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					      Putnam County


  COMPREHENSIVE PLAN
FUTURE LAND USE ELEMENT




         Putnam County
       514 St. Johns Avenue
        Palatka, FL 32177

    Effective September 8, 2006
                                                         TABLE OF CONTENTS

A. INTRODUCTION ...............................................................................................................1
   1. General Setting of Putnam County................................................................................ 1
   2. General History.............................................................................................................. 2

B. EXISTING LAND USE DATA...........................................................................................2
   1. Description of Existing Land Uses .............................................................................. 3
        a. Agriculture ......................................................................................................................................3
        b. Commercial.....................................................................................................................................3
        c. Industrial .........................................................................................................................................3
        d. Institutional and Public Facilities ................................................................................................3
        e. Mining .............................................................................................................................................3
        f. Recreation/Open Space ...............................................................................................................4
        g. Residential Land Use.....................................................................................................................4
        h. Undevelopable Features ...............................................................................................................4
        i.    Vacant Lands..................................................................................................................................4
   2. Designated Historically Significant Properties............................................................. 4
   3. Inventory of Existing Land Uses................................................................................... 5
        a. Methodology ..................................................................................................................................5
        b. Existing Land Use Tabulation .....................................................................................................5
   4. Inventory of Natural Resources..................................................................................... 7
        a. Description .....................................................................................................................................7
        b. Climate ............................................................................................................................................7
        c. Topography ....................................................................................................................................8
        d. Natural Drainage Features............................................................................................................8
        e. Wetlands..........................................................................................................................................8
        f. Floodplains .....................................................................................................................................9
        g. Natural Groundwater Recharge Areas .......................................................................................9
        h. Soils................................................................................................................................................10
        i.    Commercially Valuable Minerals...............................................................................................10

C. LAND USE ANALYSIS ....................................................................................................12
   1. Population Projections................................................................................................. 12
   2. Analysis of Natural Conditions Affecting Development............................................. 13


                                                                             A-i
     a. Wetlands........................................................................................................................................13
     b. Floodplains ...................................................................................................................................13
     c. Natural Groundwater Recharge ................................................................................................15
     d. Areas of Critical State Concern (moved here from previous section 9)..............................15
3. Employment Availability ............................................................................................ 16
     a. Economy.......................................................................................................................................16
     b. Labor Force ..................................................................................................................................16
4. Analysis of Public Facilities Affecting Development .................................................. 16
     a. Traffic Circulation .......................................................................................................................16
     b. Sanitary Sewer ..............................................................................................................................17
     c. Solid Waste ...................................................................................................................................18
     d. Drainage ........................................................................................................................................18
     e. Potable Water...............................................................................................................................19
     f. Waterwells and Cones of Influence ..........................................................................................20
5. Vacant Land Analysis .................................................................................................. 20
6. Land Adjacent to County Boundaries ......................................................................... 21
     a. Boundaries with Other Counties...............................................................................................21
     b. Boundaries with Putnam Municipalities...................................................................................21
7. Determination of Land Uses ....................................................................................... 22
     a. Future Agricultural Land ............................................................................................................22
     b. Future Commercial......................................................................................................................22
     c. Future Conservation Land .........................................................................................................23
     d. Future Industrial Land................................................................................................................23
     e. Future Mining Category..............................................................................................................23
     f. Future Public Buildings, Grounds, and Public Facilities .......................................................23
     g. Future Rural Center.....................................................................................................................24
     h. Future Rural Residential .............................................................................................................24
     i.    Future Urban Reserve.................................................................................................................24
     j.    Future Urban Service ..................................................................................................................25
8. Determination of Land Requirements for Residential Land Use............................... 25
     a. Residential Land Use...................................................................................................................25
     b. Determination of Land Requirements for Residential Land Use.........................................26
     c. Land Availability ..........................................................................................................................27



                                                                        A-ii
                                                                LIST OF TABLES

Table A- 1: Existing Land Use Table (2005) - Unincorporated................................................................... 28
Table A- 2: Commercial Minerals...................................................................................................................... 29
Table A- 3: Population Projections ................................................................................................................... 30
Table A- 4: Future Land Use Table - Unincorporated ................................................................................... 31
Table A- 5: Residential Land Holding Capacity .............................................................................................. 32



                                                               LIST OF FIGURES



Map A- 1: General Location.............................................................................................................................. 33
Map A- 2: Existing Land Use Map................................................................................................................... 34
Map A- 3: Future Land Use...............................................................................................................................35
Map A- 4: Historic Structures Map .................................................................................................................. 36
Map A- 5: Wellfields Map ................................................................................................................................... 37
Map A- 6: Drainage Basins Map........................................................................................................................ 38
Map A- 7: Wetland Cover Map.......................................................................................................................... 39
Map A- 8: Floodplains Map................................................................................................................................ 40
Map A- 9: Floridan Aquifer Recharge Areas Map .......................................................................................... 41
Map A- 10: Soil Classifications Map.................................................................................................................. 42
Map A- 11: Commercially Valuable Minerals Map ......................................................................................... 43
Map A- 12: Publicly Owned Opened Spaces Map.......................................................................................... 44




                                                                            A-iii
PUTNAM COUNTY                                                     FUTURE LAND USE ELEMENT

                                FUTURE LAND USE ELEMENT

A.     INTRODUCTION
The Future Land Use Element and its accompanying Future Land Use Map (FLUM) are the key
components of the Comprehensive Plan. They provide the County with direction for the use of
land during the 10-year planning period based upon housing needs, the infrastructure required to
support, these needs and the identified sources of funding that will finance infrastructure costs.
The Future Land Use Element contains an inventory of current land uses and a projection of land
uses that will be required to support County growth over the next ten years. This element draws
data from each of the other Comprehensive Plan elements to identify where and how growth in
the County should proceed.
The Existing Land Use Map included as part of this element, describes the location and
distribution of current land uses in Putnam County. The Future Land Use Map is the focus of the
Comprehensive Plan. It indicates the proposed location, densities, intensities, and distribution of
land uses to the year 2015. All goals, objectives and policies contained within this plan must be
consistent with the Future Land Use Map. All land development regulations in effect subsequent
to the adoption of this plan must also be revised to be consistent with the Future Land Use Map
and the goals and objectives of this Element.
The minimum criteria for the contents of this required Plan Element are established in Chapter
9J-5, Florida Administrative Code. This Plan Element was formulated to be consistent with those
criteria as well as relevant sections of Chapter 163, Part II, F.S., the State Comprehensive Plan,
and the Northeast Florida Strategic Regional Policy Plan
The County adopted its Comprehensive Plan in 1991, and subsequently adopted a Remedial Plan
in 1993. In conformance with adopted legislation, an Evaluation and Appraisal Report (EAR)
was conducted in 1999. The County in 2000 and 2002 revised portions of the Comprehensive
Plan in accordance with the formally approved EAR. The 2005 amendment to the
Comprehensive Plan is intended to update the Comprehensive Plan with all the EAR comments.
       1.      General Setting of Putnam County
       Putnam County contains an area of 533,702 acres including the incorporated
       municipalities of Crescent City, Interlachen, Palatka, Pomona Park and Welaka. The
       County lies within the north central portion of the Florida peninsula and is characterized
       by many lakes, other water bodies and wetlands. The St. Johns River runs through the
       eastern portion of the County with the City of Palatka serving as an effective head of
       navigation. Most of the land is forested with vacation and retirement homes clustered
       around the lakes. One of the heavier areas of such development is in the southeast portion
       of the County on the peninsula formed by the St. Johns River and Crescent Lake and in
       the northwest portion of the County near Melrose and Interlachen. Land elevations range
       from 16.4 feet along the St. Johns River to 180.45 feet in the highlands west of
       Interlachen; however, most of the County has a reasonably gentle topography.




                                               A-1
PUTNAM COUNTY                                                     FUTURE LAND USE ELEMENT

       The unincorporated area of the County, 515,335 acres or 805 square miles, is the subject
       of this study. Unincorporated Putnam County is under the jurisdiction of the Putnam
       County Board of County Commissioners and contains approximately 98 percent of the
       land in the entire County.
       Putnam County’s economy depends on agriculture, silviculture, and manufacturing
       including lumber and wood products, furniture and fixtures and paper and allied products,
       with vacation homes and sport fishing serving as a secondary recreation and tourist
       related industry. The St. Johns River has greatly influenced land development. Primary
       transportation facilities are along the river and north/south routes converge generally in
       the central and eastern sectors of the County. Of the five municipalities in the County,
       four (Palatka, Pomona Park, Welaka and Crescent City) are in the eastern portion, with
       one, Interlachen, in the west/central area.
       Primary residential development is projected to be strongest in the east and northwest
       corners of the County. Both areas are influenced by growth of adjacent counties, are
       receiving improved accessibility, and are historically strong recreational use areas and are
       of special concern as high recharge areas for the Floridan aquifer. Commercial and
       industrial establishments are generally concentrated in the east central area around
       Palatka, though there is local retail commercial and service land uses within the other
       municipalities.
       2.     General History
       Until 1849, Putnam County was part of Alachua, Baker, Clay, Marion, Orange and St.
       Johns counties. In January 1849, the County was split and the City of Palatka was
       designated as the Putnam County seat. The county was named after Major Benjamin
       Putnam, an officer in the Second Seminole War. The St. Johns River is its major natural
       feature and the County has about 100 miles of river frontage and approximately 1,500
       lakes. Steamboats provided most of the intrastate commerce until the advent of the
       railroads. Putnam County has always had an active agricultural and rural history with
       crops and groves in the earlier days up to the current harvesting of timber and other
       natural resource extraction.


