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            Emergency Management and Homeland Security
                     Articles of Interest 6-29-07
(The articles, reports and additional information contained in this edition were collected from 6-22
                                               to 6-29)

 The information posted below does not necessarily represent the opinions of the editor of this
document or IAEM. This publication is meant simply to distribute and make available information
                     relevant to the Emergency Management profession.

"Every time we make something foolproof, someone creates a better fool!"
                                             Bill Vola
                         City of Clearwater, FL Emergency Management

                               Special Announcements
  The Florida Division of Emergency Management is hiring a Statewide Disability Coordinator.
                               Complete details can be found at:
 http://www.iaem.com/resources/Career/Job_bulletin_board/forums/DCForumID6/5070.html or
                  http://www.nemaweb.org/jobs/Job_Description.cfm?ID=920

 Emergency Management Performance Grant Bill (HR 2775) approved by House Transportation
                             and Infrastructure Committee
     http://www.iaem.com/committees/GovernmentAffairs/GovtAffairs.htm#empg062907




Disclaimer: This information is provided by Steve Detwiler and while IAEM supports my work        1
     they do not endorse or support any agency, organization, or company that posts or
                                  distributes this document.
 This service is brought to in cooperation with the International Association of Emergency
Managers (IAEM). If you’re interested in learning more about IAEM, please visit our website
                                  at: http://www.iaem.com/

                                   U.S. News Reports
Emergency Management and Homeland Security
Merge ahead
http://www.gcn.com/print/26_14/44487-1.html?topic=homeland-security&CMP=OTC-RSS

Wrong Decatur Gets $178,000 Check (Indiana)
http://www.cbsnews.com/stories/2007/06/21/ap/strange/main2960180.shtml

FEMA Officials Attend Firefighter Memorial Service in Charleston
http://www.fema.gov/news/newsrelease.fema?id=37232

Secretary Chertoff Discusses Hurricane Readiness with FEMA
http://www.fema.gov/news/newsrelease.fema?id=37241

State, Local Responders Handle Texas Flood Relief
http://www.defenselink.mil/news/newsarticle.aspx?id=46483

WiFi system may boost public safety
http://www.indystar.com/apps/pbcs.dll/article?AID=/20070622/LOCAL1801/706220337/1195/LOC
AL18

FEMA reaches staffing milestone
http://www.fcw.com/article103092-06-25-07-Web

State passes on proposals for new public-safety offices (Minnesota)
http://www.bizjournals.com/twincities/stories/2007/06/25/story4.html?from_rss=1

Sept. 11 keeps Homeland Security motivated
http://www.chieftain.com/editorial/1182682802/1

States' post-9/11 grants unspent
http://www.usatoday.com/news/washington/2007-06-25-state-terror-grants_N.htm#states

Amateur Radio Operators Prepare For Emergencies
http://www.wcsh6.com/news/article.aspx?storyid=64352

Giuliani: Bill Clinton's response to terror 'big mistake'
http://www.cnn.com/2007/POLITICS/06/27/giuliani.bill.clinton.ap/index.html

FEMA Statement on Limited Activation of the Emergency Alert System Resulting in Broadcast
Interruptions
http://www.fema.gov/media/archives/2007/062607.shtm

http://www.suntimes.com/news/metro/444934,CST-NWS-radio27.article

Cities sign disaster plan for cross-border protection (Texas and Mexico)
http://www.elpasotimes.com/search/ci_6228431

Preparedness critical in massive fires (California)
http://www.nctimes.com/articles/2007/06/21/news/californian/4_02_446_20_07.txt
Disclaimer: This information is provided by Steve Detwiler and while IAEM supports my work    2
     they do not endorse or support any agency, organization, or company that posts or
                                  distributes this document.
 This service is brought to in cooperation with the International Association of Emergency
Managers (IAEM). If you’re interested in learning more about IAEM, please visit our website
                                  at: http://www.iaem.com/


Border Patrol looks to hire more women, minorities
http://www.govexec.com/story_page.cfm?articleid=37316&sid=60

Border tech program is plagued by early setbacks
http://www.govexec.com/story_page.cfm?articleid=37317&sid=60

Coast Guard extends fleet upgrade contract
http://www.govexec.com/story_page.cfm?articleid=37312&sid=60

Gov. Riley Urges Preparation at Alabama/Mississippi Hurricane Conference
http://www.govtech.com/em/articles/125878

Mitigation Model House Demonstrates Better Building Techniques
http://www.fema.gov/news/newsrelease.fema?id=37372

FEMA questions stalled projects (Florida)
http://www.palmbeachpost.com/storm/content/south/epaper/2007/06/27/0628FEMA.html

New Entry-Level Certification Program Is Available for Emergency Managers
http://www.iaem.com/documents/IAEMNewsRelease062807.pdf

Former Jeff emergency manager gets interim position (Louisiana)
http://www.nola.com/news/t-p/metro/index.ssf?/base/news-22/1182230841208490.xml&coll=1

St. Tammany Parish President Sues FEMA (Louisiana)
http://news.yahoo.com/s/wdsu/20070622/lo_wdsu/13554300

New Hurricane Shelter (Alabama)
http://www.wkrg.com/servlet/Satellite?pagename=WKRG%2FMGArticle%2FKRG_BasicArticle&c
=MGArticle&cid=1173351736981&path=%21news%21local

New Mexico Successfully Tests Ability to Receive Medical Supplies During Public Health
Emergency
http://www.govtech.com/em/articles/125676

Virginia Announces $39 Million in Criminal Justice and Public Safety Grants
http://www.govtech.com/em/articles/125663

Feds, agencies push disaster preparedness
http://www.stargazettenews.com/apps/pbcs.dll/article?AID=/20070623/NEWS01/706230322

Health Department here takes part in terrorism drill (Hawaii)
http://the.honoluluadvertiser.com/article/2007/Jun/23/br/br9025764138.html

Guantanamo panelist: Tribunal evidence was weak
http://www.cnn.com/2007/LAW/06/23/guantanamo.ap/index.html

Whitman on hot seat over 9/11 aftermath
http://news.yahoo.com/s/ap/20070626/ap_on_go_ca_st_pe/attacks_health

State Auditor Releases "Emergency Accountability Plan for Local Governments" (Mississippi)
http://www.wlox.com/Global/story.asp?S=6725613
Disclaimer: This information is provided by Steve Detwiler and while IAEM supports my work    3
       they do not endorse or support any agency, organization, or company that posts or
                                  distributes this document.
 This service is brought to in cooperation with the International Association of Emergency
Managers (IAEM). If you’re interested in learning more about IAEM, please visit our website
                                  at: http://www.iaem.com/


US media unclear on terrorism phraseology post-9/11: Study
http://in.news.yahoo.com/070627/139/6hfz0.html

Emergency Management Headquarters Opened (Arkansas)
http://www.todaysthv.com/news/news.aspx?storyid=48092

Report blasts U.S. for failures in fighting terrorism
http://www.cnn.com/2007/POLITICS/06/25/terror.report/index.html

Supreme Court to rule on Gitmo detainees' rights
http://www.cnn.com/2007/LAW/06/29/scotus.gitmo.appeals.ap/index.html




June 26, 2007
White House to Nominate Nonprofit CEO Ashley for DHS Grants Post
By Eileen Sullivan, CQ Staff

The president plans to nominate W. Ross Ashley III to head the Department of Homeland
Security’s multibillion-dollar grant programs, the White House announced Tuesday.

Ashley is the former chief executive officer of the National Children’s Center Inc., a nonprofit
organization providing services for children and adults with developmental disabilities in
Washington, D.C., and Maryland.

Ashley’s nomination comes a little more than a year after a funding controversy that ended in the
resignation of the last grants administrator, Tracy A. Henke. Henke and the department were
under fire last year because of funding cuts to counterterrorism programs in New York City and
Washington, D.C. The department has improved its grant-making decisions and does not expect
a similar situation next month when the Urban Area Security Initiative awards are expected to be
announced. In addition, the grants office was moved to the Federal Emergency Management
Agency in the department’s latest reorganization.

According to the White House, Ashley also served as vice president of government services at
ChoicePoint Inc., and was founder and executive vice president of Templar Corp. Ashley also
served 20 years in the U.S. Air Force Reserves and National Guard and received his bachelor’s
degree from George Mason University and his master’s degree from the Joint Military Intelligence
College.

The position requires Senate confirmation. No hearings have been set.




Disclaimer: This information is provided by Steve Detwiler and while IAEM supports my work         4
     they do not endorse or support any agency, organization, or company that posts or
                                  distributes this document.
 This service is brought to in cooperation with the International Association of Emergency
Managers (IAEM). If you’re interested in learning more about IAEM, please visit our website
                                  at: http://www.iaem.com/

Deportees' Bittersweet Homecoming
Migration Is Boon, Bane for Honduras

By Pamela Constable
Washington Post Foreign Service
Wednesday, June 27, 2007; A01

TEGUCIGALPA, Honduras -- Almost every day, another unmarked jet from Houston lands at the
international airport in this Central American capital and disgorges a new batch of deportees from
U.S. immigration custody. More than 1,800 this month. More than 13,700 since January.

The passengers file out uncertainly, pausing to grab the paper or plastic bags holding their few
belongings, and enter a low building with a sign that says: "Welcome Home, Brothers." There are
weary-looking older workers, scowling young men with tattoos, a handful of women. They wear
clean prison uniforms or the grimy clothes in which they were caught.

Those who found menial jobs in the United States say they sent far more money home than they
could ever earn in Honduras, but most say they were caught within days of sneaking across the
border and have returned with empty pockets. Two out of three say they intend to try again.

"The immigration van caught us after we walked for three days across the desert in Arizona,"
says Matias Miranda, 42, an illiterate farmer who just made his second attempt to enter the
United States in search of work. "I was getting older and I wanted to try once more, to help my
children. But already I am back without a single peso. All I got was this Bible, and I still have the
one they gave me last time."

Illegal migration is a crucial safety valve for Honduras, a chronically poor country of 7.5 million
where 40 percent of the populace earns less than $3 a day and just over half the workforce has a
sixth-grade education. Money sent directly to Honduran families from relatives working in the
United States, both legally and illegally, provides nearly one-third of the national income -- $1.8
billion in 2005, $2.3 billion last year.

Over the past several years, however, the pace of deportations from the United States has
skyrocketed as the U.S. Border Patrol has beefed up operations. In 2005, 18,941 Hondurans
were deported; in 2006, 24,643 were deported; and by mid-June 2007, the figure had exceeded
13,700. There have been similar increases in deportations from Mexico and Guatemala, which
Hondurans must cross before they reach the United States.

The current debate over immigration reform in the United States, where an estimated 12 million
illegal immigrants live, has caused hope and anxiety here, because it holds out both the promise
of legalizing tens of thousands of Hondurans now in the United States and the threat of a harsher
crackdown near the border, which about 90,000 Hondurans attempt to cross illegally each year.

