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White House bristles at Bond remark
By JEFF ZELENY
NEW YORK TIMES
02/05/2010

Robert Gibbs, the White House press secretary, said Thursday that Missouri Sen. Christopher "Kit" Bond, the
ranking Republican on the Intelligence Committee, should apologize for suggesting that the administration
leaked information in the investigation of the Nigerian man accused of trying to blow up a jetliner on Christmas
Day.
"The notion that somehow the White House, in conjunction with agencies involved in this interrogation, gave out
classified information? Yes," Gibbs said, "I think an apology on that is owed, because it's not true."
The comment from Gibbs was the latest in a series of escalating charges between the White House and
congressional Republicans in the case of Umar Farouk Abdulmutallab, 23, whose prosecution on criminal
charges has fueled an intense political debate.
In a statement Thursday afternoon, Bond dismissed the call to apologize.
"After telling me to keep my mouth shut, the White House discloses sensitive information in an effort to defend a
dangerous and unpopular decision to Mirandize Abdulmutallab and I'm supposed to apologize?" Bond said in a
statement.
Bond sent a letter to the White House suggesting that the administration disclosed for political gain that
Abdulmutallab had begun cooperating with authorities last week. Bond said he had been told the information
was confidential and was surprised to learn the White House held a briefing on the case Tuesday evening.
"FBI officials stressed the importance of not disclosing the fact of his cooperation in order to protect ongoing and
follow-on operations to neutralize additional threats to the American public," wrote Bond. "FBI Director Bob
Mueller personally stressed to me that keeping the fact of his cooperation quiet was vital to preventing future
attacks against the United States."
At the White House press briefing Thursday, Gibbs said the senator's assertion was incorrect. Abdulmutallab's
cooperation with the authorities, he said, was first disclosed at a congressional hearing on Tuesday by the
director of national intelligence, Adm. Dennis Blair, and FBI chief Mueller.
Gibbs said the White House briefing was intended to place the information in the proper context.




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Bond to Obama: Keep secrets secret
ST. JOSEPH NEWS-PRESS   By Ken Newton
Friday, February 5, 2010

Missouri Sen. Kit Bond advised President Obama on Thursday to keep sensitive security information secret. The
written scolding concerned the White House handling of a Nigerian who tried to blow up a U.S.-bound jetliner on
Christmas Day.
Mr. Bond, vice chairman of the Senate Intelligence Committee, found it ―deeply disturbing‖ that White House
officials released to the press information about Umar Farouq Abdulmutallab’s cooperation with law enforcement
officials.
―The release of this sensitive information has no doubt been helpful to his terrorist cohorts around the world,‖ the
Republican senator said in a letter sent to Mr. Obama. ―The American people rightfully expect the government’s
first priority to be their security.‖
The Missouri lawmaker suggested politics trumped security. The White House has countered that congressional
Republicans are the ones playing politics.
White House Deputy Press Secretary Bill Burton said Wednesday, ―Nothing came out last night that
compromises any of the investigations or any of the interrogations that are currently ongoing. We feel like we
pursued the correct course in interrogating Abdulmutallab ...‖
Debt limit increased
The U.S. House passed a measure increasing the federal limit on public debt without a Republican vote
Thursday afternoon. Two of the GOP members representing the region said the debt extension amounts to bad
fiscal policy.
Northwest Missouri Congressman Sam Graves, a Tarkio Republican, said the sixth such increase in the last
three years continues Washington’s uncontrolled spending.
―This Congress has maxed out our credit card,‖ Mr. Graves said after the 217 to 212 vote. ―Instead of finding a
way to pay it off, they want to kick the can down the road by borrowing more.‖
When Republicans had majorities of Congress, Mr. Graves voted in 2002 and 2004 to increase the public debt
limit.
Northeast Kansas Congresswoman Lynn Jenkins, a freshman Republican, said House Democrats included pay-
as-you-go provisions as a political tactic.
―These spending habits are unsustainable,‖ she said. ―They are threatening our nation’s long-term stability and
our national security, and they are burying our kids and grandkids under mountains of debt they should not have
to pay back.‖
Fighting earmarks
Missouri Sen. Claire McCaskill struck another blow in her fight against congressional earmarks on Thursday.
The Democratic senator joined Republican colleague Jim DeMint of South Carolina in proposing a ban on
earmarks in the Fiscal 2011 budget.
The resolution would enact a rule change that requires 67 Senate votes in order to insert an earmark in a
spending bill.
In Fiscal 2010, Ms. McCaskill said, ―Congress appropriated over $10 billion in congressional earmarks. While
that’s not a huge percentage of the budget, it’s a good place to start reducing waste in federal spending.‖


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Challengers bank on anti-incumbent
wave
By Bill Lambrecht
POST-DISPATCH WASHINGTON BUREAU
02/05/2010


WASHINGTON — Missouri challengers for U.S. House seats are taking advantage of the public's sour mood to
haul in substantial campaign cash, but incumbents have accelerated their fundraising by tapping PACs and
friends in Congress.
The finance totals suggest the potential for more hotly contested House races in Missouri than usual and the
likelihood of heavier spending given the recent Supreme Court decision allowing unlimited donations
independently by corporations, labor unions and other outside interests.
In St. Louis, Ed Martin, the onetime chief of staff to former Gov. Matt Blunt and a Republican challenging Rep.
Russ Carnahan, raised $178,000 in the final three months of 2009, narrowing Carnahan's cash advantage to
less than $50,000 heading into the election year, disclosure reports to the Federal Election Commission this
week show.
Labor union donations helped Carnahan take in $233,000 for the quarter. But his political committee's operating
costs of more than $115,000 diminished his campaign bank balance.
Meanwhile, Democrat Tommy Sowers reported donations of $179,000 in his challenge of Rep. Jo Ann Emerson,
R-Cape Girardeau, thanks in large measure to support from veterans around the country. Sowers, a former
Army Green Beret, took in roughly two-thirds of his contributions from outside Missouri. He had $265,000 on
hand; Emerson reported $414,000 in the bank.
But Emerson reported a stronger fundraising quarter, taking in $318,000, nearly half from PACs — the political
action committees of business and labor. Emerson, a moderate in her party, enjoyed something most
Republicans don't see: contributions of at least $1,000 from a dozen labor union PACs.
Martin and Sowers contended that their contributions reflect potent anti-incumbent sentiments that bode well for
outsiders in the midterm elections.
"If the climate stays the way it is, this is a classic, marquee, middle America race," said Martin, who is angling for
support from Republicans nationally.
Sowers acknowledged drawing proceeds from around the country but observed that nearly all of his donations
came from individuals rather than political committees.
"This is the 10th-poorest district in America. It's going to be tough to raise all the funds we need from inside the
district," he said.
Sowers echoed Martin's hopes about incumbents' difficulties in November. "This year, if you're in, you're out," he
asserted.
Elsewhere in Missouri, Republican aspirants have been less successful in their drive for contributions to unseat
Missouri's longest-serving incumbent — Rep. Ike Skelton, D-Lexington, in his 17th term in Congress.
State Sen. Bill Stouffer of Napton lent his campaign $70,000 in December. In the previous quarter, Vicki Hartzler,
a former state representative from Harrisonville also competing for the Republican nomination, lent her
campaign $105,000.

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For the most recent filing period, Hartzler raised $78,000, Stouffer $71,000. Stouffer reported $307,000 on hand,
Hartzler $255,000.
"The fourth quarter was a tough environment. ... We just wanted to stay in the game," Stouffer said regarding the
loan. "We're on track, and we feel pretty good."
Hartzler asserted that she had raised more than Stouffer from individuals, which she interpreted as meaning she
has a broader base of support. "People all over this district are giving sacrificially to this effort," she said.
Meanwhile, Skelton demonstrated the power of incumbency with a robust effort that raised $492,000 last
quarter. He had an imposing $967,000 on hand.
Skelton's fundraising was bolstered by receipts of about $50,000 from committees of fellow Democrats in
Congress, some of them donating from leadership PACs — loosely regulated entities used by members of
Congress to support other politicians and their own political activities.
In the southwestern Missouri race to replace Rep. Roy Blunt, R-Springfield, who is running for the Senate,
auctioneer Billy Long outpaced two other Republican aspirants and had $479,000 on hand, more than the war
chest of his two competitors combined.




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Vets group opens ad campaigns in
Missouri, Illinois
By Bill Lambrecht
Post-Dispatch Washington Bureau
WASHINGTON — An advocacy group that includes veterans from wars in Iraq and Afghanistan is spending
$600,000 on television ads in Missouri targeting Rep. Roy Blunt as part of a $2 million national campaign.
VoteVets.org, a four-year-old group that aims most of its energies at Republicans, criticizes Blunt in the ad for
contributions from the oil industry and attempts to draw a link between oil imports and terrorism.
The ads will be running starting today in St. Louis, Kansas City, Columbia and Springfield, a VoteVets.org
spokesman said.
A similar ad in Illinois targets Rep. Mark Kirk, who won the Republican nomination on Tuesday to run for the
Senate seat opened by Barack Obama’s election to the White House.
The Missouri ad features James Sander, an Iraq veteran from Columbia, telling the camera that Blunt, the
Republicans’ likely Senate candidate in November, ―put America’s security ahead of his own … taking hundreds
of thousands from companies that do business in countries that fund terror.‖
VoteVets.org also is running ads in Iowa, Kentucky, South Dakota and Wyoming targeting Republican
senators and in Indiana aimed at both senators there, Richard Lugar (R) and Evan Bayh (D).
VoteVets co-founder Jon Soltz said in an interview that the campaign is aimed at passing energy legislation in
Congress. Presently, bills aimed at combating climate change are stalled. Blunt voted against cap-and-trade
legislation in the House; Kirk supported the bill but has since said he wouldn’t do so again.
Referring to Blunt and Kirk, Soltz said: ―We want these members of the House who seek higher office to know
how Iraq veterans feel about their relationships with Big Oil CEOs …‖




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Talent, Cunningham, Beck among
speakers at conservative conference
here
By Jo Mannies, Beacon Political Reporter
Posted 6 p.m. Thurs., 02.04.10 --National Eagle Forum founder Phyllis Schlafly, former U.S. Sen. Jim Talent
and state Sens. Jim Lembke and Jane Cunningham are among the prominent area conservatives slated to
speak at the three-day Educational Policy Conference conducted by the Constitutional Coalition.
Cable television commentator Glenn Beck is the conference's headliner, and is scheduled to address attendees
Friday night at the Chaifetz Arena.
 The speakers Saturday include U.S. Rep. Michele Bachmann, R-Minn., whose speech is entitled,
"Fundamentals of a Good Education That will keep us Free and Strong."
Organizers said this week that even the press must pay the $199 conference fee. Since the Beacon (and
presumably, most other news outlets) will not pay to cover the news, we won't be covering any of the convention
or its speakers.
A spokeswoman said Tuesday the conference did not need press coverage.
The conference, entitled "What Makes America Work? Lessons Children and Others MUST hear," is slated to
begin Thursday night with an address by conservative commentator Michael Medved.
Other scheduled speakers, and their topics, include:
  PHYLLIS SCHLAFLY Child Abuse in the Classroom
  TED BAEHR Faulty Reasoning, Film, Michael Moore and Economics
   ANN MCELHINNY Science – “Not Evil, Just Wrong!”
  STATE SEN. JANE CUNNINGHAM Bullying Gone too Far!
  EMILY BROOKER PC on the Campus
  DAVID HOROWITZ Teaching Revolution on College Campus
  DR. ROBERT LITTLEJOHN Teaching not WHAT but HOW to think!
   DEBI DEMEIN Federal vs. State School Boards
  DR. MIRIAM GROSSMAN You’re Teaching My Children WHAT?
  DR. PATRICK FAGIN What Research Shows about Sexual Diversity and Marriage
  DR. KAREN GUSHTA The War on Children
   (Former) U.S. SEN. RICK SANTORUM, R-Pa., and KEN FERGUSON How to rid your TV of ALL Sexual
programs and advertisements
  SALLY CANFIELD How and Why Biblical Sexuality
  FRANK GAFNEY It is a Dangerous World – America Under Attack