B.     EXISTING LAND USE DATA
The Future Land Use Element is based upon an inventory of existing land uses and their
geographic dispersal, natural resources, existing land uses in adjacent jurisdictions, areas of
critical state concern, and population projections. Of the five required data, only the fourth is
inapplicable, i.e., there are no areas of critical state concern designated in Putnam County. The
Bureau of Economic and Business Research (BEBR) mid-range population projections and
seasonal population projections were used for the data and analysis section of this element. The
following existing land uses and land use distributions are provided in this inventory summarized
in Table A-1 and depicted on Map A-2.




                                               A-2
PUTNAM COUNTY                                                 FUTURE LAND USE ELEMENT

    1.   Description of Existing Land Uses Uses
                          a.      Agriculture
         Lands classified as agricultural fall into one of two categories, General Agricul-
         tural land or Silviculture. General Agriculture includes ranching, dairy farming,
         cropland, and other agricultural activities. Silviculture land comprises the
         majority of the rural agriculture lands.
                          b.      Commercial
         This category includes all retail and wholesale sales and service facilities and their
         ancillary facilities such as parking, driveways and landscaped areas.
         Representative land uses included are: shopping centers, commercial strip
         development, wholesale warehouse and open storage yards, professional
         buildings, theaters, over-night tourist and travel lodging, gas and oil storage, and
         cemeteries. The intensity of land use permitted under the commercial category
         varies by type of commercial operation.
                          c.      Industrial
         Industrial land uses are food, mineral, and timber processing facilities, and both
         light and heavy manufacturing-plants. Secondary warehousing structures, open
         storage, parking, drives and landscaping, are also included.
         Like commercial land use, the intensity of industrial land use varies by type of
         industrial activity and is controlled by the County’s Land Development Code.
                          d.      Institutional and Public Facilities
         These land uses are primarily governmental, educational, religious, health and
         military facilities. Other similar semi-public non-profit institutions are also
         included. Auxiliary land uses are counted as part of the facility as long as their
         use is specifically related to its operation.
         Included under this category are major utility and transportation (not roads)
         facilities such as locks, airports, terminals, and auto parking facilities.
         Communication utilities are mainly microwave and similar transmitting towers,
         telephone exchanges, and antenna farms. Other utilities are public service
         facilities such as: power generating stations and transmission lines, water supply
         plants and towers, sewage treatment plants and pumping stations, and solid waste
         landfills, transfer stations and incinerators.
                          e.      Mining
         The Mining land use covers both surface and subsurface mining. Minerals and
         building materials mined include sand, clay, gravel and peat. Mined out areas are
         generally retained in this category until revegetation occurs.




                                           A-3
PUTNAM COUNTY                                                   FUTURE LAND USE ELEMENT

                            f.      Recreation/Open Space
           This category includes open space and active recreation areas. Some facilities
           such as ball fields, basketball courts and tennis courts are located in various
           municipalities. Water recreational use is important to Putnam County and fishing
           is an important tourist sport. Because of this, many boat launching ramps and
           several marinas are also in place. Open Space includes those sites used for passive
           recreation such as picnic areas and nature trails.
                            g.      Residential Land Use
           For the purposes of this definition all residential categories are being considered
           together. Residential land use includes all land associated with structures utilized
           for permanent residential occupancy. Dwelling unit types included in this
           category are single family units, mobile homes, and multi-family structures.
           Residential land use areas are separated in the Existing Land Use Map into three
           categories defined by their densities as follows:
                          Low Density            Up to 2 dwelling units per acre
                          Medium Density         Over 2 to 6 dwelling units per acre
                          High Density           Over 6 dwelling units per acre
                            h.      Undevelopable Features
                   (1)    Waterbodies
                   Waterways, rivers, lakes, reservoirs, bays and estuaries, major springs and
                   slough waters comprise this category. This category and every existing
                   land use category includes wetlands as defined in the Florida
                   Administrative Code. This category does not include canals which are
                   included as rights-of-way similar to roads.
                   (2)    Roads, Railroads, Canals, Utilities
                   Roads, railroads, canals and utility rights-of-way are shown on the legend
                   of the Existing Land Use Map as a map feature, not as a land use category.
                            i.      Vacant Lands
           This category consists of vacant unvegetated areas that usually have been cleared
           for development to occur. Typically they are: vacant lots, unbuilt subdivisions
           with a street pattern, and other vacant urban or rural areas where a specific
           activity is not indicated. For purposes of this study, barren and inactive mined out
           lands have been included as open lands.
    2.     Designated Historically Significant Properties
    This description of properties includes historic buildings, archaeological, and prehistoric
    sites, which have been designated by the County or state to warrant special protective
    status. The County has a wealth of historic sites; however, most of the historic structures


                                           A-4
PUTNAM COUNTY                                                   FUTURE LAND USE ELEMENT

    are located within the city limits of Palatka and Crescent City. The Melrose section of the
    unincorporated area has over thirty structures of historical significance, with some of
    these listed in Table C-14 of the Housing Element.
    In addition to historical structures, the unincorporated area of Putnam County has 63 sites
    classified as midden or mounds. The locations of these sites are available by contacting
    the County Planning Department but are omitted from this Plan to preclude unauthorized
    scavenging for artifacts.
    There are, at last count, some 11 historic structures in Putnam County, including 4
    structures on the National Register for Historic Places. This does not include those
    structures in the Melrose historic district located along the west Putnam County line,
    which has a predominance of historic residential structures. There are no other major
    concentrations of historic structures. Many of the historic structures are scattered
    throughout the County and have been included in various existing land use categories
    shown on the land use map, instead of having a separate land use category and acreage
    tabulation. Only the historic Melrose district is depicted on Map A-4.
    3.     Inventory of Existing Land Uses
                            a.      Methodology
           The following land use inventory was initially prepared from Department of
           Transportation aerial photographs provided by Putnam County and from Landsat
           imagery data. Subsequent data extrapolation was incorporated to a parcel based
           identification system through utilization of the Putnam County Property Appraiser
           system in coordination with County GIS Department applications. The existing
           land use acreage is presented in Table A-1. A map of Putnam County’s Existing
           Land Uses is given on Figure A-1.
                            b.      Existing Land Use Tabulation
                   (1)    Agricultural
                   Agricultural Uses cover almost 14 percent of the county or 72,537 acres.
                   Although agricultural activities are dispersed throughout the County,
                   silviculture, for the most part, is the most prevalent practice for lands
                   located on the west side of the St. Johns River.
                   (2)    Commercial
                   Two thousand and seventy six (2,076) acres were reported in this
                   category. Almost all commercial land use serves the resident population
                   on a retail level and is located in or near the major municipalities. A lesser
                   proportion of commercial activity occurs around the smaller communities
                   that are located at principal intersections and on sites along the main
                   highways.
                   (3)    Industrial
                   There are approximately 2,566 acres of industrial property located in
                   Putnam County. The majority of that acreage is located west of the St.
                                            A-5
PUTNAM COUNTY                                              FUTURE LAND USE ELEMENT

                Johns River near the City of Palatka and is associated with the forest
                products related industries. Mining and other extractive uses located in the
                county are reflected in the Mining existing land use category.
                (4)    Institutional
                The institutional uses located in the county are those facilities related to
                the government of the major municipalities; those used for educational
                purposes; and medical/health related facilities such as hospitals, clinics
                and nursing homes. There are approximately 4,570 acres of institutional
                lands including public facilities lands.
                (5)    Mining
                The Mining existing land use consists of mineral extraction facilities and
                associated lands. There are approximately 2,700 acres of mining areas
                which account for less than one percent of total unincorporated land mass.
                (6)    Public Facilities
                The Public Facilities use consists mostly of railroad and highway rights-
                of-ways (those not included as undevelopable features), and other public
                facilities such as the landfills. There are 1,123 acres in this category
                amounting to 0.9 percent of the district. Table A-1 shows this category
                combined with the Institutional Existing Land Use category.
                (7)    Recreation/Open Space
                Some facilities such as ball fields, basketball courts and tennis courts are
                located in various municipalities. Water recreational use is important to
                Putnam County and fishing is an important tourist sport. Because of this,
                many boat launching ramps and several marinas are also in place. At
                present, the County’s park system includes 16 parks with a total of
                approximately 156 acres. However, it is the open space that accounts for
                the majority of this existing land use category comprising well over
                100,000 acres. The Recreation/Open Space category contains a total of
                104,390 acres which encompass almost 20 percent of the county land
                mass.
                (8)    Residential Land Use
                Residential land uses occupy approximately 38,046 acres. The residential
                category, has a density range of less than two dwelling units per acre up to
                a medium range (two to six dwelling units per acre). No high density
                housing was found among the existing residential uses. Low density
                housing is primarily scattered along the main roads and the medium
                density housing is located in selected areas along Crescent Lake and the
                St. Johns River.




