faced by PS organizations during a typical project
     lifecycle. This article documents these common challenges and captures some of
     the techniques employed to minimize the execution gaps in the project life cycle.
10




     In July of 2006, TPSA took its fourth official snapshot of the publicly reported
     financial data for The Service 50. TPSA then hosted a public Webcast, on August 3rd,
     to review The Service 50 and discuss key metrics TPSA tracks and trends from this
     public financial data. This document summarizes the results of this fourth snapshot.
8




     In April of 2006, TPSA took its third official snapshot of the publicly reported
     financial data for The Service 50. TPSA then hosted a public Webcast, on April 27th,
     to review The Service 50 and discuss key metrics TPSA tracks and trends from this
     public financial data. This document summarizes the results of this third snapshot.
8




     This article presents a list of common terms and definitions used to enable the
     working dialogue for the TPSA Industry Task Force on Intellectual Asset
     Management (IAM). These common terms and definitions will then be used as we
3
     move forward to develop a framework and best practices for IAM.
    As more companies make product selections based in part on the Green practices of
    their vendors, support organizations should not only embrace these technologies to
    cut gas consumption and auto emissions, they should also publicize their efforts and
7
    results to show that Green Support means more than going “lights out” in the data
    center.

    The literature on classic professional services organizations focuses on the success
    and optimization of the PS pyramid, in which veteran partners sit at the top of a
    pyramid of junior resources. Unfortunately, this classic approach to building a
    professional services practice is not well-suited to the technology professional
5   services (TPS) organizations of the 21st century. This article reviews the deficiencies
    in the pyramid model and introduces a new model to consider when building and
    scaling a TPS organization.



    For a PS Organization, an effective marketing mix will address four key marketing
    activities: core content creation, market analysis, awareness, and demand
    generation. This article takes a closer look at the area of demand generation. The
    article is based on the services marketing work conducted at a Fortune 50 company
6   that was launching a services business within its dominant product organization.
    The experiences of this company provide an insightful example of effective demand
    generation techniques.



    This article introduces the Services Engineering function by defining its objectives,
    outlining key roles of the department, and listing metrics that can be used to
    evaluate the effectiveness of the function. The article also discusses why the
5
    function is critical to the long term success of a technology professional services
    organization.

    In January of 2006, TPSA took its second official snapshot of the publicly reported
    financial data for The Service 50. TPSA then hosted a public webcast to introduce
    The Service 50 and discuss key metrics TPSA will be tracking and trending from this
    public financial data. This document summarizes the results of the second snapshot.
8
    This is the first of a two-part series on why technology companies are continuing to
    invest in professional services capabilities. In this first part, we start by discussing
    how professional service executives currently defend their businesses. We then
    discuss the brutal impact that professional services revenues have on technology
6   companies. Despite the negative effects of PS revenues, technology companies
    continue to add PS capabilities and revenues. We discuss why this shift continues.
    The article ends with a summary of the forces currently pulling the PS discussion in
    three distinct directions, and how TPSA intends to help align these currently
    conflicting forces.
    One of the most common challenges facing technology services executives is
    managing profitable growth. How should the company scale its professional services
    capabilities? Should the company build professional services (PS) organically?
    Should partners be used instead? What about acquisition? Why not “lease” an
    entire PS organization? This article explores this new option by reviewing EMC’s
5
    partnership with Accenture to incubate a consulting business unit. As the reader will
    learn, there remain many unknowns regarding the success of this innovative
    alternative.



    This document provides an overview of the importance of defining a financial
    business model for the PS organization. This document also details how TPSA will
    define the specific line items of the PS business model for benchmarking purposes.
5



    In October of 2005, TPSA took its first official snapshot of the publicly reported
    financial data for The Service 50. TPSA then hosted a public webcast to introduce
    The Service 50 and discuss key metrics TPSA will be tracking and trending from this
7   public financial data. This document summarizes the results of this first snapshot.




    For a PS Organization, an effective marketing mix will address four key marketing
    activities: core content creation, market analysis, awareness, and demand
    generation. This article defines all four of these marketing activities and provides an
    example services marketing budget that achieves a balance between tactical
5
    content creation and strategic demand generation.
                                       Graphics included
Figure 1: Self-Service Success Crisis. Figure 2: “How do I?” Questions Represent Largest
Percent of Issues. Figure 3: Breakdown of Video Creation Time. Figure 4: Self-Service
Captivate Video for Dreamweaver.