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   U.S. REP. MICHELE BACHMANN, R-Minn. Fundamentals of a Good Education That will keep us Free and
Strong
  DR. BRAD WATSON RULE OF LAW: Darwin, Hegel and Faith
  DR. MATT SPALDING AN ORDERLY SOCIETY: We STILL Hold These Truths…
  DR. JERRY NEWCOMBE ENDOWED BY OUR CREATOR: The Role of God in America
  BRIGITTE GABRIEL ONE LAW FOR ONE PEOPLE: Textbooks -Shariah and the U.S. Constitution
  SEN. RICK SANTORUM CREATED LIFE: The Declaration, Life and Liberty
  State SEN. JIM LEMBKE SOVEREIGNITY: The State and Unconstitutional Federal Dictates
  DR. JAY RICHARDS ECONOMICS: Understanding Money, Greed and God
  JOSEPH FARAH FREE IDEAS: America’s Unique Freedom of the Press
  (Former) U.S. SEN. JIM TALENT, R-Mo., SECURITY: The Constitutional and Moral Underpinnings of
National Defense
  JIM CUFFIA FREEDOM: The Liberty Project
  DR. WM. FORSTCHEN Washington Crossing the Delaware
  MARK HAMPY Literature to Create Moral Leaders
  DONNA HEARNE How to Activate America




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President names Nixon to10-member
national Council of Governors
By Jo Mannies, Beacon Political Reporter
Posted 6:45 p.m. Thurs., 02.04.10 --Missouri Gov. Jay Nixon among 10 governors named Thursday by
President Barack Obama to serve on the newly created Council of Governors.
According to the White House, the 10-member council "will work closely with the secretary of defense, the
secretary of homeland security, and other defense and national security advisors to exchange views, information
and advice on matters of mutual interest pertaining to the National Guard, homeland defense, synchronization
and integration of State and Federal military activities in the United States, and civil support activities."
Other governors selected to serve on the bipartisan council include:
·     Gov. James H. Douglas, R-Va., Co-Chair
·     Gov. Chris Gregoire,D-Wash., Co-Chair
·     Gov. Janice K. Brewer, R-Ariz.
·     Gov. Luis G. Fortuño, R-Puerto Rico
      Gov. Brad Henry, D-Okla.
·     Gov. Robert F. McDonnell, R-Va.
·     Gov. Jeremiah W. (Jay) Nixon, D-Mo.
·     Gov. Martin O’Malley, D-Md.
      Gov. Beverly Eaves Perdue, D-N.C.
·     Gov. M. Michael Rounds, R-S.D.




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Governor pulls Ransdall's nomination
and 83 others from senate review
Pulaski County Daily    By: Darrell Todd Maurina
Posted: Thursday, February 4, 2010 1:10 pm
JEFFERSON CITY, Mo. (Feb. 4, 2010) — Gov. Jay Nixon’s has pulled 84 names back from Missouri State
Senate consideration for various boards and commissions, including former Pulaski County Presiding
Commissioner Bill Ransdall.
The governor’s decision came Wednesday, just one day before the nominations would have died.
Ransdall was appointed last fall to one of three seats on the Missouri State Tax Commission, which pays
$106,000 per year and by state statute must be a full-time position. As a condition of his appointment, Ransdall
was required to give up numerous positions including his elected office as Pulaski County Presiding
Commissioner, his chairmanship of the Pulaski County Growth Alliance and Missouri Ozarks Community Action,
his membership on a state board that oversees local soil and water commissions, and his role as a compensated
employee of Rastur Inc., a company which demolishes and re-sells items from Fort Leonard Wood housing
being refurbished or replaced by newer homes.
However, Ransdall’s nomination and that of several other Democrats who previously served in the Missouri
House of Representatives ran into a buzzsaw of opposition from Republicans who didn’t like the way they
conducted themselves as members of the Missouri House of Representatives. While Ransdall has said locally
for years that he tries to maintain good relationships with Republicans as well as Democrats, some of his former
House of Representatives colleagues who are now members of the Missouri State Senate publicly criticized him
for partisanship.
Ransdall also drew fire for voting in favor of a recommendation from agriculture officials at the University of
Missouri to increase tax rates on the state’s highest-quality farmland while lowering rates on the lowest-quality
farmland. The recommendation was passed unanimously by the Missouri State Tax Commission and would
have gone into effect in 2011, but was rejected by both houses of the state legislature and will now die.
While Ransdall is out of a job for now, it’s not clear that his nomination is as dead as the proposed tax increase.
According to Scott Holste, a spokesman for the governor’s office, Ransdall and the 83 other names who Nixon
had submitted for consideration could still be brought up for confirmation.
―Those nominations can be resubmitted to the senate while it is in session and the senate would not be under
any kind of deadline except prior to the end of the session for considering those nominations,‖ Holste said. ―But
any names that would be submitted for nominations for board and commissions now, those people would not be
able to serve on those boards and commissions until such time as they are confirmed. That’s kind of the
difference between appointments that are made during the legislative session and ones made when the
legislature is not in session.‖
Missouri’s state legislature is a part-time organization, and Ransdall’s appointment followed standard procedure
when the senate is not in session. Rather than waiting up to half a year for vacancies to be filled, the governor
has the right to fill positions immediately pending state senate confirmation, but any appointments that weren’t
confirmed by today’s deadline would have died, according to Farrah Fite, communications director for the Senate
Majority Caucus.


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―If they are not confirmed by that date they would have been removed from the committee and never been
eligible to serve again,‖ Fite said.
Fite said neither Nixon nor Sen. Charlie Shields, the Republican president pro-tem of the state senate and
chairman of the Senate Gubernatorial Appointments Committee, wanted that to happen.
―Sen. Shields made a commitment early in the session that we would do as many as possible but everybody
would be fully vetted,‖ Fite said.
The committee members had been reviewing at least 20 and sometimes up to 30 nominees per week, but the
committee simply did not have enough time to review all the names, she said.
According to Fite, Ransdall was one of only four people pulled out for individual consideration on the state
senate floor. Others included John Temporiti, the former chairman of the Missouri Democratic Party who was
appointed to the Missouri Housing Development Commission and former State Rep. Philip Smith of Louisiana,
who was appointed to the Administrative Hearing Commission; none of those three have yet been approved and
all face serious Republican opposition.
The fourth person was an appointee to the Missouri Highways and Transportation Commission who was pulled
out by an individual senator but later confirmed after that senator had time to meet with the appointee.
Sheilds’ staff said they expected that most of the names submitted by Nixon would eventually be resubmitted
and approved
Holste said he had no information on whether Ransdall’s name would be coming back to the state senate with
the governor’s recommendation for appointment — but that’s the case for the other 83 people, too.
―There has not been any decision made on individual names that were withdrawn as far as whether they will be
resubmitted,‖ Holste said.




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Funding cuts impact program for
parents
ST. JOSEPH NEWS-PRESS      By Alonzo Weston
Friday, February 5, 2010

Alex DuFrain plays with her son Quincy during playtime at Parents As Teachers. Mrs. DuFrain has participated
in the program with all five of her children.
For Joe and Alex DuFrain, Parents as Teachers is a family affair. The couple sent their five children through the
early childhood program.
―My first little girl is now a seventh-grader at Bode, and my last one, he’s just about to turn 1 year old,‖ Mrs.
DuFrain said.
Since parenting doesn’t come with a handbook, the early childhood education program is good for new parents,
she added. What’s even better is, the program brings the information to your home through visits.
―You don’t have to leave your house to find out any information,‖ Mrs. DuFrain said. ―When you’re up to leaving
your house, they have things at the Keatley Center that’s age-appropriate for your children.‖
Some other parents may not be as fortunate as the DuFrains if state funding is cut to the Parents as Teachers
program, as recently proposed by Gov. Jay Nixon. The governor proposed cutting $4.1 million from the program
across the state. Locally, that translates into a cut of about 13.7 percent, or $90,000 out of the St. Joseph
Parents as Teachers’ roughly $600,000 yearly budget.
The cuts could, in turn, potentially mean lost jobs and a loss of services in the program, said Debbie Kunz,
Parents as Teachers coordinator for the St. Joseph School District.
―We won’t be able to serve as many families, they won’t get as much contact every year, which means there’s
less intervention, and I won’t be able to hire any new parent educators,‖ she said. ―We also might put families
who want to be in the program on a waiting list.‖
This will be the second consecutive year the program has endured state cuts, Ms. Kunz added. Not only are the
monetary cuts damaging to the program, but there are also possibly unfortunate intangible consequences.
―The problem is, if we cut services to families before their child goes to school, we see difficulties along the
whole continuum of the child’s life,‖ Ms. Kunz said.
―Education is the great equalizer,‖ she added. ―When you short-change that from the beginning, we’re really
going to hurt Missouri’s children.‖
Mrs. DuFrain said it would be highly unfortunate for families if the cuts were made to Parents as Teachers.
―We’d lose some important learning tools for young parents,‖ she said. ―I think it would be a disadvantage to the
community.‖




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Facing Education Cuts
Thursday, February 4, 2010
George Anderson Daily Dunkin Democrat
Decrease in state tax revenue equals potential cuts for area districts
Schools across the state have been hearing about possible budget cuts for some time. When the Missouri
General Assembly went back into session in January, anxiety in the districts grew as they prepared for the
unknown.
In the local area, both large and small districts began to prepare to cut programs, positions, and anything they
could in anticipation of the state funding cuts they had heard about.
According to Kennett Superintendent Jerry Noble, the state was warning of possible cuts due to a decrease in
state tax revenue.
"What they are telling us is that we are probably going to have some cuts this school year because they had
projected a four percent decrease in state tax revenue and it is down 6.4 percent right now," Noble said. "They
are thinking we are going to get some cuts in school funding before school lets out this year. And next year,
depending on who you talk to, [they are anticipating] anywhere from 10-15 percent in cuts."
Noble said the superintendents met with Chris Nicastro, Missouri Commissioner of Education, last month, who
told the superintendents to be cautious with their budgets as they finished the year and prepared the 2010-2011
budgets.
"[Nicastro] was telling us to be really cautious about our spending and to be conservative with our budgets,"
Noble said. "We know we are going to have some cuts, we just don't know how severe they are going to be."
Noble said if the budget is cut seven percent, the Kennett School District would lose nearly $700,000. He added
that one way the district may battle the cuts is by not replace teachers who will be retiring this year unless it is
absolutely necessary.
"Right now, it looks like we have three teachers who are going to retire that we are not going to replace, so that
would save us approximately $150,000," Noble said. "The summer school savings would be approximately
$200,000."
Noble added that the district will also not purchase a new school bus, which would save the district about
$80,000.
Southland Superintendent Raymond Lasley, administrator for one of the smaller districts in the area, is also
preparing for cuts.
"From what I have been told so far, [the possible cuts] are going to affect Southland pretty negatively," Lasley
said. "It is going to hurt the education of the kids. It is going to increase class sizes [and] decrease the time each
teacher can spend with each individual child. That is the immediate thing [the cuts] will do.
"Of course, those sort of ripple out into everything else when you increase class sizes. Southland has worked for
years to have very small class sizes so we can address the needs of each individual kid instead of doing it as a
whole class. It is going to have to change on the short view."
Lasley said to prepare for the proposed cuts, Southland is looking into each program to see what can be cut.
"[We are] just trying to cut any expenses and any program that we can," Lasley said.
After the General Assembly went back into session, Representative Terry Swinger (D-Caruthersville) said
education is the "number one priority" of those at Jefferson City.