Meanwhile, the steady rise in deportations is met here with a mixture of alarm and relief. Officials
worry that the current flow of cash remittances to families -- expected to reach a record $2.8
billion this year -- will start to lessen and that the economy will not be able to absorb a sustained
influx of jobless returnees.

On the other hand, Honduran society has paid a high price for this economic antidote. Experts
here say illegal immigration destroys families during long separations and lures fatherless youths

Disclaimer: This information is provided by Steve Detwiler and while IAEM supports my work              5
     they do not endorse or support any agency, organization, or company that posts or
                                  distributes this document.
 This service is brought to in cooperation with the International Association of Emergency
Managers (IAEM). If you’re interested in learning more about IAEM, please visit our website
                                  at: http://www.iaem.com/

to crime and gangs. It also fosters dependency on handouts from abroad and a tendency to fritter
cash windfalls on luxury goods.

"Honduras today survives on remittances, but mass migration also causes enormous damage,"
said Julio Velásquez, an official of the Honduran National Human Rights Commission. "Those
who manage to reach the U.S. can lift their families a little out of poverty, but often the families fall
apart and the kids end up in gangs or on drugs. We need to create the conditions so people don't
need to leave, instead of thinking of migration as something to admire."

Darío Cardona, the deputy minister of labor, said a variety of factors have contributed to the
exodus. The minimum wage here is only $3.50 a day, and many Hondurans earn far less as
seasonal field hands or street vendors. Although the economy is growing and inflation is down,
Cardona said, progress has been hampered by corruption, poor public education and lack of
investment.

"The poor who leave subsidize the poor who stay," he said. "Depending on other countries is a
short-term help for us, but it is not a long-term solution. Our country is exporting its youth and its
labor force, and after a few years many of them come back with nothing."

Sympathy and Respect

At the Center for Attention to Migrants next to Toncontin International Airport, deportees who
have just been uncuffed from airplane seats are greeted with the sympathy and respect due
homecoming survivors of a long ordeal. Immigration officials offer good-luck handshakes while
volunteers pass around coffee, tortillas and brochures for free training in fish farming, pastry
cooking, auto mechanics or computer programming.

Valdete Wilemon, a Brazilian nun who runs the center, says she has heard a thousand horror
stories from returning migrants -- of people crazed from thirst in the U.S. deserts, falling to their
deaths from trains in Mexico, being beaten and robbed by cross-border guides.

"I see migration as a big business for those who exploit it, and a cause of great suffering for the
migrants," she said. "We treat them with dignity, and we welcome them home. But this country is
very poor, and the people will keep trying to get to the north, no matter how big a wall they build,"
she added. "The deportations are more now, but so is the flight."

Despite her ministrations, new deportees are often angry and bleak. They mill uneasily or slump
in chairs, ripping open sacks containing shoelaces, belts and wallets confiscated by U.S.
immigration officials -- and copies of the Bible donated by prison visitors -- while they wait
impatiently to be processed for reentry into Honduras.

Some look sullen with failure or haggard with exhaustion; others grin and whoop with defiant
relief. A few young men with tattoos, possible signs of gang membership, curse at visitors. One
man pulls out a snapshot of his wife and daughter, left behind when his factory was raided in New
Jersey. Another complains angrily that his landscaping boss in Texas betrayed him to avoid
paying his salary.

"I not criminal guy," says Santos Canales, 30, struggling to explain himself in English. "I work
hard. I have wife and five kids. The boss know I am illegal. I ask for my money. He call police, not
pay me."

Disclaimer: This information is provided by Steve Detwiler and while IAEM supports my work               6
     they do not endorse or support any agency, organization, or company that posts or
                                  distributes this document.
 This service is brought to in cooperation with the International Association of Emergency
Managers (IAEM). If you’re interested in learning more about IAEM, please visit our website
                                  at: http://www.iaem.com/

In the next room, immigration officials call the deportees one by one for brief interviews. They
answer two pages of questions that provide a basic but revealing profile of the motives and
fortunes of many illegal migrants from Central America. Education level? Most say they reached
only sixth grade. Occupation? Most say farmer, driver, factory worker or bricklayer.

How long did you spend in the United States? A few say several years, but most answer less
than two months. How much did you earn? Most say zero; a few say between $1,000 and $2,000
a month. How much did you send home? Again, most say zero; some say several hundred
dollars a month.

How many times have you been deported? Many say twice, some say more. Are you planning to
go back? Many in their 20s and 30s answer yes; most in their 40s and 50s shake their heads and
say no.

"For me, it was definitely worth it," says Hidalgo Fuentes, 30, who quit his local factory job and
was caught in May trying to reach Missouri on a cargo train. "Here, the best I can earn is about
$30 a week. The last time I went north, I earned $500 a week washing dishes, and my family was
able to build a house." Asked if he expects to try again, he just smiles.

Reuniting the Family

Outside the center, a throng of families waits anxiously. Most have received calls from relatives in
U.S. detention, saying they will be home this week. Gladys Morales and her two children are
there, taut with excitement and dressed in new clothes for what Belkis, 13, calls "the Big Day."

They are waiting for Gladys's husband, Ramón, 34, who has been in New Orleans for three
years. He worked as a house painter, sending home a steady stream of cash that helped them
improve their three-room shack on a hillside outside the capital. But they missed him terribly,
especially José Ramón, 9. For this family, the joy of reuniting is far more important than the loss
of income.

Suddenly, there he is in the door, still wearing the paint-splattered pants he had on when U.S.
immigration agents raided an apartment complex he was painting in April. The children rush
forward, and he crushes them to his chest.

"So you still remember me?" he murmurs affectionately. "How are you doing in school? Are you
behaving yourselves?"

José Ramón clutches his father's hand all the way home, a huge grin on his face. He brags about
his grades and jokingly offers to teach his father English.

When they reach their house, Ramón Morales looks around appreciatively. The back room is still
a dirt-floor shed with a latrine, but the front room has new tiles, a fresh coat of paint, and a TV set
and three CD players covered with doilies. Over a welcome-home meal of rice, beans and pork
chops, Morales says he has no idea how he will earn a living now, but he is sure of one thing.

"My children need me. So many homes fall apart, but we stayed united," he says. "I worked hard,
I suffered a lot, I sent money home. But after going through all that, you come back with a new
mentality. I want to build a life here now. I can't leave them again. It's time for me to come home."


Disclaimer: This information is provided by Steve Detwiler and while IAEM supports my work            7
     they do not endorse or support any agency, organization, or company that posts or
                                  distributes this document.
 This service is brought to in cooperation with the International Association of Emergency
Managers (IAEM). If you’re interested in learning more about IAEM, please visit our website
                                  at: http://www.iaem.com/




Storm warnings crank up (Seminole County, FL)

Seminole to deploy radios, text messages, sirens

Sandra Pedicini, Sentinel Staff Writer

June 27, 2007

Seminole County will start giving away hundreds of weather radios and signing residents up for
text messages about impending storms Monday -- the same day Oviedo will select a company to
install tornado-warning sirens.

Seminole County also plans to launch its "Prepare Seminole" Web site -- prepareseminole.org --
at 8 a.m. Monday.

On it, residents can find general information about storms, along with details about how low-
income and elderly residents or people with special needs can get free NOAA weather radios.
Residents also can get information by dialing 311 from a land line or cell phone within the county.

"Our goal is for everyone in Seminole County to have a NOAA weather radio," said Alan Harris,
the county's emergency-management operations manager. "That's obviously a hefty goal. It takes
a lot of cooperation with all types of partners."

Seminole County Emergency Management division manager Stephen Watts said the county has
about $8,000, which will pay for about 325 radios. That money has come from private donations
and grants. The county also has applied for a $30,000 grant that will pay for about 1,200 more
radios, Watts said.

The county will publicize the radios through spots on its cable-television station and in disaster-
preparedness guides it will make available in health departments, libraries and parks.

The county will program radios for residents and counsel them on disaster preparedness.

While people who receive weather radios must live in Seminole County, anyone can sign up for a
text-messaging service through the Web site.

The service will send text messages about emergencies in Seminole County to personal
computers, personal digital assistants, cell phones and pagers. Roam Secure Inc., which already
provides the service in Orange County, will provide it in Seminole as well.

Seminole County's efforts were spurred by the Feb. 2 tornadoes that killed 21 people in Lake
County. So was Oviedo's decision earlier this year to install sirens.

Once the Oviedo council selects a company Monday to install the sirens, officials hope to have
them in place in early October.

Oviedo fire Chief Lars White has recommended that Federal Signal Corp. install the sirens. For a
Disclaimer: This information is provided by Steve Detwiler and while IAEM supports my work            8
     they do not endorse or support any agency, organization, or company that posts or
                                  distributes this document.
 This service is brought to in cooperation with the International Association of Emergency
Managers (IAEM). If you’re interested in learning more about IAEM, please visit our website
                                  at: http://www.iaem.com/

cost of $146,000, the city would get six electromechanical sirens that would sound if a tornado
approaches, along with computerized storm-monitoring equipment.

Tentative locations include Sweetwater Park; the corner of State Road 426 and Aulin Avenue; the
Alafaya Utilities wastewater-treatment plant; and City Hall.

Two other siren locations are a little more uncertain.

White said the city still is weighing Long Lake Park over the Oviedo Sports Complex. While the
city had also selected Fire Station 48 as a location, White said officials are now considering Partin
Elementary School, where "the coverage is a little bit better."

Local governments throughout Central Florida started investigating sirens after the February
tornadoes. But many later decided against the devices, which can get expensive for larger areas.
Oviedo forged ahead, though, with City Council member Steve Henken championing the sirens.

Seminole County put together a task force that at first was enthusiastic about sirens but later
backed away from recommending them. It decided instead to give away weather radios and offer
the text-messaging service, which originally was supposed to start by the beginning of hurricane
season June 1.




Costs Skyrocket as DHS Runs Up No-Bid Contracts
$2 Million Security Project Balloons to $124 Million

By Robert O'Harrow Jr.
Washington Post Staff Writer
Thursday, June 28, 2007; A01

The project started in 2003 with a $2 million contract to help the new Department of Homeland
Security quickly get an intelligence operation up and running.

Over the next year, the cost of the no-bid arrangement with consultant Booz Allen Hamilton
soared by millions of dollars per month, as the firm provided analysts, administrators and other
contract employees to the department's Information Analysis and Infrastructure Protection offices.

By December 2004, payments to Booz Allen had exceeded $30 million -- 15 times the contract's
original value. When department lawyers examined the deal, they found it was "grossly beyond
the scope" of the original contract, and they said the arrangement violated government
procurement rules. The lawyers advised the department to immediately stop making payments
through the contract and allow other companies to compete for the work.

But the competition did not take place for more than a year. During that time, the payments to
Booz Allen more than doubled again under a second no-bid arrangement, to $73 million,
according to internal documents, e-mail and interviews.