Figure 1: Charter Category--Q108-Q209. Figure 2: PS Charter Priorities--Q108-Q209
Trend. Figure 3: Revenue Mix by TPS Charter, Q209. Figure 4: PS in the Revenue Mix by
PS Charter, Q209. Figure 5: PS Business Model Comparison by Charter, Q209. Figure 6:
Below the Line Investments (as a Percent of Total Revenue) by Charter, Q209. Figure 7:
Percent of Companies with an Overlay PS Salesforce. Figure 8: Target Billable Utilization
for Delivery Staff. Figure 9: Percent of Delivery Staff Subcontracted. Figure 10: What
percent of your implementation services do you outsource? Figure 11: Percent of
Companies wiht a Dedicated PS Engineering Function. Figure 12: Percent of Companies
with a Dedicated PS Marketing Function. Figure 13: Percent of Companies with a PSA
System. Figure 14: How do you manage the pool of resources available for PS delivery?
Figure 15: Do you measure the broader economic impact of PS for any metrics?
Figure 1: Framework for Practices and Results. Figure 2: Results Zones. Figure 3: Practice
Zones. Figure 4: Practice Priorities. Table 1: Categories for Baseline Performance. Figure 5:
Core Gauges on the Services Dashboard. Figure 6: Core Services Dashboard. Figure 7:
Extended Gauges for the Services Dashboard. Figure 8: The Extended Services Dashboard.




Figure 1: The Cost-to-Serve Continuum. Figure 2: Value-Added Professional Services
Dashboard. Table 1: Field Engineer Contact with Customers.
Figure 1: Services as a Percentage of Total Revenue--Q108 to Q109 Trend. Figure 2:
Organization Type Distribution. Figure 3: Product Type Distribution. Figure 4: Company
Size Distribution. Figure 5: Distribution of Respondent Company Revenue by LOB. Figure
6: Types of Innovation. Figure 7: Do you consider investing in services innovation as one
of your dominant business strategies? Figure 8: Do you have a formal services strategy
and/or SR&I roadmap? Figure 9: Formal Services Strategy and/or SR&I Roadmap. Figure
10: Research and Innovation Investment Overview. Figure 11: Distribution of Research
and Innovation Investment--Services vs. Product. Figure 12: Distribution of Respondents
by Research and Innovation Investment Category. Figure 13: Distribution of Investment in
Innovation by Focus and Category. Figure 14: Percent Investment in Services Research and
Innovation by Category. Table 1: Parameter/Practice. Figure 15: Key SR&I Practices--
Service-Dominant Companies. Figure 16: Respondent (Aided) Awareness of Services
Innovation Related Organizations and Concepts. Figure 17: With what frequency do you
get information on services science, education, research, or innovation. Figure 18: How
many times has your service organization engaged with an academic institution to conduct
service research? Figure 19: How many academic institutions does your company engage
with . . 1: 2009 Functional Heat Map. Figure 2: Proactive Support Adoption by Company
Figure .? Figure 20: Which challenges to services research and innovation exist within your
Size.




Figure 1: Multiple Content Sources Required for Success.
Table 1: Q408 Service 50 Top 10 by Revenue. Table 2: Q408 Serviced 50 Top 10 Service
Stars. Figure 1: Services Companies. Figure 2: Hardware Companies. Figure 3: Software
Companies. Figure 4: Summing It Up. Figure 5: Q408 Key Average Performance Results by
Company Type. Figure 6: Q408 Key Performance Results by Company Type as Compared to
TPSA Service 50 Averages.




Figure 1: Cost of a Field Service Visit. Figure 2: Average Field Service Visits per Day and
Drive Time to Customer Site.




Figure 1: Impact Analysis. Figure 2: The Stages of Group Change.
Figure 1: Sub-Contracting in Imbedded PS. Figure 2: Results Zones Maps Red, Yellow, and
Green Results on a Standard Normal Curve. Figure 3: Practice Zones. Figure 4: Assessing
Results and Practices. Figure 5: Steps to Services Success.




Figure 1: PSA Adoption by TPSA Members. Figure 2: Growing Dependence on KM Tools by
PS.




Figure 1: Average Ratio of TSEs to Customers. Figure 2: Average Ratio of TSEs to
Knowledge Workers.
Figure 1: Bay Area VC Funding for Q3 2008 by Industry. Figure 2: Q3 2008 Bay Area VC
Software Funding by Category. Figure 3: CRM and Service Related Investments.