                                           A-6
PUTNAM COUNTY                                                 FUTURE LAND USE ELEMENT

                  (9)     Undevelopable Features
                  There are 47,219 acres of lakes in Putnam County. This is equivalent to 74
                  square miles of land area. There are numerous other features such as
                  streams and rivers included in the total 66,397 acres of waterbodies listed
                  in the Existing Land Use Table A-1.
                  A portion of the Ocala National Forest is in Putnam County and contains
                  24,172 acres, which are included in the Recreation and Open Space
                  Category (see Table A-1). ).
                  Roads, railroads, canals, and utilities account for approximately 9,454
                  acres or approximately less than two percent of the county’s
                  unincorporated land area.
                  (10)    Vacant
                  Vacant or undeveloped land comprises less than four percent of land area
                  or approximately 20,445 acres in the unincorporated county. It is
                  anticipated that much of these lands will be developed with an active land
                  use during the planning horizon.
    4.     Inventory of Natural Resources
    Natural resources are the foremost development constraint. This factor has, over the past
    twenty years, been very important since certain land uses may not be supportable by all
    types of land. In addition, certain resources have been demonstrated to have intrinsic
    value and should be preserved for the public good. Development of the County’s natural
    resources must be consistent with the long-term conservation of the resource, and shall
    not result in harmful environmental/natural resource impacts.
                            a.     Description
           This section provides a review of the natural resources, particularly as they relate
           to land development, both present and future, and their effect on the
           Comprehensive Plan for Putnam County. Development of guidelines for wise
           management of Putnam County’s natural resources depends on an understanding
           of the County’s climate, topography, soils and minerals, wetlands, floodplains and
           drainage areas.
                            b.     Climate
           The basic climate of Putnam County is temperate with seasonal changes typical of
           northern climates although not as severe. Summer and winter temperatures are
           moderated by the Atlantic Ocean and to some extent the St. Johns River and many
           large lakes. Winters are generally mild with occasional freezes, while




                                           A-7
PUTNAM COUNTY                                                FUTURE LAND USE ELEMENT

         summers are hot and humid in character. Average monthly temperatures range
         from a low of 56.3 degrees Fahrenheit in the winter to 80.8 degrees in the
         summer. The rainfall annual average is 55 inches with the heaviest rainfall in the
         months from June through October.
                         c.      Topography
         Topography in Putnam County ranges from a low of 16.4 feet around the St.
         Johns River at the edge of the Coastal Lowlands and rising in a westerly direction
         to a high of 180.45 feet in the western portion of the County around Interlachen.
         The western portion of Putnam County is astride the central Florida highland
         ridge line running in a north-south direction. .
                         d.      Natural Drainage Features
         Putnam County contains two major surface water drainage basins: the St. Johns
         River Basin and the Oklawaha River Basin. Although the Comprehensive Plan
         Drainage Sub-element describes the drainage basins in more depth, this section
         provides a brief overview. The drainage basins are shown on Figure A-6.
         Drainage basins are delineated by selecting topographically high areas which
         separate one stream basin from another. In some cases, delineations were made
         when manmade drainage facilities could connect one basin to another during high
         water periods. Each sub-basin represents a geographic area, which is developed
         around a central drainage feature such as a stream or lake.
         The northern and eastern halves of Putnam County lie within the St. Johns River
         Drainage Basin with those areas west of the St. Johns River draining generally
         south and east towards the St. Johns River. Those areas east of the St. Johns
         River drain generally towards the west with the exception of those areas of the
         Fruitland peninsula, which drain east into Dunns Creek and Crescent Lake.
         Sub-basins within the St. Johns River Basin are: Crescent Lake, Etoniah Creek,
         which is the largest sub-basin in the County, Deep Creek and St. Johns River. A
         portion of southwest Putnam County roughly south of S.R. 20 and west of U.S. 19
         is located within the Oklawaha River Basin, which drains south and east.
         Sub-basins within the Oklawaha Basin are: Sweetwater Creek, Rodman Reservoir
         and Orange Creek.
                         e.      Wetlands
         Figure A-7 contains a map of the wetlands based on district wide wetlands
         information collected by the St. Johns River Water Management District
         (SJRWMD). Putnam County has an abundance of wetland areas scattered
         throughout its borders. According to SJRWMD Landuse/Landcover data from
         2000, wetlands cover approximately 128,200 acres of in the County. This
         represents roughly 24.2% of the total County land area. Many of these wetlands
         are associated with the St. Johns River and its tributaries. The Conservation



                                        A-8
PUTNAM COUNTY                                                 FUTURE LAND USE ELEMENT

         Element of the Comprehensive Plan provides additional data regarding the
         function and types of wetlands in the County.
         f.     Floodplains
         Floods are a natural occurrence. Rainfall in amounts excessive for assimilation by
         the natural drainage system, creates excess water overflows onto the floodplains.
         Floodplains are described in greater detail in the Conservation Element of the
         Plan, but an overview is provided here as this natural feature is a factor which
         influences land use decisions.
         A map of flood prone areas taken from U.S.G.S. and FEMA studies is shown on
         Figure A-8. Significant problems arise when natural drainage patterns are altered
         disrupting the natural system and stressing the land’s ability to function as a
         drainage storage, recharge, and conveyance facility. Impervious surface
         associated with development decreases the land area available for infiltration and
         increases runoff rates. Construction of structural water control facilities can
         change fragile natural drainage patterns and may cause severe flooding and water
         quality problems reaching far downstream.
         Putnam County participates in the National Flood Insurance Program (NFIP)
         administered by the Federal Emergency Management Agency. The purpose of the
         program is to protect lives and property through the implementation of floodplain
         management measures, which requires development to be constructed above the
         100-year base flood elevation. This is the elevation the water will rise to if a storm
         occurs that has one chance in one hundred of occurring in any given year.
         As expected in a County with 24 percent of its land in wetlands or other water
         bodies, extensive flood plains exist. Many of them are associated with the
         streams, but substantial areas are landlocked without a drainage course and the
         water must evaporate or be recharged into the water table. This condition occurs
         in the western and southeastern portions of Putnam County. Any development in
         floodplains is subject to the County’s adopted Land Development Code.
         g.     Natural Groundwater Recharge Areas
         The Floridan aquifer is composed chiefly of limestone and dolomite and is the
         major source of potable water in Putnam County. The Natural Groundwater
         Recharge section describes the aquifer characteristics in more detail and this
         section is only meant as an overview of another pertinent factor in assigning land
         use designations.
         In Putnam County, high groundwater recharge areas occur in the northwest and in
         the Fruitland peninsula area in the southeast. As shown on Figure A-9, the largest
         area of aquifer recharge in excess of 12 inches/year in Putnam County is in the
         southern part of the county between Pomona Park and Welaka.




                                          A-9
PUTNAM COUNTY                                               FUTURE LAND USE ELEMENT

         The central eastern portion of Putnam County between the St. Johns River and
         Crescent Lake contains areas of both high and moderate recharge, as does the
         western portion between Interlachen and the Melrose area. Consideration will
         have to be given to methods to protect this function of the land.
         h.     Soils
         Knowledge of soil conditions is necessary in planning for the use and man-
         agement of soils for crops and pasture, woodland, woodland grazing, and as
         wildlife habitat. Also, knowledge of soil conditions and the ability of soil to
         absorb moisture is extremely important when planning for the use of septic tanks
         for sanitary wastewater disposal. The Sewer Sub-element provides detailed
         information regarding septic system suitable soils and problem areas, and Figure
         D-3 of that element, illustrates those soils best suited for septic absorption. Soil
         suitability is a significant potential development indicator. Since up to 76% of the
         households use septic systems, the placement of systems in soils that are suited
         for absorption is critical.
         Soils in Putnam County are depicted on the Composite Soils Map, Figure A-10.
         This map depicts fifteen soil categories throughout the County. The Soils Map
         denotes land units that have a distinct pattern of soils, relief and drainage. Each
         land unit is a unique natural landscape and may consist of one or more major
         soils. Soils making up one unit can occur in other units, but in a different pattern
         or proportion to each other. The map provides a basis for comparing the land use
         soil capacity potential of large areas. Areas that are, for the most part, suited to
         certain kinds of farming or to other land uses can be identified.
         Soil properties used are those that influence the minimum rate of infiltration ob-
         tained for a bare soil after prolonged wetting. These properties are: depth to
         seasonably high water table, intake rate and permeability after prolonged wetting,
         and depth to a layer or layers that slow or impede water movement. A hydric soil
         is a soil that in its natural (undrained) condition is saturated, flooded, or ponded
         long enough during the growing season (March — October in north Florida) to
         develop anaerobic conditions that favor the growth and regeneration of
         hydrophytic (wetland) vegetation (Florida USDA— Soil Conservation Service,
         1985). Hydric soils have severe limitations for septic tank operation.
         i.     Commercially Valuable Minerals
         Commercially valuable mineral deposits in Putnam County are of four types (See
         Table A-3): Sand, kaolin clay, heavy minerals and peat (not a mineral, but an
         extractable resource). These deposits are outlined on the map in Figure A-11.
         Table A-3 is an inventory of all known active and inactive mining operations in
         the County. Following this is a brief discussion of mining within the County.




