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									                                University Senate Agenda
                                     Monday, October 6, 2008
                                        3:00 – 5:00 p.m.

                                             EDC 117

1. CALL TO ORDER (Phil VanderMeer).

 2. ACTION ON MINUTES (September 8, 2008)
      All previous minutes are posted at http://www.asu.edu/provost/asenate

3.   REPORT OF THE SECRETARY – (Judy Grace)

4.   REPORT FROM UAC (Phil VanderMeer)

5. OLD BUSINESS

     A. Curriculum and Academic Programs Committee (Greg Castle)
        Consent Agenda: 2nd Reading CAPC recommends/Senate recommends.
         All CAPC documents can be reviewed on their website:
         http://www.asu.edu/provost/CAPC] For Senate Motions see attachments.

.        Senate Motion # 8 (2008-09): College of Design, School of Architecture and Landscape
         Architecture, Name change of a graduate degree program, From
         Master of Science in Building Design to Master of Science in the Built Environment

         Senate Motion # 9 (2008-09): College of Teacher Education and Leadership Reorganization
         of an existing academic unit, Departments of Elementary Education, Secondary Education,
         Special Education, and Graduate Studies and Professional Development to Division of Teacher
         Preparation and Division of Educational Leadership and Innovation

         [NOTE: Senate Motion #10 and #11 were withdrawn because Senate approval is unnecessary.]

         Senate Motion #12 (2008-09): School of Global Management and Leadership. Name change
         of a graduate degree program, From Master of Accountancy and Applied Leadership to Master
         of Professional Accountancy

         Senate Motion #13 (2008-09): College of Liberal Arts & Sciences, School of Human Evolution
         and Social Change, Establishment of a Graduate Certificate, Immigration Studies

         Senate Motion #14 (2008-090): School of Life Sciences, Disestablish a Graduate Certificate
         Bioethics, Policy and Law

         Senate Motion #17 (2008-09): College of Human Services, Department of Recreation
          and Tourism Management, Implementation of a new Graduate Degree Program,
          M.S. in Youth Development Leadership




                                                                                                       1
B. University Academic Council

          Senate Motion # 15 (2008-09) Research Committee (Second Reading) (Attachments)

          Senate Motion # 16 (2008-09) Academic Reorganization (Second Reading) (Attachments)

      Amendments (received by September 22) -- to Senate Motion #16 will be presented
        October 6, 2008

             1) Procedure for Future Reorganizations – presented by UAC
             2) Amendment offered by Film and Media Studies
             3) Amendment offered by the Departments of History, Religious Studies, and Philosophy
             4) Amendment offered by the School of Global Studies

      Memorandum - Response to Alternative Proposals

6. NEW BUSINESS

     A.     Curriculum and Academic Programs Committee (Greg Castle)
            1st reading for items approved by CAPC on October 2:

             Senate Motion #18 (2008-09): College of Liberal Arts & Sciences,
             Disestablishment of an academic unit, Department of Mathematics and Statistics

             Senate Motion #19 (2008-09): College of Liberal Arts & Sciences,
             Establishment of an academic unit, School of Mathematical and Statistical Sciences

     B.     Senate Motion #20 (2008-2009)
            Tenure clock for faculty in merged units (Eduardo Pagan) (Attachments)

7. ATTENDANCE FOR LATECOMERS

8. REPORTS FROM SENATE COMMITTEES
   A. Committee on Committees (Tory Trotta)
   B. CAPC Information Items (Attachments)

9.    OPEN FORUM

10. ADJOURNMENT




                                                                                                  2
ARIZONA STATE UNIVERSITY                                                                 Second Reading
ACADEMIC SENATE
FALL 2008 SESSION


                             Senate Motion #        8    (2008–09)

Motion Introduced by:             Curriculum and Academic Programs Committee
                                  Gregory Castle, Chair

Date of Introduction              September 8, 2008
for First Reading:

Date of Second Reading:           October 6, 2008

Title of Motion:                  Request from the College of Design – School of Architecture and
                                  Landscape Architecture- to change the name of a graduate degree from
                                  Master of Science in Building Design to Master of Science in the Built
                                  Environment



1   The Curriculum and Academic Programs Committee recommends Academic Senate approval

2   of a proposal submitted by the College of Design – School of Architecture and Landscape

3   Architecture – to change the name of a graduate degree from Master of Science in Building

4   Design, to Master of Science in the Built Environment



Rationale:

The reason for the name change in the program is to better reflect the more inclusive evolution of the Schools
curriculum that now considers both the building and the urban landscape. The courses in the major have
evolved to reflect this condition.




                                                                                                            3
ARIZONA STATE UNIVERSITY                                                                 Second Reading
ACADEMIC SENATE
FALL 2008 SESSION


                             Senate Motion #         9    (2008–09)

Motion Introduced by:              Curriculum and Academic Programs Committee
                                   Gregory Castle, Chair

Date of Introduction               September 8, 2008
for First Reading:

Date of Second Reading:            October 6, 2008

Title of Motion:                   Request from the College of Teacher Education and Leadership -for the
                                   reorganization of an existing academic unit – Departments of Elementary
                                   Education, Secondary Education, Special Education, and Graduate Studies
                                   and Professional Development to – Division of Teacher Preparation and
                                   Division of Educational Leadership and Innovation



1   The Curriculum and Academic Programs Committee recommends Academic Senate approval

2   of a proposal submitted by the College of Teacher Education and Leadership for the

3   reorganization of an existing academic unit – Departments of Elementary Education,

4   Secondary Education, Special Education, and Graduate Studies and Professional

5   Development to - Division of Teacher Preparation and Division of Educational

6   Leadership and Innovation



Rationale:

The new structure will allow faculty to work together in more flexible arrangements, and will encourage
collaboration in such areas as integration of curriculum and planning, instructional teams, and cooperative
research.




                                                                                                              4
ARIZONA STATE UNIVERSITY                                                              Second Reading
ACADEMIC SENATE
FALL 2008 SESSION


                            Senate Motion #        12   (2008–09)

Motion Introduced by:            Curriculum and Academic Programs Committee
                                 Gregory Castle, Chair

Date of Introduction             September 8, 2008
for First Reading:

Date of Second Reading:          October 6, 2008

Title of Motion:                 Request from the School of Global Management and Leadership – to
                                 change the name of a graduate degree program – from Master of
                                 Accountancy and Applied Leadership to Master of Professional
                                 Accountancy



1   The Curriculum and Academic Programs Committee recommends Academic Senate approval

2   of a proposal submitted by the School of Global Management and Leadership – to change

3   the name of a graduate degree program – from Master of Accountancy and Applied

4   Leadership to Master of Professional Accountancy



Rationale:

The name change will better reflect the underlying purpose of the program and improve its marketability.
The existing program will also be modified. These updates are proposed without disturbing the underlying
financial or support structure of the degree program.




                                                                                                           5
ARIZONA STATE UNIVERSITY                                                                   Second Reading
ACADEMIC SENATE
FALL 2008 SESSION


                             Senate Motion #         13    (2008–09)

Motion Introduced by:              Curriculum and Academic Programs Committee
                                   Gregory Castle, Chair

Date of Introduction               September 8, 2008
for First Reading:

Date of Second Reading:            October 6, 2008

Title of Motion:                   Request from the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences – School of Human
                                   Evolution and Social Change to establish a Graduate Certificate in
                                   Immigration Studies



1   The Curriculum and Academic Programs Committee recommends Academic Senate approval

2   of a proposal submitted by the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences – School of Human

3   Evolution and Social Change to establish a Graduate Certificate in Immigration Studies



Rationale:

The objective of this certificate program is to offer both traditional academic training through coursework
and research, as well as practical experience working with local immigrant/refugee communities.

The Immigration Studies graduate certificate program will provide students with an understanding of the
causes and consequences of international migration, as well as relevant professional and research training
opportunities. The certificate will prepare students for future study in graduate and professional schools, or
for careers as immigration practitioners and advocates in Non-Government Organizations, local and federal
government agencies, and private and public institutions serving immigrant and refugee communities.




                                                                                                                 6
ARIZONA STATE UNIVERSITY                                                                   Second Reading
ACADEMIC SENATE
FALL 2008 SESSION


                              Senate Motion #        14    (2008–09)

Motion Introduced by:              Curriculum and Academic Programs Committee
                                   Gregory Castle, Chair

Date of Introduction               September 8, 2008
for First Reading:

Date of Second Reading:            October 6, 2008

Title of Motion:                   Request from the School of Life Sciences to disestablish a Graduate
                                   Certificate in Bioethics, Policy and Law



1   The Curriculum and Academic Programs Committee recommends Academic Senate approval

2   of a proposal submitted by the School of Life Sciences to disestablish a Graduate Certificate

3   in Bioethics, Policy and Law



Rationale:

This graduate certificate is being disestablished as the program attracted only one student during its three
years on record. The one student in question completed the program.




                                                                                                               7
ARIZONA STATE UNIVERSITY                                                                   Second Reading
ACADEMIC SENATE
FALL 2008 SESSION


                             Senate Motion #         17    (2008–09)

Motion Introduced by:              Curriculum and Academic Programs Committee
                                   Gregory Castle, Chair

Date of Introduction               September 8, 2008
for First Reading:

Date of Second Reading:            October 6, 2008

Title of Motion:                   Request from the College of Human Services, Department of Recreation
                                   and Tourism for the implementation of a new Graduate Degree – M.S. in
                                   Youth Development Leadership



1   The Curriculum and Academic Programs Committee recommends Academic Senate approval

2   of a proposal submitted by the College of Human Services, Department of Recreation and

3   Tourism for the implementation of a new Graduate Degree – M.S. in Youth Development

4   Leadership



Rationale:

The M.S. in Youth Development Leadership places a priority on field-based experiences with local
government, school districts, faith-based groups, non-profit organizations, youth serving civic groups and
agencies, and corporate organizations that specialize in or offer youth services.

The program is designed to attract traditional full-time graduate students interested in pursuing a research
type emphasis as well as those non-traditional part-time graduate students and practitioners who are
continuing their professional roles in service agencies.

This interdisciplinary degree is offered by the Arizona State University College of Human Services at the
West campus.