Figure 1: Cost of a Field Service Visit. Figure 2: Average Field Service Visits per Day and
Drive Time to Customer Site.




Figure 1: Converged Services Diagram. Figure 2: Converged Services Require a Combined
KM Strategy.
Figure 1: Two Sources of Competitive Advantage. Figure 2: Key Strategic and Operational
Factors. Figure 3: Factors that Impact Field Productivity. Figure 4: Top Three KPIs that
Service Organizations Use to Measure Field Service Performance. Figure 5: Service
Revenues per Field Engineer. Figure 6: Field Engineers Billed Against Service Level
Agreement. Figure 7: Conceptual Service Productivity Model.




Figure 1: Conceptual Service Productivity Model. Figure 2: Absenteeism per Year.




Table 1: Q207 – Q208 Services 50: Comparison of Key Metrics. Table 2: Q207 – Q208
Services 50: Companies Common to Both Quarters. Table 3: Q207 – Q208 Services 50:
Blended Portfolio Companies Only. Table 4: Comparison of Profitability and Revenue Top
10s: Q208. Table 5: Top 10 Companies by Services Revenue: Q208. Table 6: Top 10
Companies by Total Net Income: Q208. Figure 1: Technology Pace Setters Key Financial
Metrics: Q208. Figure 2: Comparison of Key Financial Metrics by Net Income Segment.
Figure 3: Comparison of Margin Efficiency. Figure 4: Company Size and Net Income
Segment. Figure 5: Product Type and Net Income Segment. Figure 6: Company Size and
Net Income. Figure 7: Product Type and Net Income. Figure 8: Product Type, Company Size
and Net Income. Figure 9: Large Software Companies and S50 Top 10: Key Financial
Metrics. Figure 10: Below-the-Line Costs: 2003, 2005, 2007 Summaries. Figure 11: Below-
the-Line Costs: 2007.



Table 1: TPSA 2008 Compensation Study Elements. Table 2: TPSA 2008 Compensation
Study Overview. Figure 1: Positions with Incentive Compensation in Plans. Figure 2:
Current and Future Year Intentions on Compensation Planning. Figure 3: Basis for Pay
Modifiers. Figure 4: Salary Data Point Overview: Geography. Figure 5: Salary Data Point
Overview: Function, Level, Position. Figure 6: Base – Incentive Mix by Function. Figure 7:
Base – Incentive Mix by Position. Figure 8: Incentive Compensation Drivers: All Positions.
Figure 9: Incentive Compensation Drivers: Functional View.
Figure 1: SSPA Member Adoption of Knowledge Management. Figure 2: SSPA Member
Planned Spending for Knowledge Management. Figure 3: Incident Volume by Channel.
Figure 1: Remote Support Adoption by SSPA Members. Table 1: Product Comparison
Matrix.




Figure 1: Blurring Product Boundaries. Figure 2: Agent Facing Knowledgebases Used by
SSPA Members. Figure 3: Option to Create Knowledgebase Entry When Closing Case in
Salesforce. Figure 4: InstantService Agent Console for High Volume Web Chat.
Figure 1: Pro Dev Investment, Min, Avg Max. Figure 1: Pro Dev Investment, Min, Avg Max.
Fig. 3: Is there a Curriculum Manager in Your Organization? Figure 4: Service Strategy
Profile and Presence of Curriculum Manager. Figure 5: To what executive does your
Curriculum Manager report? Figure 6: To what executive does your Curriculum Manager
report? Service Strategy Profile. Figure 7: Curriculum Manager Reporting and Avg. % of TPS
Rev Invested in Pro Dev. Figure 8: Are any PS employees required to have a minimum
number of hours of Pro Dev each year? Figure 9: Service Strategy Profile and Requirement
of Minimum Hours of Training for any PS Employees. Figure 10: Profitability and
Requirement of Minimum Hours of Pro Dev for TPS Staff. Figure 11: Profitability and Avg %
of TPS Revenues Allocated to Pro Dev. Figure 12: Can you quantify in any way the impact of
Pro Dev on PS financial performance? Figure 13: TPS Profitability and Ability to Link Pro
Dev and Financial Performance. Figure 14: Ability to Quantify the Financial Impact of Pro
Dev and Avg. % TPS Revenue Spent on Pro Dev.