Disclaimer: This information is provided by Steve Detwiler and while IAEM supports my work         9
     they do not endorse or support any agency, organization, or company that posts or
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 This service is brought to in cooperation with the International Association of Emergency
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The arrangements with the McLean consulting firm, one of the nation's largest government
contractors, illustrate a transformation in the way the federal government often gets its work done:
by relying on private, sometimes costly consultants to fill staffing shortfalls in federal agencies.

Contracting specialists said companies are increasingly being called upon to handle duties once
considered appropriate only for government workers. And because the number of federal
procurement workers responsible for overseeing spending has not kept pace, the spending on
such contracts often soars far beyond approved estimates, the specialists said.

Elaine C. Duke, the department's chief procurement officer, acknowledged the problems with the
Booz Allen contract in a recent interview. She said that the "contracting officers were stretched
thin" and that the managers running the program were unable to provide clear guidance about
what they needed to buy. But Duke said those matters have been resolved. She defended a
decision to issue a second no-bid contract in 2005 as necessary to keep an essential intelligence
operation running until a competition could be held.

"It was the best out of the choices that we had on the table at the time," she said. "We couldn't
have a gap in mission."

Booz Allen vice president Jack Mayer said his firm did quality work, followed federal rules and
charged fair prices. Mayer said Booz Allen was prepared to compete with other companies for the
work. He said the cost of the project ballooned because demands from the department's offices
kept expanding.

"What happened was the hours that people were working," he said. "It wasn't Booz Allen's fault."

A review of memos, e-mail and other contracting documents obtained by The Washington Post
show that in a rush to meet congressional mandates to establish the information analysis and
infrastructure protection offices, agency officials routinely waived rules designed to protect
taxpayer money. As the project progressed, the department became so dependent on Booz Allen
that it lost the flexibility for a time to seek out other contractors or hire federal employees who
might do the job for less.

The average annual cost of a contract employee is $250,000, almost twice that of a federal
employee, according to an estimate recently cited by the Senate Select Committee on
Intelligence.

In May 2003, the Department of Homeland Security was trying to organize itself following the
merger of 22 agencies. It immediately began to rely heavily on contractors to staff its operations
and outfit offices with computer systems and other technology.

One of the core tasks it faced was the creation of operations that would analyze potential threats
and protect government facilities, power plants and other parts of the nation's infrastructure. The
department's offices were to be responsible for supporting the anti-terrorism efforts of other local,
state and federal agencies, as well as the private sector, by sharing information about possible
threats, government documents show.

The newly created department, however, had only a skeleton procurement staff. So it turned to
the Department of Veterans Affairs to handle the contract award. Veterans Affairs officials in turn
hired Booz Allen through the General Services Administration. Booz Allen is one of the

Disclaimer: This information is provided by Steve Detwiler and while IAEM supports my work          10
     they do not endorse or support any agency, organization, or company that posts or
                                  distributes this document.
 This service is brought to in cooperation with the International Association of Emergency
Managers (IAEM). If you’re interested in learning more about IAEM, please visit our website
                                  at: http://www.iaem.com/

government's biggest contractors, with about $2 billion in federal revenue, and had done
extensive work for defense and intelligence agencies. The GSA had preapproved Booz Allen to
provide engineering and professional services to federal agencies at set labor rates.

Such inter-agency arrangements offer flexibility to government agencies. But audits have found
they can lead to diminished oversight and accountability. That's because responsibility for
monitoring spending and work is divided among agencies.

Auditors at the Government Accountability Office said Homeland Security officials acknowledged
that they often used such arrangements for the "speed and convenience -- not total value
including cost." The GAO report last year cited the contract with Booz Allen as an example where
there was insufficient planning and "no assurance of good value."

As the work at the Homeland Security offices grew, spending on labor costs quickly surpassed
the original estimate and mounted throughout 2003 and 2004.

One indication of the minimal oversight:

In fall 2004, while the contract was administered by Veterans Affairs, Booz Allen took on a variety
of tasks without government approval for as long as seven weeks, according to an e-mail by a
Homeland Security procurement official. "VA never Oked the work, by an order or verbally,"
contracting officer Paul Attorri wrote.

A Booz Allen spokesman said details about the apparent lapse were unavailable. But he said the
firm had a valid contract during the period in question.

On Dec. 21, 2004, the Homeland Security Department decided it was time to take back control of
the contract's management from Veterans Affairs. Department lawyers and procurement officials
soon discovered that the deal "had grown many magnitudes beyond its original $2M,"Attorri wrote
in an e-mail.

The discovery put Homeland Security officials in a hard place. The department had become so
reliant on Booz Allen for support that contracting officials said the information analysis office
"would not be able to function, let alone attempt to carry out their missions" without the firm's
employees, a contracting official later wrote.

That support work included intelligence analysis, preparation of congressional reports, budget
activities and other tasks crucial to the operation of the office, documents show.

To buy themselves time to solicit bids, agency officials decided they should award Booz Allen a
temporary "bridge" contract through the GSA to keep the infrastructure and intelligence analysis
offices running. As part of that move, the department used its authority to dispense with federal
acquisition procedures that would have brought extra delays -- and more scrutiny -- to the project,
according to memos, e-mail and interviews with procurement officials.

Throughout the spring of 2005, for instance, Booz Allen worked for months with only "verbal
authorization" from Homeland Security officials, rather than a written contract, as the department
continued working on the bridge contract, according to Duke, the department's procurement chief.



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In March 2005, a senior agency procurement official asked for approval in an e-mail to waive a
requirement that the department draw up a plan for spending the money. The reason: The bridge
contract was "contemplated only as a short-term sole-source" arrangement. Ashley J. Lewis, the
department's director of acquisition policy and oversight at the time, approved the request less
than a day after he received it: "You've got it," Lewis said in a brief response.

Contracting officials did not create a statement of the work that would "require measurable
performance and quality standards" from Booz Allen. A contracting specialist wrote that "the
massive effort . . . was not feasible in this situation" because the bridge contract was considered
temporary.

Officials did not require Booz Allen to provide a fixed price for the work they would be doing -- a
standard way of preventing cost overruns; the government agreed to pay the firm by the hour on
an open-ended basis. Officials used that approach because they did not know how much the
project would eventually cost. Booz Allen's labor rates ran $42 to $383 an hour.

On May 25, 2005, Homeland Security approved the temporary contract that would keep the
offices operating. The deal was projected to be worth $18 million, a third more than previously
estimated.

Because its approval took so long, the arrangement was technically slated to end less than a
week later, when the department hoped to allow other companies to bid for the work. But the
"bridge contract" did not end, and costs continued to rise.

On June 1, 2005, the temporary contract was extended, as the agency approved the first of
multiple modifications to the work that would increase spending by at least $25 million more.

When Booz Allen finally faced competition last year, Homeland Security had broken the work into
five contracts. In total, those contracts were worth more than $50 million over a year's time.

Booz Allen won them all.




Court rules FEMA must turn over documents

By Megan O'Matz

South Florida Sun-Sentinel

June 23, 2007

The Federal Emergency Management Agency must turn over to the South Florida Sun-Sentinel
and other news organizations the addresses of 1.3 million disaster aid recipients, a federal
appellate court in Atlanta ruled Friday.

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FEMA had been fighting to keep the information secret for almost three years.

The Sun-Sentinel sought the addresses as part of its reports on fraud and mismanagement in
FEMA's disaster aid program after Hurricane Frances lashed Florida during Labor Day weekend
2004.

A federal judge in Fort Lauderdale ruled more than a year ago that the newspaper should have
the addresses — but not the names — of aid recipients for Hurricane Frances and 30 other
disasters dating back 10 years. But FEMA appealed the decision to the Eleventh Circuit Court of
Appeals.

A three-judge panel ruled the release of the addresses will help the newspaper and the public
determine "whether FEMA has been a good steward of billions of taxpayer dollars." The question,
the court found, is an important one given the agency's "awesome statutory responsibility to
prepare the nation for and respond to all … national disasters and terrorist attacks."

"We cannot find any privacy interests here that even begin to outweigh this public interest," Judge
Stanley Marcus wrote in a 66-page decision.

Rachel E. Fugate, attorney for the Sun-Sentinel, hailed the decision. "This isn't only a huge
victory for the Sun-Sentinel but for all media and especially the public, which hopefully will be
even better informed now."

The decision was also a victory for three other Florida papers: the News-Press of Fort Myers,
Florida Today and the Pensacola News Journal. The papers also sought the addresses of
FEMA's disaster aid recipients but lost in a decision by the U.S. District Court in Fort Myers.

The three newspapers appealed and the Atlanta court consolidated the case with FEMA's appeal.

It's unclear whether FEMA will further challenge Friday's ruling. A spokesman for the agency said
FEMA is still reviewing the decision.

After Hurricane Frances struck Florida, the Sun-Sentinel filed a Freedom of Information Act
request with FEMA, seeking the names and addresses of almost 10,000 disaster aid claimants in
Miami-Dade County. The paper was trying to determine why the individuals received $21.5 million
when the storm hit 100 miles north, causing little obvious damage in Miami-Dade.

FEMA refused to release the identities of the claimants and provided the Sun-Sentinel with claims
data by ZIP code only. The newspaper used the information to target the general location of the
aid in relation to the storm's path and impact.

By canvassing neighborhoods and obtaining other state, local and federal records, the Sun-
Sentinel showed, over the next 15 months, how FEMA paid millions of dollars to people who had
little or no damage from Hurricane Frances and some of the other storms that hit in 2004. It also
became obvious that the waste and fraud had occurred in prior disasters nationwide in which
individuals found FEMA's procedures so lax they referred to assistance as "free money."

The reporting led to investigations by the U.S. Senate and the U.S. Inspector General for
Homeland Security and federal indictments in Miami. The probes found patterns of abuse,
wasteful spending, fraud and erroneous payments.

Ironically, Marcus wrote, the court found support for the release of the claimants' addresses from
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an unlikely source: FEMA itself.

In the days after the Sun-Sentinel's initial stories appeared raising concerns of widespread fraud,
top FEMA officials criticized the newspaper, saying the damage couldn't be determined
countywide but had to be evaluated address by address.




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Campus Safety and Security
WSU emergency plan is better with texting (Washington)
http://www.dailyevergreen.com/story/22753

Text messages part of new safety plan (University of Tennessee)
http://dailybeacon.utk.edu/showarticle.php?articleid=51341

High Cost Technology Gadgets Aid Campus Safety
http://www.lasvegasnow.com/global/story.asp?s=6713921

Learn how to survive: UC Davis police offer training for emergencies (California)
http://www.davisenterprise.com/articles/2007/06/22/news/204new1.txt

Safer schools focus of Secret Service seminar
http://www.jdnews.com/news/school_49126___article.html/secret_service.html

FSU has accounted for all students, faculty at its renowned London Study-Abroad program
http://www.fsu.com/pages/2005/07/07/london_study.html




Schools gamble on storm coverage (Florida)

Financially pinched, they are short on insurance and rely on FEMA for backup.