                                                                                                               8
Arizona State University                                                      Second Reading
University Senate
Fall 2008 Session


Senate Motion #15 (2008-09)

Date of Introduction: September 8, 2008

Motion introduced by: University Academic Council, Philip VanderMeer, chair

Text:
                                Formation of a Research Committee

Whereas Board of Regents policies and A.R.S. 15-1601 require that university faculty ``shall
participate in the governance of their respective universities and shall actively participate in the
development of university policy," and

Whereas Policies regarding research pertain directly to activities conducted by faculty and students,

Therefore: The University Senate resolves that a Research and Creative Activities Committee be
formed according to the following:

   1 The Committee shall be composed of nine members from the Academic Assembly
     appointed by the Chair of the University Academic Council to staggered three-year terms,
     plus two members appointed by the Vice President for Research and Economic Affairs. At
     least three members shall be members of the University Senate. The Vice President shall
     serve as an ex officio non-voting member.
   2 The Research Committee is advisory to the Vice President for Research and Economic
     Affairs on policies and programs to promote, enhance, and govern research and creative
     activities. It serves as a review body for policies in the research manual and issues brought
     to it by the Vice President. The Committee may undertake studies of issues that pertain to
     its mission.
   3 The Research Oversight Committee for classified research shall be renamed the Classified
     Research Subcommittee.
   4 The Classified Research Subcommittee and the Misconduct in Research Subcommittee shall
     be a subcommittees of the Research and Creative Activities Committee.


Seconded by Senator:____________________________________________________
Not Required (for motions from Senate Committees)

Amendment(s) passed:

Disposition:

Voted on at current meeting: In favor_________          Against____________


                                                                                                       9
10
Arizona State University                                                  Second Reading
   University Senate
   Fall 2008 Session


   Senate Motion #16 (2008-9)

   Date of Introduction: September 8, 2008

   Motion Introduced by: University Academic Council
                             Philip VanderMeer, chair

   Title of Motion: Academic Reorganization


   Text:

   The University Academic Council moves the adoption of the recommendations contained
   in the Academic Reorganization Report.


   Seconded by Senator:____________________________________________________

   Not Required (for motions from Senate Committees)



   Amendment(s) passed:




   Disposition:



   Assigned to Committee:_____________________________________________________



   Voted on at current meeting: In favor_________ Against____________

   Amendment to Senate Motion #16: Procedure for Future Reorganizations
   Presented by the UAC




                                                                                           11
ACADEMIC REORGANIZATION AT ARIZONA STATE UNIVERSITY

1. College of Liberal Arts and Sciences

        . Establish a school of government, politics and global studies
                --Disestablish the School of Global Studies
                --Disestablish the Department of Political Science

        . Establish a school of social transformation
                This school is a merger of five existing units: African African-American Studies; Asian Pacific
                American Studies; Film and Media Studies; School of Justice and Social Inquiry; and, Women and
                Gender Studies.
                --Disestablish the School of Justice and Social Inquiry

        . Establish a school of history, philosophy and religious studies
                --Disestablish the Department of History
                --Disestablish the Department of Religious Studies
                --Disestablish the Department of Philosophy

2. College of Design

        . Establish a school of design studies
                --Disestablish the Department of Industrial Design
                --Disestablish the Department of Interior Design
                --Disestablish the Department of Visual Communication Design

3. School of Global Manaeement and Leadership (SGML)

        . Merge the Department of Management (SGML) with the Department of
                Management in W.P. Carey.
                --Disestablish the Department of Management


        . Merge the Department of Accounting (SGML) with the School of Accountancy in W.P.
               Carey.
               --Disestablish the Department of Accounting

        . Move faculty affiliated with SGML's Department of Global Business to their respective
                faculties in W.P. Carey.
                --Disestablish the Department of Global Business

        . Disestablish centers
                --Disestablish the Center for Responsible Leadership, the Center for Global Management, and the Center
                for Productivity, Innovation and Quality.




                                                                                                        12
       . Disestablish the School of Global Management and Leadership
4. College of Human Services

  . Merge the Department of Social Work (West) with the School of Social Work (Downtown)
               Disestablish the Department of Social Work

  . Merge the Department of Recreation and Tourism Management into the School of Community Resources and
Development (Downtown)
          Disestablish the Department of Recreation and Tourism Management

  . Disestablish the Department of Communication Studies
       The faculty and the degree programs will move to the Division of Social and Behavioral Sciences in the New
       College of lnterdisciplinary Arts and Sciences.

  . Move the School of Criminology and Criminal Justice to the College of Public Programs and physically locate at
the Phoenix Downtown campus in AY 09-10.

   . Move the Center for Violence Prevention and Community Safety to the School of Criminology and Criminal
  Justice

  . Move the Center for Behavioral Health Policy to the School of Social Work
  . Disestablish the College of Human Services
5. College of Technology and Innovation

   . Establish the Department of Engineering Technology
       Disestablish the Department of Mechanical & Manufacturing Engineering Technology
       Disestablish the Department of Electronic Systems

  . Merge the Division of Computing Studies into the Department of Engineering
       Disestablish the Division of Computing Studies

  . Merge the Department of Aeronautical Management Technology into the
   Department of Technology Management
          Disestablish the Department of Aeronautical Management Technology




                                                                                                      13
     Whereas the principles of shared governance which direct the operation of this university should
guarantee the greatest possible faculty involvement in such efforts; and
    Whereas the reorganization of academic units at ASU is of vital concern to all faculty, especially those in
the affected units; and
    Whereas faculty participation in crafting possible reorganization proposals is a crucial part of producing
the most effective and workable proposals; and
    Whereas both the budgetary crisis and the potential intellectual value of additional reorganization of
academic units will continue after consideration of the Academic Reorganization Proposal introduced on
September 8;

   We move to create the following procedure:
     --that each dean-led unit (college or school) form an ad hoc committee to coordinate proposals from
     any of its units wishing to pursue a possible reorganization;
     --that the administration create an ad hoc committee including faculty members selected by the
     University Senate to coordinate and refine any proposals, and to look for connections across the
     university;
     -- that the resulting reorganization proposals be submitted to the University Senate .




                                                                                                            14
                        Proposal to the Senate from FILM AND MEDIA STUDIES

Film and Media Studies (FMS) proposes a motion to remove FMS from the proposed School of
Social Transformation. The inclusion of FMS in the proposed school: 1) is not an intellectually
sound idea; 2) does not lead to budgetary savings; and 3) would hamper recent successes.

Background FMS is committed to making ASU a destination of choice for scholars and students
interested in film and media research and education. Five of our eleven faculty members left top
institutions – University of Michigan, UCLA, and the UA – to come to ASU because they embraced
the New American University vision of a world-class institution committed to access and excellence.

 FMS is moving forward at ASU speed. In order to create an inviting yet professional workspace, we
invested over $70,000 to revitalize the sixth floor of Languages and Literature. We also regularized
sixteen courses, making our curriculum more recognizable to students and employers alike. In order
to provide our majors with flexible options, we developed eighteen Flash-based distance-learning
courses. To enhance our image, we created a dynamic yet functional home page, a YouTube site
showcasing student work, and a Facebook network linking our advising efforts to a virtual
community of majors and minors. Finally, we aligned the major with the profession and cultural
phenomenon we teach by creating four areas of emphasis: 1) Media Industries; 2) Media and Society;
3) Styles and Genres; and 4) Screenwriting.

 The hard work is paying off. Now in its third year, FMS has grown from serving 40 majors with
five faculty and two part-time staff to serving over 210 majors with eleven faculty, nine faculty
affiliates, and two full-time staff. At the same time, our curriculum serves the broader student
population. This fall, for example, enrollment in FMS courses topped 1,500 – 700 of which came
from our online courses. We expect enrollment to double over the next three years now that our
major is one of two in CLAS available to ASU Online. We also expect to launch two online Masters
of Advanced Studies degrees in Fall 2009, one in Screenwriting for working professionals and one in
American Media and Popular Culture for international students.


CLAS Proposal: School of Social Transformation
In response to state funding reductions and in an effort to advance ASU‘s school-centric model,
CLAS proposed the establishment of a School of Social Transformation that combines African and
African American Studies, Asian Pacific American Studies, the School of Justice and Social Inquiry,
Women and Gender Studies, and Film and Media Studies. Savings would come from a reduction of
administrative overhead and consolidation of support services.

FMS faculty and affiliates discussed the merits of the proposal. We also met with Professor Fonow,
the proposed school‘s director. After careful deliberation, the faculty voted unanimously not to move
the unit into the proposed school for the following reasons:

           The inclusion of FMS in the School of Social Transformation lacks intellectual
            justification. As ―Diagram 1‖ demonstrates (attached), only one aspect of one
            dimension of our discipline addresses questions of race, gender, and justice. To offer a
            competitive degree that tackles one of our nation‘s most powerful industries, students
            must be trained in all dimensions of our discipline: aesthetics, industries, culture, and
            production.


                                                                                                        15
            The vast majority of our majors are interested in a rigorous film and media education
             and not necessarily race, gender, or justice. They want to work in the entertainment
             industry, and we provide them with critical thinking, writing, and speaking skills that
             prepare them for this highly competitive field. We suspect students would move to
             other units like Communication or other institutions like the School of Media Arts at the
             UA if FMS is moved into the School of Social Transformation.
            The majority of FMS faculty members, like the field itself, are interested in film and
             media research. As a result, we believe it would be very difficult to retain or recruit
             top faculty to a program housed in a School of Social Transformation.


There also does not appear to be cost-saving benefits to moving FMS into the proposed school:
          FMS runs quite effectively on an operations budget of $27,000 a year ($19,500 after
            the permanent budget cuts take effect in FY10). This amount covers phones, mail,
            computer maintenance, and supplies. We, of course, have other revenue streams to
            cover travel, instruction, special events and programs, and development.
          The Director of the program receives only one summer month stipend, the
            projected amount that faculty leads in the School of Social Transformation are to
            be paid.
          Two Service Professionals manage the program‘s accounts, payroll, class schedule,
             online programs, events, majors, minors, and, starting in Fall 2009, graduate degrees.
Finally, FMS is already intimately linked with other units in a way that supports ASU‘s
transdisciplinary mission. Many of our courses have permanent cross-listings with English, SILC,
TCLS, and Religious Studies. The tenure-lines of our faculty are in English, TCLS, and SILC. We
also work across the campus with other units to sponsor film festivals, guest speakers, and
development events. This year, for example, we are working with Jewish Studies to sponsor a
conference on the Jewish experience in American film that has attracted top scholars from across the
country. We are also working with the Institute for Humanities Research to sponsor a student
documentary film competition and festival on humanities and sustainability.

