The W. K. Kellogg Foundation and the Nursing Profession: Shared Values, Shared Legacy by ProQuest

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the political, economic, and military issues shaping events in the immediate postwar
period.


Jayne Elliott, PhD
Research Facilitator, Administrator
AMS Nursing History Research Unit
Room 3245A, School of Nursing
University of Ottawa
451 Smyth Road
Ottawa, ON K1H 8M5 Canada



The W. K. Kellogg Foundation
and the Nursing Profession:
Shared Values, Shared Legacy
By Joan E. Lynaugh, Helen K. Grace, Gloria R. Smith,
Roseni R. Sena, Maria Mercedes Duran de Villalobos,
and Mary Malehloka Hlalele
(Indianapolis, Ind.: Sigma Theta Tau International
Honor Society, 2007)
(428 pages, paper; $29.95)

W. K. Kellogg is a name recognized by millions as the worldwide maker of popular
breakfast cereals, but for many health care professionals Kellogg is also recognized as
a premier philanthropic foundation that funds innovative health care projects. The W. K.
Kellogg Foundation and Nursing Profession offers readers a scholarly exposition of the
history of the W. K. Kellogg Foundation and insiders’ views of some of the decision-
making policies that funded innovative and diverse health care projects for more than
seventy-five years.
     Nurse historian Joan Lynaugh opens the book with a succinct overview of the
history of the W. K. Kellogg Foundation. Kellogg created the foundation in 1930
from cereal profits. His interest in the health of children motivated him to use the
foundation to help communities find ways to empower their local leaders to create
new ways to improve the health, education, and welfare of children. A firm believer
in the power of education to change human behavior, Kellogg maintained that educa-
tion was the means by which one generation could best improve the next generations’
opportunities for better lives. This premise, put to the test in the 1931 Michigan
Community Health Project, revealed the effectiveness of interdisciplinary collabo-
ration in creating new public health s
								
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