But Still They Blog by ProQuest

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As a library person, the author has been particularly interested in "liblogs" -- what some call the biblioblogosphere. These are blogs written by library people or about library issues. In 2008, he was much more ambitious. He attempted to locate every English-language liblog that had been around for at least half a year, was still available, and had at least a little visibility. The results were interesting and voluminous. It's hard to make any correct overall statements about 600-plus blogs, but there were a number of interesting partial trends. In 2009, the silly claim that "blogging is dead" seemed to have increased -- and it was hard not to notice that the 500 blogs in his Bloglines account weren't requiring as much time to scan as they had a year before. The bottom line: Library people seem to be starting fewer new blogs and walking away more often; people are posting fewer posts -- but still they blog.

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									            >crawford                    at large                                                Walt Crawford
                                                                                                         LYRASIS




                                                                        But Still They Blog


                             IF     you’ve been reading real blogs for the past decade, you may have noticed




“       In 2009, the silly

      claim that ‘blogging

      is dead’ seemed to
                                    a change in the past year or two. I’m finding significantly fewer posts and,
                             in many cases, somewhat longer posts. If you follow lots of blogs, you may also
                             notice that old ones seem to be disappearing, possibly at a faster rate than sus-
                             tained new blogs are being born. You might even agree with hundreds of pundits
                             who claim that blogging is dead.
                                That claim is nonsense, but there are changes. A couple of definitions may be
                             in order. By “real blogs” I mean personal blogs as opposed to professional publi-
                             cations done in the guise of blogs, marketing pieces, and blogs created primarily
       have increased—       to increase the blogger’s reputation or to make more money. Those are all, of
                             course, real blogs—but they’re not the most interesting variety. By “sustained
      and it was hard not    new blogs” I mean that most new blogs—probably 90%–95%—have never been
                             more than brief experiments (or assignments), rarely lasting more than a year or
        to notice that the   for more than a few dozen posts.

                             THE LIBLOG LANDSCAPE
        500 blogs in my          As a library person, I’ve been particularly interested in “liblogs”—what some
                             call the biblioblogosphere. These are blogs written by library people or about
       Bloglines account     library issues. (Library blogs, blogs produced by libraries themselves, are a dif-
                             ferent but overlapping sphere.) I’ve been following many liblogs for years; I rely
        weren’t requiring    on liblogs for inspiration and source material for some of my columns and most
                             of my essays in Cites & Insights. Liblogs form a primary resource for the articles I
                             create and expand at the Library Leadership Network. I’ve been so interested in
        as much time to      liblogs that I’ve done analyses of the field since 2005—a selective (and contro-
                             versial) study of 60 blogs in 2005 and a less-selective (and less-controversial)
       scan as they had      study of 213 “midrange” liblogs in 2006.
                                 In 2008, I was much more ambitious. I attempted to locate every English-lan-
          a year before.     guage liblog that had been around for at least half a year, was still available, and
                             had at least a little visibility (which, at the time, I defined as having a sum of
                             Bloglines subscription and Technorati “authority” of at least nine—which could

58 www.onlinemag.net
mean as few as six subscribers and three links). Librarians




                                                                       “
flock to social media and social networks and build tools to
help understand use of those media. I located two major                                If you follow lots of blogs,
lists of liblogs, in addition to hundreds of blogrolls. (Why
the “at least a little visibility” rule? Partly to limit the size of                 you may also notice that old
the universe, partly because it was clear that some blogs are
“friends and family” blogs that the bloggers really want to                       ones seem to be disappearing,
keep under the radar, and my study would inherently tend
to publicize the blogs, at least slightly.)             
								
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