                                        A-10
PUTNAM COUNTY                                                FUTURE LAND USE ELEMENT



                (1)    Sand
                Sand deposits extend in a broad band on the western side of the County
                from the area around Putnam Hall and Grandin in the northwest through
                the sinkhole country on the western side of the County to the vicinity of
                Interlachen and the southern border with Marion County west of Rodman
                Reservoir. Numerous sand pits from current and previous mining
                operations dot this area. Currently, there are two active sand mining
                operations in the area just south of Interlachen. A large inactive operation,
                the Keystone Sand Mine, is located north of Highway 100 between
                Putnam Hall and Florahome. Another inactive operation, the Crossley
                mine, is located to the northwest of Interlachen near Long Pond. The
                Keuka Mine owned by Florida Rock Industries is an active mine, and the
                Grandin Sand mine holdings (over 400 acres) in the area between Grandin
                and Interlachen west of Highway 315 in the near future is the second
                active sand excavation mine.
                The sand produced is primarily construction sand; however the Feldspar
                Corporation kaolin operation at Edgar produces both construction and spe-
                cialty sands as a byproduct of the clay mining process. The specialty sands
                are important for glass manufacture and other industrial uses; the glass
                sands have markets in Alabama, Florida and Tennessee. Tennessee
                (2)    Kaolin
                Kaolin clay is common throughout the Citronelle sediments of western
                Putnam County along the Lake Wales Ridge. This is roughly the area west
                of Highway 315. As of 1983 all the kaolin produced in the state came
                from the Feldspar Corporation’s Edgar mine in Putnam County. Both sand
                and kaolin are produced at this mine; the sediments are hydraulically
                mined and water processed (dredged and slurried).
                Florida kaolin has a combination of properties not known to exist naturally
                in any other commercial kaolin. Thus Florida kaolin is used as a single
                substitute for a variety of other clay blends. It is used in a wide variety of
                ceramic products, including high and low voltage electric porcelain, spark
                plug porcelain, sanitary ware, chemical porcelain, floor and wall tile, high
                temperature refractories, artware, and electronic ceramics.
                When kaolin alone is extracted from the sand body only 20 percent of the
                mined material is actually marketed; the value of the silica sands in the
                same deposits was not exploited until around 1958. With the inclusion of
                construction—and specialty quality sands in the production mix, more
                than 85 percent of the sediments mined can be marketed. Thus the
                Feldspar Corporation mine at Edgar produces sand as well as kaolin (see
                Table A-2).


                                        A-11
PUTNAM COUNTY                                                      FUTURE LAND USE ELEMENT

                      (3)     Heavy Minerals
                      There is a significant deposit of heavy mineral sands straddling the border
                      between Putnam and Clay Counties east of Simms Creek and northwest of
                      Bostwick. This is known as the Green Cove Springs ore body. It lies on
                      the Duval Upland of northern peninsular Florida. The deposit is composed
                      of loose to slightly consolidated quartz sands containing an average of
                      three or four percent heavy minerals. The most abundant of these minerals
                      are ilmenite, leucoxene, rutile, kyanite, sillimanite, staurolite, zircon, and
                      tourmaline. Minor amounts of epidote and garnet are also found, as well as
                      monazite.
                      Private owners lease the Green Cove Springs mine to IILUKA Mining
                      Company. Mining in the Clay County portion has been done for the last
                      20 years. On July 7, 1983, a conceptual plan for reclamation was
                      approved by the Governor and Cabinet for the Green Cove Springs mine
                      covering 11,029 acres in Clay and Putnam Counties. This plan calls for the
                      eventual mining of 8,715 acres of the site. Reclamation requirements
                      include restoration of drainage patterns, wetlands, and streams which may
                      be altered. The County has approved amendments to the Comprehensive
                      Plan to allow more mining on the Putnam County portion of the
                      Associated Minerals site south of Sun Garden Road. Pursuant to State
                      rules, reclamation of the site is nearly complete.
                      (4)     Peat
                      Putnam County includes several significant peat deposits. One large
                      deposit is located in the northwestern area, extending north and south of
                      Highway 100 between Grandin and Florahome. The Traxler Peat
                      Company operates a mine in this area, producing peat for horticultural
                      purposes. .
C.     LAND USE ANALYSIS
This section of the Future Land Use Element summarizes existing conditions and potential
development trends based upon factors that affect development such as the availability of urban
services (potable water, sanitary sewer, solid waste, and roadways) population growth, and area
economies. In addition, there is an analysis of potential limitations imposed by natural resources
and man-made constraints.
       1.      Population Projections
       Population growth is the driving force behind future facility needs and land requirements.
       Future population and the spatial requirements necessary to meet this future growth must
       be taken into consideration in preparing the Future Land Use Element. The BEBR mid
       range population estimates were used for the comprehensive plan (see Table A-3).
       During the period 2000 through 2005, the Putnam County Building Department issued
       permits for 2,046 dwelling units. Based on an average household size of 2.48 persons per
       household, the County has grown by 5.074 residents during the five year period.

                                               A-12
PUTNAM COUNTY                                                 FUTURE LAND USE ELEMENT

    The population projections are shown on Table A-3 along with a percentage breakdown.
    In 2000, unincorporated Putnam had a population of 55,764. By the year 2015, the
    population in all of Putnam is projected to be 79,700 residents and unincorporated
    Putnam is expected to reach 63,560, including seasonal population. This represents a
    fourteen percent increase of population in the fifteen-year period from 2000 to 2015.
    Including seasonal population increases, the unincorporated area is projected to have
    71,657 people and the total county 88,362.
    2.     Analysis of Natural Conditions Affecting Development
    Land has a carrying capacity to support development. Good planning strives to not stress
    the land beyond its capacity to support development. Such action invariably results in
    destruction of the environment and a dramatic reduction in quality of life.
             a.     Wetlands
           Wetlands are considered to be an important natural resource that should be
           conserved as a public resource because of three significant natural functions
           which wetland systems provide: (1) their ability to affect water quality, (2) their
           ability to store storm runoff water, and (3) the influential affect of a wetland on
           the characteristics of species diversity.
           Hydric soils are closely associated with wetlands and present severe limitations to
           the function of septic tanks.
             b.     Floodplains
           Floodplains and flood hazard zones are generally more extensive than areas
           categorized as wetlands. Flooding is a natural occurrence, and only becomes a
           hazard when the natural floodplains have been altered through urbanization and
           development. As urbanization increases in the low-lying areas, property damage
           and loss of life increase due to flooding. Flooding is a problem in several areas of
           Putnam County where development has occurred within floodplains. Periodic
           flooding has been documented in numerous locations in Putnam County. Some
           areas of flooding identified in the draft Stormwater Management Plan prepared by
           Ayers and Associates are detailed below.
           Palmetto Bluff Road and Millican Road have periodically flooding. Palmetto
           Bluff Road floods in three locations between its intersection with Millican Road
           and the Town of Bostwick. Millican Road floods beginning one-half mile south
           of the Millican/Palmetto Bluff Road intersection and extends south for
           approximately one-half mile. There is also an erosion problem at the
           Millican/Palmetto Bluff Road intersection.




                                          A-13
PUTNAM COUNTY                                              FUTURE LAND USE ELEMENT

         Frequent flooding occurs in River Park when Lake Laverne, Lake Maxine and a
         third un-named lake stage up and flow west through an undersized ditch and
         culvert crossing at Lake Drive. The outlet system for River Park is significantly
         undersized in proportion to the areas of the lakes and surrounding drainage basin.
         As a result, the banks overtop and site flooding occurs.
         Another area which experiences periodic flooding is around Mud Lake. Flooding
         occurred on Red Fox Trail immediately north of S.R. 19, Karen Place and Karen
         Court south of S.R. 19. Karen Place and Karen Court are in the Fox Trail
         Subdivision. At least one home in the Fox Trail subdivision flooded during the
         hurricanes of 2004, and numerous other homes experienced yard flooding. There
         were more than six inches of standing water over the road.
         Local flooding has been reported in the Whispering Pines subdivision. Roads and
         occasional yard flooding occurs even during moderate rainfall events. The cause
         is predominantly from erosion of dirt roads.
         CR 315 floods near the intersection with 64th Street. There is a drop in elevation
         where the road curves to the right around Mariner Lake. Dirt roads draining to
         CR 315 cause sediment to clog roadside swales along CR 315 which is a major
         cause of flooding at this location.
         Another area with flooding problems is known locally as the Mondex
         Subdivision, which is located south of Palatka and north of the Barge Canal
         between S.R. 19 and Stokes Landing Road. This area consists of low-density
         residential development with numerous privately owned dirt roads and flooding is
         a recurring problem here. Roads, yards, and structure flooding has occurred in the
         subdivision on an annual basis.
         Flooding in East Palatka occurs where SR 207 crosses Dog Branch. Large
         deposits of sediment accumulate at this location which causes severe loss of
         conveyance capacity and the water has been seen at the edge of the highway
         pavement.
         Flooding at the County Public Works Facilities on Putnam County Boulevard and
         various low areas have been reported by the County. The parking lots, the clay
         and limerock stockpile area and the maintenance garage are flooded on average
         twice per year. Flooding occurs due to a relatively large watershed discharging
         through an undersized outlet under East River Road. No residential flooding has
         been reported.
         Article 6, Section 6.05 LDC, establishes standards for construction in areas of
         special flood hazard. The areas of special flood hazard are those areas identified
         as category A, AO, AH, A1 through A30, AE, and A-99 of the on the latest
         available Flood Insurance Rate Map.
         The County is currently in the process of collecting and assessing data from areas
         that flooded during the 2004 hurricane season.