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"The interesting part about it is, even though the revenues are down so much, the number one thing the
constitution says we have to do is pay off public debt," Swinger said. "That is the first thing that we always do on
the budget. Then the second priority is education.
"Every attempt is made by everybody to fully fund the education program. It is going to be difficult to say just
exactly how that is all going to shake out, but still, everybody [at Jefferson City] is committed to do everything
they can to preserve the funding for education."
Swinger said he expects most of the funding to "be there," although he did not rule out any cuts.
"I would say that most of it would be there," Swinger said. "There may be some specialty programs that might
get hit.
"Parents as Teachers is something that gets funded better in Missouri than it does in any other state in the
United States. We are actually the only state that has a mandate that every school district has Parents as
Teachers. I am a big proponent and a big supporter of Parents as Teachers, but that [being cut] is a possibility.
Again, that is something that I really support and something I will do everything I can to keep funding reduction
stopped.
"[The Assembly is] just going to be looking at things because our revenues are so depressed. Most of the people
in the legislature, their number one priority is education. The number one goal of everybody is education. Most
folk are going to try to preserve it as best they can."
Late last month, Nicastro sent word to schools that the "state has protected local schools from financial crisis."
Nicastro said Missouri's public education is faring far better than in many states in the nation.
"Despite the state's tremendous budget challenges, the Governor has recommended $63 million in additional
revenue to make up for the loss in gaming revenue for the current year," Nicastro said. "School officials
throughout the state have been dealing with the economic slump for months, making adjustments in their
budgets and anticipating possible reductions in state aid. We think most school districts will get through this year
in pretty good shape due to this careful planning.
"There is no question that Missouri is in an unprecedented financial slump, which has affected every part of our
state," Nicastro said. "Gov. [Jay] Nixon and the legislature, however, have made unprecedented efforts to shield
public schools from the brunt of the financial crisis. School officials are grateful for that support. It has enabled
our schools to adjust their budgets gradually and deal with the economic slump in an orderly way, thus protecting
classroom services for students."
Nicastro said that while public schools in some states have already been hit with big losses in state aid,
Missouri's $3 billion "foundation program" for schools has not been affected to date and updated information will
be provided to all school districts soon.




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Bill Would Aid Disabled Children
JEFFERSON CITY- A Missouri House bill would expand on the recent autism measure passed by the Missouri
Senate to give insurance coverage to all children with disabilities.
House Bill 1810, also called the Children's Therapy Act, would allow families with children suffering from
conditions like Down Syndrome and cerebral palsy to get insurance coverage. The Children's Therapy Act is not
the same or an extension to the Senate 618 Bill, or the Autism Bill. The Children's Therapy Act takes the same
idea of the Autism Bill but expands to all disabilities.
Mid-Missouri mother Kate Basi has three children, one with Down Syndrome.
"The two bills have very similar purposes. They're both trying to provide needed services to children," said
Basi. "It's just that what the Autism bill is doing for children with Autism, what the House Bill 1810 is aimed at
doing for all children with disabilities."
Basi has supported and worked on the Children's Therapy Act since July 2009. She said the bill is in its infancy
but it could help families like her's if it's passed.
"Because they will be able to get insurance coverage, they will be able to have access to therapies which will
then allow their children to develop the skills more easily they need in order to be functioning members of
society," said Basi. "That's our ultimate goal."
Republican State Representative Therese Sander is spear heading the House Bill. Sander said she heard a lot
of community support from families who get "denied access to insurance companies when [they] have kids with
special needs."
Basi said she hopes her efforts with the bill will go beyond her own household.
"We've been really lucky to have gotten the level of service and the quantity of service we've had," said Basi.
"My concern with this is having seen the difference that it makes with my daughter, I feel like I want to make sure
that all children have the same opportunity."
Republican Senator Scott Rupp is in charge of the Autism Bill. He said there's a reason why the Senate Bill 618
focuses on autistic children.
"Autism is the number two most prevalent, yet it's the only one excluded," said Rupp. "It's very important that we
start here because it's a neurobiological disorder that for some reason is not provided coverage for like they do
all the others."
Basi said she would like to see Children's Therapy Act gain as much attention as the Autism Bill, but Senator
Rupp said it's been a bumpy road getting where the bill is today.
"The insurance industry has been opposing this for the last two years I've been working on it," said Rupp. "They
have thrown out argument after argument."
Basi said she hasn't heard any arguments about the House Bill yet. She said she hopes the bill passes so it can
ease some of her responsibilities to work as both a mother and a therapist.
"[The House Bill will] allow us to be parents, to be family members, and not to have to be therapists at all times,"
said Basi. "That's really what we're going for.
KOMU-TV : Reported by: Daniel Posey




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Mo. Senate considers bill limiting tax
credits
Marshall Griffin, St. Louis Public Radio (2010-02-04)
JEFFERSON CITY, MO. (St. Louis Public Radio) - A bill that would give the Missouri General Assembly control
over almost every state tax credit is being considered by the State Senate.
The bill's supporters, including State Senator Chuck Purgason (R, Caulfield), say giving lawmakers control over
the size of each tax break would ensure that they can set aside enough money to fund education, health care
and other critical needs.
"When you're facing a $1.4, $1.5 billion budget deficit in (2012), when you sitting there trying to make a decision
whether to cut Medicaid, not fund the formula (for K-12 schools), or issue tax credits, I think that's an issue that
we need to make," Purgason said.
Purgason's comments came during a hearing before the Senate Committee on Governmental Accountability and
Fiscal Oversight, which he chairs.
Purgason is also running for the U.S. Senate.
The bill's opponents say it could strip millions of dollars from programs that create jobs and provide services to
the needy. Lobbyist Jim Moody says many of the tax credits in question have been helping needy Missourians
for years.
"Whereas, someone in a market rate might have to pay a rent of, say, $700-750, the tax credits involved in these
programs might reduce that rent to, say, $350-400 for an elderly person," Moody said.
The bill's sponsor, State Senator Jason Crowell (R, Cape Girardeau), says the state is facing a budget shortfall
in the year 2012 and may have to choose between giving out tax credits and having enough money for
education and health care.
The committee is expected to vote on the bill at a later date.




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Lobbyists unhappy with Schoeller's
legislation
Bill would bar advocacy by taxpayer-funded entities.
Chad Livengood News-Leader

Jefferson City -- A bill to ban the use of taxpayer money for lobbying state legislators faced considerable
backlash Thursday from the people who would be most affected: lobbyists.
Rep. Shane Schoeller's bill would prohibit any entity that accepts tax dollars from using that money to influence
the passage or defeat of legislation.
It would not outright ban municipalities, state agencies or other recipients of tax dollars from hiring lobbyists to
roam the halls of the Capitol. But the lobbyists would be forbidden to advocate to legislators why they should
vote a certain way on a bill, Schoeller said.
"There needs to be a clear line that says you can monitor, you can educate, but you can't advocate," Schoeller
told the House government accountability and ethics reform committee.
Schoeller, R-Willard, filed the legislation last year in response to the Missouri Department of Transportation
sending 20 employees to the Capitol to lobby on a bill -- on taxpayer time.
At the time, MoDOT said it sent the employees and 100 volunteer "highway safety advocates" to the Capitol to
hold a rally and pressure legislators to pass a primary seat belt law. The legislation didn't pass, in part because
MoDOT's lobbying actions irked several legislators.
"This clearly says (taxpayer-funded lobbyists) can continue to do what they do," Schoeller said. "They just simply
can't ask you to vote yes or no."
A hearing on Schoeller's legislation drew a considerable number of registered lobbyists, who said it could
hamper their ability to do business in the capital city. They also said it could affect the lobbying efforts of any
private entity they represent that gets tax dollars, such as Medicaid providers and nursing homes.
Lobbyist Randy Scherr, whose clients include the city of Branson, said it would be virtually impossible to allow
lobbyists to educate a lawmaker on an issue while forbidding them from advocating a position.
"There is no distinction between educating and advocating," Scherr said. "You're putting everybody in a trick bag
on this."
Schoeller likened his reform proposal to the way school boards seek voter approval to levy higher property taxes
for construction projects. School boards place the issue before voters, send out educational materials, but can't
use tax dollars to advocate for approval of a bond issue, Schoeller said.
"To me, there's very little difference between what happens there and what happens here," he said.
Under Schoeller's legislation, any registered lobbyist who accepted tax dollars to advocate a position could be
prohibited from lobbying for up to two years. Municipalities and any other political subdivision would be subject to
a fine of $1,000 to $5,000 for using tax dollars to pay for a lobbyist.
Some lobbyists said the bill would hamstring a public entity's ability to advocate for a policy position, while doing
nothing to regulate the lobbying practices of corporations and wealthy individuals.


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"This would stop school districts from coming together and working for the betterment of children," said Mike
Reid, lobbyist fro the Missouri School Boards' Association.
House members from southwest Missouri who signed on as co-sponsors to Schoeller's bill include Rep. Eric
Burlison, R-Springfield; Rep. Charlie Denison, Rep. Tony Dugger, R-Hartville; R-Springfield; Rep. Ed Emery, R-
Lamar; Rep. Marilyn Ruestman, R-Joplin; and Rep. Don Wells, R-Cabool.
But members of the committee from both political parties were skeptical of the proposal.
"I support the concept, I really do. But I don't think it will change much," said Rep. David Day, R-Dixon.
Rep. Gina Walsh, D-St. Louis, said lobbyists help educate legislators on an issue. "If there weren't people here
to educate me, I wouldn't be able to do my job," Walsh said.
The committee is considering several ethics reform bills this year and will roll various proposals into one large bill
on bipartisan agreement, said Rep. Kevin Wilson, R-Neosho.
After the hearing, Schoeller said he doubts his bill will be included in the final product.
"The members on the committee made it very clear that they don't support the legislation," Schoeller said.