“Film” School of the Future
Cities the size of Phoenix typically have three to four film and media schools. ASU has a School of
Theater and Film and a Program in Film and Media Studies. Although FMS and Theater and Film
serve hundreds of students, we are collectively not close to meeting the demand for our majors. More
importantly, it is inconceivable to us that the New American University model would not have a
dedicated film and media school for the following reasons:

      For film alone, international box office receipts reached another all-time high in 2007
       with $17.1 billion; domestic receipts reached $9.6 billion ($26.7 billion total).
      Over one million people work in the U. S. entertainment industry. ASU should be at
       the forefront of institutions preparing students to enter this increasing global industry.
      The film and TV industry generates about $38 billion a year for the state of California. This
       does not include video games or the Web. Work is increasingly flowing to New Mexico
       and, to a lesser extent, Arizona. ASU should work with the state to expedite flow to this
       region.
      The average American watches 127 hours of TV a month. They spend 26 hours, 26
       minutes per month on the Internet. People with home video game consoles play an
       average of two hours a day. There are over 375 million registered members of MySpace
       and Facebook.

                                                                                                       16
We believe ASU can become a top-ten film and media school in this economic environment by
combining existing units into a School of Cinema, Television & Interactive Media and focusing
its curriculum on three imperatives:

                 The integration of theory, history, and practice to ensure students become
                  media literate citizens and professionals.
               A focus on Industry Studies, Cultural Studies, and National Cinemas to
                  ensure students understand the global economics and cultural significance of
                  media.
               A cost-effective and flexible production program focused on new
                   media, documentary film, and experimental narrative.
FMS is already a top-ten ―media studies‖ program. By combining the four filmmakers in Theater
and Film with the eleven faculty in FMS, as well as linking the mission of the Center for Film, Media
and Popular Culture to the school, ASU will exceed the status of film and media programs at our
aspirational institutions – all of which house their programs in English. More importantly, we would
complete with the University of Michigan, Northwestern University, University of Texas at Austin,
University of Wisconsin-Madison, and the University of California, Santa Barbara – all of which
house their programs in Communication or Humanities – for a spot in the top-five programs in the
country (behind UCLA, USC and NYU).

Discussions to combine film production with FMS (we already share a common core) into a ―One
School, Two Colleges‖ model reporting to both CLAS and Herberger broke down early last year.
Proposed by FMS and supported by Deans Wheeler and Losse (and, at least initially, by Dean
Kim), the discussions stalled for complex reasons. Yet we believe this model remains viable,
exciting, and serves in the best interest of students. See ―Diagram 2‖ (attached).

There are other structures that can lead ASU to being the ―film‖ school of the future. We have
discussed remaining as a unit in the Humanities as well as adding documentary and new media to our
curriculum. To address the ―branding‖ conflict posed by Theater and Film and Film and Media
Studies on one campus, we could change our name to Cinema, Television & Interactive Media.
These changes would put us in a position to compete for top-ten status in three years.


We have also discussed the possibility of moving FMS to the downtown campus. Most of our
faculty were trained in professional film schools, and the proximity to the Walter Cronkite School of
Journalism would provide a number of exciting opportunities. At the same time, the location of FMS
in CLAS provides tremendous curricular and cost-savings opportunities that we would not want to
see diminished. For example, FMS does not hire scholars that work on national cinema because
SILC and TCLS have several excellent scholars that work in this area.

To address the role and structure of film and media at ASU, we propose establishing a committee of
faculty and administrative leaders charged with developing and recommending a plan to make ASU a
top-ten film and media school in the context of the current budget restrictions. The committee we
envision would report directly to the Provost. The committee could move fast, taking advantage of
previous work, and, in reporting to the Provost, feel free to think beyond the interests of the
respective colleges (and, for that matter, individual faculty and directors). Properly charged, a
proposal could be developed and presented to the Senate, Deans, Provost, and President by the end of
fall or, at the latest, in early spring.



                                                                                                        17
School of Cinema, Television &
Interactive Media One School, Two
Colleges




                                    18
19
Amendment offered by the Departments of Religious Studies,
Philosophy, and History
This amendment has several parts:
--an Amendment,
--a statement regarding the plan,
--separate proposals from each department (III A. History; III B. Religious Studies, and III C. Philosophy).




I. Amendment           The Departments of Religious Studies, Philosophy, and History respectfully request
an amendment to strike the portion of the provost‘s reorganization proposal (Arizona State University
Academic Senate Motion #16 Academic Reorganization) relating to the merger of the three humanities
departments.

Rationale and Alternative Proposals

As detailed in the appended statement the faculties of History, Philosophy, and Religious Studies, the plan to
combine these three units into one school risks damaging these programs without generating substantial
savings over alternative proposals. With this amendment, each of the three units submits alternative
proposals that that are currently under discussion. The proposals specify means of achieving $400,000 of the
$505,000 savings projected for the three-unit school. In the months to come, the three units will identify
further savings as they continue to explore alternative reorganization proposals in consultation with a variety
of units and with the CLAS Deans.




II. Statement from the Faculties of History, Philosophy, and Religious Studies
regarding the University Reorganization Plan
[The three departments also endorsed the document below. Religious Studies and Philosophy supported it
unanimously; the History Department added this note: ―Of 25 votes, all were cast in favor of the following
amendment statement, with 17 voting yes on both the amendment and the attached document; 4 voting yes
on the amendment and abstaining on the document; and 4 voting yes on the amendment and no on the
statement.‖


Lack of Consultation

Faculty of the departments of History, Philosophy, and Religious Studies are deeply dismayed that a massive
and consequential proposed reorganization of our departments into a school of human events and values
proceeded with a complete lack of participation or consultation of the involved faculties. A plan created in
secrecy and presented to faculty hours before a public announcement was an affront to minimal standards of
faculty governance, collegial consultation, and intellectual responsibility. This unfortunate process resulted
in a reorganization proposal that at best fails to have positive intellectual merit and at worst is destructive to
the vitality, integrity, and prestige of our programs and to the transdisciplinary potential of the new American
university concept.




                                                                                                               20
Confusion over Urgency

We are disturbed by the false conjunction of two important but separate questions: how to address urgent
budgetary pressures and how and whether to undertake a significant reorganization within CLAS involving
our departments. ASU has undergone financial crises before; dealing with these does not obviously
necessitate massive administrative and intellectual renovation. Conversely, significant reorganization entails
lasting academic impacts that need to be considered on their own merits, and if possible without the
immediate pressure of financial issues. The attempt to ―raise a feeling of urgency‖ to propel predetermined
change (―Step One‖ from Kotter and Cohen‘s Heart of Change: Real-life Stories of How People Change
their Organizations) has resulted in a poorly considered proposal that lacks both an intellectual rationale and
long-term cost-effectiveness. The proposal exhibits a lack of respect for expertise in our respective academic
fields and undercuts our responsibility to pursue excellence in our programs. Because the initial recisions for
2008-2009 are already in effect, and there is unlikely to be a call for further revertments until early 2009, we
believe that there is time for a responsible and respectful discussion of reorganization plans in the coming
months.

Potential Program Damage

The rationale for the proposed School of Human Events and Values focuses narrowly on budgetary savings,
and ignores potential damage to the reputation and quality of the distinct humanities programs resulting from
such a re-organization. It would be irresponsible not to take the following concerns into account:

    a) Lack of Intellectual Rationale. There is no intellectual rationale for the proposed school. Far from
       being a bold visionary step, it is a regressive move that recalls nineteenth-century models of
       academic organization. Tellingly, contemporary institutions of higher education that combine these
       disciplines are either small colleges, or third rate universities lacking the resources to sustain strong
       programs in the humanities (for example, Grambling State University‘s Department of History and
       Philosophy; or Montana State University‘s Department of History, Philosophy and Religious
       Studies). None of our peer institutions, let alone aspirational peers, structure the humanities as the
       proposal envisions.

    b) Blow to National Visibility. The national visibility and prestige of the three programs would
       immediately suffer. The external perception of this reorganization would be perceived for what it is,
       a weakening of the humanities at ASU. Professional colleagues would not be fooled by empty
       rhetoric trumpeting it as a harbinger of the future. It will impact negatively ASU‘s national rankings
       and undercut ASU‘s goal to join the American Association of Universities. Such institutional goals
       hinge to a significant degree on academic strengths in the humanities

    c) Damage to Faculty Recruitment and Retention. By potentially damaging the reputations of the
       departments involved, the proposed new school would greatly hinder efforts at faculty recruitment
       and retention. Already, existing faculty have expressed alarm concerning the changes proposed, and
       many of our most productive junior and senior faculty members will decide to seek positions
       elsewhere. Recruiting replacements for these individuals would not only be difficult for a school
       whose identity and focus promises to remain unclear for some time to come, but also costly to the
       University.

    d) Impact on Graduate Student Recruitment. Graduate student recruitment will also be damaged by
       the proposed merger. Already underfunded in terms of graduate support, humanities units at ASU
       find it difficult to provide graduate funding offers that are competitive with other national programs,
       even in areas where ASU programs are nationally recognized. The uncertain focus of the school, as
       well as the perception that this merger will result in diminished resources and opportunities,
       threatens to seriously weaken graduate programs in History, Philosophy, and Religious Studies.



                                                                                                              21
    e) Needless Internal Competition for Limited Resources. Each unit that is envisioned as belonging to
       the new school has undergone a unique process of evolution in order to develop a distinctive profile
       that in many areas has achieved national and international recognition. As part of a larger school,
       where decisions about resource distribution and hiring will be made conjointly and by a school
       director, rather than by the units themselves, each unit is at risk of losing the distinctive profile that
       forms the basis for its reputation. Existing faculty who have worked to build the programs of which
       they are members, may no longer feel that they have a place in the programs as they develop in the
       proposed school.

    f) Potential Threat to External Research Funding. The proposal to combine History, Philosophy,
       and Religious Studies into one school will compromise the faculty‘s ability to compete successfully
       for external research funding. External funding depends upon the strength and visibility of strong
       disciplinary units. This is the case for prestigious fellowships and discipline-specific funding such as
       the History Department‘s large USDE ―Teaching American History‖ grants. It is equally the case for
       the successful external funding initiatives conducted by transdisciplinary centers (e.g., Ford
       Foundation‘s Difficult Dialogues Initiative). This is one of the specific liabilities of camouflaging the
       core disciplines of history, philosophy, and religious studies within a School of Human Events.

Budgetary Considerations

Dean Losse has indicated that the targeted budgetary savings for the proposed humanities merger of history,
philosophy, and religious studies is approximately $505,000, more than $400,000 of which would be saved
by the projected cancellation of two external chair searches—one each for philosophy and religious studies.
We are assuming that the other $100,000 would be generated by merger of staffs and consequent staffing
cutbacks, even though Provost Capaldi has indicated that advisement staffing would in no case be cut. Given
the willingness of the philosophy and religious studies departments to operate without such external searches,
we believe the limited savings projected of $100,000 is far too meager to justify the proposed merger,
especially in light of the weak intellectual arguments put forward for the particular merger that is on the
table. There are alternative ways to generate $100,000 in savings within the humanities division of CLAS,
and these alternative proposals need to be examined more carefully in the context of a university-wide
commitment to the humanities.