                                        A-14
PUTNAM COUNTY                                               FUTURE LAND USE ELEMENT

         As part of the Countywide Stormwater Master Plan, the County is identifying all
         areas which experience repetitive flooding and erosion (in addition to the few
         general areas listed above) and developing a plan to reduce or eliminate these
         problems. The description of the master plan and flooding areas is elaborated
         upon in the Infrastructure Element.
         c.     Natural Groundwater Recharge
         The majority of water used in the County is from the Floridan aquifer. Nearly all
         of the water recharging the Floridan aquifer in the SJRWMD and SRWMD is
         derived from rainfall in the districts. Rainfall percolating downward from land
         surface to the Floridan aquifer must move through the unsaturated soil zone, the
         surficial aquifer, and the semi-confining layers to recharge the Floridan aquifer.
         The amount of water stored in the aquifer systems is determined by a balance
         between recharge, evapotranspiration, runoff, leakage to or from adjacent
         aquifers, natural discharge, and withdrawals from water wells.
         In Putnam County, potentiometric highs occur in the northwest and in the
         Fruitland peninsula area in the southeast. These areas are known recharge points
         for the Floridan Aquifer (See Figure E-1). Recharge occurs from rainfall, and
         from lakes and other aquifers that have elevations above the potentiometric
         surface of the Floridan Aquifer. Discharge occurs from lateral groundwater
         outflow and by pumpage. Water entering the Floridan Aquifer in northwestern
         Putnam County flows underground to surrounding counties including Alachua,
         Baker, Bradford, Clay, Duval, Marion, and Union Counties.
         Land uses in the northwest (Interlachen & surroundings) and southeast (Fruitland
         Peninsula) recharge areas need to be controlled to insure that groundwater is not
         contaminated. The two largest uses of groundwater are for domestic self-supply
         and agriculture followed by commercial and industrial uses. There are no Priority
         Water Resource Caution Areas where water supply is identified as being critical
         by the year 2010.
         Water quality is generally excellent in the upper layers. Saltwater intrusion is not
         an overriding issue in Putnam as it is for the coastal areas of Florida. The County
         needs to carefully plan land uses in the high recharge areas.
         d.     Areas of Critical State Concern
         There are no areas of Critical State Concern, pursuant to 380.05 F.S., recorded in
         Putnam County.




                                        A-15
PUTNAM COUNTY                                                  FUTURE LAND USE ELEMENT

    3.     Employment Availability
           a.        Economy
           The economy of Putnam County is based on several factors. These include: the
           age, education, and size of the resident labor force, types of employment available
           in and within commuting distance of the County, personal income levels, and
           most importantly the health and growth of the local business community. The
           County is committed to supporting economic development and creating a climate
           that is conducive to new industry locating in Putnam County. Detailed data for
           this position is provided in the County’s new Economic Element as part of the
           Comprehensive plan.
           b.        Labor Force
           The resident labor force of Putnam County has grown from 18,166 employees in
           1980 to 30,686 in 2004. The proportion of the total population in the labor force is
           lower when compared to the region as a whole, though it is following a rising
           trend. It has increased from a 35.9 percent labor force participation in 1980 to
           42.3 percent in 2004. By contrast, the national average labor force participation
           rate was 63.9 percent in 2000.
           This lower labor force participation in Putnam County is typical of a population
           which has many retiree households. The population in the 25-64 age groups has
           maintained or slightly increased its percentage of the population over the period
           from 2000 to 2015 (see Housing Element Table C-18). Putnam County has long
           been a haven for retirees relocating from other areas and older age groups have
           constituted a continually expanding proportion of the recent resident population
           growth.
           Unemployment rates in Putnam County were consistently higher than the regional
           averages in the early 1980s. By 1982, the Putnam County unemployment rate rose
           to 8.2 percent peaking at 11.4 percent in 1983. The comparable regional rates
           were seven percent in 1982 and 8.1 percent in 1983. By 2001, the Putnam County
           unemployment rate had decreased to 5.9%.
    4.     Analysis of Public Facilities Affecting Development
    It is important to ensure that public facilities and services that are necessary to support
    development are available current with the impact of development.
                a.    Traffic Circulation
           The roads and highways providing traffic circulation in Putnam County consist of
           two systems. The major routes and highways running through and beyond the
           County borders are state-owned and maintained, US 17, SR 19, SR 20, SR 100
           and SR 207. They form the primary and secondary arterial highway system. The
           only primary highway in Putnam County is U.S. 15-17 running north-south in the
           eastern part of the County. All other roads in the County are considered to be
           secondary facilities. The roadway system is depicted in the Traffic Circulation
           Element, Figure B-1.
                                            A-16
PUTNAM COUNTY                                                 FUTURE LAND USE ELEMENT

         The local access and collector system includes County and other locally-owned
         and maintained roads, approximately 1,665 miles of roads, that usually feed into
         the arterial highway system. The FDOT has adopted a level of service standard
         (LOS) B for intrastate roadways in rural areas in Florida. However, rural two-
         lane segments, or segments defined as transitioning from rural to urban can
         maintain a LOS C standard. Traffic modeling projections for State roads reveals
         that most roadway segments will continue to operate at an acceptable level in the
         short term, until 2010, except for two segments of SR 20, west of Interlachen and
         east of Mosely Avenue. The deficiency volumes and description of the specific
         roadway segments in found in the Traffic Circulation Table B-6 and Figure B-4.
         Several additional roadway segments are projected to fall below an adopted level
         of service standard by 2015, including portions of SR 26, SR 100, US 17, SR 19,
         and SR 21. (see Traffic Circulation Table B-7 and Figure B-5)
         The County relies on the FDOT and its implementation of the state highway plan
         to achieve and maintain the required levels of service on these highway segments.
         The State has already programmed or begun expansion on some of the intrastate
         roads that may experience deficiencies including portions of SR 20, US 17, SR
         21, and SR 16.
         Overloading is not projected to occur on the County’s portion of the system.
         However, a significant portion of the county roads need paving and drainage
         improvements. An estimated 71.5 percent of the county’s roads are unpaved.
         Road improvements will be apportioned on the basis of need, cost and available
         capital budget funding, but cannot create a level of service deterrent to the
         issuance of building permits since the traffic volumes are too small to require
         paved roads. County road conditions and the need for a special study to update the
         1993 Transportation Plan is explained further in the Traffic Circulation Element.
           b.     Sanitary Sewer
         According to the Sanitary Sewer section of the Infrastructure Element there are 26
         package treatment plants and three municipal treatment plants in Putnam County.
         Putnam County is also developing a regional sanitary sewer treatment plant
         during this planning period. All other sanitary waste is disposed of in septic
         tanks. These are regulated through the Florida Department of Health and
         Rehabilitative Services. No major central sanitary waste disposal systems exist
         other than the Palatka, Welaka and Crescent City municipal systems, which only
         serve small unincorporated areas of Putnam County.
         The proposed County system will help channel growth into the “East Palatka”
         area. Reliance for at least the first 5 years of the current planning period will still




                                          A-17
PUTNAM COUNTY                                               FUTURE LAND USE ELEMENT

         be predominantly on septic tanks and private package treatment plants in accord
         with existing environmental and health regulations.
         c.     Solid Waste
         The County operates a Class I landfill and a Class III landfill in unincorporated
         Putnam County, however refuse collection is franchised out. The present operator
         is Waste Pro, Inc. for the entire county as a homogeneous geographic service area,
         except the City of Palatka. Palatka operates its own refuse collection systems and
         the solid waste collected is then disposed in the County landfill.
         The County will continue in its mandated role of providing space in the County
         landfill to accommodate the solid waste generated by municipalities as well as the
         County. The projected landfill need through 2015 is shown on Table D-3 of the
         Infrastructure Element. The Central Landfill, which is operating under a FDEP
         permit, has a remaining capacity of more than 1,500,000 cubic yards. At the
         projected rate of usage by existing and new development in both the County and
         the municipalities the facility will last until the year 202015. The County has also
         purchased another 625 acres of land to construct another landfill before the
         current landfill cells are at 100% capacity.
         The County has a Solid Waste Management Board which includes representation
         from all municipalities. This representation affords the County ample opportunity
         to join with and to support the Putnam municipalities in all efforts to meet the
         requirements of Chapter 403.706, FS. .
         d.     Drainage
         Flooding, a natural occurrence; it only becomes a hazard when the natural
         floodplains have been altered through urbanization and development. As
         urbanization increases in the low-lying areas, property damage and loss of life
         also increases. Some of the numerous lakes in western and southeastern Putnam
         County are vulnerable to pollution problems due to increasing urban development
         around their shorelines. These problems exist in several areas of Putnam County.
         The extent of the floodplains is also shown on Figure D-6.
         Erosion of dirt roads is a problem in numerous areas of western Putnam County.
         The development and the construction of roads has modified natural drainage in
         Putnam County. As is the case with most counties and municipalities in north
         Florida, growth came slowly and structures and roads were located without
         concern for the impact of development on drainage. These communities are faced
         with problems of identifying needs and implementing a comprehensive program
         to correct the drainage problems caused by past development by setting in place a
         master plan for managing drainage to accommodate projected growth.
         The Putnam County Public Works Department is responsible for County
         maintained roads and associated drainage facilities such as roadside ditches and
         swales. The Public Works Department also maintains drainage improvements
         (drainage ditches, swales, storm water sewers, and culverts) in developed areas
         approved and accepted by the County.
                                        A-18
PUTNAM COUNTY                                               FUTURE LAND USE ELEMENT