Dave Weber

Sentinel Staff Writer

June 25, 2007

Hurricane season is under way, but school districts across Florida are short on property
insurance and counting on the federal government to pick up the pieces if a big storm strikes.

Most school districts have insurance that covers only a fraction of the value of their buildings.
Premiums have shot sky-high since the devastating hurricane seasons of 2004 and 2005, and
school officials say they cannot afford more coverage.

Several districts are pooling insurance premiums to buy more coverage, gambling they won't all
get hit by a storm.

Even so, districts expect the Federal Emergency Management Agency to open its checkbook for
school repairs, which could run into billions of dollars if a major hurricane hits the state. FEMA
has helped schools pay for hurricane damage in the past but can't promise how much money it
might pony up.

"It is a huge concern," said Scott Clark, in charge of insurance for Miami-Dade County public
schools. "We are relying on FEMA's reimbursement in the event of a major storm."


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Miami-Dade's school system, the largest in the state and fourth-largest in the nation, has 350
schools valued at $7.5 billion but only $245 million of hurricane coverage.

The cost: $30 million, with a $25 million out-of-pocket deductible on claims.

Clark has seen the computer models for possible storm damage, and he's nervous.

"We are pretty underinsured," Clark said. "For a 100-year storm -- a Category 4 or 5 -- it's
projected our losses would be between $700 million and $1 billion."

FEMA handed out $168 million to Florida schools after the 2004 hurricanes and $171 million in
2005. But districts have less insurance coverage now than they did then and could be turning to
FEMA for much larger handouts.

FEMA not 'bottomless pit'

FEMA officials say they are ready to help but don't have unlimited resources.

"Any funding by FEMA is intended to supplement financial assistance from other sources," said
Jim Homstad, spokesman for the agency's Florida office in Lake Mary. "I doubt American
taxpayers who provide FEMA with its funding would like to hear the agency referred to as a
bottomless pit."

Counties and cities have faced sharp increases in their premiums and cuts in coverage, too. A
recent study for the Florida Association of Counties pointed to a 200 percent jump in property-
insurance costs for counties.

But the number of city and county buildings in the state is relatively small compared with the huge
number of public schools: 171 in Orange County alone and 3,877 statewide. The exposure is
enormous.

Statewide, hurricane insurance covered less than 3 percent of the value of school buildings,
according to a study by the Florida Association of District School Superintendents. That's like
having a $250,000 house insured for $7,500.

The Orange County district, which includes Orlando schools, has $20 million of hurricane
insurance on $4.8 billion of buildings. The cost is nearly $3.4 million, with a $1 million deductible.

"We think it is reasonable when you look at the dollars and the risk," said Lee Nicholls, risk
manager for the district.

Nicholls pointed out that inland Orlando escaped hurricane damage for decades before Charley
came along in 2004, causing $10 million in scattered damage at 123 schools.

Insurance covered only $3.8 million, after deductibles. FEMA chipped in about $2.6 million to
soften the blow, and the district is counting on FEMA in the future, too.

Coastal districts such as Brevard are more concerned with low insurance coverage. Charley,
Frances and Jeanne slapped Brevard in 2004, doing $16 million in damage to schools.

"Most districts are relying on FEMA," said Mark Langdorf, who handles insurance for Brevard
schools.

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The district has only a tenth of the coverage it had a few years ago -- $55 million now compared
with $500 million then -- at 11/2 times the cost.

To cut costs and gain coverage, many Florida districts have formed insurance consortiums. A
new one being set up across the center of the state might include Seminole, Lake, Manatee,
Pasco, Sumter and St. Johns counties sharing $100 million in hurricane coverage.

"It's definitely a pool arrangement, and we understand the ramifications of it," said Bill Vogel,
superintendent of Seminole schools, which recently signed on with the consortium.

The six districts would share $100 million in hurricane coverage. If one or even two districts are
hit by a storm, the reasoning goes, chances are the others might not be.

But some other districts shy from hurricane pools, which one official said are helpful only if they
include "a school district in Nebraska." Including coastal counties in the pool especially increases
the risk, said Steve Henderson, director of insurance for Polk schools.

"I am not going to hold hands with Pasco, Manatee or Brevard," Henderson said.

Charlotte County's example

Look south to hurricane-ravaged Charlotte County schools to see how bad it can be, Henderson
and others say.

Hurricane Charley in August 2004 damaged or destroyed 20 of the county's 21 public schools.
Six that had to be rebuilt from the ground up still are under construction.

Back then, insurance covered about $200 million of the $225 million in damage. FEMA kicked in
$25 million. Today the best coverage Charlotte schools can get is $100 million shared with seven
other counties, including three on the hurricane-prone east coast.

"At the time of the storm, we had $250 million in coverage. We were in great shape. They paid a
lot," said Greg Griner, finance officer for Charlotte schools. "The next time, we would get
substantially less."




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Special Needs
For additional articles on this topic feel free to visit:
http://www.eadassociates.com/news.html or
http://www.nod.org/index.cfm?fuseaction=Page.viewPage&pageID=11

Protecting our most vulnerable: Disaster planning for special needs citizens is a must
http://www.couleenews.com/articles/2007/06/20/news/04disaster.txt

Transportation a weak link in nursing home evacuations (Wisconsin)
http://savannahnow.com/node/311005

Firefighters Welcome FEMA's New Disability Coordinator (Los Angeles, CA)
http://lafd.blogspot.com/2007/06/firefighters-welcome-femas-new.html




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Global Warming and Hazard Research and News

NOAA Emphasizes Importance of Using New Elevations in Louisiana Reconstruction, Recovery
Projects - Provides Critical Update on South Louisiana Elevation Surveys
http://www.publicaffairs.noaa.gov/releases2007/jun07/noaa07-r421.html

Police: Inmate grabs guard's gun, kills him
http://www.cnn.com/2007/US/06/25/corrections.officer.shooting.ap/index.html

Bin Laden looms over Padilla terrorism trial
http://news.yahoo.com/s/nm/20070626/ts_nm/usa_padilla_dc

Storms force rescues in Oklahoma, Texas
http://news.yahoo.com/s/ap/20070627/ap_on_re_us/flooding

Eleven dead in Texas floods; more rain expected
http://www.cnn.com/2007/WEATHER/06/28/flooding.ap/index.html

Rain floods central Texas, halts some rescues
http://www.cnn.com/2007/WEATHER/06/27/flooding.ap/index.html

More rain forecast for Texas, Oklahoma
http://news.yahoo.com/s/ap/20070629/ap_on_re_us/flooding

Private dollars leading recovery of New Orleans
http://news.yahoo.com/s/csm/20070627/ts_csm/aprivate

Storm lull irrelevant to season's peak, experts warn
http://www.palmbeachpost.com/storm/content/nation/epaper/2007/06/25/m1a_hurricanes_0624.h
tml

California has worst U.S. traffic: study
http://news.yahoo.com/s/nm/20070628/us_nm/unitedstates_roads_dc

Chairman of state air resources board resigns (California)
http://www.latimes.com/news/local/la-me-air29jun29,0,218359.story?coll=la-home-center

Oil Industry Scales Back Expansion Plans
http://www.cbsnews.com/stories/2007/06/18/business/main2943314.shtml

Analysis: Bird Flu Fears Reignited
http://www.redorbit.com/news/health/973528/analysis_bird_flu_fears_reignited/index.html

Greenpeace warns of 200 mln global warming refugees by 2040
http://news.yahoo.com/s/afp/20070619/lf_afp/climatewarmingrefugees_070619181426

Antarctic icebergs may help soak up greenhouse gases: study
http://news.yahoo.com/s/afp/20070621/sc_afp/scienceuswarmingicebergs_070621183021;_ylt=A
tUCpJyjr32CXxRdwBS6l0PPOrgF



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                                  at: http://www.iaem.com/

Tamiflu could halve pandemic flu death toll: study
http://news.yahoo.com/s/nm/20070622/sc_nm/roche_tamiflu_dc;_ylt=Ahki0bx.gLXfq6kMJIYPptkh
ANEA

Stretch limited vaccines to fight pandemic: experts
http://news.yahoo.com/s/nm/20070622/sc_nm/birdflu_pandemic_vaccine_dc;_ylt=AludxbOL.Gae
hNRVVkCOJkIhANEA

Great Lakes slowly losing water
http://www.physorg.com/news101732060.html

Historic wildfire still smolders (Georgia)
http://www.cnn.com/2007/WEATHER/06/23/georgia.wildfire.ap/index.html

Wisconsin Chemical Fire Explosive
http://www.redorbit.com/news/science/977564/wisconsin_chemical_fire_explosive/index.html

Wildfires Burn in Alaska
http://www.redorbit.com/news/science/977514/wildfires_burn_in_alaska/index.html

Galveston poised to defy geologists (Texas)
http://www.latimes.com/news/nationworld/nation/la-na-galveston24jun24,0,831646.story?coll=la-
home-center

Superbug may strike 5 percent of hospital, nursing home patients
http://www.cnn.com/2007/HEALTH/06/25/staph.infections.ap/index.html

Researchers ID factors in Ariz. Monsoons
http://news.yahoo.com/s/ap/20070625/ap_on_sc/predicting_monsoons;_ylt=AtEpKJHNndR902bI
a8Z8uBJvieAA

SARS survivors recover from physical illness, but may experience mental health decline
http://www.physorg.com/news102008903.html

Gadget can predict quakes before they hit
http://www.msnbc.msn.com/id/19475498/

Potentially lethal H5N1 bird flu resurfaces in Europe
http://www.physorg.com/news102143935.html

NOAA scientists to search tropical skies
http://www.physorg.com/news102174062.html

International summit on bird flu amid rising fears of pandemic
http://news.scotsman.com/scitech.cfm?id=996022007

Floods, heatwaves send signal about global warming's impact: UN
http://news.yahoo.com/s/afp/20070627/sc_afp/unclimateweatherasia_070627112212;_ylt=AgyW
nu1NwoPR1xBZSXCPBnXPOrgF

An Earth without People
http://www.sciam.com/article.cfm?articleId=2691D716-E7F2-99DF-
38F54EF6075AAB4D&chanId=sa013&modsrc=most_popular
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                                  at: http://www.iaem.com/


Researchers: Antarctica Ice Sheet Stable
http://www.redorbit.com/news/science/982819/researchers_antarctica_ice_sheet_stable/index.ht
ml

2007 seen as second warmest year as climate shifts
http://news.yahoo.com/s/nm/20070629/ts_nm/climate_weather_dc

Statement Issued Regarding Domestic Terrorism Incident in Los Angeles, CA
http://lafd.blogspot.com/2007/06/statement-issued-regarding-domestic.html

Lake Tahoe, CA Fire

Firefighters gain ground on Calif. Blaze
http://news.yahoo.com/s/ap/20070626/ap_on_re_us/wildfires

Crowd aims fury at regional panel
http://www.latimes.com/news/local/la-me-clearance26jun26,0,2914697.story?coll=la-home-center

Blaze near Lake Tahoe 'spots' across fire line
http://www.cnn.com/2007/US/06/26/wildfires/index.html

More strong wind could drive Tahoe fire
http://news.yahoo.com/s/ap/20070627/ap_on_re_us/wildfires

Schwarzenegger Officials Respond to Angora Wildfire near Lake Tahoe
http://www.govtech.com/em/articles/125875

Firefighters make headway; blaze 55 percent contained
http://www.cnn.com/2007/US/06/28/wildfires.ap/index.html

Tahoe fire shows cost of paradise still rising
http://www.latimes.com/news/columnists/la-me-cap28jun28,0,5942002.column?coll=la-home-
center

Evacuees start to return as wildfire 70 percent contained
http://www.cnn.com/2007/US/06/29/wildfires.ap/index.html

Lake Tahoe Fire Cause Ruled Human
http://www.redorbit.com/news/science/983519/lake_tahoe_fire_cause_ruled_human/index.html

Report from the fire line
http://www.latimes.com/news/local/la-ex-first26jun27,1,4348375.story




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                                  at: http://www.iaem.com/




NYC Power Outage Snarls Traffic, Trains

By ADAM GOLDMAN
The Associated Press
Wednesday, June 27, 2007; 5:23 PM

NEW YORK -- A brief power outage darkened a large swath of Manhattan and the Bronx
Wednesday, knocking out traffic lights, cutting subway service and forcing the evacuation of the
Metropolitan Museum of Art on one of the hottest days of the year.