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Missouri lawmaker proposes restrictions
on lobbyists
By CHRIS BLANK/The Associated Press
February 5, 2010 | 12:01 a.m. CST
JEFFERSON CITY — Frustrated by transportation officials who last year urged lawmakers to change Missouri's
seat belt laws, a Republican state House member urged colleagues Thursday to silence lobbying efforts in the
Capitol by state agencies, local governments and public schools.
Legislation sponsored by southwest Missouri Rep. Shane Schoeller would bar governmental agencies from
using public money to hire lobbyists that urge lawmakers to support or oppose bills. Lobbyists for public groups
still could be hired with public funds to track the Legislature, speak with lawmakers and provide information.
"You can monitor, you can educate, but you can't advocate," said Schoeller, R-Willard, who said the restrictions
were needed to protect tax dollars.
But numerous lawmakers on a special House ethics panel — which this year has debated a variety of other
restrictions on lobbyists — expressed doubts about Schoeller's legislation, with some defending lobbyists' jobs
as necessary to the process.
Rep. David Day said he agrees public funds should not be used to sway the Legislature but questioned what the
bill would accomplish.
The impetus for Schoeller's bill was an attempt last year by the Department of Transportation to get lawmakers
to approve a bill allowing police officers to stop motorists solely for not wearing a seat belt. Department
employees, while still on the clock, came to the Capitol and urged lawmakers to approve the bill.
Critics of the lobbyist restrictions warned Thursday the proposed restrictions could have far-reaching
consequences that cause problems outside the Capitol by barring governmental entities from joining groups that
employ a lobbyist.
Mike Reid, a lobbyist for the Missouri School Boards' Association, said another possible problem is limiting the
information lawmakers receive. He said school leaders frequently hear directly from parents in their communities
and that the lobbyist restriction could make it harder for state officials' to hear those views.
"This broad brush is way too broad," Reid said.
Supporters of the lobbyist restrictions said many taxpayers oppose the stances taken by the public agencies and
questioned whether Missourians' own tax money should be used for causes they oppose.
The Missouri Sunshine Coalition, a freedom of information group of which The Associated Press is a member,
backed the bill because some government entities have joined associations that urge the Legislature to restrict
access to public records. That has included details about the execution of prison inmates, police misconduct
records and hospital financial records.
"Public funds should not be used to lobby against the public," said coalition president Jim Robertson, who is the
managing editor for the Columbia Daily Tribune.




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Drug tests for officials, welfare
recipients gains support in House
Chris Blank The Associated Press

Jefferson City -- Missouri's elected officials and many people who receive cash welfare benefits would start
undergoing drug screening under legislation given first-round House approval Thursday.
Lawmakers, judges and other state officeholders would receive drug tests before taking office and every two
years after that. The officials would pay for the tests, and refusing one would be considered an admission that
they used a controlled substance without permission.
Likewise, work-eligible adults who apply and receive cash welfare payments would be tested if the Department
of Social Services has a "reasonable suspicion" that the person is using drugs. Those who refuse or test positive
would not be eligible for the cash benefits for one year. Their children could keep receiving benefits, but the
money would need to be handled by a third party outside the household.
House leaders said Thursday that the drug tests would give taxpayers assurance that their money is not going
toward drug use. They said not requiring elected officials to be tested would be hypocritical.
"We're not going to subsidize drug use by welfare beneficiaries," said House Speaker Pro Tem Bryan Pratt, R-
Blue Springs.
The drug-testing requirement would apply to applicants to the cash-aid program called Temporary Assistance for
Needy Families. It is designed to help low-income parents learn job skills and care for their children. More than
43,000 families consisting of 112,000 people receive benefits through the assistance program.
A single parent with two children receives $292 per month through the program, but must work or take job-
training courses for at least 30 hours per week.
Missouri is not the first to consider drug tests. Arizona requires testing for welfare recipients when there is
evidence of drug use, and Michigan approved a 1999 law requiring drug tests.
But federal courts have tossed out some broad drug-testing requirements for elected officials and welfare
recipients in other states.
For example, a federal appeals court in 2003 struck down Michigan's drug-testing law. And the U.S. Supreme
Court in 1997 struck down a Georgia law requiring political candidates to take drug tests, in part because there
was no evidence of substance abuse problems among the state's public officials.
Missouri lawmakers approved their drug-testing bill 113-40 on Thursday, and it needs another vote before
moving to the Senate. Lawmakers debated the bill for three days, but most of that discussion focused on drug
screening for elected officials and the possible penalties for officeholders who fail tests.
Initially, the House legislation would have allowed people who test positive for drugs to complete a treatment
program and still keep their welfare benefits. Lawmakers on Thursday removed that provision and lowered the
threshold for the evidence needed to require concerns about the process for determining who would be required
to take drug tests.
The legislation gives the Department of Social Services until July 2011 to develop its drug-testing policies. It
requires the department to give lawmakers an annual report on the number of drug tests taken and the results of
those tests.
Starting in October, Social Services Department employees who do not report suspected drug use or fraud by
those seeking benefits would be fired.

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Mo. House gives drug testing bill first
round approval
By Juana Summers
St. Louis Post-Dispatch
JEFFERSON CITY — After three days of floor debate, the House gave preliminary approval to a bill that
establishes a system for drug testing Missouri’s welfare recipients.
The House today voted 113-40 in favor of the proposal, which would apply only to recipients of cash assistance
through Temporary Assistance for Needy Families. Individuals who tested positive for controlled substance use
would lose the federal benefits.
The bill includes an amendment that requires public officials to take drug tests every two years, including before
they were able to take office. If an elected official refused the test, it would be considered an admission of guilt.
The bill was sponsored by Rep. Ellen Brandom, R-Sikeston. Brandom sponsored similar legislation last year
that passed in the House but died in the Senate.




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Area state representatives discuss
proposal to drug test welfare recipients
Thursday, February 4, 2010
Joshua Payne Daily Dunklin Democrat
Area state representatives see a need in stopping drug use of all kinds, but find some issues with currently
proposed legislation to drug test work-eligible welfare recipients.
The proposal, recently outlined by Republican senators, is to direct the Missouri Department of Social Services
to set up a drug-testing program for work-eligible welfare recipients.
During discussion, the senate committee learned that the drug-testing bills were only to be used of there is
"reasonable cause" to believe welfare recipients are using illegal drugs.
State Rep. Tom Todd, D-Campbell, noted that he believed that drug use of all kinds needed to be stopped, but
he was not sure if the proposed bill is the right way.
He added that the proposal would single out low income individuals and people on assistance, and seemed to
be a form of discrimination.
Todd explained that he was, however, in support of any actions to do away with drugs.
"[I] think [drug use] is one of the worst things about ruining lives," Todd said.
He added that one of his concerns with the proposal was the cost to the State of Missouri.
Todd explained that the current estimates were for the fiscal note to be over $2 million in the first year.
"I don't know where the money will come from," Todd said.
He also added that he was unsure if the individuals, once testing positive, would be placed in a program for
treatment.
Todd explained another issue with the proposal is that drug courts in the state were currently full of participants
and he was not sure if they could handle the traffic that the proposal would potentially create.
He noted that the state had to be careful in assessing the regulation and costs of bills before they are passed.
Todd explained that he was not aware of a statistic showing that "needy families" were worse on drugs.
"If we are testing these people, why not test all of us working for the state or receiving assistance," Todd said.
He added that he was currently unsure how he would vote when concerning the proposal.
"We've got to try to get rid of the drug problem, [but I am] worried about the ramifications," Todd said.
State Rep. Terry Swinger, D-Caruthersville, noted that he voted in approval of the proposal last year and would
do the same this year.
"[I] think drugs are such a problem, [we need to] do anything to curtail these issues," Swinger said.
He added that his biggest concern with the proposal was the added expense with the current state of the budget.
"It will be difficult to find [funds]," Swinger said.




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Lawmakers want K2 incense made
illegal
Chad Livengood News-Leader

Jefferson City -- Two state legislators want to make an herbal incense chemically similar to marijuana a
controlled substance.
Legislation filed by Rep. Ward Franz and Sen. Kurt Schaefer would make the synthetic drug K2 and others like it
illegal.
Franz, R-West Plains, said law enforcement officials have told him the relatively unknown incense is being
smoked as a legal alternative to marijuana.
"The witnesses and reports are saying that it's just as good as high-quality marijuana," Franz said. "It's all over
southwest Missouri."
Schaefer, R-Columbia, said he's had complaints from constituents that teenagers are becoming impaired after
buying the incense legally.
"You can't have people driving around impaired on a substance that's unregulated," Schaefer said.
The News-Leader previously reported on K2 after a local high school newspaper published an article on the
trend of smoking the substance.
K2 is a combination of herbal ingredients and is sold as incense in local smoking shops like Mr. Eddie's
downtown.
Although the herbal ingredients are listed on the product's Web site, one substance that a Kansas crime lab
found in the product that wasn't mentioned online was JWH-018 -- a synthetic compound that has a marijuana-
like effect on the brain.
John Huffman, the college professor who created the chemical for his research, told the News-Leader for the
December story that it has never been tested on humans and could have toxic results.
"It should absolutely not be used as a recreational drug," he said in an e-mail.
He also said the substance is at least three times stronger than naturally occurring THC, the substance in
marijuana that creates a high for the user.
Franz said the House Public Safety Committee plans to hold a hearing Tuesday on his bill.
The Kansas legislature passed a law banning the distribution of synthetic marijuana earlier this week, according
to Peggy Mast, R-Emporia.
"I talked to law enforcement last night, and they're very relieved to have it passed," she said.
Mast said there was very little opposition to the bill. She said she felt it was important to stop the product's
distribution now, before it became a larger problem.
She said it was becoming popular enough that some gas stations had been selling K2 or similar products, like
Spice Gold.
"Already, some stores are pulling it off the shelf, realizing it's not going to be available anymore," she said.
If the governor signs it into law, Kansas would be the first state in the nation to outlaw the product.
Additional Facts
Proposed bills to ban K2
House Bill 1472
Senate Bill 887

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Patrol warns parents about K2
substance
By DON NORFLEET
The Fulton Sun

The Missouri State Highway Patrol has warned parents to be aware of a new substance that provides a high
similar to marijuana and can be dangerous.
Sgt. Paul Reinsch, a patrol information and education officer, says spice cannabinoids, or K2 as it is known on
the street, has been showing up in Missouri and is the latest temptation for young people.
Darryl Maylee, chief deputy of the Callaway County Sheriff's office, said K2 has not been a problem so far in
Callaway County.
"However, I understand you can buy it in Columbia," Maylee said.
Reinsch said K2 "will impair a driver's ability to operate a motor vehicle. It could also be a problem for some
school districts until availability can be restricted."
Reinsch said spice cannabinoids have been sold as plant food, incense and spice but many people smoke it to
create a "high" similar to marijuana. He said K2 can be ordered from the Internet for consumption and currently
is legal.
The substance, Reinsch said, has some pharmacological similarities to tetrahydrocannabinols (THC), which is
the chemical in marijuana that creates a "high."
Reinsch said legislation is being drafted in Missouri that would make K2 a controlled substance and illegal to
possess. He said the U.S. Drug Enforcement Administration also is studying how K2 might be controlled with
changes in federal drug laws.
Legislation banning K2 in Kansas is moving forward. The Kansas Senate approved a bill by a vote of 36-1 to ban
K2 and the Kansas House on Tuesday advanced similar legislation with a first round voice vote.
The patrol, Reinsch said, "wants to make parents aware of K2. Education is the key to safeguarding the public
against new threats to our children and the motoring public."
K2 burns like marijuana and little bags of it are showing up among teens and adults.
Reinsch said K2 is smoked to create a high that lasts up to six hours and is moderately impairing. It has been
showing up more frequently in Northwest Missouri, he said.
K2 is popular in Lawrence, Kan., home of the University of Kansas, where it is sold at a store at Lawrence. It
comes in a small pouch of herbs that look like oregano but are laced with synthetic chemicals that emulate
marijuana. In addition to K2, the substance is sold under the names of Spice, Zohai and Genie. It often is
promoted as incense, spice or food supplement. But its most common use is to smoke it as a marijuana
substitute.
K2 is said to have been created by an undergraduate chemistry student at Clemson University.