***************************************************************************************
***

III. A. History Department Proposal
                                            September 1, 2008
                                      Department of History Proposal
                                              Cover Letter

During the last two weeks the members of the Department of History at Arizona State University have met
several times to discuss the proposed school of history, philosophy, and religious studies outlined by Provost
Elizabeth Capaldi on August 18, 2008. According to the proposal, in this new school members of these three
departments ―would develop educational and research opportunities at the intellectual intersections of these
fields.‖

At present some members of ASU‘s Department of History already work at these intellectual intersections: a
few faculty members are associates in the Department of Religious Studies, and they look forward to
continued fruitful collaboration with their colleagues and graduate students. However, the Department of



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History faculty concluded after extended discussion that the provost‘s proposal does not fully engage the
diverse interests of our department‘s faculty as a whole. Those interests reach out from the department‘s
foundation in the humanities towards the social and natural sciences and embrace interdisciplinary and
transdisciplinary approaches in a continuing effort to gain a greater understanding of the past, and using
those insights to inform present discussions and shape future directions. The proposal slights several areas
where the department has established a national and international reputation and promises to divert energy
from several current initiatives within the department that exemplify efforts to achieve ASU‘s avowed goal
of serving as the template of the New American University.

However, the provost‘s proposal came at an opportune time, for it reignited discussions over how the
Department of History might well address the challenges and opportunities inspired by the principles and
purposes of the New American University. In those discussions, several faculty members recalled how
President Michael Crow, in a visit with the department‘s faculty, encouraged us to think big, think anew, and
contemplate the notion of evolving into a school of historical inquiry. At the same time, we appreciate the
other considerations that led to the provost‘s proposal. With those thoughts in mind, we present the
following proposal, which would take advantage more fully of our overall strengths as a department, spark
greater initiatives for research and teaching across disciplinary boundaries, and realize far more completely
the objectives of the New American University as modeled by Arizona State University.


                             School of Historical and Critical Inquiry (SHCI):
                                          A Preliminary Proposal

         One of the missions of Arizona State University is to contribute to solving the critical problems that
human society faces in the twenty-first century. Problem-solving, and the advancement of knowledge more
generally, entail a process of progressive acquisition of knowledge. We learn from past successes and
failures, and thus expand and refine our current expertise. Our students will construct the future based on
such analyses. Historical and critical inquiry is central to this process, for it helps us understand how people
in the past (in all cultures) have responded to similar issues, while also forcing us to think critically about our
assumptions, hypotheses and goals. The School of Historical and Critical Inquiry (SHCI) will serve as a
linchpin in efforts to advance knowledge, to reach a standard of intellectual excellence, and to broaden
access not only to education, but to a better standard of living for people of all walks of life. Encompassing
research on topics such as social and political justice, sustainable natural and urban environments, human
rights, the evolution of institutions and ideas, and cultural and sociopolitical tensions and conflicts within and
across national boundaries, this school will embody the transdisciplinary mission and design imperatives of
the New American University.
         Historical and critical inquiry is inherently transdisciplinary. Historical study links not only scholars
formally trained in the academic discipline of history, but also art historians, historians of science and
technology, archeologists, and classicists, as well as historically-minded scholars of religion, film and media
studies, philosophy, global studies, sociology, and ethnic and area studies. Critical thinking is a key aspect
of all these disciplines, which emphasize rigorous standards of conceptualization, theorization, and analysis.
Scholars who apply these critical thinking tools to questions of poverty, democracy, civil rights, religious
freedom, gender and racial equity, migration, understanding across national and cultural boundaries, the
human dimensions of science and technology, environmental ethics, social justice, and the evolution of ideas,
and whose intellectual pursuits are rooted in a strong commitment to an analysis based in time and place, will
compose the faculty of the School of Historical and Critical Inquiry. The proposed new School of Historical
and Critical Inquiry will respond to the University‘s current budgetary concerns. At the same time, SHCI
will advance the design imperatives of Arizona State University. Specifically, we see SHCI making the
following contributions to the College and the wider University:

          SHCI will contribute to the New American University‘s design imperative of intellectual fusion
           by inviting other units and individuals to partner with the current Department of History in



                                                                                                                23
           creating a dynamic new transdisciplinary school. Natural partners include, but are not limited to,
           those with whom individual faculty members have already forged successful collaborative
           teaching and research relationships. The resulting intellectual fusion will provide the most
           dramatic and far-reaching example of transdisciplinary collaboration to date in CLAS. Degree
           programs currently offered by faculty entering the new school will be protected and enriched by
           this intellectual fusion.

          SHCI will contribute to the entrepreneurial character of the New American University by building
           economies of scale in the coordination of advisement, the combination of several levels of
           previous departmental administration, and the avoidance of needless future duplication of faculty
           expertise. Because of broad public support for the mission of the new school, we anticipate the
           school‘s early endowment.

          SHCI will contribute to the New American University‘s global engagement by fostering teaching
           and scholarship on Europe, Asia, Latin America, and Africa as well as North America and by
           close integration of its research and curriculum with key international and regional research
           centers that are closely tied to the Department of History, including the Center for Asian
           Research, the Center for Jewish Studies, and the Melikian Center. Already the largest single
           generator of international student fellowships (Fulbright, NSEP, Marshall, etc.) outside the Barrett
           Honors College, the new school will be a leader within the university in addressing President
           Crow‘s benchmarks for greatly expanded student mobility. In this effort, the new school will
           welcome close participation and possible joint appointments with global studies. In collaboration
           with global studies, SHCI will develop a concentration in global history and house the College‘s
           new initiatives in area studies, both of which will permit broad transdisciplinary collaboration.

          SHCI will advance the New American University‘s imperative for community embeddedness, as
           well as its commitment to problem solving and use-inspired research, by incorporating and
           promoting the public history and history education programs that already command external
           funding and national recognition. The future faculty of the new school includes leading public
           intellectuals of the American southwest—scholars whose insights into contemporary issues are
           regularly sought both at the regional and national level. SHCI will facilitate the expansion of that
           community engagement.

        The moment is right for the formation of the School of Historical and Critical Inquiry. For the past
several years, Arizona State University has been pioneering a bold and exciting experiment in
transdisciplinary scholarship, creatively rethinking the university structure as it emerged in the late
nineteenth century. This process has resulted in the formation of several innovative schools, including the
School of Life Sciences, the School of Human Evolution and Social Change, and the School of International
Letters and Cultures. At the same time, the current history department has been undergoing its own process
of transformation toward greater interdisciplinarity in its graduate curriculum and strategic plan, as have
other units within the college. We believe that the School of Historical and Critical Inquiry builds on these
efforts to offer an even greater measure of transdisciplinarity and intellectual fusion, gathering scholars from
across all three divisions of CLAS.
         For all these reasons, we propose the formation of a School of Historical and Critical Inquiry that is
broad, bold, and transformational. Building on and leveraging current strengths, this school will provide a
dynamic forum from which scholars in a variety of disciplines can contribute to answering the pressing
questions of our day.



III. B. Religious Studies



                                                                                                              24
                        A Global Vision of the Study of Religion in the 21st Century:
The School of Religion, Society, and Culture

    A.      The Proposal
We propose to establish a School of Religion, Society, and Culture that will provide the institutional matrix
needed 1) to sustain the national stature of the academic study of religion at ASU and 2) to promote links and
collaborations that are the hallmark of the new American University. ASU was among the first public
universities to establish a Department of Religious Studies in 1979. The new school will build upon ASU‘s
reputation as a leader in the study of religion at public universities and demonstrate an unparalleled
responsiveness to the global challenges of the 21st century. In this way, ASU will serve as a national, and
international, model for the study of a dimension of human experience, religion, whose power to foster both
conflict and cooperation has grown impossible to ignore in the last decade.
The proposal contributes to the university‘s budgetary challenges through effective reconfiguration of
existing resources. It is a sustainable alternative to the proposed School of Human Events and Values, whose
purported savings are calculated in exceedingly narrow and misleading fashion. The real costs of the
proposed ―megaschool‖ are enormous in terms of long-term losses that model will inevitably trigger: 1. the
loss of stature for distinct disciplines within the humanities (religious studies, history, philosophy); 2. the loss
of ASU‘s nationally recognized legacy and achievement as a leader in the academic study of religion in
public higher education; 3. faculty attrition and recruitment problems arising from the program‘s loss of
national visibility and stature within the profession; 4. the loss of critical research funding and external
support; and 5. a disaffected faculty forced to join a megaschool against their united wishes.
ASU has emerged as a leader in the study of religion in the academy. In the past three decades, the
department has developed a national reputation as a model for the academic study of religion in public higher
education. Its defining features include a faculty who approach religion from a variety of disciplinary
perspectives, and whose expertise is global in scope.
The stature of religious studies at ASU would be undermined through the proposed merger with history
and/or philosophy, a regressive move that is clearly out of step with national trends. Many universities, only
now recognizing the secular blinders that have impeded the programmatic development of the critical study
of religion, are struggling to catch up. In light of ASU‘s national and international leadership in this field, it
would be self-destructive for the university to destroy its distinguished legacy by collapsing the program into
some large amorphous entity.
Religious studies faculty have long been leaders at ASU in forging collaborations across departmental
boundaries, creating and sustaining programs such as Islamic Studies, Jewish Studies, the Program for
Southeast Asian Studies, Latin American Studies, and most recently the undergraduate program in religion
and conflict. Religious studies faculty have also been very active in fostering transdisciplinary networks of
intellectual inquiry and collaborative research, participating in projects that have brought in over $3 million
to the university in just the past five years. This record of collaboration in teaching and research does not
reflect a departmental silo, but a unit committed to the kinds of cross-departmental cooperation that
strengthen the institution as a whole. Its success has been achieved through the maintenance of a strong,
humanly scaled unit that has sustained the programmatic integrity of the academic study of religion.