Power was restored within about an hour, but that did not stop the city from experiencing some of
the chaos it endured during blackouts last year and in 2003.

The Metropolitan Museum of Art was evacuated, and visitors were forced to sit on the outside
steps in the sweltering heat. Traffic lights up and down the east side of Manhattan and the Bronx,
including the area around Yankee Stadium, went dark.

The city was in the second day of temperatures well over 90 degrees.

"People came in off the street and we were selling flashlights, bottled water, candles, ice," said
Barry Newman, a pharmacist at a Gristede's Pharmacy on the Upper East Side.

In the street, "people stood outside their apartment buildings, looking nervous. Everyone was
saying, 'What's going on? What's going on?'"

Consolidated Edison said the blackout affected 136,700 customers in all, or more than 500,000
people.

The cause was under investigation, but utility spokesman Chris Olert said it was some sort of
transmission disturbance. He didn't know whether the heat was a factor. "We won't even
speculate on the cause yet," Olert said.

Suspensions and delays were reported along the city's subways because of the power failure.
The Metro-North commuter railroad, which serves the northern suburbs, had to reduce the
number of trains it was using, resulting in delays and crowded trains as the evening rush-hour
approached, said spokeswoman Marjorie Anders.

The power outage was reminiscent of previous summer blackouts that struck New York City.

Last summer, about 174,000 people were affected by a blackout in Queens. Residents sweltered
without air conditioners on some of the hottest days of the year, and estimated business losses
ran into the tens of millions of dollars as stores were forced to throw out perished goods.

The Public Service Commission issued a blistering report this year, and said the company
needed to make "critical and substantial" improvements.
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New York was also hard hit by a 2003 blackout that cut power to a large chunk of the Northeast.




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Other
Local, federal guidelines in conflict (South Carolina)
http://www.charleston.net/news/2007/jun/24/local_federal_guidelines_conflict/

Officials confirm Charleston fire began in loading dock (South Carolina)
http://www.cnn.com/2007/US/06/23/firefighters/index.html

Doctors back plan to store medical info under your skin
http://news.yahoo.com/s/afp/20070626/hl_afp/ushealthsciencetechnology

Terrorism: Giuliani's running mate
http://www.latimes.com/news/politics/la-na-rudy28jun28,0,5246375.story?coll=la-home-center

Forward Observer: Beware Iran Hawks
http://www.govexec.com/story_page.cfm?articleid=37287&sid=60

Giuliani confronts string of bad news
http://news.yahoo.com/s/ap/20070626/ap_on_el_pr/giuliani_s_woes



How will tax cuts affect your hometown? (Florida)

David Damron

Sentinel Staff Writer

June 25, 2007

Jennifer Forristall sends her three children to a summer-camp program run by Orange County
and says it's the only child care she can afford.

"If they get rid of it, I would be devastated," said Forristall, 31, who runs a home-cleaning service
and pays the camp east of Winter Park $60 a week per child. "If they do that, you'll see parents
telling their kids to 'Lock the doors, and don't let strangers in -- I have to go to work.' "

Yet her kids' camp and scores of other local-government programs for parks, roads, fire stations,
health clinics and libraries now face the ax, as cities and counties start to pare their budgets to
pay for state-mandated property-tax cuts.

Local governments across the state must rebalance their books because state lawmakers agreed
earlier this month to whack $15.6 billion from local property-tax revenues during five years.
Budget chiefs might have to repeat the exercise next summer if voters approve an additional $8
billion in tax cuts statewide in a Jan. 29 ballot measure.

Many government leaders are reluctant to detail exact program cuts just yet, but almost all of
them must make reductions. Some are hinting at fee increases. Others say they will impose hiring
freezes or layoffs to make up the difference.

The cuts, which state officials say would save the average property owner $174 a year, could
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range from minor to far-reaching, officials say. They will affect residents from all walks of life in
myriad ways.

In Volusia, for example, library patrons face losing magazine subscriptions. Altamonte will likely
kill its bookmobile program and eliminate five full- and three part-time positions.

In Orange, there will be no new construction of parks or fire stations next year. And Pine Hills
residents will not get that new community swimming pool anytime soon.

In many counties, including Orange, some road-paving and -widening plans will likely be delayed.
County-run health clinics could trim operating hours, and mosquito spraying could be pared back.

Orange County's $530 million "Children's Legacy" program -- Mayor Rich Crotty's ambitious
borrowing plan to build roads, buy sensitive lands and pay for commuter rail -- will likely be
delayed and could be dramatically scaled back.

To compound matters, most government operating costs are rising, some sharply, such as
employee-health-care, fuel and road-building expenses.

"All those costs are going up," Tavares City Administrator John Drury said. "So you either reduce
services or find a way to increase revenues."

Public-safety cuts unlikely

But not all services face the same threat.

Most Central Florida residents, for instance, can still expect more police and jail guards because
leaders know that cutting public safety would likely be political suicide, especially with the recent
spike in crime.

Earlier this year, some officials had talked of firing cops -- but that was before the extent of the
first rounds of property-tax cuts was known. Now, many are saying the first-year cuts aren't nearly
as severe as once feared.

"We've been pretty creative in the context of going on a diet," Crotty said. "It's what I'd hoped for
in terms of not making drastic service cuts, while still providing tax relief."

Other local services such as utility operations and building departments are largely run using
fees, so they may face little or no budget pain.

But taking those costly programs off the table only compounds the cuts in other areas.

Osceola County Manager Mike Freilinger, for instance, says he wants to reduce spending by 5
percent across the board. But because certain areas such as the jail won't be able to do that, he
has asked all his department heads to propose budget cuts up to 10 percent.

That could mean slower emergency-response times, longer waits at the planning office and more
pressure to trim social services, he predicts. And Osceola might hold off on building a new fire
station if it can't afford to staff it.

Freilinger said he hopes to avoid layoffs or salary cuts, but he said employees could get retrained
and assigned to more critical positions.

Disclaimer: This information is provided by Steve Detwiler and while IAEM supports my work              25
     they do not endorse or support any agency, organization, or company that posts or
                                  distributes this document.
 This service is brought to in cooperation with the International Association of Emergency
Managers (IAEM). If you’re interested in learning more about IAEM, please visit our website
                                  at: http://www.iaem.com/

Orange might ax 120 jobs

Of all Central Florida's local governments, Orange appears to be the furthest along in its budget-
cutting plans.

Most departments are working toward about a 10 percent hit in the $476 million general-revenue
budget. It's likely that 100 to 120 positions will be eliminated if commissioners agree to Crotty's
budget proposal this summer.

Layoffs won't be needed, though, with frozen positions and attrition accounting for the losses,
county officials said.

Like other local governments, Orange will also consider tapping its $62.4 million reserve fund, so
there will be less money in the rainy-day fund if hurricanes wreak havoc.

Proponents of the tax cuts say city and local governments have enjoyed healthy tax-revenue
increases for many years, and it's time to bring some relief to the property owners who have
made that possible.

Margie Patchett, who leads the Volusia Tax Reform group, which lobbied for tax cuts, said she's
not troubled by the service reductions that local leaders are forecasting, adding that public safety
should be the main focus of local government anyway.

She said she sympathized with moms such as Forristall, who count on inexpensive public day
care. Even so, Patchett said such programs shouldn't be a government priority.

"They're competing with the private sector," Patchett said. "We don't think that's right."




On patrol in Orlando (Florida)

An Orlando Sentinel reporter rides with Orlando police and Orange deputies for 2 nights in areas
where murders and other violence are on the rise.

Jim Leusner

Sentinel Staff Writer

June 23, 2007

Orlando police vehicles converge on a small, dingy apartment building at the corner of South
Street and Albany Avenue. Officers jump out and dart toward two men hanging out on a street
corner.

Two "dime" ($10) bags of marijuana fall to the ground as two men stand next to two cars parked
in the yard.

"I did not drop that," claims a 23-year-old man on probation for cocaine possession and resisting
Disclaimer: This information is provided by Steve Detwiler and while IAEM supports my work 26
       they do not endorse or support any agency, organization, or company that posts or
                                    distributes this document.
 This service is brought to in cooperation with the International Association of Emergency
Managers (IAEM). If you’re interested in learning more about IAEM, please visit our website
                                  at: http://www.iaem.com/

arrest. "Just please don't take me to jail."

Minutes later, officers find a loaded 9 mm Smith & Wesson semiautomatic pistol wrapped in a
sock under a window air conditioner. Stolen in 1999, it is a weapon that could have been used in
many crimes.

Crowds of staring neighbors say they know nothing, but a gun is off the street.

It is 8 p.m. and just another Wednesday night in Orlando's Parramore neighborhood, just west of
downtown, where street drug dealers cater to drivers from across Central Florida looking for pot
and crack cocaine.

Earlier this month, an Orlando Sentinel reporter rode back-to-back nights with Orlando police and
Orange County sheriff's tactical officers who work high-crime zones where murders and other
violence have increased during the past two years.

Orlando Sgt. James Brooks and his men wearing black shirts, fatigue pants and gloves are
trolling local "fishing holes" known for drug-dealing, shootings and resident complaints.

Since September, when the agency handpicked a group of aggressive officers to take on the
west side, they have arrested more than 1,500 suspects and recovered more than 100 guns.
Orange County's tactical units, which have targeted west-side neighborhoods in its jurisdiction
since January 2006, have made more than 3,800 arrests and seized 200 guns.