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One Missouri lawmaker pushes for
tougher D-W-I laws
Maria Keena Reporting

JEFFERSON CITY, MO (KMOX) -- Proposed legislation by Joplin Republican Representative Bryan Stevenson
calls for a crack down on D-W-I laws in Missouri.
If passed, every municipality would be required to keep records of all drunk driving arrests. Saint Louis County
Prosecutor Bob McCulloch testified that his job would be much easier with tougher laws. McCulloch says even to
prosecute a class A misdemeanor, he has to be able to prove the accused had a first D-W-I.
The legislation also calls for punishing local communities that do not report D-W-I's by pulling its state funding.




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Missouri House Committee discusses
stricter drunk driving laws
ST. LOUIS GLOBE-DEMOCRAT By Kiki Schmitz, State Capitol Bureau

Thursday, February 4, 2010

JEFFERSON CITY - Drunk driving laws need an overhaul, a Republican representative said, continuing what
has been one of the major issues for the Democratic governor.
An extensive bill sponsored by Rep. Bryan Stevenson, R-Joplin, to toughen drunk driving laws statewide was
heard in a House committee Wednesday. Changes would increase the suspension period for drivers with a
blood alcohol level of .15 percent or higher. In addition, Stevenson pushed for a more comprehensive statewide
DWI tracking system to punish repeat offenders.
The current DWI tracking system is flawed, Stevenson said, and a few municipalities fail to report offenses to the
state, ultimately causing repeat offenders to be charged and sentenced as first time offenders. Stevenson's bill
would allow the governor to "withhold any state funds to a law enforcement agency or prosecuting or circuit
attorney's office that fails to submit information."
"This is a very severe problem that certain municipalities are not reporting the information," Stevenson said. "We
have to bring firm pressure to ensure that this information is reported."
Rep. Jamilah Nasheed, D-St. Louis, expressed concern that cutting funds would threaten public safety and have
a negative effect on the overall community.
"I don't think the way to deal with it is to strip funds," Nasheed said.
St. Louis County Prosecutor Bob McCulloch agreed, however, with Stevenson, saying, "If nothing else comes
out of it but we get the recording system straightened out, that will get a lot of the issues resolved."
McCulloch, who spoke on behalf of the Missouri Association of Prosecuting Attorneys, said there was a problem
with both the "quantity and quality" of reports and agreed that there should be "sanctions considered against
those who don't comply." McCulloch said he did not support any tracking system in particular, just "as long as we
have a place where that information is available."
Rep. James Morris, D-St. Louis, questioned the motive behind a municipality that did not send any records.
McCulloch attributed a failure to report to "laziness" and "incompetence."
"It is not that difficult to report," McCulloch said. "There's minimal information to get in."
Under the proposed legislation, an first time offender with an alcohol level of .15 percent or higher would have
his or her license suspended for 45 days and one year of restricted driving privileges. This is an increase from
the current law, which is a 30-day suspension and 60 days of restricted driving privileges. If a driver refused to
submit to an alcohol or drug test, they would automatically receive the higher penalty. A second time offender
with a level of .15 or higher would have his or her license suspended for 90 days and 458 days of restricted
driving privileges.
The committee adjourned after almost two hours of discussion and testimony from one witness, McCulloch. The
hearing will continue next week.



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State senate targets adult businesses
Legislation to have strict regulations gets initial approval.
David A. Lieb   The Associated Press

Jefferson City -- The Missouri Senate endorsed strict regulations for sexually oriented businesses Thursday --
just days after a federal grand jury convened to look into the demise of a similar bill five years ago.
The legislation would ban strip clubs and adult video stores within 1,000 feet of homes, schools, churches,
libraries, parks and day cares. It also would ban nudity, require semi-nude employees to stay 6 feet from
customers and force adult businesses to close by midnight.
Senators gave initial approval to the bill by voice vote after a short debate with scant opposition. A final vote,
which would send the bill to the House, is expected early next week.
The legislation is sponsored by Sen. Matt Bartle, R-Lee's Summit, who testified Tuesday before a federal grand
jury in Kansas City that he is looking into how his 2005 version died in the House. Bartle has said he believes
there is a link between a $35,000 contribution from the adult entertainment industry to a political committee and
then-House Speaker Rod Jetton's decision to send the bill to a committee whose chairman opposed it.
Jetton has denied wrongdoing and said there's no connection between the money and the legislation's demise.
Bartle and Senate Majority Leader Kevin Engler, R-Farmington, both said it was mere coincidence that the
Senate took up Bartle's latest anti-pornography legislation the same week as the grand jury investigation. But
they acknowledged the publicity could help propel the bill to passage this year.
"I'm not going to deny that the environment right now is opportune," Bartle said. "I think that it's highly unlikely
under these circumstances ... that anybody in the Legislature is going to take some campaign contributions from
a porn shop."
The only audible "no" vote on the legislation Thursday came from Sen. Jolie Justus, D-Kansas City, who tried
unsuccessfully to exempt sexually oriented businesses in Kansas City from the proposed regulations.
Justus said the legislation would force some adult-oriented businesses to close, and Bartle acknowledged that
was likely. The adult entertainment industry employs about 3,000 people in Missouri and generates $4.5 million
in sales tax revenues, Justus said.
With the economy ailing, "this is not the time to be cutting jobs, this is not the time to be getting rid of a significant
amount of sales tax revenue," Justus said.
Kansas City already has a good 27-page ordinance for such businesses, she said.
Bartle countered that if Kansas City were exempt from the legislation, "the practical effect is going to be to make
Kansas City a porn capital of America."
The bill's restrictions on the location of sexually oriented businesses would apply only to those opening after its
Aug. 28 effective date. But existing businesses may have to remodel. They would have 180 days to comply with
provisions requiring semi-nude dancers to remain on a stage at least 18 inches high that is at least 6 feet from
customers in a room with at least 600 square feet.
Businesses or individuals that don't comply with the legislation could face misdemeanor charges punishable by a
fine of up to $500 and 90 days in jail for each day a violation exists.


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After Bartle's previous bill passed the Senate on March 29, 2005, Jetton assigned it on April 4 to a House
committee led by Rep. Bob Johnson, R-Lee's Summit, who opposed the bill. In between those dates, a political
committee for the adult entertainment industry gave $35,000 to the Committee for Honest Campaigns, which
usually helped finance Republican campaigns.
Bartle's legislation eventually cleared Johnson's committee in 2005 but never made it to the House floor. Instead,
senators amended similar restrictions on adult-oriented businesses to a drunken driving bill sponsored by Jetton.
That bill passed and was signed into law. But a court struck down the provisions on sexually oriented businesses
because they violated a state constitutional ban on legislators changing a bill's original purpose.




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Strip club bill advances in Missouri
By JASON NOBLE and STEVE KRASKE
The Kansas City Star
JEFFERSON CITY | Legislation placing far-reaching restrictions on adult-entertainment businesses in Missouri
won preliminary approval in the state Senate on Thursday and may continue on a legislative fast track thanks to
a federal investigation.
Sen. Matt Bartle presented the bill on the Senate floor just two days after he appeared before a federal grand
jury in Kansas City to answer questions about the defeat of a nearly identical bill in 2005.
To become law, legislation approved Thursday must be voted on once more in the Senate, passed through the
House and ultimately signed by the governor. But if successful, it would represent a sea change for adult-
oriented businesses. Among the provisions:
•Nudity would be banned in strip clubs.
•Semi-nude dancers would have to stay at least six feet away from and not touch patrons.
•Adult businesses would have to close between midnight and 6 a.m. and could not sell alcohol.
•Adult businesses could not be opened within 1,000 feet of a school, church, day-care facility, library, park,
residence or another adult business.
If upheld in court, the law probably would shut down strip clubs and adult bookstores, said attorney Dick Bryant,
who represents about a dozen adult entertainment businesses in the Kansas City area.
―But I have every confidence that the courts will find the same problems that existed last time around,‖ he said.
―Once again, the First Amendment will protect what it’s designed to protect.‖
Bryant said that if passed into law, the legislation could wind up costing the state millions in lost tax revenue and
in compensation payments for forcing the businesses to close.
―I guess if taxpayers truly want to spend $1 million a pop for getting rid of stores, more power to them,‖ he said.
The proximity of Bartle’s grand jury testimony to the Senate debate was a coincidence, the Lee’s Summit
Republican insisted, although he acknowledged that it might be a beneficial one for his bill.
―I’m not going to deny that the environment right now is opportune for placing this legislation before the
legislature,‖ he said. ―But it was not coordinated.‖
Bartle initially filed the bill in December and it was passed out of committee early last week, before his
appearance Tuesday before the grand jury was publicized.
Coincidental or not, Capitol observers said that the ongoing investigation will make passage more likely of what
is already a politically perilous bill to oppose during an election year.
―Because of the grand jury investigation, I hope Senator Bartle’s bill will have a much easier time this session,‖
said House Speaker Pro Tem Bryan Pratt, a Blue Springs Republican. ―And it’s my sense that it will.‖
The lone dissenter in the Senate was Kansas City Democrat Jolie Justus, who first attempted to exempt Kansas
City from the legislation’s restrictions, then voiced the only audible vote against it.
Justus cited Kansas City’s local ordinances regulating adult businesses and invoked the right of cities and
counties to manage their own affairs as reasons for the exemption.
―(Cities) have shown it is possible to self-regulate on these issues,‖ she said.