    B. Intellectual Rationale:
Far from a private option of the individual or a fading phenomenon of a past world, religions are vital
depositories of assumptions, motivations, beliefs, and values that have extraordinary real-world
consequences. Public discourse about religion, however, falls woefully short of apprehending and responding
to religions‘ actual power, making literacy about religion an imperative for national and global citizenship in
the 21st century. Scholarship on the role and influence of religion, for good and for ill, is crucial to




                                                                                                                 25
advancing effective exchange on such issues as human rights, sustainability, biomedical and technological
developments, coexistence and pluralism, migration, state violence, and terrorism.
The proposed School of Religion, Society, and Culture constitutes a bold initiative with a knowledge-
producing capacity unmatched by private or public universities. It will sustain the integrity and national
prominence of the academic study of religion at ASU as it facilitates the links and partnerships that connect it
to programs and faculty across the university, enhancing the potential both to generate capital and to
improve the quality of graduate education across unit boundaries.


          C.      Institutional Configuration:
The new School of Religion, Society, and Culture will be located within the Division of Humanities within
CLAS. Its Director will be recruited from current faculty in Religious Studies. Although it will retain its
current degree programs it will reassess degree requirements with an eye toward taking greater advantage of
resources in other units. The School will incorporate exceptional faculty expertise by drawing on existing
faculty pools:
         the faculty in Religious Studies whose expertise extends across all major religious traditions and
          regions in the world, and includes a broad range of thematic emphases.
         scholars of religion who hold a concurrent appointment in Global Studies.
         faculty from English, History, SILC, the Honors College, Law, Jewish Studies, and Global Studies
          who are members of Graduate Faculty in Religious Studies
         Selected faculty in other units who are engaged in transdisciplinary exploration of related themes


    D. Core Thematic Areas of Emphasis
The School of Religion, Society, and Culture is uniquely positioned to advance inquiry in three core areas
of significant national and international concern: religion and global communities, religion and conflict, and
religion, politics, and ethics. To the task of addressing these concerns, the School brings faculty expertise,
programmatic resources, and other demonstrated strengths that are without parallel in universities west of the
Mississippi. These strengths reflect, sustain, and rely upon the programmatic integrity of the study of
religion at ASU.


Core I.           Religious Formations of Global Communities
Faculty in this core collaborate on research and teaching about the role of religions in the formation of
transnational networks and global communities. Foci in this core include global flows of capital and people
in religious contexts; conversion and missionizing; colonial studies; religious diversity in the Americas, Asia,
and Europe; and the historical expansion of religious traditions, such as Buddhism, Christianity, and Islam.
The proposed School consolidates extensive faculty expertise in the study of the Americas and of Asia,
making it an excellent location to house interdisciplinary majors, such the new Major in Asian Studies. At
the doctoral level, initial planning has begun for a new track in Religion in Global Contexts.


Core II:          Religion and Conflict
Although a rich reservoir of values, principles, and ideals, religion is also a powerful source of conflict and
violence as diverse traditions—religious and secular—collide. This core is concerned with the intersections
of religion with conflict, war, violence; peace studies; religion and science; and religious challenges to
secular authority in the modern nation state.




                                                                                                               26
The Center for the Study of Religion and Conflict has successfully promoted transdisciplinary research
and education on the dynamics of religion and conflict. Established in 2003, it advances knowledge and
informed policy by serving as a research hub that fosters exchange and collaboration across the university as
well as with its broader publics—local, national, and global.
With major awards from private and public sources, including the NSF, the State Department, the Ford
Foundation, and the Templeton Foundation, faculty have collaborated on a broad range of projects with
scholars from other units across the university, including the sciences, social sciences, and the humanities. It
is striking that our ability to draw upon faculty from a broad range of distinctive fields and units to address
issues of religion and conflict has been among the most compelling qualifications that funding agencies have
cited in awarding these grants to the CSRC.


Core III.       Religion, Politics, and Ethics
Religion has reemerged as a major force in American public life and in relations among nations, regions, and
cultures. Knowledge of religious ideas, movements, and actors helps us to understand and evaluate
developments in contemporary political life, both in the United States and globally.
Faculty in this core area engage the issues that emerge in the encounter of religions with the secular power of
the nation state, as well as the religious entailments of such practical and conceptual problems as war, human
rights, terrorism, gender equality and reproductive rights, biotechnology, risks to the environment, and
torture.


        E. Transdisciplinary Clusters and Programmatic Links
In conversation with other units, the School of Religion, Society, and Culture will develop research clusters
that combine the expertise of faculty in the humanities, social sciences, and natural sciences. Potential areas
of enhanced collaboration include:
       Religion and Anthropology
       Religion and Colonial/Post-colonial Studies
       Religion and World Literatures
       Religion and the American West
       Religion and Sustainability


        F. Intellectual Capacity Building and Budgetary Savings
The new School will have a single director chosen among current faculty, eliminating the cost of additional
salaries for heads of faculty groups and creating substantial savings by hiring from within ASU. Rather than
damage the national reputation of the academic study of religion at ASU, this school will enhance it through
augmenting its partnerships with faculty across the university, thereby enhancing other programs at ASU.
By contrast, a so-called School of Human Events and Values lacks coherence and appeal. Its anticipated
savings are minimal on the surface, resulting from cuts in the 12-month position of chair of religious studies
and appointing a faculty head on a 10-month contract. This generates minimal savings in the economy of
scale. However, the hidden costs are prohibitive and indenture the future of the university. If a staff position
must be eliminated, it does not depend upon collapsing the three units into one school.
In short, anticipated savings do not offset the actual costs and qualitative setbacks which are ignored in the
proposed solution to an immediate budget shortfall. The School of Religion, Society, and Culture is the
optimal structure to sustain the integrity and reputation of the academic study of religion, and the humanities
more generally, as it advances the collaborative intellectual work of the new American university.




                                                                                                              27
III. C. Philosophy

Philosophy within the New American University

We wish to express our position in response to the proposed reorganization of CLAS as it affects the
Department of Philosophy. We recognize the gravity of the budget crisis and the value of contributing to the
formation of the New American University at ASU. Our four principal concerns are these:

    1. Will the shift to a school structure sustain the integrity and national visibility of philosophy as an
       important area of inquiry and distinctive methodology?
    2. Is the proposed School of Human Events and Culture the best school structure for facilitating ―new
       and innovative program connectivity‖? In particular, does it capitalize on Philosophy‘s focus on
       Human Valuing and Public Practices in which Philosophy has nationally recognized strength?
    3. Will the specific budget cutting measures applied to philosophy, particularly reduction in number of
       TAs and reduction of lines through not replacing faculty, cost philosophy its current national
       ranking?
    4. Will the ―big questions‖ that ASU embraces recognize the importance of conceptual, theoretical, and
       ethical inquiry in addition to ―use-oriented‖ research in empirically oriented disciplines?

A. The Integrity and Visibility of Philosophy as a Method of Inquiry
As one of the smallest departments involved in the reorganization into schools, Philosophy risks losing its
identity as a distinctive area of inquiry at ASU under the proposal to replace departments with faculty groups
within a school whose name makes no reference to specifically philosophical methodologies employed
within that school. We thus share with Religious Studies the belief that a school-centric model needs to
preserve the national visibility of traditional methodologies. Thus we would prefer either to remain a distinct
department within an innovatively titled school or to be included in a school whose title makes reference to
philosophical thought.

B. Philosophy within a School Configuration
We share with Religious Studies the view that the proposed consolidation of the Departments of History,
Religious Studies and Philosophy lacks a clear conceptual rationale. We also believe that a reconfiguration of
existing humanities departments into a school structure should do three things:
     Signal the importance of the Humanities to addressing contemporary problems including the need for
        increased cultural literacy.
     Retain the national visibility of the various humanities disciplines
     Position Philosophy within a school structure that both fosters and benefits from Philosophy‘s
        strength in Human Valuing and Public Practices

One possible school structure that would meet these desiderata is a reorganization of Humanites into four
schools:
        The School of International Letters and Cultures
        A school comprising English, Creative Writing and Film &Media Studies
        A school of historical studies
        A school of philosophical and religious studies

         Such a configuration would bring the number of schools in the Humanities into closer parity with the
number of schools in the social and natural sciences. It would respect the intellectual identities of CLAS
faculty as humanists as well as specialists in their separate disciplines. Additionally, this four-school


                                                                                                             28
structure would enable a more focused relationship between the Institute for Humanities Research and the
various humanities disciplines.
         A School of Philosophical and Religious Studies (SPRS) allows for natural and promising
synergies between these two faculties, especially in the areas of ethics, values, and an investigation of social
practices. Significant numbers of faculty in both units work on questions of ethical and religious values, law
and society, peace and conflict, equality, politics and justice. The possibilities of collaborations in research,
teaching, and pursuing funded project are rich. There are also connections between philosophical
epistemology and religious belief, metaphysical and religious views of reality, religious consciousness and
current questions in philosophy of mind. These would create desirable transdisciplinary study opportunities
for students. The strength of each faculty complements the other which makes for a stronger instructional
profile. Students can explore differences and common points between philosophical and religious ethics. The
philosophy department‘a specialization in Western thought is complemented by Religious Studies‘ resources
in Eastern, Islamic, and Native American thought. The resulting compact school would use existing staff
more effectively and have a single director thereby resulting in cost saving.
         Combined programs of philosophy and religious studies have a long history, originating in the fact
that Religious Studies was once primarily focused on philosophical questions in theology and there were thus
close connections between Religious Studies and philosophy of religion and medieval philosophy. Over the
past several decades, however, Religious Studies as a discipline has undergone enormous shifts in
methodologies, in its central questions, in its canonical literature, and in its shift to concern with global
religious traditions. This has, in many colleges and universities, been a reason to break up joint programs in
Religious Studies and Philosophy into separate departments. ASU is now uniquely positioned to redefine the
relationship between Religious Studies and Philosophy and to forge a new, productive equal partnership
between these two disciplines. The ASU Religious Studies Department‘s strengths in the areas of religion
and conflict and the role of religion in cultural practices would be complemented by the ASU Philosophy
Department‘s strengths in the area of normative assessment of public practices.
         It is of central importance to the Philosophy Department that the new school configuration capitalize
on Philosophy‘s strength in Human Valuing and Public Practices, a thematic focus that has obvious potential
to create productive synergies between philosophy and other faculties (including Religious Studies, Political
Science, Global Studies, Women‘s and Gender Studies, Justice and Social Inquiry, and Law) and to facilitate
collaboration on ―big questions‖ whose answers are likely to have impact.
          As the Department outlined in its fall 2007 vision statement, we have nationally recognized
strengths in philosophy of law, political philosophy, feminist ethics, applied ethics, and normative ethics and
moral psychology. We there articulated a plan to shape our program around a focus in Human Valuing and
Public Practices that would bring to bear philosophical work in ethics, philosophy of law, social and political
philosophy, moral psychology, feminist theory, gay and lesbian philosophy, and metaphysics of the person in
understanding the nature of human valuing and in the normative assessment of public practices. Our national
visibility and potential for attracting graduate students, however, depend completely on our ability to sustain
an attractive graduate program. Reductions in our already minimal resources compromise that ability.