Yet the "fishing" remains plentiful, officers say, because of remorseless young offenders,
residents afraid to help police and public apathy.

"I don't think people know what goes on in Orlando," said Brooks, a no-nonsense, 25-year
veteran. "I guarantee you if you transported this problem to other parts of the city, the community
reaction would be different."

While heading to the location of a raid, officers in a van joke to stay loose. They compare stories
about suspects who pulled guns on them, their frustrations with the courts and their run-ins with
teens who have no education and poor prospects.

"They call me an 'Uncle Tom' and don't even know what it means," said Officer Keith Stubbs, who
is black.

'Not bad for a night's work'

About 9 p.m., OPD's tactical-patrol caravan turns on to Barley Street, a modest subdivision of old,
one-story concrete-block homes off Ivey Lane. A half-dozen young men wearing baggy shorts
hang out on the corner. One flees, darting between homes. A half-dozen officers give chase on
foot while patrol cars circle.

Ten minutes later, Charles Davis, 21 -- recently released from jail on charges of resisting arrest
and driving without a license -- is arrested a few blocks away. A .40-caliber pistol is found in a
trash can near where the chase began.

A few miles north on Old Winter Garden Road, another tactical unit stops a sport utility vehicle
with illegally dark windows. Officers say they smell marijuana inside. A search reveals five
baggies of pot and a 9 mm pistol.

Disclaimer: This information is provided by Steve Detwiler and while IAEM supports my work           27
     they do not endorse or support any agency, organization, or company that posts or
                                  distributes this document.
 This service is brought to in cooperation with the International Association of Emergency
Managers (IAEM). If you’re interested in learning more about IAEM, please visit our website
                                  at: http://www.iaem.com/

The driver, Jody Hayes, 29, is a convicted felon with numerous drug arrests. Passenger Joshua
McCarthy, 19, was sentenced in April to two years of probation for carrying a concealed firearm.

Handcuffed and sitting on the ground, Hayes has an answer when asked why so many people
carry guns: "You look at someone wrong, they're liable to do something to you."

That may be what happened about 10:30 p.m. when Jhymy Jean Gustin, 16, got into an
argument with four men at Lee Avenue and Anderson Street in Parramore. A hooded man shot
him in the head with a .45-caliber pistol, a witness told police.

Later, two tactical officers see four men hiding, then drive off from a nearby South Street home. A
stop of the vehicle leads to the arrest of Julius Martin, 17, on charges of first-degree murder. A
.45-caliber pistol is recovered in the home.

Five hours of work netted 11 arrests, three guns, four ounces of pot, a little crack and some
prescription drugs.

"Not bad for a night's work," Brooks said.

Minor-crime arrests help

Across town the night before, sheriff's Sgt. Jim Deleu and his officers are one of five teams
working Pine Hills and South Orange Blossom Trail. A 13-year veteran with a shaved head, he
likes to quiz suspects about their lives. He encourages his officers to make arrests, even for
minor offenses.

"If we arrest them for the smallest crime, we may stop a crime," Deleu said. "We get their
fingerprints and photographs. And we may stop a homicide."

On this night, the sheriff's teams will arrest 23 people -- mostly on narcotics charges, recover two
stolen cars and seize a variety of crack cocaine and prescription drugs. Deleu calls it an
"average" night.

The evening is a nonstop series of encounters with suspicious people on the street and drivers
with drugs, most of whom have a history of arrests, been on probation or served stints in prison.

Poor child-rearing blamed

Steve Dix, one of the deputies who works the area, attributes much of the crime to poor child-
rearing.

"One parent doesn't have enough time to raise their kids," Dix said. "The streets are raising their
kids."

Deputies target South Orange Blossom Trail, which has open-air drug and prostitution markets,
young thugs who peddle drugs and commit robberies around Pine Hills apartment complexes,
and crack dealers who operate out of cars and cheap hotels.

One of the biggest problems is crack-addicted prostitutes who keep drug dealers in business and
lure men to the Trail with offers of quick, $20 sex.

"Prostitution is not a victimless crime," Deleu said. "They are setting people up to get robbed.
They are supporting crack dealers. It's like a big web of crime."
Disclaimer: This information is provided by Steve Detwiler and while IAEM supports my work         28
     they do not endorse or support any agency, organization, or company that posts or
                                     distributes this document.
 This service is brought to in cooperation with the International Association of Emergency
Managers (IAEM). If you’re interested in learning more about IAEM, please visit our website
                                  at: http://www.iaem.com/


Many of the Trail dealers and thugs wear dreadlocks, black shirts and baggy black pants, making
it difficult for investigators and witnesses to identify suspects. Many also are emulating rap
singers espousing the "thug life," he said.

'That's enough'

Deleu proudly shows off a few convenience stores on West Colonial Drive and a nearby, small
neighborhood off Walkup Street where business owners, landlords and residents worked with
deputies to drive drug dealers away.

"There are a lot of good people in Pine Hills," he said. "There has to be more [community]
influence to make it extremely unpopular for kids to commit crimes. They have to say, 'That's
enough.' "

On South Orange Blossom Trail, it's a freak show with male and female prostitutes. One man, the
size of a football lineman, wears hot pants and high heels.

While tactical officers dealt with a driver possessing illicit prescription drugs, an Oklahoma tourist
approached Deleu to complain about prostitution and drug dealing at his $30-a-night hotel.

"I don't think they were playing Monopoly," said Jeremy Blankenship, 32. "I had no clue where
this hotel was."

By 1 a.m., a few prostitutes still loiter on the Trail. Deleu smells marijuana on two men, ages 22
and 18, who walk into an all-night convenience store and questions them. Both have been in and
out of jail.

The older one said a gunman tried to rob him a few days earlier, but he had no money.

The younger one, unemployed and kicked out of school, shrugged his shoulders about his long
list of arrests starting with battery at age 9 and attempted murder when he was 14.

Princess Willis, a 42-year-old restaurant worker and mother of three who lives off the Trail, said
the older man typifies crime on the sin strip.

"This area is poverty stricken," she said. "It's not the kids. These kids were born crack-addicted.
His mother was a crack-addicted dancer and hooker. They're a product of crack and the '80s."




Disclaimer: This information is provided by Steve Detwiler and while IAEM supports my work           29
     they do not endorse or support any agency, organization, or company that posts or
                                  distributes this document.
 This service is brought to in cooperation with the International Association of Emergency
Managers (IAEM). If you’re interested in learning more about IAEM, please visit our website
                                  at: http://www.iaem.com/

                            International News Stories
Accused Asian terror leader warns more blood will be shed
http://www.cnn.com/2007/WORLD/asiapcf/06/25/abu.dujana/index.html

Meeting seeks to find plan for Darfur
http://news.yahoo.com/s/ap/20070625/ap_on_re_af/darfur_conference

Stretch limited vaccines to fight pandemic-experts (China)
http://www.alertnet.org/thenews/newsdesk/HKG232451.htm

Stricken Pakistan braces for possible cyclone
http://news.yahoo.com/s/afp/20070625/wl_asia_afp/pakistanweatherrain_070625124809

Americans set new mark for giving
http://www.cnn.com/2007/US/06/25/charitable.giving.ap/index.html

Draft emergency response law bans false information on accidents (China)
http://english.people.com.cn/200706/25/eng20070625_387300.html

Heat wave grills Italy
http://news.monstersandcritics.com/europe/news/article_1322060.php/Heatwave_grills_Italy

Greek Heat Wave Leaves Three Dead; Power Demand Hits Record
http://www.bloomberg.com/apps/news?pid=20601085&sid=awOhYtbQ44_s&refer=europe

Mexico purges federal police chiefs
http://www.latimes.com/news/nationworld/world/la-fg-mexdrug26jun26,0,3471511.story?coll=la-
home-center

EU overcomes divisions in new treaty
http://news.yahoo.com/s/ap/20070623/ap_on_re_eu/eu_summit

Waldheim, ex-UN leader and Nazi, buried in Austria
http://news.yahoo.com/s/nm/20070623/ts_nm/austria_waldheim_funeral_dc

First big wave of Iraqi refugees heads for the US
http://news.yahoo.com/s/csm/20070626/ts_csm/orefuge_1

Crater Could Solve 1908 Tunguska Meteor Mystery (Russian Federation)
http://news.yahoo.com/s/space/20070626/sc_space/cratercouldsolve1908tunguskameteormyster
y

Protesters torch Iran gas stations
http://www.cnn.com/2007/WORLD/meast/06/27/iran.fuel/index.html

EU backs anti-terror deal with U.S. on bank data
http://news.yahoo.com/s/nm/20070627/ts_nm/security_eu_usa_dc

UN: Half the world soon to be in cities
http://news.yahoo.com/s/ap/20070627/ap_on_re_eu/state_of_world


Disclaimer: This information is provided by Steve Detwiler and while IAEM supports my work    30
     they do not endorse or support any agency, organization, or company that posts or
                                  distributes this document.
 This service is brought to in cooperation with the International Association of Emergency
Managers (IAEM). If you’re interested in learning more about IAEM, please visit our website
                                  at: http://www.iaem.com/

Brown becomes new British prime minister
http://news.yahoo.com/s/ap/20070627/ap_on_re_eu/britain_brown

Russia: ex-Guantanamo detainee killed
http://news.yahoo.com/s/ap/20070627/ap_on_re_eu/russia_guantanamo

Iranians still planning attacks in Iraq: U.S.
http://news.yahoo.com/s/nm/20070627/wl_nm/iraq_dc

BCIA may partially clear sky in case of emergency (China)
http://english.people.com.cn/200706/27/eng20070627_388088.html

Top judge warns of high terror threat (Europe)
http://news.yahoo.com/s/ap/20070628/ap_on_re_eu/europe_terrorism

London bomb sparks terror alert
http://www.cnn.com/2007/WORLD/europe/06/29/london.alert/index.html

Manhunt for London bomb suspect
http://www.cnn.com/2007/WORLD/europe/06/29/london.alert/index.html

Explosive material found in second car on London street
http://www.cnn.com/2007/WORLD/europe/06/29/london.alert/index.html

US urge vigilance after London incident
http://news.yahoo.com/s/ap/20070629/ap_on_go_ca_st_pe/us_britain_bomb_defused

http://www.cnn.com/2007/US/06/29/us.london.device/index.html

800,000 hit by South Asia floods
http://www.cnn.com/2007/WORLD/asiapcf/06/29/southasia.storms.ap/index.html

Kenya to receive training in disaster management from Israel
http://www.kbc.co.ke/story.asp?ID=43354

Storms kill dozens in Pakistan
http://www.cnn.com/2007/WORLD/asiapcf/06/23/pakistan.floods/index.html

State-of-the-art Emergency Operation Centre at Mantralaya (India)
http://in.news.yahoo.com/070623/48/6hans.html