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Justus also echoed Bryant’s concern that the new regulations could force strip clubs and other adult businesses
to close, which would have economic ramifications for the city and statewide.
Adult businesses in Missouri employ 3,000 people, she pointed out, and many of those could be forced out of
their jobs by Bartle’s bill.
―This is not the time to cut jobs,‖ Justus argued.
But she was challenged by Sen. Charlie Shields, a St. Joseph Republican whose district includes part of Kansas
City’s Northland, and by Bartle, who wondered if exempting Kansas City from the law would attract such
businesses to the city.
―This will make Kansas City the porn capital of Missouri,‖ Bartle said.
Justus’ amendment was defeated.
Seeking to allay constitutional fears that typically arise in debates over regulating adult businesses, Bartle
stressed that all the measures had been passed— and upheld — elsewhere.
―I know that the members of this body are not interested in passing another bill that doesn’t have a reasonable
chance of withstanding the scrutiny of the courts,‖ he said. ―I think this will withstand constitutional scrutiny.‖
As for what happened with his 2005 bill, Bartle said federal authorities are interested in how the legislation died
in the House after being sent to an unfriendly committee.
Four days before the bill was assigned to that committee, strip club owners gave $35,000 to a fundraising group
with ties to a top adviser to former House speaker Rod Jetton.
Bartle said he thought that donation was directly related to the undermining of his legislation.
Jetton has denied any wrongdoing in connection with the handling of the bill.
The grand jury, which has not issued any indictments, is expected to reconvene on March 9.




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Missouri lawmaker wants dancing
option for P.E. requirement
COLUMBIA MISSOURIAN By Trevor Eischen
February 5, 2010 | 12:01 a.m. CST
JEFFERSON CITY — A lawmaker has waltzed into the House with new legislation giving students the option to
get class credit for ballroom dancing.
Rep. Tim Flook, R-Liberty, has written a bill allowing students in public schools to take a ballroom dance class
instead of a physical education or fine arts class.
"Maybe you're not good at volleyball, or running, or playing soccer, but you could take a ballroom dance course
for P.E. class credit," Flook said.
Citing popular dance shows such as "So You Think You Can Dance," Flook said he believes if the option is
given, schools would likely offer the class for student demand.
Flook said dancing is more than moving to rhythm or stepping with the right foot.
"This to me is a lot more than a gym activity," he said. "Some of us believe that it really is a good way to develop
the culture of respect."
As a boy, Flook said he remembers learning traditional Mexican dances such as the cumbia, merengue and
salsa. He said he also remembers the stress he had searching for a dance partner.
"Every event in my family involved live music and dancing," Flook said. "I had to learn how to pluck up the
courage to learn a dance step and dance with a young lady."
Too many negative outlets exist to promote a "turmoil between the sexes," he said, adding that ballroom dancing
will provide a positive and productive outlet for both sexes to interact.
While Flook attended school at William Jewell College, he met political science professor Will Adams, an avid
ballroom dancer and instructor, and enrolled in his ballroom dance class. Adams has taught ballroom dance
since 1974 and is the president of Culture Through Ballroom Dance, a nonprofit organization offering
dance instruction to dancers of all ages.
Adams said he approached Flook after noticing ballroom dancing wasn't mentioned in talks about improving
Missouri's childhood obesity rate. In 2006, Adams and his friend Paula Marie Daub started teaching dance
classes during and after school in Kansas City area school districts. The program is a pilot project of what
students could take if Flook's bill passes.
Adams said the emphasis on ballroom dance goes beyond physical health. The course teaches students cultural
information about each dance. Adams said the most important lessons students learn is courtesy, self-esteem
and how to work with the opposite gender.
"The least important thing we teach them is the dance," Adams said.
Flook said he got some of his ideas from Jeremiah J. Morgan, a stake president with The Church of Jesus Christ
of Latter-day Saints in Missouri.
Morgan said the Mormon culture values the benefits dancing can bring to young men and women. He said the
Mormon church regularly holds dances to help socialize students, which is especially important during the
awkward teenage years.
"The young men and young women can learn to interact," Morgan said. "They get to spend time together and get
used to each other."

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Mo. farm tax plowed under by
lawmakers
THE DAILY STAR-JOURNAL
Jefferson City - The House and Senate approved resolutions rejecting the State Tax Commission's call to
increase taxes on farmland by an average of 11.5 percent statewide.
The House voted 140-15 and the Senate followed 30-3.
Sen. Majority Floor Leader Kevin Engler, R-Farmington, said the Senate will work to combine the bills before the
legal deadline. Approval is required 60 legislative days from the commission's action Dec. 15.
"We will work with the House to make sure both chambers have voted on the same resolution rejecting this tax
increase," Engler said. "We will beat this deadline to protect taxpayers."
The tax hike on the most productive land, grades 1-4, is about 29 percent, or about 90 cents per acre. In grades
5-7, which include pasture, productivity values would drop about 24 percent, or about 20 cents per acre.
Missouri Farm Bureau President Charles Kruse praising the House action.
"We are pleased members of the Missouri House took quick action to reject the recommendations of the State
Tax Commission," Kruse said in a statement. "Missouri farmers are carrying some of the highest debt load in the
nation, and clearly they cannot be expected to shoulder a tax increase."
He also commended the Senate.
"We appreciate Senator Bill Stouffer's and Rep. Brian Munzlinger's leadership in sponsoring and expediting
these concurrent resolutions through their respective legislative bodies," Kruse said.
Stouffer, R-Napton, said the commission's increase in farmland productivity values means a tax increase on
farmers and ranchers statewide.
In a Senate press release, Stouffer said, "What we have is an industry with extremely volatile markets combined
with record production expenses, weak demand and landowners struggling to manage debt and cash flow.
"Now is a bad time to raise taxes on any Missourian, including the state's landowners."
Sen. Jason Crowell, R-Cape Girardeau, said the state should avoid creating roadblocks for family farmers.
"We need to be finding ways to lower taxes for our farmers, not force them to shoulder a higher tax burden,"
Crowell said. "If our family farms see increases in their expenses, it will only contribute to an already wounded
economy in our state. Farmers are the backbone of Missouri's economy, and it is the state's job to provide every
avenue possible for farmers to succeed."




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County commissioners want fewer
unfunded mandates
KRCG-TV By Kermit Miller
Thursday, February 04, 2010 at 6:34 p.m.
County commissioners from across Missouri rallied at the capitol Thursday, asking lawmakers to reign in
unfunded mandates on local government.
Commissioners said the money they spend to incarcerate state prisoners and pay the office costs of public
defenders, along with reductions in the state's compensation for services such as property reassessment, tear at
the fabric of cooperation between state and county officials.
―We need to remind the legislature and the governor that the fabric has grown thin...'cause the fibers can't stand
additional strain,‖ Carter County Presiding Commissioner Gene Oakley said.
Gov. Nixon addressed the group briefly, but did not saying anything about unfunded mandates from the state.




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Agreement aims to save Katy bridge
COLUMBIA DAILY TRIBUNE By Terry Ganey
Published February 4, 2010 at 2:40 p.m.
Updated February 4, 2010 at 5:14 p.m.

BOONVILLE — A historic Missouri River bridge that is a potential link in the 225-mile Katy Trail State Park will
be preserved for future use under an agreement with Union Pacific Railroad, Gov. Jay Nixon announced
Thursday.
The railroad will turn over the bridge to the city of Boonville to develop as a tourist attraction. At the same time,
the state will apply $23 million in federal stimulus funds to the construction of a new railroad bridge over the
Osage River, which Union Pacific can use to haul freight and Amtrak can use to carry passengers. Union Pacific
had originally planned to dismantle the Boonville bridge, which was no longer in service, and use some of the
steel pieces to construct the second bridge over the Osage.
―This is a win all the way around,‖ Nixon said in a news conference announcing the agreement. Benjamin Jones,
a spokesman for the railroad, said Union Pacific would contribute $5.6 million to the construction of the new
bridge, which would eliminate a transportation bottleneck and enable two sets of tracks to carry trains in both
directions across the state. The Missouri Department of Transportation would own the new bridge, which Jones
said must be constructed within two years under the law covering the use of stimulus funds.
Nixon was joined for the announcement by members of the Save the Katy Bridge Coalition, who believe the
structure will provide a unique way to hike and bike across the Missouri River. They also point to the engineering
significance of the bridge’s 408-foot-long center lift span, which was the longest of its kind in the country when
the bridge opened in 1932.
Boonville Mayor Dave Nicholas said the city had designated $500,000 toward getting the bridge back in shape,
especially reconnecting it to the riverbanks on each side. He said international donors were ready to help fund
the project.
―We do know there is money that’s been committed,‖ Nicholas said. ―Now that we’ve got the bridge, we can
begin seeking those donations.‖ Nicholas could not estimate what it would cost to put the bridge back in use.
―It will take a few million,‖ he said.
Paula Shannon, chairwoman of the steering committee of Save the Bridge Inc., had said an engineering firm
estimated that $2 million would finance a ramp walkway through the bridge with the center span remaining in the
upright position.
The bridge has been the subject of lawsuits and a bone of contention in a political campaign. The Coast Guard
had been calling for its removal since the 1990s, claiming it was a hazard to river navigation. When he was state
attorney general, Nixon sued, claiming unsuccessfully that the state Department of Natural Resources had a
claim to using the bridge to carry the trail across the river.
When Nixon, a Democrat, ran for governor, his spokesman said Nixon would do all he could as governor to
preserve the old bridge for future use. A spokesman for Republican governor candidate Kenny Hulshof said
lawsuits to preserve the bridge were a waste of taxpayers’ dollars and that it was Hulshof’s position that no
public money should be spent on the bridge issue.
In the end it was federal recovery act money that will help preserve the bridge. The $23 million for the new
Osage River bridge will come from $31 million that Missouri will receive to make improvements along the rail
corridor between Kansas City and St. Louis.

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Wrongfully imprisoned
Men cleared of crimes speak out.
By Brennan David
Thursday, February 4, 2010

Josh Kezer speaks to audiences across the county warning of the reality of wrongful convictions. He doesn’t do
it for himself or the publicity; he passionately tells his tale for all the men and women he believes deserve a new
day in court.
In front of a standing-room-only classroom last night on the University of Missouri campus, Kezer and two other
exonerated inmates told their stories in an effort to raise money for the Midwestern Innocence Project. Through
fundraising, the organization provides legal counsel for prison inmates in cases that have a high probability of
being overturned.
Sean O’Brien, an associate professor at the University of Missouri-Kansas City School of Law and Midwestern
Innocence Project board member, is one of many masterminds who head exoneration cases or work to find an
attorney to handle a case. With a staff of two attorneys, a fundraiser, legal secretary and several volunteers in
Kansas City, he works to conduct the groundwork needed to jump-start a potential exoneration case.
―We want people to be able to put a face on the issue,‖ O’Brien said. ―People understand there are innocent
people in prison, but this makes it real to them.‖
O’Brien and project attorneys rely on volunteers to sort through the 700 cases the project has on file. Only two or
three cases will be selected this year, he said, sometimes making a successful exoneration into a five-year
process.
DNA evidence and testing technologies have contributed to clearing numerous inmates nationwide, including 20
Missouri cases since 1980. Typical components of an exoneration case include eyewitness misidentification,
junk science, false confessions, lousy lawyering and snitch testimony, O’Brien said. Each of the three
exonerated speakers’ cases was a mixed bag of such components, including snitch testimony.
Kezer was 17 when he was arrested for shooting a Southeastern Missouri State University student three times.
He was prosecuted in Scott County and served 16 years in state prison. He was exonerated last February after a
rebuke of prosecutor-turned-Congressman Kenny Hulshof.
In a 44-page decision, a Cole County circuit judge said Hulshof withheld key evidence from defense attorneys
and embellished details in his closing arguments. Conflicting testimony and three jail inmates who had claimed
Kezer confessed to the killing later acknowledged they lied in hopes of getting reduced sentences.
―They didn’t care about the truth. I should have never been arrested,‖ Kezer said. ―That’s not me saying that.
That’s out of the judge’s mouth.‖
Also sharing his story was former high school science teacher Dennis Fritz. Ron Williamson and Fritz were
convicted in the sexual assault and murder of a 21-year-old woman who was found strangled in December 1982
in Ada, Okla. In 1988, both men were convicted, partially because of microscopic hair comparisons done as part
of a scientific testing method that has since been largely discredited.
Fritz and Williamson, who served 11 years in prison, also were convicted based on testimony by witness Glen
Gore, an informant later shown by DNA testing to have been the real killer. Gore was later convicted of rape and
murder.



