DEPRESSIVE SYMPTOMS, NEGATIVE LIFE EVENTS AND INCIDENCE OF LIFETIME TREATMENT OF CANCER IN THE HUNGARIAN POPULATION by ProQuest

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									                                                                           Articles Section

Journal of Cognitive and Behavioral Psychotherapies,
Vol. 10, No. 1, March 2010, 39-57.



    DEPRESSIVE SYMPTOMS, NEGATIVE LIFE EVENTS
     AND INCIDENCE OF LIFETIME TREATMENT OF
       CANCER IN THE HUNGARIAN POPULATION
     Csaba L. DEGI*1, Piroska BALOG2, Maria KOPP2, Éva KÁLLAY1,
                 Julian F. THAYER3, Ellen L. CSIKAI4
                      ¹Babeş-Bolyai University, Cluj-Napoca, Romania
                        2
                          Semmelweis University, Budapest, Hungary
                             3
                               Ohio State University, Ohio, USA
                        4
                          The University of Alabama, Alabama, USA

          Abstract
          Cancer incidence and mortality rates in Hungary are the highest in the
          Central-Eastern European region. Our investigative study examined
          associations of cancer-prone behavioral risk factors, psychosocial variables
          and demographic characteristics with cancer treatment on a population
          level. Data were obtained from the Hungarostudy 2002, a cross-sectional,
          representative survey of the adult Hungarian population (n=12643).
          Controlling for all other study variables in a binary logistic regression
          model, results revealed that the odds of having been treated for cancer were
          almost twice as high among persons with depression and respondents who
          experienced negative life events than for those who were not depressed and
          reported no negative life events. These results send a warning signal to the
          Hungarian health care system regarding the widespread need for education,
          prevention, psycho-social screening programs and treatment of depression.

          Keywords: depression, negative life events, cancer treatment, population
          study

         In Hungary, cancer incidence (772.24 per 100 000) and cancer mortality
(263.81 per 100 000) rates are the highest in the Central-Eastern European region
and among the highest in international comparative analyses based on
epidemiological data (Gárdos, 2002; WHO, 2006). Also, prevalence of clinical
depression (score 19 and higher on the Beck Depression Inventory) in the
Hungarian population has been increasing since 1988 when it was 7.5%. The
prevalence rose to 14.1% in 1995 and 16.5% in 2002 (Balo & Purebl, 2008).
While the associations between psychosocial variables and cancer have been
relatively thoroughly-studied in general, no research has specifically addressed
these relationships within the Hungarian population. The national representative
*
 Correspondence concerning this article should be addressed to:
E-mail: csabadegi@yahoo.com

Depressive symptoms and cancer incidence                                                 39
Articles Section

survey (Hungarostudy 2002) provided a valuable 
								
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