         The Florida Department of Transportation (DOT) maintains the drainage systems
         for state roads. Most of these roads are drained by ditches, but some in urbanized
         areas have storm water sewer systems.
         Important local regulations that protect drainage and surface water quality are the
         County Subdivision Regulation (Section 7.12), the Stormwater Code (Section
         7.08) and the Zoning Code (Article 2). The Subdivision Regulation identifies
         County requirements for road construction and drainage. The Stormwater
         Management Code addresses the level of service standards and design of drainage
         systems. The Zoning Code provides specifications regarding lot coverage, set
         backs, vegetative barriers and density/intensity of land use.
         Putnam County is preparing a Countywide Stormwater Master Drainage Plan
         (SMP). This plan will identify existing natural and man-made drainage features,
         sites which exhibit flooding problems, causes inhibiting drainage from these sites,
         data on sources of surface water pollution from storm water run-off, solutions for
         managing Countywide stormwater run-off, and a rationale for prioritizing
         implementation of the plan based upon County financial resources and projected
         patterns of growth.
         e.     Potable Water
         According to FDEP there are six (6) municipal owned and operated water
         treatment plants (WTPs) which serve municipalities in Putnam County and 137
         private package plants. The package plants include four (4) County owned and
         operated WTPs in East Palatka [East Palatka WTP, County Maintenance Yard,
         Port Buena Vista MHP and Paradise Point Subdivision], six (6)WTPs owned and
         operated by the Putnam County School Board, and one owned and operated by
         the Putnam Correctional State facility. Capacities of the drinking water systems
         are listed in the Infrastructure Element Table D-2.
         Potable water wells are required to draw from the Floridan aquifer in accordance
         with County Regulations, Section 6.06, Wellfield Protection Code, and Section
         6.07, Groundwater Recharge Areas Code. The purpose of the codes are to protect
         private wells from running dry during the winter months when ferneries and other
         agricultural interests use tremendous amounts of water to protect plants from
         freezing, and to protect the wellfields from contamination.
         The ability of existing potable water systems to meet the demand of Putnam
         County residents appears to be sufficient at the present time. The ability to have
         sufficient drinking water is partially due to the East Putnam Regional Water Plant
         which will be using Reverse Osmosis and taking the burden off of the freshwater
         aquifer. Had the County pursued the freshwater aquifer, the service area of the
         WTP would have been identified as a Priority Water Resource Caution Area. In




                                        A-19
PUTNAM COUNTY                                               FUTURE LAND USE ELEMENT

         Putnam County, an assumption can be made that private wells and privately
         operated public water systems will remain the principal means of potable water
         for the planning period.
         Pursuant to the Putnam County Septic Tank regulations found in Articles 6 and 7
         of the Land Development Code, developers must provide centralized water and
         sewer services in new subdivisions with lots less than one-half acre in size. The
         Land Development Code also requires a 100-foot septic tank setback from the
         ordinary high water mark of all water bodies, a minimum 100-foot lot width, and
         a minimum lot area of one-half acre for all new lots within 500 feet of all
         waterbodies. It will be important for the County and the Water Management
         District to cooperate in order to manage available water resources, which will
         ensure an adequate supply of potable water.
         f.     Waterwells and Cones of Influence
         There are waterwells operated by both municipal and homeowner association
         operated waterwells serving the public in the unincorporated portion of Putnam
         County. The municipal wellfields may actually be within the land area of a
         municipality, however, the cone of influence of the well could extend into county
         jurisdiction. Examples are the municipal wells of the City of Palatka which are on
         the airfield site surrounded by County lands. Additionally, there are several
         privately operated public wells serving homeowner associations and similar
         groups.
         Land uses in the County located within the cone of influence that could affect the
         quality or quantity of water taken from a producing well must be restricted or
         monitored so as to retain the water quality of the aquifer. Given the rural
         character and the generally simple hydrogeology of Putnam County, a fixed
         radius approach will suffice for the County in providing wellfield protection. The
         FDEP defines the wellhead protection zone as a 500-oot radial setback distance
         around a potable water wellhead and this should be Putnam’s minimum default
         wellfield protection radius. .
    5.   Vacant Land Analysis
         Putnam County has large areas of vacant and undeveloped lands that are now
         available for expansion or development. The lands shown on Table A-1 and Map
         A-1 as Vacant/Undeveloped are available for development at this time and total
         some 19,737 acres or 3.83 percent of the unincorporated County area. There are
         some midden sites that are not located on the maps for fear of depredation in these
         spots; however, they are not significant in determining the available acreage for
         development.
         Additional undeveloped lands may be considered to be lands presently in the
         agricultural or silviculture/forestland categories. A total of 273,282 acres or 53
         percent of the unincorporated County may be considered available for possible
         development. There is therefore, more than ample lands to serve any development


                                        A-20
PUTNAM COUNTY                                                 FUTURE LAND USE ELEMENT

         that will occur during the ten-year planning period without putting undue adverse
         pressure on lands sensitive to development.
    6.   Land Adjacent to County Boundaries
         a.     Boundaries with Other Counties
         Putnam County is bounded by lands in six other counties. These lands are
         generally a continuation of the basic land use pattern at the County border.
         Adjacent land use patterns are shown on Figure A-4.
         To the northwest in Clay County, is the area known as Keystone Heights, which is
         spotted with lakes partially developed with vacation and retirement homes similar
         in character as that portion of Putnam County. To the north are lands in the Camp
         Blanding Military Reservation, which are used for training, and to the northeast
         are wooded and agricultural lands of Clay County.
         To the northeast are vacation homes in St. Johns County across the St. Johns
         River from Putnam County. Due east in St. Johns County, the lands are wooded
         and partially developed with agricultural uses.
         Further south and east are lands in Flagler County across Crescent Lake, on the
         east side of the Crescent Lake and the county limits, both wooded and partially
         developed with vacation and retirement homes. To the southeast is Volusia
         County with lands that are a continuation of the Putnam County land character of
         wooded areas interspersed with agricultural uses and homes. Further west, along
         the southern boundary is the continuation of the Ocala National Forest that lies
         partially in Putnam County, in Marion County.
         To the west is a portion of Alachua County that is sparsely developed with
         recreational and retirement homes and some agricultural uses.
         None of these land uses conflict with the emerging land use pattern of Putnam
         County and are, in fact a continuation of the same patterns as found in the County.
         Therefore, if the present development patterns are retained there should be no
         reasons for conflict over land uses between the various counties.
         b.     Boundaries with Putnam Municipalities
         The five Putnam municipalities within the County’s boundaries vary in geograph-
         ic size. Future development and redevelopment that may impact these
         incorporated jurisdictions needs to be coordinated with the appropriate local
         government offices.
         Of special concern is the unincorporated area surrounding Kay Larkin Airport, a
         640-acre facility in the City of Palatka. The installation is located on the west side
         of the City and shares its boundary with the County. Land use and related zoning
         around this facility must follow the requirements of s.333, F.S. There must be
         coordination established between the County and City to ensure that plans for
         future land in the area are compatible with airport operations.


                                         A-21
PUTNAM COUNTY                                               FUTURE LAND USE ELEMENT

    7.   Determination of Land Uses
         This section of the Future Land Use Element translates the previous analysis into
         a visual scheme, the Future Land Use Map, A-3, which assigns land use
         categories to those areas that are anticipated for development, redevelopment or
         conservation of natural resources. This task includes the projection of the amount
         of land for different land use categories that will be necessary to accommodate
         future population growth (see Table A-4). The methodology used to project the
         future demand for the various land uses was based on the existing land use
         acreage, population, and development trends. .
         All of the following categories allow for a mix of uses and the percent and types
         of uses are specified in the goals, objectives and policies of this element. The key
         differences between the 1991 comprehensive plan and this EAR update is that a
         density bonus point system was created and additional rural and urban categories
         were created for residential and non-residential uses.
         a.     Future Agricultural Land
         There are two agriculture future land use designations, A1, that permits residential
         development with a density range between 1 dwelling unit per 5 acres to 1
         dwelling unit per 10 acres, and A2, which permits residential development with a
         density range of 1 dwelling unit per 10 acres and 1 unit per 20 acres. The actual
         allowed density is determined by the point-score methodology provided in Policy
         A.1.9.4 of the Future Land Use adopted goals, objectives and policies.
         The Future Land Use Map shows approximately 47,621 acres in the A1
         designation, however this includes other lands such as wetlands, and residential
         uses in addition to the farmlands. Similarly, Map A-3 shows approximately
         233,711 acres of A2 lands, which are predominantly silviculture lands.
         b.     Future Commercial
         Commercial and service related land use includes those businesses associated
         with the retail trade sector. Employment in Putnam County grew from 18,166
         employees in 1980 to 30,686 in 2000. According to the US Census Bureau,
         “County Business Patterns Report”, employment in the retail sector decreased by
         1% and the wholesale sector decreased by 29% between 1998 and 2003.
         The Commercial future land use category has 1,561 acres, less than one percent of
         the unincorporated area.
         The Floor Area Ratio (FAR) for this land use category shall have be a maximum
         of 1:1 with a maximum impervious surface lot coverage of 85 percent of the site.