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―I was convicted by snitch testimony,‖ Fritz said. ―These were the dirtiest of the dirty and the lousiest of the lousy.
They needed to find me guilty.‖
Fritz’s tale became the subject of a John Grisham book, ―The Innocent Man.‖
St. Louis resident Darryl Burton served the longest time in prison of the three speakers. For 24 years, he worked
to clear his name of a murder he did not commit. He said he found faith and his grown-up daughter in the
process.
Burton was convicted in 1985 of a gas station murder on the basis of testimony by two people claiming to be
witnesses. No physical evidence or motive was offered at the trial, but the two witnesses made deals with the
prosecutor in exchange for their testimony because they faced unrelated felony charges.
―I thought it would take 24 hours for them to realize they made a mistake and let me go,‖ Burton said. ―It took 24
years.‖




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Missourinet
Senate advances revived sex shop regs
by Bob Priddy on February 4, 2010
Senator Matt Bartle talked about the issue to a federal grand jury in Kansas City Tuesday. Today he won
preliminary approval of his bill regulating the adult entertainment industry. The bill has most of the provisions of
the 2005 bill that cleared the Senate but was killed by a hostile House committee.
The grand jury is believed to be investigating any connection between a donation from the adult entertainment
industry to a committee run by a close associate of then-House Speaker Rod Jetton, who assigned the bill to the
killing committee. Bartle calls the donation ―troubling.‖
He predicts the industry will file court challenges to his proposal if it becomes law. But he says the provisions of
his bill all have endured court tests at various levels.
The Senate is expected to send his bill to the House next week. Bartle expects a warmer reception there this
time.


House advances bill to strip TANF benefits from drug users
by Brent Martin on February 4, 2010
A bill that would kick Missourians off a welfare program if they test positive for drugs has advanced in the House.
Do drugs; lose Temporary Assistance for Needy Families (TANF) money under HCS HB 1377 that advances in
the House on a 113-to-40 vote. The bill would strip TANF money from anyone who tests positive for drug use.
Rep. Jeff Roorda (D-Barnhart) suggests to Rep. Scott Dieckhaus (R-Washington) that his amendment to the bill
could inadvertently hurt poor children.
―You’re meddling with this bill and you don’t know how hungry kids who are getting a few cents a day to eat are
going to get a third party intervention so that they still get those few cents a day,‖ Roorda asks Dieckhaus during
House floor debate.
―My concern, my amendment does not deal with a third party whatsoever,‖ Dieckhaus responds. Dieckhaus
succeeds in pushing through his amendment that strips a provision from the bill that would have referred those
testing positive for drug use to a drug treatment program. He attempts to assure Roorda that the Department of
Social Services would intervene and make sure that the children of TANF recipients who lose benefits would still
receive assistance.
Roorda insists during his House floor debate with Dieckhaus that the action would end up hurting the children of
TANF recipients the most.
―Do you want to incentivize drug use? I certainly don’t,‖ Dieckhaus replies to Roorda. ―I pay taxes. I don’t want to
incentivize drug use.‖
―You work off the assumption, gentleman, that this money is going for drugs,‖ Roorda counters. ―I work off the
assumption that it’s going for the bologna sandwiches that keep these kids fed.‖
A provision added to the bill during House floor debate would subject state lawmakers to drug tests.
One more positive vote sends the bill to the Senate.


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Bartle doubts donations will help this time
by Bob Priddy on February 4, 2010
It’s been five years since Senator Matt Bartle’s effort to regulate adult businesses died in the House under
circumstances that apparently interest a federal grand jury. Bartle’s new effort looks a lot like the old one.
Five years ago, Bartle went through his bill during debate section by section, emphasizing that each ingredient
had been upheld by one court or another. He’s done it again with this proposal, which lacks the licensing and
fees that were in the 2005 bill.
Five years ago, the bill was killed by a hostile committee in the House, sent there by Speaker Rod Jetton after
the adult entertainment industry had made a contribution a political committee run by a close Jetton adviser.
Bartle told a grand jury about those circumstances last two days before his bill advanced in the Senate. He says
circumstances have removed one opposition factor from 2005. ―It’s highly unlikely….that anybody in the
legislature’s going to take campaign contributions from a porn shop,‖ he says.
Bartle says the arrival of campaign contributions just before or just after bills are being considered does not look
good. One of the campaign ethics reform proposals this year bans campaign donations to lawmakers during
legislative sessions.


National Guard deploys to Haiti with supplies, help to rebuild
by Jessica Machetta on February 4, 2010
Missouri National Guard airmen are preparing to fly relief supplies to Haiti. Another crew heads to Arizona before
aiding in reconstruction efforts.
State Adjutant General Steve Danner says eleven National Guard airmen have flown a C-130 to Pope Air Force
Base in North Carolina. They deployed from Rosecrans guard base in St. Joseph.
Danner says the C-130 can carry up to 42,000 pounds of supplies. A separate guard crew will deploy from
Arizona. The civil engineer airmen will join a bigger crew there. In Haiti, they’ll plan and direct operations in
clean-up, demolition of buildings, reconstruction.
A separate air crew from Missouri will deploy to Haiti from Arizona. That crew will aid in civil engineering efforts,
working to clean up and rebuild the crumbled island nation.
Governor Nixon praised the guard for its readiness to provide service when needed. He’s also urging
Missourians to donate to the relief effort, saying a list of trustworthy organizations are posted on the State of
Missouri Web site.
―These Airmen are helping meet the significant challenges of getting badly needed supplies to this devastated
country, and we are very proud of them,‖ said Gov. Nixon, who visited with Airmen at Rosecrans last Friday.
―The Missouri National Guard has a long record of humanitarian missions to help people in great need after
disasters. This mission adds to that tradition.‖
―Once again, the Missouri National Guard is ready to provide assistance when needed,‖ said Danner, adjutant
general for the Missouri National Guard. ―Your Missouri National Guard Citizen-Airmen and Soldiers are well
trained and equipped for this mission.‖
For more on how and where to help in the relief efforts, visit www.mo.gov
For more on the C-130, visit http://www.af.mil/information/factsheets/factsheet_print.asp?fsID=92&page=1
Follow the guard on www.facebook.com/Missouri.National.Guard
www.twitter.com/Missouri_NG
www.youtube.com/MoNationalGuard
www.myspace.com/missouri_ng

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EDITORIALS … & Letters to the Editor
Welfare and drugs
Friday, February 5, 2010
seMissourian.com
Many taxpaying Missourians will applaud current legislative efforts to restrict or cut off welfare payments to
recipients who use illegal drugs. Why, they ask, should taxpayers foot the bill for addictions?
The simple answer: They shouldn't.
But the issue is more complex than requiring drug tests for the more than 40,000 Missouri families who receive
payments from the Temporary Assistance for Needy Families program.
For example, what about the children or other dependents of a welfare-recipient head of the household who
tests positive for illegal drug use? Should everyone be cut off?
Should those who test positive for drugs be cut off permanently, or just for a limited amount of time?
Who would monitor the testing and enforce whatever regulations the Missouri Legislature might impose? And
are legislators who favor drug testing for welfare recipients willing to fund the cost of enforcement when cuts are
being made throughout state government?
These questions need not put a halt to the effort to regulate welfare recipients and drug use, but they will need to
be addressed before any meaningful piece of legislation is passed and sent to the governor for a signature.
This proposal needs careful deliberation.




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Too soon to require prescriptions to
fight meth producers
Prescriptions for cold meds to fight meth too extreme -- for now.

On Tuesday, we published a front-page story about a Jefferson City plan to curb methamphetamine abuse. It
told how some Missouri lawmakers want to further regulate over-the-counter cold medicines.
Part of the story's headline read: "Lawmakers propose requiring prescription for meth ingredient."
Two days later, we ran another front-page story about methamphetamine. Its headline? "Missouri still at top in
meth incidents."
That Associated Press account explained how in 2009 Missouri -- once again -- had the dubious honor of being
the state with the most meth labs in the U.S.
Upon initial consideration, you might conclude that the lawmakers mentioned in the first story should prove their
point with the statistics in the second story.
Unfortunately, it's not that simple.
Consider this paragraph from the story about the meth labs:
"Even as communities and states keep coming up with ways to make it harder to manufacture
methamphetamine, makers of the dangerous and addictive drug keep finding ways around them."
The story goes on to explain how meth cooks import ingredients from out of state and find ways around a law
limiting purchases of cold medicines to specific amounts and continue to develop innovative, small-scale drug-
making methods.
A comment in the story by Sgt. Jason Clark, who heads the division of drug and crime control for the Missouri
State Highway Patrol, is worth stressing here: "People need to realize the dope is more important to them than
anything and they'll do whatever they have to do get it."
Realizing that, how can lawmakers be sure that requiring prescriptions will have significant impact on this
widespread problem? Are they sure enough to burden every law-abiding citizen with a legitimate need for these
products?
Is this fair to the many Missourians who already have trouble finding a doctor, or paying for a visit, due to the
high costs of health insurance plans?
As we stated in this space last year when the same prescription idea surfaced, we think other measures should
be tried first. One is electronic tracking, which was OK'd in 2008 but never funded.
Now, however, the Legislature has an offer on the table from drugmakers to pay for the implementation of the
monitoring if the state allows their products to remain available over the counter.
It's an offer we shouldn't refuse.
Start with the tracking, as other states have done. Figure out if it helps. Continue to fund police task forces to
root out high-volume meth cooks.
Try everything and anything that's reasonable before you penalize thousands of allergy sufferers.
Keep in mind that good public policy does not outrageously inconvenience everyday citizens because of the acts
of criminals.
Our Voice
This editorial is the view of the News-Leader Editorial Board.