Figure 1: Incident Volume by Channel. Figure 2: Response and Resolution Times by
Channel. Figure 3: Support Satisfaction by Channel. Figure 4: Linksys Web Self-Service
Portal.
Figure 1: What is your company’s support technology budget? Figure 2: 2008 Technology
Budgets for SMB and >$1B Members. Figure 3: Technology Spending by Product Category:
2007 vs. 2008. Figure 4: Technology Spending by Product Category: SMB vs. >$1B. Table 1:
Member Adoption Rates for Functional Modules. Figure 5: What Technology Are Members
Using for Incident Management? Figure 6: What Technology Are Members Using for Agent
Knowledgebase? Figure 7: What Technology Are Members Using for Remote Support?
Table 2: Member Satisfaction with Functional Modules. Figure 8: Functional Modules with
the Highest Planned 2008 Purchases.




Figure 1: Onshore vs. Offshore Support Staff. Figure 2: The Talent Management Lifecycle.
Figure 3: Ideal Years of Experience vs. Available Workforce. Figure 4: Rating Criticality of
Skill Sets in New Hires. Figure 5: What Do Applicants Look For? Figure 6: Preferred Career
Paths for Technical Support Engineers. Figure 7: Real World vs. Ideal Sourcing Ratios. Table
1: Talent Development: Readiness to Specialization. Figure 8: Respondents Rate Time and
Effectiveness of Training Programs. Figure 9: Comparing Importance of Subjects with
Existing Training Modules. Figure 10: Comparing Duration of Technical and Language
Training. Figure 11: Mix of Training Methods Used in New Hire Training. Figure 12: Average
Time in Position for Support Engineers. Figure 13: Talent Specialization: Services Marketing,
Technical Operations. Figure 14: Talent Specialization: R&D, Business Operations.
Figure 1: Path to Recognizing Product Revenue. Figure 2: Navigating 97-2. Figure 3: Are
Services Software Related? Figure 4: Rev Rec Math. Figure 5: The Third Question. Table 1:
VSOE Categories for PS. Table 2: VSOE Rate Categories. Table 3: Parameters Impacting
Review of Product Revenue Recognition.




Figure 1: Increase in Purchases/ Sales of Services if Cross-EU Barriers Were Removed.
Figure 2: A Shifting Services Business Continuum Model. Figure 3: Risk of the Core
Strategic Options. Figure 4: Top Three Services Differentiators (Survey Average). Figure 5:
Top Three Services Differentiators (by Sector).
Figure 1: 2008 Functional Heat Map




Figure 1: What is your company’s support technology budget? Figure 2: 2008 Technology
Budgets for SMB and >$1B Members. Figure 3: Technology Spending by Product Category:
2007 vs. 2008. Figure 4: Technology Spending by Product Category: SMB vs. >$1B. Table 1:
Member Adoption Rates for Functional Modules. Table 2: Member Satisfaction with
Functional Modules. Table 3: Member Satisfaction with Functional Modules. Figure 5:
Functional Modules with the Highest Planned 2008 Purchases.




Figure 1: Annual Training Time for Reps with >1 Year Experience.
Figure 1: SSPA Benchmark Results for Key ACD Metrics. Figure 2: First Contact Resolution
Rates Vary by Complexity




Figure 1: The Service 50 – Margin Dollars Q405-Q407. Figure 2: Corporate and Business
Strategy. Figure 3: Strategy as Source of Service Innovation. Figure 4: Five Functions of PS.
Figure 5: Investment in Services Engineering. Figure 6: Margin Breakpoints. Table 1:
Impacting Project Margins. Table 2: Impacting Field Margins. Table 3: Impacting Labor
Margin. Table 4: Impacting Operating Margin. Table 5: Summary of Sources for PS
Innovation.

Figure 1: Average Annual Attrition Rates by Geographic Region
Figure 1: Product Service Mix Trends. Figure 2: Time Spent on Pre-Sales. Figure 3: Impact
of PS on Customer Satisfaction. Figure 4: Compensating on Customer Sat. Figure 5: PS
Impact on Renewal Rates. Figure 6: Attach Rates.




Figure 1: Service 50 Comparison of Key Metrics for HW and SW Companies Combined,
Q405 - Q407. Figure 2: Software Spectrum: % Revenue from Services and Company Net
Income. Figure 3: Hardware Spectrum: % Revenue from Services and Company Net
Income. Figure 4: Software Companies, Comparison of Above and Below Average %
Services Revenue. Figure 5: Hardware Companies, Comparison of Above and Below
Average % Services Revenue. Figure 6: Software Companies, Comparison of Net Income
and Avg % Revenue from Services. Figure 7: Hardware Companies, Comparison of Net
Income and Average % Services Revenue. Figure 8: Service 50 Key Metrics, HW and SW
Companies Combined, Q405 - Q407 Comparison.