                                        A-22
PUTNAM COUNTY                                              FUTURE LAND USE ELEMENT

         c.     Future Conservation Land
         Conservation lands include publicly and privately owned lands dedicated and
         utilized for conservation and preservation purposes such as but not limited to
         those associated with the Ocala National Forest the floodplains and wetlands of
         the St. Johns River and Dunns Creek and the floodplains and wetlands of the
         Oklawaha River between Rodman Dam and Little Lake George. Projected growth
         in Putnam County can be accommodated without removing acreage from the
         current conservation land use category. The Conservation land use category, as
         shown on the Future Land Use Map, contains approximately 127,126 acres or
         26.9% of the unincorporated land area. Privately owned land in this category
         allows the placement of a home or caretakers residence at a maximum density of
         one dwelling unit per 30 acres.
         c.     Future Industrial Land
         The industrial land use category includes manufacturing, assembly and processing
         facilities, warehousing and distribution centers, and bulk and outdoor storage
         uses. The County Chamber of Commerce in 2005 lists Putnam County as having
         13 manufacturing establishments employing over 2,700. This includes some of
         the firms engaged in mining activities, however mining activities are not part of
         this land use category. The Putnam Comprehensive Plan - Economic Element
         provides greater insight regarding industrial activities.
         Industrial development may have a maximum FAR of 1and a maximum impervi-
         ous surface lot coverage of 85 percent of the lot or site. There are approximately
         5,260 acres of industrial designated land in unincorporated Putnam as shown on
         the Future Land Use Map, comprising approximately 1 percent of land area.
         d.     Future Mining Category
         This land use category includes those areas with either active or inactive mines
         and extraction facilities. There are approximately 14,910 acres of Mining lands,
         or 3.2 percent of the unincorporated County land area. This is a slight gain of
         Mining lands in comparison to the Existing Land Use category, as a result of
         expanded mining activities anticipated in north Putnam County by the Iluka
         Corporation. There are no maximum development intensity thresholds for this
         category and residential development is not permitted.
         e.     Future Public Buildings, Grounds, and Public Facilities
         This land use category includes facilities or services that may be public or
         privately owned, and are established and intended to provide public benefit.
         These uses generally include government buildings and grounds including police,
         fire and emergency rescue services, schools (all levels), libraries religious
         facilities, civic and community centers, airports, landfills, solid waste transfer
         stations, water and wastewater treatment facilities (over 500,000 GPD capacity),
         correctional facilities and similar uses.


                                         A-23
PUTNAM COUNTY                                       FUTURE LAND USE ELEMENT


         Approximately 1,806 acres have been identified for this category as depicted on
         the Future Land Use Map.
         The FAR for those structures included under this category will be 0.05:1; with a
         maximum lot coverage of 70 percent of the site.
         f.     Future Rural Center
         This category is intended to allow rural centers that include a mix of uses located
         in a compact, contiguous pattern that support the surrounding rural land uses.
         Those rural centers that have not been clearly geographically defined are depicted
         on the map as a circle with a radius of approximately 1500 feet drawn around the
         road intersection. There are approximately 4,376 acres of this land use category,
         which is less than one percent of the unincorporated land area.
         Residential development is allowed within a maximum density range of dwelling
         unit per acre up to 4 dwelling units per acre dependent upon accumulation of
         sufficient density bonus points. The maximum non-residential floor area ratio is
         0.7 and the maximum residential FAR is 0.5:1. The maximum impervious
         surface coverage ratio for non-residential is 75 percent and the maximum
         residential impervious surface ratio for residential use is 50 percent.
         g.     Future Rural Residential
         The Rural Residential category is intended to provide a transition area from the
         agriculture to urban uses. This is a mixed use category with a predominance of
         residential uses. Residential development is allowed within a maximum density
         range of 1 dwelling unit per 5 acres up to 1 dwelling unit per acre as determined
         by using the point score criteria. The maximum Floor Area Ratio for both
         residential and non-residential uses is 0.4:1. with a maximum residential
         impervious surface ratio of 40%, and 70% for non-residential uses. There are
         approximately 24,355 acres of Rural Residential area, which is 5.2 percent of the
         unincorporated land.
         h.     Future Urban Reserve
         This category is for those areas in proximity to the existing municipalities. Many
         of these areas do not have a full range of urban infrastructure but are close enough
         that urban expansion could occur. Although this category is predominantly for
         residential and agriculture uses, commercial, industrial and public facilities are
         also allowed. As a mixed-use category, these areas allow more development of
         commercial, industrial and public facilities with slightly higher residential
         densities of a maximum of 1 dwelling unit per acres (up to 4 dwelling units per
         acre after sufficient bonus points have been accumulated). The residential
         maximum impervious surface ratio is 50% with a FAR of 0.5:1 and the non-
         residential maximum impervious surface ratio is 80 percent with a FAR of .85:1.
         There are approximately 8,566 acres of land in the Urban Reserve category, 1.8
         percent of the total unincorporated area.


                                        A-24
PUTNAM COUNTY                                                FUTURE LAND USE ELEMENT

         i.     Future Urban Service
         This category recognizes areas where urban infrastructure, such as central water,
         sewer, stormwater systems, paved major roads, exists or is programmed and
         available for more urban type of development. Although agricultural activities are
         allowed as a holding land use, this land use designation allows a broad mix of
         residential, commercial, industrial, public facility and recreation uses. Residential
         development can achieve a density of up to 9 dwelling units per acre, the highest
         in Putnam County, with adequate density bonus points. Non-residential uses have
         a more urban FAR of 1.0 with a maximum impervious surface ratio of 85 percent,
         and residential development has a FAR of 0.7 with a maximum impervious
         surface ratio of 50 percent.
    8.   Determination of Land Requirements for Residential Land Use
         This section of the Future Land Use Element builds upon the many factors that
         influence growth and land use and formulates a conceptual plan for the
         requirement and distribution of land uses in Putnam County as it is projected to
         appear in the year 2015. The product of the analysis presented herein is shown
         graphically in the County’s Future Land Use Map (FLUM) which provides a
         depiction of the spatial distribution of land uses throughout the County.
         Much of the housing analysis is contained in the Housing Element and the
         housing factors that influence the amount of land needed including rate of
         construction, population projection, and a holding capacity analysis will be
         included in this section.
         a.     Residential Land Use
         According to the US Census Bureau, in the period between 1990 and 2000,
         Putnam County’s population increased by 5,353 residents. Based upon current
         County building permit data, and the University of Florida Bureau of Economic
         and Business Research’s (BEBR) population projections, the County is currently
         growing at a slightly faster rate.
                (1)     Housing Analysis
                Housing need projections were prepared by the Shimberg Center for
                Affordable Housing (now known as the Florida Housing Data
                Clearinghouse) based on household projections (population age,
                household size), household income and housing costs. This data set is
                included in the Housing Element of the Plan.
                (2)     Seasonal Household Units & Population
                Seasonal and population figures are derived by calculating the number of
                housing units held for occupancy only during limited portions of the year,
                such as winter residents, and migrant worker units in the unincorporated
                county, and by extrapolating the seasonal population based on the 2000
                Census. Anticipating this component of the population is especially
                important for infrastructure planning. The seasonal and migrant worker
                                         A-25
PUTNAM COUNTY                                              FUTURE LAND USE ELEMENT

                population figures presented in this report are intended to provide the
                maximum potential that is likely to occur during peak seasons.
                The US Census tabulates seasonal housing units under vacant housing for
                seasonal, recreational or occasional use, housing for migratory workers
                and “other”. The 2000 Census indicated that there were 2,955 seasonal
                housing units in unincorporated Putnam County, accounting for
                approximately 13 percent of the unincorporated County’s total housing
                stock.
                Although the seasonal population may increase slightly predominantly
                from the construction of seasonal homes, but also partly from additional
                seasonal farm labor in 2005-2015, seasonal influx of residents is not
                anticipated to greatly increase the total projected population and is
                expected to remain at approximately thirteen percent of the total
                population.
                (3)    Residential Demolitions
                During the period 1980 through 1990, ninety-eight (98) residential
                demolition permits were issued. Since then, there have been an additional
                514 demolition permits issued between the years 2000 to 2005. The
                previous comprehensive plan had estimated 110 dwelling units to be
                demolished and this estimate has been exceeded.
                (4)    Determining Number of Residential Housing Units
                The Shimberg Center for Affordable Housing assists local governments in
                determining their projected number of housing units to sustain its
                population. Housing statistics are only projections based on statistical
                models and past trends. These projections may not reflect actual
                conditions or future housing demands and trends of the County. However,
                these models are the best available data.
                Housing need projections were prepared by the Shimberg Center for
                Affordable Housing based on household projections, household income
                and housing costs. According to the Shimberg Center for Affordable
                Housing, there were 24,338 dwelling units in 2002 in the unincorporated
                portion of the County. It is estimated that there will be a total of 27,048
                households by 2015 (an increase of 4,657 dwelling units).
                UNINCORPORATED                          2002   2005   2010   2015
                Single Family dwelling units            23,909    117 1,354 2,652
                Multi-family dwelling units                429     11     34     58
                Total Demand                            24,338    128 1,388 2,710
         b.     Determination of Land Requirements for Residential Land Use
         The estimated land requirements for the projected housing demand is derived by
         correlating the housing demand projected for the year 2015 with the amount of

                                       A-26
PUTNAM COUNTY                                              FUTURE LAND USE ELEMENT

         land use allocated to various residential land use categories. Table A-5 provides
         an analysis of residential land use requirements by the applicable land use
         category. Residential development with a density of more than 1 dwelling unit per
         acre in unincorporated Putnam County will be encouraged to concentrate in close
         proximity to existing urban areas which can provide water and sewer services and
         within smaller mixed development nodes.
         As shown in Table A-5, a total of 321,558 acres of land (as depicted on the Future
         Land Use Map) will be required to support residential growth development in
         unincorporated Putnam County through the year 2015.
         c.     Land Availability
         As shown in Table A-1, there are 20,445 acres of Vacant/Undeveloped land in
         unincorporated Putnam County. These lands shown on the Existing Land Use
         map are included in the 321,558 acres of lands available for residential
         development shown on the Future Land Use Map. Projected residential growth
         can be accommodated without encroaching on land already designated as a
         conservation, historic or agriculture resource.