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Health care proposal the end of states'
rights
THE MANEATER By Clay Carter
Published Feb. 5, 2010

With the election of Scott Brown, R-Mass., to the U.S. Senate, it is clear the American people oppose President
Barack Obama's attempt at health care reform. Despite this election, Obama is still encouraging Congress to
pass his health care bill.
This is just one example of how states' rights have been diminishing over the years. This is exactly opposite
what our founding fathers wanted. In the Tenth Amendment, rights not explicitly given to the federal government
are left to individual states.
With Obama's health care plan, I can't help but ask where these rights are represented. The federal government
is trying to force every American citizen to buy health care. This is evident in an ABC interview with Obama from
November, where he said penalties for not having health insurance were "appropriate."
Washington claims it can force people to buy health care under their right to regulate commerce, but not all
Americans want health care. Some don't feel it's important; others take good enough care of themselves so they
don't need it.
So now people who choose not to buy health care coverage will be forced to comply by the federal government
or risk a penalty. This is wrong. The government should not have the right to dictate mandatory health coverage.
If we allow the federal government to force us to buy health care, it will continue to abuse this power until it
dictates our lives.
First, the government forces us to buy health care. Then it's life insurance. Finally, it starts telling us what types
of clothes to buy. Once we give the federal government the power to intrude in our lives, when will it stop?
After allowing big brother in, he becomes nearly impossible to remove. By permanently forcing health care on us,
we will be stuck with this coverage, no matter how terrible it is.
Thankfully, we do have elected officials who are standing up for our rights. State Sen. Jim Lembke, R-St. Louis,
who has been called the "Sovereignty King," has introduced a resolution re-declaring Missouri's 10th
Amendment rights.
The symbolic legislation from the St. Louis Republican is expected to face tough opposition from Democrats who
want the federal government, especially Obama, to run their lives. But the federal government is violating the
10th Amendment, and they need to be reminded they can't intrude on states' rights.
If socialized medicine is what the far left wants, it would be better if each state chose the system it prefers. This
way, people still have the freedom of choice. If they want to participate in government-run health care, then they
can move to a state that has socialized medicine.
If citizens want the opportunity to choose the type and quality of health care, they can move to a state without
this system. By giving states back their rights, we will have more choices and a more diverse America, which is
what our forefathers intended.
Freedom is the right to make your own choices in life, as long as those choices do not hurt others. If the
government forces us to buy health care, it takes away our choice and limits freedom.
America is the home of the free, but we cannot achieve that freedom by taking away rights.
Clay Carter is a sophomore finance major and an intern for state Sen. Jim Lembke, R-St. Louis. He can be
reached at ccp6c@mail.missouri.edu

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GUEST COMMENTARY: Don't ban animal
antibiotics, keep food safe
COLUMBIA MISSOURIAN By Blaine Luetkemeyer
February 3, 2010 | 12:16 p.m. CST
A recent guest column, ―Bill banning certain uses of antibiotics in animals is necessary,‖ Jan. 15, written by my
colleague, Rep. Louise Slaughter, D-N.Y., was more than a little off base.
Contrary to her claim that antibiotics are overused in livestock production, I know that the hog, poultry and cattle
farmers in my district, and around the country, use antibiotics responsibly and judiciously to keep their animals
healthy, and healthy animals mean safe meat products. Farmers also use antibiotics only after their veterinarians
run diagnostics to determine the presence of bugs that can cause diseases.
Rep. Slaughter says her Preservation of Antibiotics for Medical Treatment Act would simply prohibit
―nontherapeutic‖ uses of antibiotics. In fact, her bill would ban antibiotics used to prevent or control animal
diseases.
Does anyone really believe it would be a good idea to stop veterinarians from administering drugs that would
keep animals from getting sick or from giving them antibiotics once they do get sick to stop a disease from
spreading? That would be like prohibiting doctors from giving children antibiotics to prevent them from getting the
strep throat one of their classmates contracted.
The American Veterinary Medical Association, a respected group of veterinarians and animal and public health
professionals including many of Missouri’s roughly 325 food animal veterinarians, is opposed to this legislation
because they clearly recognize that it will increase animal disease and death with no assurance of improvements
to human health.
We know based on the experiences of pork producers in Denmark that if antibiotics used to prevent diseases are
banned, there will be an increase in illnesses, and even deaths, in animals. With more illnesses, producers will
need to use greater amounts of antibiotics to treat the resulting diseases.
Controls on animal antibiotics are already strong. In fact, they are tougher than the controls on human
antibiotics. The U.S. Food and Drug Administration requires animal antibiotics manufacturers to show that their
products will not harm human health or the environment, and a withdrawal period, time between an animal’s last
dose and its slaughter, is required for every animal drug.
The appropriate use of antibiotics ensures that the cost of food for American consumers does not increase.
Americans enjoy a safe, abundant, and cheap source of food through farmers’ efforts to keep livestock
production free of disease.
According to a 2003 study by the American Agricultural Economics Association, an antibiotics ban similar to the
one put in place in Denmark would cost more than $700 million over ten years for the U.S. pork industry alone.
There is no doubt that these costs will be passed on to consumers.
More recently, a study(PDF) by Iowa State University shows that eliminating growth promotion and feed
efficiency antibiotics would cost pork producers an additional $6 per head and would result in a roughly $1.1
billion loss to the industry over ten years.
As for the matter of antibiotics and trade, this issue has been used by some U.S. trading partners to restrict our
exports. There’s no science behind their claims that animal antibiotics are causing problems because none


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exists. The United States has the safest food supply in the world thanks, in part, to the responsible and judicious
use of antibiotics to keep animals healthy. It would be extremely unwise to restrict or eliminate their use because
of some unfounded assertion that they are contributing to antibiotic resistance in humans.
One other point about antibiotic use in livestock production: Would consumers rather eat meat from animals that
were kept healthy during their lifetime through responsible antibiotic use or from animals that were sick because
they were denied preventive antibiotics? Consider, for example, another Iowa State University study(PDF) that
found hogs that were sick during their lifetime had higher incidences of food-borne pathogens.
I do not know the number of livestock producers Rep. Slaughter represents in Buffalo or Rochester or Niagara
Falls, New York. What I do know is that production agriculture is incredibly important to the economic well-being
of my district.
Losing the use of antibiotics to prevent and control diseases will jeopardize the animal health status of
Missouri. The issue of antibiotic resistance in people is of great concern to me, but measures such as the
Preservation of Antibiotics for Medical Treatment Act, which purport to address the issue, are misguided at best
and harmful to animal and public health at worst.
Blaine Luetkemeyer is the representative for Missouri's 9th Congressional District.




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COLUMN: Education commissioner gives
Missouri a crucial warning
COLUMBIA MISSOURIAN By George Kennedy
February 4, 2010 | 11:54 a.m. CST
I’ve never been quite sure what the Coordinating Board for Higher Education actually does. It doesn’t seem to
have much real authority, and its coordinating efforts for 35 years certainly haven’t prevented the mushrooming
growth of colleges at nearly every crossroads in the state.
However, this week has made clear one role of Robert Stein, the coordinating board’s commissioner. He’s our
official Cassandra. (In case your recollection of Greek mythology is as shaky as mine, I’ll remind you that
Cassandra was the prophetess of gloom and doom. Unlike the ancient Greeks, we’d do well to take Mr. Stein
seriously.)
The Missourian’s Ben Wieder reported Tuesday on Mr. Stein’s letter of warning to higher education officials. The
letter itself turned up the next day on the Missourian’s Web site. It included this:
―The facts are clear that, absent some unforeseen intervention or unprecedented economic turnaround, the
state’s fiscal situation will mean reduced state appropriations to public higher education beginning in fiscal year
2011, deepening in fiscal year 2012, and likely persisting as a new lowered base for several years beyond.‖
In the two weeks since he wrote, the fiscal picture has gotten even worse. Nobody has said so publicly yet, but
to me it’s looking increasingly unlikely that the legislature will be able to honor the deal struck between Gov.
Nixon and President Forsee for next year – fiscal 2011, in budget-speak. That deal calls for another tuition
freeze in exchange for a cut to the core budget of only 5.2 percent. Bad as it was, that’s looking more and more
like a pleasant fantasy.
Beyond 2011, Mr. Stein pointed out, things get really ugly. For instance, he calculated that if higher education
has to absorb 10 percent of the state budget cuts that seem inevitable for fiscal 2012 (―an optimistic assumption
given past practice‖) that would be another 10 percent on top of the planned 5 percent for next year. All this, as
he didn’t need to say, from a budget that was already too small.
His ―potential cost savings ideas‖ range from the undesirable to the impossible. The latter, as you’d expect,
include those most likely to yield big savings. Close a college? Make some into branches of others? Remove
state funding and thereby privatize some? Eliminate all athletic programs?
Rep. Chris Kelly’s response rings true: ―Every single person that you talk to about Missouri higher education
would say there are too many institutions. Not one single person would tell you their institution ought to lose
anything.‖
Remember the furor when Elson Floyd suggested bringing Northwest Missouri State into the UM system? I
thought then that he might be seeking a national champion football team or hoping to take advantage of
Northwest’s pioneering use of pig manure as fuel for the campus power plant. Now it’s clear that he was just
ahead of his time.
We’ve already adopted one of Mr. Stein’s ideas by requiring employees to begin contributing to the pension
program. And that planned survey of which benefits employees value most might better be worded as asking
which they would most like to keep.



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The unpalatable suggestions that our university might have to swallow include increasing class sizes, increasing
faculty workloads to permit reducing faculty numbers and cutting some academic programs. Mr. Stein didn’t
mention layoffs or furloughs, but it’s hard not to think of them.
Near the end of his letter, Mr. Stein displays a gift for ominous understatement. ―With constant pressure from a
variety of constituents to expand offerings, produce more graduates and accommodate more demands from
business and industry, shrinking out of financial necessity could be a very painful process.‖
Cassandra was fated to be disbelieved. Robert Stein, I’m afraid, is fated to be correct.
George Kennedy is a former managing editor at the Missourian and professor emeritus at the Missouri School of
Journalism.




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USA TODAY MISSOURI NEWS
MONDAY, FEBRUARY 1 -- Jefferson City — A woman is accused of drugging her 1-year-old granddaughter in
hopes that the baby's divorcing parents would get back together if they had a sick child. Terri Chilton, 41, faces
one count of first-degree child endangerment after she allegedly fed the girl blood thinner. The girl began
bleeding uncontrollably from her mouth and nose and from two minor scratches, but survived.

TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 2 -- Mount Vernon — After six months of renovations, the Lawrence County jail
reopened and was expected to re-admit at least 25 prisoners, Sheriff Brad DeLay said. The jail can hold 52
inmates. It was closed last summer after numerous escapes and a brief inmate riot. The cost of renovations and
housing inmates elsewhere was $454,000.

WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 3 -- Hillsboro — An eastern Missouri teenager is facing charges for allegedly
stealing up to 30 guns, including one used by another teen to shoot a deputy last week. The Jefferson County
Sheriff's Department said Dalean Germany, 18, of Barnhart, stole the guns last month from a home in Imperial.

THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 4 -- Kansas City — A civil trial over hog odors opened in Jackson County. In opening
statements, an attorney for 15 northwest Missouri residents said his clients have been harmed by odors from an
80,000-head Premium Standard Farms hog operation. Premium Standard's lawyer said the smells at the Gentry
County complex are simply part of life in a rural, agricultural area.

FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 5 -- Jefferson City — Missouri Parks Association said the state needs $200 million to
make capital improvements to parks that have been delayed as sales taxes decreased. Association President
Susan Flader said waste systems, trails, roads and bridges at many state parks need repairs or renovations.
Missouri has 83 parks and historic sites.




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