144 dead as India's monsoon sweeps westward
http://news.yahoo.com/s/afp/20070624/wl_sthasia_afp/indiaweatherflood_070624165813;_ylt=Al
KITFkgl5VBLc4yqTMr3DfPOrgF

Tornadoes rip through parts of western Canada
http://news.yahoo.com/s/afp/20070624/sc_afp/canadatornado_070624184504;_ylt=Ane4jiv_wKY
p15_pRwUdzWjPOrgF

China’s massive dam is changing the weather
http://dsc.discovery.com/news/2007/06/22/chinadam_pla.html?category=earth&guid=200706220
91500

Disclaimer: This information is provided by Steve Detwiler and while IAEM supports my work    31
     they do not endorse or support any agency, organization, or company that posts or
                                  distributes this document.
 This service is brought to in cooperation with the International Association of Emergency
Managers (IAEM). If you’re interested in learning more about IAEM, please visit our website
                                  at: http://www.iaem.com/

Three cases of H5N1 bird flu confirmed in Germany
http://www.physorg.com/news101895953.html

Blair set to be named Mideast envoy
http://news.yahoo.com/s/ap/20070625/ap_on_re_eu/mideast_blair

Armies must ready for global warming role: Britain
http://news.yahoo.com/s/nm/20070625/sc_nm/climate_security_dc;_ylt=AgkEH2zC4zxK9Xq8.cg
PY.UhANEA

All-night battle as blaze nears Athens
http://news.yahoo.com/s/afp/20070628/sc_afp/greecefire_070628221150;_ylt=AqOuMyiSDu9UU.
ZWkCObDfXPOrgF

New Palestinian PM wants to work with Israel
http://www.cnn.com/2007/WORLD/meast/06/28/palestinian.pm/index.html

Swiss climate warms twice as fast as northern hemisphere: study
http://news.yahoo.com/s/afp/20070626/sc_afp/switzerlandclimate_070626174606;_ylt=AgHG3Yp
i7gTDeHUNPf5lK9_POrgF

Norway decries EU 'protectionism' on carbon dioxide quotas
http://news.yahoo.com/s/afp/20070627/sc_afp/norwayclimatewarming_070627173057;_ylt=ArdX
4BYTSTjWs2QegGQ7z1bPOrgF

Scorching heat, floods wreak havoc across Europe
http://news.yahoo.com/s/afp/20070627/wl_afp/europeweather_070627202325;_ylt=AiuwuvW1Adl
a.FUnGoOK7mPPOrgF

IAEA, N. Korea reach agreement on shutdown
http://news.yahoo.com/s/ap/20070629/ap_on_re_as/koreas_nuclear

U.N. closes down Iraq weapons monitors
http://news.yahoo.com/s/ap/20070629/ap_on_re_mi_ea/un_iraq_weapons_inspectors

Satellite Communications Deployed for Improved Global Response to Disasters
http://www.govtech.com/em/articles/125664




Disclaimer: This information is provided by Steve Detwiler and while IAEM supports my work    32
     they do not endorse or support any agency, organization, or company that posts or
                                  distributes this document.
 This service is brought to in cooperation with the International Association of Emergency
Managers (IAEM). If you’re interested in learning more about IAEM, please visit our website
                                  at: http://www.iaem.com/

                                          Reports
INFLUENZA PANDEMIC: Efforts to Forestall Onset Are Under Way; Identifying Countries
at Greatest Risk Entails Challenges
http://www.gao.gov/new.items/d07604.pdf

Hurricane Katrina: EPA's Current and Future Environmental Protection Efforts Could Be
Enhanced by Addressing Issues and Challenges Faced on the Gulf Coast
http://www.gao.gov/cgi-bin/getrpt?GAO-07-651

GAO−07−697: Combating Terrorism: Law Enforcement Agencies Lack Directives to Assist
Foreign Nations to Identify, Disrupt, and Prosecute Terrorists
http://www.gao.gov/new.items/d07697.pdf

The CIP Report (June 2007)
http://cipp.gmu.edu/archive/cip_report_5.12.pdf

Transportation Equity in Emergencies: A Review of the Practices of State Departments of
Transportation, Metropolitan Planning Organizations, and Transit Agencies in 20 Metropolitan
Areas
http://www.trb.org/news/blurb_detail.asp?id=7698




Disclaimer: This information is provided by Steve Detwiler and while IAEM supports my work     33
     they do not endorse or support any agency, organization, or company that posts or
                                  distributes this document.
 This service is brought to in cooperation with the International Association of Emergency
Managers (IAEM). If you’re interested in learning more about IAEM, please visit our website
                                  at: http://www.iaem.com/

                               Additional Information

Chronicles of Katrina: Lessons Learned for Home Preparedness book (New Book)
http://stevencraigauthor.com/default.aspx

Homeland Security Digital Library (HSDL)
https://www.hsdl.org/?auth/login&dest=search

FEMA Citizen Corps Newsletter (July 2007)
http://www.citizencorps.gov/pdf/newsletter/cc-newsletter-july2007.pdf

Ocean City, MD Volunteer Fire Department (This is where I took my recent vacation)
http://www.ocvfc.com/

CIA Releases Two Significant Collections of Historical Documents
http://www.foia.cia.gov/

Seminar on Early Warning Systems
The European Commission and the Portuguese Presidency are co-organising a seminar between
15 and 18 July 2007 on Early warning systems, with special emphasis on tsunami warning
systems for the Mediterranean and the Atlantic. See seminar website:
http://www.proteccaocivil.pt/EWS/enquadramento_uk.htm

Angora Fire Update for June 26, 2007 (California State Wildfire Updates) - Lake Tahoe Fires
http://www.calfires.com/

http://www.inciweb.org/incident/725

AMA Launches New Disaster Journal: Disaster Medicine and Public Health Preparedness
The American Medical Association (AMA) unveiled its newest publication, “Disaster Medicine and
Public Health Preparedness,” today at its Chicago headquarters. The new quarterly, peer-
reviewed journal is the first comprehensive publication emphasizing public health preparedness
and disaster response for all health care professionals.
http://www.dmphp.org/

Disability Preparedness.gov
http://www.disabilitypreparedness.gov/

Prepare Seminole County, FL (This will be activated on Monday, July 3, 2007)
www.prepareseminole.org

Domestic Security, Civil Contingencies and Resilience in the United Kingdom: A Guide to Policy,
compiled and edited by Dr, Paul Cornish
http://www.iaem.com/regions/iaemeuropa/Documents-Media.asp

U.S. Public Health Service Commissioned Corps Readiness and Response Program EM Forum
Transcripts
http://www.emforum.org/vforum/lc070627.htm

Prehistoric Hurricanes (Video)
http://www.livescience.com/php/video/player.php?video_id=pur5281_prehistorichurrican

Disclaimer: This information is provided by Steve Detwiler and while IAEM supports my work    34
     they do not endorse or support any agency, organization, or company that posts or
                                  distributes this document.
 This service is brought to in cooperation with the International Association of Emergency
Managers (IAEM). If you’re interested in learning more about IAEM, please visit our website
                                  at: http://www.iaem.com/

2005 IAEM Reading List
http://www.divshare.com/download/1115553-961

US Army Corps of Engineers Emergency Operations web site
http://209.225.176.11/ceerp/

Federal Resource Collection on Disaster Behavioral Health
This resource collection contains a variety of federally produced disaster behavioral health
materials. Many resources were produced in reaction to several large-scale disasters and can be
adapted for future disasters. This collection may be updated as new disasters pose unique
challenges in response and recovery. It is available on CD-ROM or at:
http://production.esi-dc.com/DBHIS_Fed_Resources_CD/introduction.htm.

I am sure the German Coast Guard does a better job than is depicted in this video.
But... it is too funny.
http://www.emergencymgmt.info/GermanCoastGuard.mpg

JibJab.com
http://www.jibjab.com/originals/what_we_call_the_news


NEMA News

DoD AUTHORIZATION OF THE NATIONAL GUARD FOR FISCAL YEAR 2008 UPDATE
The National Governors’ Association convened a meeting of state homeland security
representatives, National Guard Associations, the Adjutant General Association of the U.S., and
key Congressional staffers earlier this month to discuss the Department of Defense authorization
of the National Guard and Reserves for FY 2008.
According to Rep. Tom Davis’ (VA) office, several important provisions pertaining to the National
Guard and Reserves have been included in the House passed FY 2008 National Defense
Authorization Act. Among the highlights contained in the House language are $1 billion to provide
the National Guard and Reserve equipment from their unfunded requirements list; authorizes a
fourth star for the Chief of the National Guard Bureau; expands the National Guard Bureau
charter to include official coordination with federal agencies, states, Joint Forces Command and
Northern Command on homeland and civil support activities; requires that DoD evaluate the
state-by-state preparedness of the National Guard for homeland missions and send the report to
both Congress, as well as governors, and repeals the Insurrection Act changes (Section 1076 of
the John Warner National Defense Authorization of FY 2007). It was stated that Reps. Taylor (D-
MS) and Hayes (R-NC) were resolute in their support to include the Guard Empowerment
language in the legislation.

On the Senate side, staffers from Senators Leahy (VT) and Bond (MO) briefed those in
attendance on the progress made with the Senate legislation. Currently, the National Guard
Empowerment Act (S. 430), introduced by Sen. Bond and originally cosponsored by Senators
Leahy, Nelson (NE), and Snowe (R-ME), has obtained a total of 54 cosponsors. According to
Sen. Leahy’s staffer, Daniel Ginsberg, S. 430 centers around: elevating the position of the
National Guard and Reserves, repealing the Insurrection Act changes, the DoD’s mobilization
policy, and maintaining an adequate equipment stock for the National Guard and Reserves. It is
important to note that since certain provisions of the Empowerment Act have been included in the
Senate version of the National Defense Authorization Act of FY 2008, Senators Leahy and Bond
are able to offer amendments to the bill pertaining to National Guard and Reserves empowerment
issues. Despite these efforts, the Senate staffers were quick to warn that the support of at least
85 to 90 Senators is needed to ensure the Guard provisions survive Conference Committee.
Disclaimer: This information is provided by Steve Detwiler and while IAEM supports my work 35
      they do not endorse or support any agency, organization, or company that posts or
                                   distributes this document.
 This service is brought to in cooperation with the International Association of Emergency
Managers (IAEM). If you’re interested in learning more about IAEM, please visit our website
                                  at: http://www.iaem.com/


NOAA NAMES NEW DIRECTOR FOR NATIONAL WEATHER SERVICE
Dr. Jack Hayes has been appointed Director of the National Weather Service beginning
September 2, 2007. Dr. Hayes rejoins NOAA, having served the past 1 ½ years as the Director
of the World Weather Watch Department, World Meteorological Organization (WMO). In this
position, he was responsible for the Global Observing System, Global Telecommunications
System, and Global Data Processing and Forecasting System which provide the foundation for
operational weather forecasting and warning services in WMO Member countries worldwide.