                                        A-27
PUTNAM COUNTY                                                                                                          FUTURE LAND USE ELEMENT

Table A- 1: Existing Land Use Table (2005) - Unincorporated
                                                                                  ELUM            Percent of
        Existing Land Use Categories          Base Density/Intensity             Acreage         Total Lands
        General Agriculture1                 up to 1 du/20 ac;35% ISR*          72,537.00          13.59%
        Commercial                                 Up to 1:1 FAR                 2,076.00           0.39%
        Industrial                                 Up to 1:1 FAR                 2,566.00           0.48%
        Institutional2                            Up to 0.5:1 FAR                4,570.00           0.86%
        Mining                                           N/A                     2,700.00           0.51%
        Recreation/Open Space                            N/A                    104,390.00         19.56%
        Residential                            2-6 du/acre; 35% ISR*            38,046.00           7.13%
        Silviculture                        1 du/5-1 du/20ac; 35% ISR*          210,521.00         39.45%
        Vacant3                                    See Note Below               20,445.00           3.83%
        SUB-TOTAL                                                               472,221.00         85.79%
        Waterbodies                                Not Developable              66,397.00          12.44%
        Roads, Railroads, Utilities,               Not Developable               9,454.00           1.77%
        Canals
        GRAND TOTAL UNINC.                                                      533,702.00          100%
             NOTES:
                1) General Agriculture is included in both the A-1 and A-2 Future Land Use Designations.
                2) Institutional is comprised of Institutional, Public Grounds and Buildings, and Public Facilities.
                3) Vacant and Undeveloped Lands occur in all Land Use Categories – Density will vary by Designation
                * The Future Land Use Score Methodology is applicable for all Residential Density Allocations.


             Sources:Putnam County and Land Design Innovations, 2005.




                                                                      A-28
PUTNAM COUNTY                                                                                     FUTURE LAND USE ELEMENT

Table A- 2: Commercial Minerals
            Company Name                    Mine Name               Commodity        Status             Location
  Chesser & Strickland Sand Company Interlachen Mine               Sand           InActive    T10S,R24E,S16
  Florida Rock Industries              Keuka Mine                  Sand           Active      T10S,R24E,S29
  Feldspar Corp., Edgar Plastic Kaolin Edgar Mine                  Kaolin, Sand   Active      T10S,R24E,S30
  Division
  Keystone Sand Co.                    Grandin Pit                 Sand           Inactive    T09S,R24E,S08
  United Clay Mines Corp.              Crossley Mine               Sand           Inactive    T10S,R23E,S27
  Traxler Peat Co                      Florahome                   Peat           Active      T09S,R24E,S11; T09s, R24E,
                                                                                              S12
  Florida Rock Industries                 Grandin Mine             Sand                       T09S,R23E,S12, T09S, R24E,
                                                                                              S07, and south to T10S, R24E,
                                                                                  Active
                                                                                              S05,
                                                                                              T10S , R243 , S06
  Iluka Resources (fka RGC(USA)                                    Titanium
  Mineral Sands)
  Laubena Farms
      SOURCE: Wright, Cynthia Roseman and Carol A. Knox. 1982. Florida
      Mining Atlas: A Guide to Mineral Resource Management. Tallahassee:
      Department of Environmental Regulation, Bureau of Water Management.
      Updated by FDEP 2005




                                                                 A-29
PUTNAM COUNTY                                                                              FUTURE LAND USE ELEMENT

Table A- 3: Population Projections

             TOTAL COUNTY
                  Year               Total Population           Seasonal Population      Grand Total Population
                                                                    Projection
                  2000                   70,423                       7,653                      78,076
                  2005                   73,764                       8,017                      81,781
                  2010                   76,800                       8,346                      85,146
                  2015                   79,700                       8,662                      88,362


             UNINCORPORATED COUNTY
                Year        Total Population                    Seasonal Population      Grand Total Population
                                                                    Projection
                  2000                   55,764                       7,104                      62,868
                  2005                   58,463                       7,448                      65,911
                  2010                   61,062                       7,779                      68,841
                  2015                   63,560                       8,098                      71,657


Source: University of Florida Bureau of Economic and Business Research, 2000 Census and Land Design Innovations, 2005




                                                         A-30
PUTNAM COUNTY                                                                                      FUTURE LAND USE ELEMENT

Table A- 4: Future Land Use Table - Unincorporated



                  Future Land Use                                           FLUM         Percent of
                     Categories            Maximum Density/Intensity        Acreage     Uninc. Lands
                                            1 du/10 ac – 1du/5 ac & 35%
             Agriculture 1                 ISR; 85% ISR non-residential    47,621.00        10.1
                                           1 du/20 ac – 1 du/10 ac & 35%
             Agriculture 2                 ISR; 85% ISR non-residential    233,711.00       49.5
             Conservation                      1 du/30 ac & 10% ISR        127,126.00       26.9
             Commercial                         1:1 FAR & 85% ISR           1,561.00        0.3
             Industrial                         1:1 FAR & 85% ISR           5,260.00        1.1
             Mining                                     None               14,910.00        3.2
             Public Grounds, Facilities        0.5:1 FAR & 70% ISR          1,806.00        0.4
                                           1 du/ac & 0.5 FAR; 0.7:1 FAR
             Rural Center                          non-residential          4,376.00        0.9
                                             1 du/5 ac & 0.4 FAR; 0.4:1
             Rural Residential                  FAR non-residential        24,355.00        5.2
                                            1 du/1 ac & 0.5 FAR; 0.85:1
             Urban Reserve                      FAR non-residential         8,566.00        1.8
                                            1 du/1 ac & 0.5 FAR; 0.85:1
             Urban Service                      FAR non-residential         2,929.00        0.6
             GRAND UNINC.TOTAL                                             472,221.00      100.0


             NOTES:

             Sources: Putnam County and Land Design Innovations, 2005.




                                                                 A-31
  PUTNAM COUNTY                                                                                      FUTURE LAND USE ELEMENT

  Table A- 5: Residential Land Holding Capacity
                                     Available for                                           Density     Expected Density Potential
 Future Land Use    Total FLUM                          Net for
                                      Residential                          Densities         Factor        (Units/Acre)   Total Units
    Categories        Acreage                          Residential
                                     Development
                                                                      1 du/10 ac, up to 1      70%              0.14             2,667
A1                      47,621            40%             19,048
                                                                            du/5 ac
                                                                      1 du/20 ac, up to 1      40%              0.04             2,805
A2                     233,711            30%             70,113
                                                                           du/10 ac
                                                                        1 du/ac up to 4        70%              2.80             1,838
Rural Center            4,376             15%              656
                                                                             du/ac
                                                                      1 du/5 ac, up to 1       60%              0.60            10,229
Rural Residential       24,355            70%             17,049
                                                                             du/ac
                                                                       1 du/ac, up to 4        60%              2.40            11,307
Urban Reserve           8,566             55%             4,711
                                                                             du/ac
                                                                       1 du/ac, up to 9        40%              3.60             4,218
Urban Service           2,929             40%             1,172
                                                                             du/ac
RESID. TOTAL       321,558                N/A            112,750             N/A               N/A              N/A             33,063
 2015 Housing Demand: 27,048

                Notes:
                   1) This column is based upon Future Land Use categories in the FLU Map.
                   2) This column is the total acreage per land use category
                   3) Percentage of total acreage expected to be developed with residential uses is listed in this column. The percentage
                       for the Rural and Urban categories came from the mixed-use split contained in the GOPs (Obj. A.1.9)
                   4) This column contains the Total acreage in Column 2 times percentage shown on Column 3
                   5) Density ranges for various land use categories are listed in this column.
                   6) Density factor refers to a percentage used to show that only a percentage of the maximum density will be used (not
                       available to all lands)
                   7) Expected density (maximum density multiplied times the factor on column 6)
                   8) Total possible units (acreage available for residential times the expected density)

                Source: Putnam County and Land Design Innovations, Inc. 2005




                                                                   A-32
PUTNAM COUNTY                FUTURE LAND USE ELEMENT

Map A- 1: General Location




                                                       A-33
PUTNAM COUNTY                     FUTURE LAND USE ELEMENT

Map A- 2: Existing Land Use Map




                                                            A-34
PUTNAM COUNTY               FUTURE LAND USE ELEMENT

Map A- 3: Future Land Use




                                                      A-35
PUTNAM COUNTY                                      FUTURE LAND USE ELEMENT

Map A- 4: Historic Structures Map


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                                            A-36
PUTNAM COUNTY                     FUTURE LAND USE ELEMENT

Map A- 5: Wellfields Map

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                           A-37
PUTNAM COUNTY                          FUTURE LAND USE ELEMENT

Map A- 6: Drainage Basins Map

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                                A-38
PUTNAM COUNTY                        FUTURE LAND USE ELEMENT

Map A- 7: Wetland Cover Map

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                              A-39
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Map A- 8: Floodplains Map

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                            A-40
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Map A- 9: Floridan Aquifer Recharge Areas Map

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                                    A-41
PUTNAM COUNTY                                FUTURE LAND USE ELEMENT

Map A- 10: Soil Classifications Map

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                                      A-42
PUTNAM COUNTY                                   FUTURE LAND USE ELEMENT

Map A- 11: Commercially Valuable Minerals Map

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                                   A-43
PUTNAM COUNTY                                 FUTURE LAND USE ELEMENT

Map A- 12: Publicly Owned Opened Spaces Map

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            .




                                   A-44

				
DOCUMENT INFO
Description: Putnam County Tennessee Retail Sales Figures document sample