Figure 1: Self-Service Success in Decline.
Figure 1: Channel Preference by Age Group.




Figure 1: Services IT Infrastructure Functions. Figure 2: How Do You Create More (and
Better) Evangelists? Figure 3: Situational Fluency.




Figure 1: Most recent year PS growth rates: TPSA Benchmark Study. Figure 2: Three year
PS growth rates: TPSA Benchmark Study. Figure 3: Three-year growth rates for PS by size of
PS business. Table 1: Core PS Business Model Benchmarks. Figure 4: Net Income Trend.
Figure 5: Pure Services Growth and Net Income Trends. Figure 6: Software Growth and Net
Income Trends. Figure 7: Hardware Growth and Net Income Trends. Figure 8: Growth and
Net Income Trends All Companies. Figure 9: Average Net Income and Service Growth All
Companies. Figure 10: Services Revenue and Net Income Delta Trends. Figure 11: TPSA
S50 Service Margins: Q306 - Q307.
Figure 1: Average Monthly Incident Volume by Industry. Figure 2: Average Incident
Volume by Channel. Figure 3: Industry Average Response and Resolution Times. Figure 4:
Average Monthly Incident Volume by Industry.
Figure 1: The Annual PS Planning Process. Figure 2: Seven Drives to Align Geographies.
Table 1: Global Metrics. Table 2: GEO Maturity. Table 3: Global Rate Table. Table 4:
Global Services Portfolio. Table 5: The PS Help Desk. Table 6: Global Resource
Management. Table 7: Global Compensation.




Table 1: TPSA Play Components. Table 2: Technology Market Research Firm Segmentation.
Figure 1: Percent of Services Revenues Allocated to Key "Below-the-Line" Functions (All
TPSA Companies). Table 3: Service Marketing Spend Categories. Figure 2: Service
Marketing Activity Mix (All TPSA Companies).




Figure 1: Reichheld’s Hierarchy of Customer Profitability. Figure 2: SSPA Community
Member Adoption of Right Channeling.




Figure 1: TPSA Service 50 Q207: Net Income Distribution. Table 1: Comparison of Key
“Long Tail” Metrics: Q206 – Q207. Figure 2: TPSA Service 50: Net Income Distribution,
Q206 – Q207. Table 2: Service 50 Q207: Ranked by Total Services Revenues. Table 3:
Service 50 Q207: Ranked by Net Income. Table 4: Comparison of Service 50 Top 10:
Revenue vs. Net Income. Table 5: Key Software Companies Metrics: Q206 – Q207. Table 6:
Technology Spending Mix: Q206 – Q207.
Figure 1: Remote Support Adoption by SSPA Members. Figure 2: Most Useful Tools for
Issue Resolution. Figure 3: SSPA Member Average First Call Resolution Rate. Figure 4:
SSPA Member Average Talk Time. Figure 5: SSPA Member Staff Allocation by Tier. Table 1:
Average Incident Cost by Tier. Figure 6: SSPA Member Average Customer Satisfaction.




Figure 1: Iron Triangle of Proposal Success. Figure 2: The PS Hourglass. Figure 3: Expanding
the Hourglass. Figure 4: Managing Opportunity. Figure 5: TPSA Benchmark Study: The
Most Valuable Training Courses and Certifications for the Success of Delivery Staff. Table 1:
Creating an Attribute Inventory. Table 2: Attribute Inventory Template. Figure 6: Impact of
Formal Skills Evaluation.

Figure 1: Planned 2007 Spending by Technology Category. Figure 2: CRM Spending by
>$1B Members. Figure 3: Member Adoption of the 360° View.




Figure 1: Proactive Upsell Prompt from Infor.
Figure 1: How are eChannel Incidents Handled?




Figure 1: Average Monthly Email Volume Increases Dramatically. Figure 2: Service Levels
Dramatically Lower for Email Incidents. Figure 3: The Classification Engine is the “Brain” of
an ERMS. Figure 4: SSPA Member Adoption of ERMS.




Table 1: Utilization Targets by Geography. Figure 1: Utilization Mix by Geography. Table 2:
Service Strategy Profiles. Figure 2: Billable Utilization Targets by Service Strategy Profile.
Table 3: Utilization by Service Strategy Profile. Figure 3: Service Strategy Profile and
Utilization Mix.