C. Big Questions
The Big Questions that shape the formation of transdisciplinary faculty groups will, of course, ultimately
emerge from transciplinary dialogue once the new school structure is in place. That said, Philosophy
proposes as candidates for further consideration the following questions:

What is justice, and how has our understanding of justice been transformed in the past century?

How can societies move from conflict and aggression to a just peace?

How should we understand the demands of human rights, and how can human rights best be practically and
institutionally realized in the world?




                                                                                                              29
How can we explain the origin and maintenance of social rules, social conventions, and communication?

How do (members of) groups acquire and maintain normative expectations about what ought to be done as
well as beliefs about what others believe ought to be done? And how do these normative expectations and
beliefs shape what individuals and their groups do?

What normative theories will best enable us to understand and evaluate contemporary social, legal, moral,
and political practices?

How are human beings to be understood as moral agents as well as biological organisms?

What are the moral and legal implications of emerging technologies? From the point of view of justice, who
are the winners and losers of those transformations and what should a just society do to make the transition
fair?

What is the nature of language?


D. Budgetary Savings and Costs
         1) Recent & Potential Future Budget Reductions. The Philosophy Department, as a relatively
small department, has already been especially hard hit by the budget crisis. To date, the $14,000 ―temporary‖
budget cut, which has now become permanent, has meant that faculty travel funds were reduced to $500 a
year, support for a year-long colloquia series was reduced to $2000, and most faculty no longer have phones
in their offices with which to conduct university business. The following appear to be the only possible
avenues of further savings:

It is hard to find sources of further savings that will not be very damaging to philosophy programs. Two
possibilities are:
      If the department unit is retained, reduce the contract term of the Department Chair to 10-months.
      Share our current Departmental Assistant, Sada Gilbert with another Department. Ms. Gilbert came
         to us from NAU, where she was a part-time assistant to the History Department. (Her responsibilities
         at NAU are detailed in an appendix.)

    2) TA Resources and the Costs of Cutting Them. We are seriously concerned about the costs that
responding to the budgetary crisis by reducing TA support to Philosophy below the 2007-2008 level has had
and will predictably continue to have.
Costs to date:
     The very distinguished philosopher, Stewart Cohen, has left for our geographically closest
        competitor, University of Arizona
     A premier journal in philosophy and the only philosophy journal housed at ASU, Philosophical
        Studies. There are only a handful of premier journals in philosophy. This was a feather in ASU‘s cap
        whose loss is extremely unlikely to be recovered.

Predictable costs:
     Reduction in the number of undergraduate students that Philosophy is able to serve. Undergraduate
        philosophy courses consistently enroll to capacity and many are or will be components in
        transdisciplinary certificates (in Symbolic Systems, Ethics, and the recently proposed certificates in
        Socio-Legal Studies and Human Rights).
     Further attrition of faculty at all ranks, some of whom were specifically recruited because they fit
        ASU‘s vision of the New American University where scholarship would have both transdisiplinary




                                                                                                             30
        connections and relevance to contemporary issues, and all of whom were recruited because of their
        record of excellence and potential for national scholarly recognition.
       Failure to be nationally ranked in the one national ranking system in philosophy, a ranking system
        that has immense visibility within philosophy, is widely taken to be authoritative, and is consulted by
        graduate students determining where it is wise to apply-- the Philosophical Gourmet Report. As of
        the last (2006) Philosophical Gourmet report, the ASU Philosophy Department ranked 44th in a list
        that ends at the top 50 universities.1 The loss of Stew Cohen and Greg Fitch may well take us off the
        Philosophical Gourmet Report entirely when the rankings are next revised. The loss of any further
        faculty threatens our ability to remain ranked and in turn will damage our ability to attract graduate
        students at all (including ones interested in the Philosophy of Science). If we drop from the rankings
        , it will be a long time before ASU regains national standing in the discipline of philosophy, first,
        because the rankings are redone at multi-year intervals, and second, because five years from now it
        will cost ASU more to replace excellent faculty than it would have cost to pay the salaries of the
        same quality faculty who were retained.
       The effective termination of a PhD in Philosophy. Ten TAs made the existing PhD program in
        Philosophy barely viable. Five TAs—that is, admitting one student per year with funding—for quite
        obvious reasons disables the program from having sufficient numbers of graduate students to run
        graduate seminars. It is not a realistic possibility to sustain the program through a tutorial system;
        such a system would overtax faculty already unsupported due to inadequate numbers of graduate
        assistants, would not be able consistently to provide an acceptable level of preparation for Ph.D.
        students, and would not be taken seriously by our colleagues at other institutions.
       The lack of a PhD program in Philosophy will be no advantage for a Philosophy of Science PhD
        program in SOLS. All or nearly all top philosophy of science PhD programs exist alongside
        Philosophy Departments and PhD programs in their own institution. PhD students in philosophy of
        science benefit from graduate training in philosophy that goes beyond what is offered in any HPS
        program.

Speculative, but reasonably predictable costs:
    Elimination of all graduate courses in philosophy, even courses that would attract and benefit
       students from other disciplines. Graduate-level courses in philosophy simply cannot be effectively
       run in the absence of any enrolled students who have a background preparation for advanced study
       of philosophy.
    Stunting of the SOLS philosophy PhD program‘s success. It is difficult to imagine that talented
       students who have options for graduate study at other institutions will take serious interest in a PhD
       program in philosophy of science that is not associated with a nationally ranked PhD in Philosophy
       and, more, which does not offer graduate courses which would complement their SOLS work and
       increase their marketability on a persistently tight philosophy job market. Students trained in a very
       narrow specialization, unless brilliant, are severely disadvantaged in a highly competitive job market.

Appendix
Ms. Gilbert‘s responsibilities at NAU‘s Department of History included:
    - rebuilt the website
    - built the Schedule of Classes
    - assisted with basic undergraduate advising, including helping students find resources and understand degree
        requirements

1
 The current ranking is based on the following faculty list: Faculty: Brad Armendt, Thomas A.
Blackson, Cynthia Bolton, Stewart M. Cohen, Richard Creath, Peter de Marneffe, G.W. Fitch, Peter
French, Theodore Guleserian, Ted Humphrey, Bernard W. Kobes, Joan McGregor, Jeffrie Murphy,
Ángel Pinillos, Douglas Portmore, Steven Reynolds, Margaret Urban Walker, Michael J. Whit.
Affiliated Faculty: Richard Dagger, Manfred Laubichler, Jane Maienschein, Jim Nickel, Norbert
Samuelson, Hava Tirosh-Samuelson, Patricia White (Dean of the Law School )


                                                                                                                    31
-   completed data analysis of undergraduate student exit interviews 1994 – 1997
-   was the Graduate Student Coordinator, and assisted grad students from admissions to graduation
-   moved all Graduate Student forms online and in electronic format
-   worked with the Graduate College to move the graduate application entirely online (NAU‘s SAM)
-   coordinated three separate faculty searches
-   coordinated graduate and undergraduate scholarships
-   prepared regular reports for the Chair
-   maintained faculty information
-   compiled reports on all courses taught for last five years, student enrollments, independent studies, and
    graduate committees, etc
-   greeted daily visitors and answered admissions questions for prospective students and parents
-   clarified undergraduate and graduate policies, particularly with graduation applications
-   answered phones when necessary and assisted walk-in visitors




                                                                                                                32
  PROPOSAL FOR THE CONTINUED AUTONOMY OF THE SCHOOL OF GLOBAL STUDIES

The School of Global Studies faculty met on 12th September and expressed its unanimous desire to remain an
autonomous unit. The faculty has put forward a plan that would more than attain the purported cost savings
that are the impetus for the proposed restructuring plan that would see Global Studies merged with Political
Science.

SGS was designed to be an innovative transdisciplinary unit that advances the overall vision of the New
American University. Since its inception it has striven to attain this mandate even in the face of a sharp
reduction in resources relative to planned growth in faculty and student enrollment. The transdisciplinary
character of the School was a key draw in recruiting initial faculty hires, and it appeals to many of ASU‘s
brightest undergraduates, as well. Rather than replicate existing disciplines, the School is focused around
several interrelated ―tracks‖ that explore pressing global problems, such as climate change, genocide,
unchecked urban growth, and poverty. Through a unique internship program, SGS students apply lessons
from the classroom to a range of global settings, such as a health clinic in Ghana, a human rights non-
governmental organization in Egypt, and the United Nations war crimes tribunal in The Hague. The
internship program and the coursework preparation exemplify the global engagement and social
embeddeness of the School of Global Studies.

The faculty believes that this feature of the program will be threatened by combining with a much larger –
and discipline-oriented – program like Political Science.

Despite its small size, SGS has been a pioneer in the emerging field of Global Studies. To establish such a
program has been a major and time-consuming undertaking that has involved developing a new curriculum
from scratch and creating a vision for a field of studies that does not replicate existing disciplines. After its
inception, SGS went through some shifts in leadership, and for this reason, among others, the health and
vitality of the program may not be well appreciated by external parties on the campus. Yet, SGS has made a
concerted effort to forge links campus-wide, through an ambitious colloquium series and collaborative
research and grant projects with other units. With the program now firmly established and its enrollment
rapidly growing, SGS is poised to realize its potential.

With respect to teaching, the first mission of SGS, the number of students majoring in SGS has increased by
153% since the founding of the school in Fall 2005. Currently there are 261 declared majors in the School.
During this same period the faculty has decreased by 1 FTE. Not only are the numbers of majors increasing,
but so is the retention and quality of SGS majors. According to the most recent available data from 2007-8,
SGS has the highest freshman retention rate of all units in CLAS having greater than 30 initial majors
(85.7%). By contrast, Political Science – a much larger major – has freshman retention rates of 76.1 and
74.2% for these two years.

The quality of SGS majors is also high. In Fall ‗07 22.4% of our majors were in the Barrett Honors
College; in Fall of 08 the percentage has increased to 25%. The average cumulative GPA for majors is 3.347.
In Fall ‗08, SGS undergraduates received over $32K in scholarship money from a variety of sources –
independent of funding sources from the Honors College. In short, SGS is a healthy and growing major --
one that attracts a disproportionate number of ASU‘s best undergraduates. Many of our outstanding students
are from out of state, enhancing revenue, who have come to ASU specifically to study in Global Studies.