Prior to leaving NOAA, Hayes served in a number of Senior Executive positions. He was the
Deputy Assistant Administrator, Office of Oceanic and Atmospheric Research and as the Deputy
Assistant Administrator, NOAA’s Ocean Service. In addition, Hayes served at NWS as the
Director, Office of Science and Technology. As previously announced, Mary Glackin will serve as
acting Director, National Weather Service until Hayes returns.

2007 NATIONAL CONFERENCE ON COMMUNITY PREPAREDNESS BIG SUCCESS
More than 600 people attended the 2007 National Conference on Community
Preparedness: Partnerships and Collaboration through Citizen Corps, June 10-13, 2007 in
Alexandria, Va. This conference was co-hosted by NEMA and IAEM, and was open to anyone
interested in community and citizen preparedness.

Thanks to all those who participated and attended. Conference presentations and handouts are
available on the IAEM web site at http://www.iaem.com.

New Emergency Management Standards
EMAP will release the new Emergency Management Standards by EMAP for public comment on
July 2, 2007. Visit the EMAP website http://www.emaponline.org for more information and
updates.

UTAH GRANTED EMAP ACCREDITATION
Utah’s system for preparedness and response to disasters was granted full accreditation on June
9, 2007 by the Emergency Management Accreditation Program (EMAP).

Emergency management accreditation represents a significant achievement. The Utah state
program documented how it meets national standards for a state’s disaster preparedness and
response system. To achieve accreditation, Utah took corrective steps in several areas to meet
all the standards during its conditional accreditation period. There currently are 13 accredited
programs in the country. These include Arizona, Florida, Illinois, Massachusetts, Montana, New
York, North Dakota, Pennsylvania, Utah, Virginia, East Baton Rouge Parish (LA),
Jacksonville/Duval (FL) and the District of Columbia.

“Utah has joined a select few of jurisdictions to take this important step in assuring that their
constitutes have a clear understanding of the matrix used to measure the level of preparedness
and they should be commended,” said Ellis M. Stanley, Sr., chair of the EMAP Commission and
general manager of the Los Angeles Emergency Preparedness Department. “States like Utah
that work toward and achieve compliance with these standards are at the forefront in ensuring
their residents are served by a comprehensive system to deal with disasters."

Accreditation is a means of demonstrating, through program assessment, documentation and on-
site assessment by an independent team, that a program meets national standards. Accreditation
is valid for five years from the date the EMAP Commission grants accreditation. Accredited


Disclaimer: This information is provided by Steve Detwiler and while IAEM supports my work      36
     they do not endorse or support any agency, organization, or company that posts or
                                  distributes this document.
 This service is brought to in cooperation with the International Association of Emergency
Managers (IAEM). If you’re interested in learning more about IAEM, please visit our website
                                  at: http://www.iaem.com/

programs must maintain compliance with EMAP standards and be reassessed in five years to
maintain accredited status.

NEMA RECEIVES EMAC GRANT FROM FEMA
FEMA has awarded $1.05 M to NEMA to support EMAC and mutual aid activities. A new
cooperative agreement between NEMA and FEMA has also been put into place to allow the two
organizations to continue to work together on mutually beneficial projects and initiatives.

SECOND EMAC ARTICLE AVAILABLE FOR PUBLICATION
The second EMAC article, “Making The Most of EMAC,” was posted to the EMAC Web Site
(www.emacweb.org). The article discusses the use of intrastate agreements in your state and
how they compliment the EMAC process. For more information on intrastate agreements or to
view examples of agreements, visit www.emacweb.org/?150.

The EMAC articles (four in total) are being developed one per month - May, June, July, and
August to be used in newsletters, bulletins, and other venues to provide education about EMAC.
The basic outline for the articles is the following:
May 07: Article: EMAC Basics
June 07: Article: Making the Most of EMAC
July 07: Article: EMAC Success Stories
August 07: Article: The Future of EMAC

For other information about EMAC, go to the EMAC website, www.emacweb.org.


US Department of Transportation Disability Preparedness News

Federal Interagency Coordinating Council on Access and Mobility
The Federal Interagency Coordinating Council on Access and Mobility (United We Ride)
developed a new three year action plan. On June 21, 2007, United We Ride Executive Council
held its Quarterly Meeting at which time the Executive Council approved the Action Plan.
Collaboration with Federal partners to address specific transportation needs for individuals with
disabilities, older adults, and people with lower incomes during emergency preparedness
planning, response, and recovery is among the action items that will be implemented in a working
group.

ICC Emergency Transportation Work Group
The work group has completed a checklist for local communities on transportation issues during
emergency preparedness, response, and recovery. To view the checklist visit:
http://www.dotcr.ost.dot.gov/Documents/Emergency/Emergency%20Checklist.doc.

The work group is also working with the Federal Highway Administration on the development of a
Primer on Evacuation of Special Populations. Most recently, the work group participated in the
Connecting Communities Forum in Columbus, Ohio to integrate special populations into
emergency transportation preparedness activities at the local level.

Transportation Equity in Emergencies Report Released (Included in the Report’s Section)
The Federal Transit Administration’s (FTA’s) Office of Civil Rights released a report designed to
promote nondiscrimination in the emergency preparedness activities administered by recipients of
FTA financial assistance. The report explores the extent to which selected transit providers,
metropolitan planning organizations, and state departments of transportation are identifying and
addressing the needs of populations that may be especially vulnerable in the event of a natural or
Disclaimer: This information is provided by Steve Detwiler and while IAEM supports my work     37
     they do not endorse or support any agency, organization, or company that posts or
                                  distributes this document.
 This service is brought to in cooperation with the International Association of Emergency
Managers (IAEM). If you’re interested in learning more about IAEM, please visit our website
                                  at: http://www.iaem.com/

man-made disaster. The report also highlights resources that may help officials in metropolitan
regions to better incorporate attention to populations with specific mobility needs into their
ongoing emergency preparedness planning activities.


UK Releases Second Draft of BS 25999 Business Continuity Standard for Comment
The BSI want to hear your views on this draft before it is published as a British Standard. BS
25999-2 DPC will specify requirements for establishing, implementing, operating, monitoring,
reviewing, exercising, maintaining and improving a documented Business Continuity
Management System (BCMS) within the context of managing an organization’s overall business
risks. The requirements specified in this British Standard will be generic and intended to be
applicable to all organizations (or parts there of), regardless of type, size and nature of business.
The extent of application of these requirements depends on the organization's operating
environment and complexity.

Therefore, the design and implementation of a BCMS to meet the requirements of this standard
will be influenced by regulatory, customer and business requirements, the products and services,
the processes employed and the size and structure of the organization. It will not be the intent of
this British Standard to imply uniformity in the structure of a BCMS but for an organization to
design a BCMS to be appropriate to its needs and that meets its stakeholder’s requirements. This
British Standard can be used by internal and external parties, including certification bodies, to
assess an organization’s ability to meet its own business continuity needs, as well as any
customer, legal or regulatory needs.

Your comments on this draft are welcome and will assist in the preparation of the consequent
British Standard. If no comments are received to the contrary, this draft may be implemented
unchanged as a British Standard.

Please note this draft is NOT the FINAL version of BS 25999-2. This document is a draft for
public comment and its contents may be subject to change. It is NOT a British Standard until it
has been published as such.
http://www.bsi-global.com/en/Standards-and-Publications/Industry-Sectors/All-Standards/BS/BS-
25999-2-Draft-for-Public-Comment-DPC-/BS-25999-2-DPC-Form/BS-25999-2-DPC-Form/


European Union Monitoring & Information Centre activated (Received June 28, 2007)
European Union responds swiftly to combat forest fires in Greece Early in the evening of 27 June
2007, Greece requested civil protection assistance from its European partners. The request
triggered a rapid reaction from the European Commission's Monitoring and Information Centre
(MIC).

Description of emergency
Extremely hot and dry weather conditions in Greece, combined with strong winds led to a
disastrous upsurge of forest fires and wildfires. By 28 June there were over 120 fires in the
country, the most affected areas being the Regions of Thessaly, Sterea, Attica and the
Peloponnesus.


Disclaimer: This information is provided by Steve Detwiler and while IAEM supports my work         38
     they do not endorse or support any agency, organization, or company that posts or
                                  distributes this document.
 This service is brought to in cooperation with the International Association of Emergency
Managers (IAEM). If you’re interested in learning more about IAEM, please visit our website
                                  at: http://www.iaem.com/

Request for assistance
Greece called upon the European Community Civil Protection Mechanism to supply additional
fire-fighting water-bombing aircraft and helicopters that can also be engaged in the fight against
forest fires. The request was sent to the MIC on Wednesday 27 June 2007 at 1800h.

Assistance sent through the mechanism

Within minutes the MIC forwarded the call for assistance to its network of civil protection
authorities.

Several countries were already able to offer and deploy assistance to Greece within a few hours
of the request:

Italy: 2 Canadair CL 415 aircraft. Two technicians of the Italian Civil Protection Department were
also deployed to Greece the same night of the request to coordinate with local authorities about
needs and intervention modalities.
France: 2 Canadair CL 415 water bomber aircraft.
Portugal: 1 Canadair CL-215 aircraft. The plane will be ready for departure as of 29 June and
estimated to arrive in Greece by that same evening

Greece has accepted all offers of assistance. Meanwhile, other Member States are considering
providing helicopters.




Disclaimer: This information is provided by Steve Detwiler and while IAEM supports my work       39
     they do not endorse or support any agency, organization, or company that posts or
                                  distributes this document.
 This service is brought to in cooperation with the International Association of Emergency
Managers (IAEM). If you’re interested in learning more about IAEM, please visit our website
                                  at: http://www.iaem.com/

                                     Contributions
The following individuals or groups contribute to the Emergency Management and Homeland
Security Articles of Interest.

Regular Contributors
    International Association of Emergency Managers
    National Emergency Management Association
    Florida Emergency Preparedness Association
    Emergency Management Institute, Higher Education Program
    King County, WA Office of Emergency Management
    Natural Hazards Observer Newsletter
    U.S. Department of Homeland Security
    Interagency Coordinating Council on Emergency Preparedness and Individuals with
       Disabilities
    National Organization on Disabilities, Emergency Preparedness Initiative
    EAD & Associates, LLC
    Nena Wiley
    Dave Freeman
    Gregory Banner
    Arthur Rabjohn
    Martha Braddock

Guest Contributors
    Steve Craig
    John (Rusty) Russell
    Bill Vola
    Bill Lang
    Dave Bujak
    Jeremy Jernigan

Special Thanks
Special thanks always to Ines Pearce and the California Emergency Services Association,
Southern Chapter who posts the Articles of Interest to their websites at:
http://pearceglobalpartners.com/NewsArticles.html and http://cesa.net/aoi.cfm?color=st




Disclaimer: This information is provided by Steve Detwiler and while IAEM supports my work    40
     they do not endorse or support any agency, organization, or company that posts or
                                  distributes this document.

				
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