Figure 1: What percentage of delivery staff is subcontracted? Figure 2: What percentage of
your implementation services is outsourced? Figure 3: What percentage of your post-sales
support is provided by partners? Figure 4: On average, how long does it take for new
delivery staff to become billable? Figure 5: On average, how long does it take for you to
source a newly signed service engagement. Figure 6: How do you manage the pool of
resources available for delivery? Table 1: Sample Forecasting Table. Figure 7: Warm Pool
Recruiting. Figure 8: Shared Resource Pool. Figure 9: Desired End State: GRM Workflow.
Figure 10: Self Assessment of Resource Planning Current Capability: TPSA Summit
Metaplanning Session, May 2007. Figure 11: Improving Resource Planning: TPSA Summit
Metaplanning Session, May 2007.
Figure 1: Legacy search tool at Invensys proved unusable for novice agents. Figure 2:
Invensys leverages intelligent search from InQuira. Figure 3: Novell’s Global Network of
Expert Customer “Sys Ops”.




Figure 1: Three Waves of Knowledge Management. Figure 2: KM 2.0: A Knowledge
Ecosystem.
Figure 1: Three Layers of Speech Technology.




Figure 1: Inbound Calls Resolved by Voice Self-Service. Figure 2: SSPA Member Adoption
of Voice Self-Service.




Figure 1: Talisma’s Supervisor Dashboard. Figure 2: KANA’s Closed Loop Knowledgebase
Analysis. Figure 3: eGain’s Self-Service Performance Dashboard. Figure 4: InQuira’s User
Intent Analysis. Figure 5: KNOVA’s Website Traffic Analysis. Figure 6: Bomgar’s Reporting
Portal Showing Available Report Types. Figure 7: LogMeIn Rescue Session Report.
Figure 1: Total Services Revenue, Q405-Q406: Service 50. Figure 2: Revenue vs. Services
Margins Q405-Q406: Service 50. Figure 3: Services Revenue, Q405-Q406: Top 10 vs. Rest.
Figure 4: Share of Overall Services 50 Revenues, Q405-Q406: Service 50. Figure 5: Average
Services Gross Margins, Q405-Q406: Service 50 vs. Top 10*. Figure 6: Average % of
Services Revenue, Q405-Q406: Service 50 Segment Comparison. Table 1: Service Top 10
Companies. Figure 7: Services Revenue Growth, Q405-Q406: Service 50. Figure 8: Share of
Service 50 Total Revenues, Q405-Q406: Company Type Comparison. Figure 9: Average % of
Services Revenue, Q405-Q406: Company Type Comparison. Figure 10: Average Services
Gross Margins, Q405-Q406: By Company Type. Figure 11: Average Total Gross Margins,
Q405-Q406: By Company Type.



Figure 1: Technology Professional Services. Table 1: The Service 50 Selection Criteria.
Figure 2: The Service 50 Revenue Mix. Figure 3: Revenue Mix by Company Type. Figure 4:
Revenue Mix for Software Companies. Figure 5: Revenue Mix for Hardware Companies.
Figure 6: Product-Service Mix Data. Figure 7: Product-Service Mix Trends. Figure 8:
Product-Service Mix Trends. Figure 9: Service Gross Margin Trends. Figure 10: Gross
Margin Analysis. Table 2: Previous Year Quarter Comparison. Figure 11: Quarterly Trends.
Table 3: The Service 50 Calendar.



Figure 1: Source of Provider Preferred for In-Home Services. Figure 2: Top Attributes for
Selecting In-Home Service Provider. Figure 3: What Price is Appropriate for In-Home
Installation?




Figure 1: The High Tech Heartbeat. Figure 2: Sun Microsystems Financial Performance.
Figure 3: CA Financial Performance. Figure 4: PSE Volatility. Table 1: Parameters for PSE
Success. Figure 5: Perceptions of the External Services Candidate. Figure 6: Realistic
Assessment of the External Candidate. Figure 7: The Internal Candidate. Figure 8: Product
Adoption Rates Reported in the TPSA Benchmark Study. Figure 9: Product-to-Service Ratio.
Figure 10: Emerging PSE Requirements.
Figure 1: 2007 Purchase Plans for Home Office and Home Theatre. Figure 2: 2007 Home
Theatre Spending Plans by Income. Figure 3: Phone, In-Person or Online Purchase
Preferences. Figure 4: Phone, In-Person or Online Purchase Preferences. Figure 5:
Consumer References for Online Shopping. Figure 6: Price is Primary Influencer for
Purchase Location.