The unit‘s research profile is also on the upswing. Despite the absence of any grant-writing support from
the administration, and no capacity to hire someone for grant support from the unit‘s operating budget, the
SGS faculty has been busy applying for and receiving research grants. Since Fall 2005 the faculty has
applied for grants totaling $7.472 million (on a per capita basis this represents $830,000 per capita FTE
faculty). To date, $356,000 has been awarded to faculty members in SGS (or $40,000 per capita FTE).




                                                                                                                33
Principal areas of research include the following:

         Global governance and climate change. SGS is functioning as a hub for the study of global
          governance, spanning global, national, regional, and local levels. Faculty members have taken the
          lead in establishing several overlapping groups and initiatives. For example, the Project on Global
          to Local Linkages in Environmental Governance (PGLLEG) is composed of recognized leaders in
          the analysis of global environmental institutions, local environmental adaptation, Asian urban and
          regional planning, and the global role of non-governmental organizations (NGOs). The group
          combines interdisciplinary interests in anthropology, law, sociology and urban planning to analyze
          and assess the effectiveness of global and multilateral actions on environmental problems and the
          mechanisms for incorporation of local participation and concerns into global decision-making.
          PGLLEG is currently working on funded projects to assess the role of local participation in global
          biodiversity institutions and the impact of international NGOs in protected areas governance in the
          Greater Mekong Region, and grants have been submitted for future projects on local adaptation to
          climate change in Asia.

 Global human rights and transnational criminal justice. Through development of a unique
  undergraduate curriculum, pathbreaking research, and transdisciplinary collaborations, SGS faculty have
  gained international recognition for their contributions to the emerging field of global human rights and
  transnational criminal justice. The School‘s expertise in this area has made its faculty a natural focal
  point of a new campus center on human rights and global governance. The ASU Center for Transnational
  Public-Private Governance is to be jointly led by the College of Law and SGS.

 Nongovernmental organizations (NGOs). Scholars and policymakers working on social problems and
  outcomes find themselves at some point having to engage NGOs at both the local and global levels. Yet
  the role of NGOs in global governance remains a lacuna in American social science disciplines and the
  American university broadly. The Faculty Group on Nongovernmental Organizations brings together
  scholars from different disciplines and practitioners from different NGO sectors to develop a framework
  for studying NGOs that goes beyond that in received scholarly research. Its initial projects focus on the
  role of NGOs in climate change and adaptation and education, national laws governing development
  NGOs, and on the convening of an international conference bringing together scholars and practitioners.

 Urban growth. The work of the SGS urban research group is increasingly focused on the relationship
  between urban culture and built form, political dynamics and urban economic development. A second
  major theme of the urban group is urban environmental protection, resilience, adaptation and mitigation
  (including rebuilding) in the context of threats, especially natural hazards and global warming, that
  increasingly affect cities worldwide. Urban group faculty are regularly invited to high-profile
  international conventions and are actively involved in teaching innovation that deploys new media,
  relating current global drivers -- such as climate change, increased urban income disequity, post-
  petroleum dynamics, globalization, and environmental stresses to urban built form and land use.

 Global contexts of religion and conflict. SGS faculty are involved in an NSF-funded project on religion
  and conflict throughout the world with faculty in Psychology Religious Studies, Political Science,
  Communication, SHESC, and SSFD. In addition, SGS faculty are participating in a Ford Foundation
  Difficult Dialogues Initiative led by the Center for the Study of Religion and Conflict.

 Economic development. SGS faculty took a leading role in a 2008 Conference on China's Economic
  Transformation held recently at the Graduate School of Business of the University of Chicago. The five-
  day conference assembled academics from China, the United States, and the rest of the world as well as
  Chinese government officials, and entrepreneurs from China, Hong Kong, and the United States to
  examine how China became capitalist and to reflect on its experience for our understanding of market
  economies.



                                                                                                          34
All told, SGS is a vital contributor to ASU‘s focus on global engagement, and the faculty unanimously agree
that it can stand on its own despite new budgetary cutbacks. An autonomous SGS can still realize, and in fact
exceed, the cost savings that a newly merged School was designed to attain.

Cost savings going forward. The faculty envisions several steps that can be taken to reduce the unit‘s
operating costs. Changes in outreach to other units on campus, in unit governance, and in staffing can all
contribute to substantial cost savings.

In the first place we will step up our already-strong efforts to recruit faculty in other units on campus to
become affiliates who can offer electives to SGS majors. SGS initially was envisioned as a hub for many of
the ASU programs that have an international focus (such as Global Health, Global History, and Religious
Studies), and we remain committed to this modus operandi. SGS has recently reached out to faculty in a
number of such programs, inviting a number of new faculty affiliates. As such, this emerging group anchored
in SGS can increasingly serve the function for which it was designed. The addition of a number of affiliate
faculty whose courses are cross-listed offers the undergraduates a much wider range of courses than that
offered by SGS faculty alone. When the economy recovers SGS will once again be able to extend its
curricular reach, and also to mount an effective graduate program.

Beyond this, the senior faculty has agreed to establish a rotating unit head, which would eliminate the need to
hire a full-time – and costly -- Director. The rotating head would be compensated not by extra salary, but by
release time from some teaching obligations.

Further, SGS can continue to share budget staff -- as we are now doing in the case of a Business Manager
with Women and Gender Studies. Moreover, we could begin to share other staff with an appropriate partner
School.

Finally, under the current structure, we would still be able to help Political Science by having selected SGS
faculty teach both graduate and undergraduate courses in that department and increasing the number cross-
listed SGS and Political Science courses. To illustrate, Hechter taught a graduate course in Political Science
last year, and Thomas is doing the same this year. Many other SGS faculty members are able to offer courses
that will help to diversify the political science curriculum with respect to their international and comparative
offerings.

All told, an autonomous SGS is best able to fulfill its mandate in the New American University, assisting the
State of Arizona to more effectively interact with the global economy. The changes outlined above are at
least cost-neutral.




                                                                                                             35
                                                Memorandum



TO:            Elizabeth D. Capaldi
               Executive Vice President

FROM:         Quentin Wheeler
              University Vice President and Dean

                Linda Costigan Lederman
                Dean of Social Sciences

                Deborah N. Losse
                Dean of Humanities

                Sid P. Bacon
                Dean of Natural Sciences

                Alan Artibise
                Executive Dean

RE:            Response to Alternative Proposals


Response to the School of Human Events and Values


The Deans of the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences have reviewed the various alternative proposals to the
School of Human Events and Values. These include: The School of Religion, Society, and Culture from the
Department of Religious Studies; the School of Historical and Critical Inquiry from the Department of
History; and the proposal from the Department of Philosophy which advances a focus for the unit on Human
Values and Public Practices, with a sound base in Metaphysics and Epistemology.

While the College applauds the seriousness with which the faculties of the three units approached the process
of reorganization as they tried to identify crosscutting, interdisciplinary areas of focus, the proposals retain
the current administrative structures with current staffing and advising resources. The substantive cut
proposed was to cancel the external chair searches. There is a further move to indicate areas of overlap in
faculty expertise that might bring additional savings in cross-listing courses to allow postponement of hiring
while ensuring student access to classes. In looking at staffing, the Department of Philosophy has indicated
that they may be able to share their coordinator with the Department of History. This is a creative solution
possible because of the proximity of the two units.

Chief among the criticisms of the proposal for the School of Human Events and Values were the following:
the lack of intellectual rationale, the loss of national visibility, the damage to faculty recruitment and



                                                                                                             36
retention, the impact on graduate student recruitment, the internal competition for limited resources, and the
potential threat to external funding. A final critique mentioned that the proposal did not fully engage the
diverse interests of the faculties.

In response to the perceived limitations of the proposal, the presence of distinct and quasi-autonomous
faculties, programs, and disciplines along side of opportunities for collaboration, where desirable, preserves
the identity of the discipline and the reputation of the individual and distinct faculties. While the training of
graduate students will be discipline specific, and recruiting will be done through the individual faculties, the
opportunities for graduate and undergraduate students from the three programs to interact in classes that deal
with cross-cutting themes will enrich their professional development. To our knowledge, the new schools
have been successful in recruiting top students even though, in the example of the School of Earth and Space
Exploration, the school name does not reflect either the discipline of geological sciences nor astronomy.
Effective websites and recruiting material direct the students to the appropriate program.

In order to continue advancing the work of reorganization, we have tried to include aspects of the intellectual
vision set forth in the alternative proposals and put forth two options. The first option includes all three
units, but takes elements from each proposal. This option is based on the proposal for the School of
Historical and Critical Inquiry and would include three autonomous faculties with the two faculty heads and
the director attending the Academic Council of Chairs and Directors as well as the meetings of the division
of Humanities.


Option I.

                               School of Historical and Critical Inquiry (SHCI):


Mission

         One of the missions of Arizona State University is to contribute to solving the critical problems that
human society faces in the twenty-first century. Problem solving, and the advancement of knowledge more
generally, entail a process of progressive acquisition of knowledge. We learn from past successes and
failures, and thus expand and refine our current expertise. Our students will construct the future based on
such analyses. Historical and critical inquiry is central to this process, for it helps us understand how people
in the past (in all cultures) have responded to similar issues, while also forcing us to think critically about our
assumptions, hypotheses and goals. The School of Historical and Critical Inquiry (SHCI) will serve as a
linchpin in efforts to advance knowledge, to reach a standard of intellectual excellence, and to broaden
access not only to education, but to a better standard of living for people of all walks of life. Encompassing
research on topics such as social and political justice, sustainable natural and urban environments, human
rights, the evolution of institutions and ideas, and cultural and sociopolitical tensions and conflicts within and
across national boundaries, this school will embody the transdisciplinary mission and design imperatives of
the New American University.




Structure and Foci of Inquiry




                                                                                                                37
        The School of Historical and Critical Inquiry will be made of three faculties: the Faculty of History,
the Faculty of Philosophy, and the Faculty of Religious Studies.
Each faculty will have a unique focus but transdisciplinary clusters will combine to address critical issues
and examine assumptions, hypotheses and goals surrounding these issues.

        The Faculty of History will be organized around six broad topics:
History and Women and Gender Studies; Ethnic Studies; History, the Nation-State and Global
Transformations: Toward Cosmopolitan Patriotism; History among the Disciplines; History and the
University; History and the Global Academic Community; and History and Global Challenges. Chief among
these broad challenges are migration and diaspora history, environmental history, the history of science and
technology, the history medicine, human rights, the history of religion, empire and colonialisms, holocaust
and comparative genocides, and Cold War history.

