Making Visible Embryos

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personnel, historians, and researchers all over the world can access the books,
papers, and journals documenting the international endeavors and programs
to institute measures to prolong life and minimize the suffering that trails epi-
demics and diseases. But beware, you will find yourself spending much more
time at this site than you can ever anticipate.

Jeannine Uribe, PhD, RN
Drexel University
College of Nursing and Health Professionals
1505 Race Street
Mail Stop 501
Philadelphia, PA 19102–1192



Note

      1. Contagion: Historical Views of Diseases and Epidemics. http://ocp.hul.harvard.edu/
contagion/


Making Visible Embryos. 2008. Tatjana Buklijas and Nick Hopwood. An online
exhibition developed by the University of Cambridge with support from the
Wellcome Trust http://www.hps.cam.ac.uk/visibleembryos/index.html


Tatjana Buklijas and Nick Hopwood’s Web site Making Visible Embryos traces
the evolution of the embryo as a cultural concept, as an object for scientific
exploration, and the interplay between these two. For most of the 700 years
covered by this Web site, the scientific specifics of the human embryonic
phase of development, which begins with implantation and ends with the
eighth week of gestation, the beginning of the fetal phase, were unknown, and
popular concepts of the embryo were nonexistent. Today images of embryos
are ubiquitous as shorthand for political, religious, and pop culture messages.
An Internet search for embryos nets information for expectant parents, craft
instructions including those for a fetus coin purse, and propaganda from pro-
and antiabortion proponents. In the fourteenth century images of human
gestation were far less common and more fantastic. Making Visible Embryos
exposes the conceptual and imagined evolution of the embryo from the 1300s
to present day.
     Buklijas 
				
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Description: Rather than simply chronicling the development of the science of embryology, Buklijas and Hopwood have interspersed their account with interesting details such as a discussion of "ensoulment" (when the soul first entered the body), explanations of how medieval laws regarding abortion and infanticide were linked to an understanding of gestational development, and how the first human egg and the earliest embryos were obtained at a Boston women's clinic. [...] clinicians and students of obstetrics and women's health will find the phases and development of the field of embryology as fascinating as embryonic development itself.
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