Figure 1: Deriving Intelligence from Customer Interactions.




Figure 1: Planned Service Options: Home Office. Figure 2: Planned Service Options: Home
Theatre. Figure 3: Where did you learn about in-home service options? Figure 4: Barriers
to Home Services. Figure 5: Why are you considering home installation services?
Figure 1: Balancing Quality, Productivity and Revenue.
Figure 1: Ad for Japan’s i-pot and Example of Online Usage Report.
Figure 1: HP SME Guided Selling Includes Upsell Offers. Figure 2: eGain’s Upsell Offers
Appear on Right Side of Self-Service Session.




Figure 1: Offer Extension and Accept Rates for Home Theatre. Figure 2: Offer Extension
and Accept Rates for Home Office.




Figure 1: SSPA Functional Heat Map. Figure 2: Member Adoption vs. Satisfaction. Table 1:
>$1B Member Intent to Purchase by Module. Table 2: SME Member Intent to Purchase by
Module.
Figure 1: SSPA Member Adoption of Quality Monitoring. Figure 2: SSPA Member QM
Adoption and Spending Plans. Figure 3: Speech Analytics in eTalk’s Qfiniti Enterprise.




Figure 1: InQuira’s User Experience Manager. Figure 2: KNOVA Microsite Example .
Figure 3: Sento’s Customer Experience Platform . Figure 4: eBonding Involves Single
Customer Portal and Back Office Integration.




Table 1: Functional categories from 2006 SSPA Technology Survey. Figure 1: Percentages
of packaged vs. internally developed software. Figure 2: Internally developed software by
product module. Figure 3: Average satisfaction for packaged vs. internally developed
technology. Table 2: Average satisfaction by product module.
Table 1: Forecasting Data Streams. Figure 1: Forecasting Data Streams. Table 2: Sample
Company Revenue Mix. Figure 2: Growth Rates of PS Business. Figure 3: Growth Rate by
Size of PS Business. Figure 4: Product/Service Ratios. Table 3: PS Revenue Requirements
for Mature Products. Figure 5: Current Product Revenue Growth. Table 4: PS Revenue
Requirements for New Product Offerings. Table 5: PS Forecast Table. Figure 6: PS Revenue
Forecast Graph. Figure 7: Three-Year Growth Rate for PS in Fall 2004. Figure 8: Maximum
Profitable PS Growth Rate in Fall 2004. Figure 9: Three-Year Growth Rates in PS in Fall
2006. Figure 10: PS Profitable Growth Rates.



Figure 1: GPS Enabled Mapping for Internet Browsers and Mobile Devices.




Figure 1: Field Service Processes. Figure 2: The Importance of Entitlement.
Figure 1: Darty Company Facts. Figure 2: Darty’s Search Screen: By Product Category,
Model Number or Symptom. Figure 3: Comet’s Kaidara Advisor Search Screen




Table 1: MVS Trends 2003-2006. Figure 1: MVS Incidents Requiring 3rd Party
Collaboration, By Segment. Table 2: Examples of Premiere MVS Programs. Figure 2: MVS
Incidents Requiring 3rd Party Collaboration, By Segment




Figure 1: How Companies Resolve Collaborative MVS Issues
Figure 1: Building the Omni-Channel. Figure 2: Average Response and Resolution Times by
Technology Segment




Figure 1: Members Increasingly Identify as Highly Complex. Table 1: Service Level Metric
Trends. Figure 2: Response and resolution times by channel




Figure 1: eChannel Volume Catches up to Phone in 2006. Figure 2: Interactions by Channel
and Industry. Figure 3: Average monthly incident volume. Table 1: Monthly Average
Incident Volume by Channel Breakdown. Figure 4: Monthly Average Incidents by
Technology Segment
Figure 1: The Project Lifecycle. Figure 2: The Expectations Gap. Figure 3: The Roles Gap.
Figure 4: The Capture Gap. Figure 5: The Proposal Triad. Figure 6: Compensation and
Customer Satisfaction in Services. Figure 7: Percentage of companies compensating Sales
Staff for Project Profitability. Figure 8: Closing the Economic Loop. Figure 9: Engagement
Types. Figure 10: Centralized Functions at CA. Figure 11: CA O-Map. Figure 12: Struggles
with Review. Figure 13: Formal Project Reviews. Figure 14: Ranking Assets. Figure 15: PLG
Survey Results. Table 1: PLG Survey.