        The Faculty of Philosophy will focus on the area of Human Values and Public Practices with a sound
base in Metaphysics and Epistemology. The area of Human Values and Public Practices is devoted to the
philosophical investigation of human values in the context of legal, political, biomedical, and social
practices. Specific areas of inquiry include: ethics--ancient, applied, metaethics, feminist ethics; moral
psychology, gay and lesbian philosophy, philosophy of law, social and political philosophy, jurisprudence,
and finally, reparation and restorative justice.

         The Faculty of Religious Studies recognizes that religions are vital depositories of assumptions,
motivations, beliefs, and values that have extraordinary real-world consequences. Central to the mission of
the faculty will be to further public discourse about religion to promote literacy about religion in order to
make it an imperative for national and global citizenship. In advancing an exchange on such issues as human
rights, sustainability, biomedical and technological innovation, migration, state violence and terrorism, the
faculty will focus on three core thematic areas: religious formations of global communities, religion and
conflict, and religion/politics/ethics.

         Common areas of inquiry identified by all three faculties include: human rights; sustainability;
migration; ethics in politics, religion, medicine, law; feminist theory; society and gender; history and
philosophy of science; political theory; religion and conflict; terrorism and violence; the convergence of
culture and religion: Buddhism, Daoism, Islam, Judaism, Christianity; and diversity in the Americas; the
American West: religions, cultures, social structures.

Academic Programs to remain as currently approved:

B.A., M.A., Ph.D. in History, Religious Studies, Philosophy



Option II:


In this second option, the faculties of History and Philosophy will be members of the school. In addition,
individual faculty members who would like the option of joining the new school may express interest in
doing so. Those faculty who choose to remain in the Department of Religious Studies must recognize that
the next wave of budget cuts may make it impossible to do anything but disperse the unit. The current
portfolio of degrees in Religious will remain in place: B.A., M.A. and Ph.D. in Religious Studies.


Mission



                                                                                                             38
         One of the missions of Arizona State University is to contribute to solving the critical problems that
human society faces in the twenty-first century. Problem-solving, and the advancement of knowledge more
generally, entails a process of progressive acquisition of knowledge. We learn from past successes and
failures, and thus expand and refine our current expertise. Our students will construct the future based on
such analyses. Historical and critical inquiry is central to this process, for it helps us understand how people
in the past (in all cultures) have responded to similar issues, while also forcing us to think critically about our
assumptions, hypotheses and goals. The School of Historical and Critical Inquiry (SHCI) will serve as a
linchpin in efforts to advance knowledge, to reach a standard of intellectual excellence, and to broaden
access not only to education, but to a better standard of living for people of all walks of life. Encompassing
research on topics such as social and political justice, sustainable natural and urban environments, human
rights, the evolution of institutions and ideas, and cultural and sociopolitical tensions and conflicts within and
across national boundaries, this school will embody the transdisciplinary mission and design imperatives of
the New American University.

Structure and Foci of Inquiry

        The School of Historical and Critical Inquiry will be made of two faculties: the Faculty of History
and the Faculty of Philosophy. Each faculty will have a unique focus but transdisciplinary clusters will
combine to address critical issues and examine assumptions, hypotheses and goals surrounding these issues.

        The Faculty of History will be organized around six broad topics:
History and Women and Gender Studies; Ethnic Studies; History, the Nation-State and Global
Transformations: Toward Cosmopolitan Patriotism; History among the Disciplines; History and the
University; History and the Global Academic Community; and History and Global Challenges. Chief among
these broad challenges are migration and diaspora history, environmental history, the history of science and
technology, the history medicine, human rights, the history of religion, empire and colonialisms, holocaust
and comparative genocides, and Cold War history.

        The Faculty of Philosophy will focus on the area of Human Values and Public Practices with a sound
base in Metaphysics and Epistemology. The area of Human Values and Public Practices is devoted to the
philosophical investigation of human values in the context of legal, political, biomedical, and social
practices. Specific areas of inquiry include: ethics--ancient, applied, meta-ethics, feminist ethics; moral
psychology, gay and lesbian philosophy, philosophy of law, social and political philosophy, jurisprudence,
and finally, reparation and restorative justice,

         Common areas of inquiry identified by both faculties and their current affiliates include: human
rights; sustainability; migration; ethics in politics, medicine, law; feminist theory; society and gender; history
and philosophy of science; political theory; the American West, diversity in the Americas, terrorism,
violence, war and reparation; and the convergence of cultures: Islam, Judaism, indigenous peoples in the
Americas; orthodox sects and communism; colonialism, imperialism.

Academic Programs to remain as currently approved:

B.A., M.A., Ph.D. in History, Philosophy



********************




                                                                                                                39
In conclusion, the two options are based on further input from the faculty and take into consideration the
commitment to maintain disciplinary expertise while facilitating opportunities for collaboration both among
faculty and students.

School of Social Transformation

The Deans of the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences have reviewed the proposal for the School of Social
Transformation. The majority of the units involved in the School are in the process of embracing it and
moving forward to create a synergy to enhance their individual excellence and autonomy. Women and
Gender Studies, African and African- American Studies, Justice and Social Inquiry and Asian Pacific
American Studies through their leadership endorse the new school as an intellectual opportunity to address
the intersectionality of race, gender, justice and social change.

The Program in Film and Media Studies and units of Women and Gender Studies, African and African-
American Studies, Justice and Social Inquiry and Asian Pacific American Studies have mutually agreed to
move forward without the Program in Film and Media Studies. While FMS would bring interesting
dimensions to the new school and was initially welcomed, its desire to remain independent overrode its
willingness to work collaboratively. The faculty of Film and Media Studies has already been informed that
by choosing to remain an independent program the next wave of budget cuts may make it impossible to do
anything but disperse the unit.

School of Government, Politics and Global Studies


 The College supports the proposal as it exists. It is a restructuring based on protecting intellectual pursuits
and excellence for both units involved, Political Science and Global Studies. In recent years Political Science
has lost faculty in international relations and comparative politics; the infusion of faculty from the School of
Global Studies (SGS) helps shore up both graduate and undergraduate teaching needs for Political Science,
while providing Global Studies with access to graduate students and graduate courses, neither of which exists
currently for Global Studies. At the graduate level nearly 80% of Political Science graduate students are in
international relations and comparative politics, areas directly related to much of the work in SGS; and at the
undergraduate level there are areas of study that are mutually beneficial for those interested in political
science or global studies. Although the alternative proposed by the School of Global Studies (SGS)
makes valid points about its intellectual aspirations, desire for autonomy and commitment to students, all of
these are amply met in the School of Government, Politics and Global Studies while at the same time
addressing the severe budgetary considerations that are the catalyst for the restructuring. In addition, within
the newly proposed school, SGS will have immediate access to experienced administrators and staff to
relieve the burdens now on faculty for administering phases of their undergraduate program that it does not
now have nor have the resources for within the foreseeable future. Strong leadership and administrative skill
will exist in the new school in ways that are stronger than in the SGS proposal, which includes an annual
rotating leadership that does not work from an administrative perspective, because it lacks continuity of
leadership.

In sum, in the proposed School of Government, Politics and Global Studies, SGS retains its identity,
undergraduate program, tenure and promotion practices, leadership by one of its own faculty as Faculty Head
and access to transdisciplinary engagement with Political Science as well as other units; SGS also gains
access to graduate students and graduate courses. Moreover, the newly proposed school reduces costs by
economy of scale.




                                                                                                             40
 Office of the Vice President and Dean
PO Box 876505, Tempe, AZ 85287-6505
(480) 965-3391 FAX: (480) 965-1093
      Website: http://clas.asu.edu/




                                         41
ARIZONA STATE UNIVERSITY                                                                  First Reading
ACADEMIC SENATE
FALL 2008 SESSION


                            Senate Motion #         18   (2008–09)

Motion Introduced by:             Curriculum and Academic Programs Committee
                                  Gregory Castle, Chair

Date of Introduction
for First Reading:                October 6, 2008

Date of Second Reading:           November 3, 2008

Title of Motion:                  Request from the College of Liberal Arts & Sciences for the
                                  disestablishment of an academic unit – Department of Mathematics and
                                  Statistics



5   The Curriculum and Academic Programs Committee recommends Academic Senate approval

6   of a proposal submitted by the College of Liberal Arts & Sciences for the disestablishment

7   of an academic unit – Department of Mathematics and Statistics



Rationale:

The nature of the change is the formation of a school while disestablishing a department. The Department of
Mathematics and Statistics, which is a department within the Division
of Natural Sciences, will be disestablished.




                                                                                                          42
ARIZONA STATE UNIVERSITY                                                                   First Reading
ACADEMIC SENATE
FALL 2008 SESSION


                             Senate Motion #        19   (2008–09)

Motion Introduced by:             Curriculum and Academic Programs Committee
                                  Gregory Castle, Chair

Date of Introduction
for First Reading:                October 8, 2008

Date of Second Reading:           November 3, 2008

Title of Motion:                  Request from the College of Liberal Arts & Sciences for the establishment
                                  of an academic unit – School of Mathematical and Statistical Sciences



8   The Curriculum and Academic Programs Committee recommends Academic Senate approval

9   of a proposal submitted by the College of Liberal Arts & Sciences for the establishment

10 of an academic unit – School of Mathematical and Statistical Sciences



Rationale:

The School of Mathematical and Statistical Sciences will focus on training
undergraduates and graduate students in mathematics and statistics while encouraging
research with other disciplines. The school model embraces, and indeed requires, close collaborations and
interactions with academic and research units across the university.

The establishment of a School of Mathematical and Statistical Sciences will
further enhance the mission of the university and improve opportunities for students and
faculty associated with the school.




                                                                                                            43
Arizona State University                                                  First Reading
University Senate
Fall 2008 Session


Senate Motion #20 (2008-9)

Date of Introduction: October 6, 2008

Motion Introduced by: Eduardo Pagan

Whereas the Provost has committed to the fair treatment of all tenured or tenure-eligible faculty
members who are going up for promotion in units that are being considered for merger or
reorganization,

The University Senate urges that every chair and/or dean develop individualized plans that give
each faculty member a fair opportunity to be successful in promotion and tenure.

Such plans may include extensions to the tenure clock, mentoring, or other supports.



Seconded by Senator:____________________________________________________

Not Required (for motions from Senate Committees)



Amendment(s) passed:




Disposition:



Assigned to Committee:_____________________________________________________



Voted on at current meeting: In favor_________ Against____________




                                                                                              44
                    INFORMATION ITEMS
                 ACADEMIC SENATE FALL 2008



On October 2, 2008, the Curriculum and Academic Programs Committee, recommended approval of the
following:

College of Liberal Arts and Sciences
School of International Letters and Cultures (SILC)

Establishment of a minor
Romanian




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