Figure 1: Technology Professional Services. Table 1: The Service 50 Selection Criteria.
Figure 2: The Service 50 Revenue Mix. Figure 3: Revenue Mix by Company Type. Figure 4:
Revenue Mix for Software Companies. Figure 5: Revenue Mix for Hardware Companies.
Figure 6: Services Revenue Gross Margin Analysis. Table 2: Two Quarter Trends. Figure 7:
Quarterly Trends. Figure 8: Product-Service Mix Data. Figure 9: Product Service Mix
Trends. Figure 10: Product Service Mix Trends. Table 3: The Service 50 Calendar.



Figure 1: Technology Professional Services. Table 1: The Service 50 Selection Criteria.
Figure 2: The Service 50 Revenue Mix. Figure 3: Revenue Mix by Company Type. Figure 4:
Revenue Mix for Software Companies. Figure 5: Revenue Mix for Hardware Companies.
Figure 6: Services Gross Margin Analysis. Table 2: Previous Quarter Comparison. Figure 7:
Quarterly Trends. Figure 8: Product-Service Mix Data. Figure 9: Product Service Mix
Trends. Figure 10: Product Service Mix Trends. Table 3: The Service 50 Calendar.



Table 1: The IAM Glossary.
Figure 1: Path to Recognizing Product Revenue. Figure 2: Three VSOE Challenges. Figure 3:
Acceptable Pricing Ranges. Table 1: Revenue Allocation Example: On-Demand Provider.
Figure 4: Revenue Recognition Process. Figure 5: Pricing Philosophies.




Figure 1: The Pyramid. Figure 2: The PS Hourglass. Figure 3: Expanding the Hourglass.
Figure 4: Roles & Responsibilities. Figure 5: Pyramid vs. Hourglass.




Table 1: Key Tactics Employed to Take the New Service Marketing Approach to Market.
Table 2: Product vs. Services Marketing.




Figure 1: Engagement Types. Figure 2: Service Life Cycle. Figure 3: Services Development
Life Cycle. Figure 4: Services Development Pipeline. Figure 5: PS Position Map. Figure 6:
Interfaces for Services Engineering. Table 1: Inputs and Outputs. Table 2: Metrics for
Services Engineering.



Figure 1: Technology Professional Services. Table 1: The Service 50 Selection Criteria.
Figure 2: The Service 50 Revenue Mix. Figure 3: Revenue Mix by Company Type. Figure 4:
Revenue Mix for Software Companies. Figure 5: Revenue Mix for Hardware Companies.
Figure 6: Services Gross Margin Analysis. Table 2: Two Quarter Trends. Figure 7: Quarterly
Trends. Table 3: Gross Margin Trends. Figure 8: Gross Margin Trends. Figure 9: Product-
Service Mix Data. Figure 10: Product Service Mix Trends. Figure 11: Product Service Mix
Trends. Table 4: The Service 50 Calendar.
Table 1: Nine Software Companies. Table 2: Contribution Calculator for Software
Companies. Figure 1: The Contribution Shift. Figure 2: Valuation Snapshot. Figure 3:
Valuation Perceptions. Figure 4: Product-Service Mix Data. Figure 5: Product Service Mix
Trends. Figure 6: Valuation Realities. Figure 7: Three Opposing Forces. Figure 8: EIA Task
Force Notes.




Table 1: Traditional Scalability Options. Figure 1: ISC Sourcing. Table 2: A Fourth Option.
Figure 2: EMC’s Services Revenue Growth. Figure 3: EMC Service Revenues.




Figure 1: Corporate and Business Strategy. Table 1: PS Business Model Definitions . Figure
2: Novell Service Mix . Figure 3: Unisys Service Mix. Table 2: Accenture Financial Results.
Table 3: IBM Global Services Results. Table 4: Support Services Business Model. Table 5:
PS Line Items.



Figure 1: Technology Professional Services. Table 1: The Service 50 Selection Criteria.
Figure 2: The Service 50 Revenue Mix. Figure 3: Revenue Mix by Company Type. Figure 4:
Revenue Mix for Software Companies. Figure 5: Revenue Mix for Hardware Companies.
Figure 6: Service Gross Margins for The Service 50. Figure 7: Product-Service Mix Data.
Figure 8: Product Service Mix Trends. Figure 9: Product Service Mix Trends. Table 2: The
Service 50 Calendar.

Table 1: Marketing Mix Categories. Figure 1: Sample Marketing Mix Budget. Table 2:
Sample Content Creation Budget.

								
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