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					    (Photo by Richard F. Hope)



Floyd Bixler Residence (206 Spring Garden Street)
        2-1/2 story grey stone home with ornate decorative red and green trim and
railings; porch and second story balcony; dormers.
         The land is a rectangular strip fronting on Spring Garden Street, with an added
strip of access to Second Street. It cuts across the middle of what were once Original
Town Lot Nos.59 and 61. These Original Town Lots were surveyed by William Parsons
when Easton was established in 1752. These two Original Town Lots were both
conveyed to Samuel Sitgreaves by the Penn Family in two transactions between 1800 and
1802.1 Samuel Sitgreaves was a lawyer; a Federalist Congressman from Pennsylvania;
and from 1798 a US Commissioner to Great Britain regarding British claims under the
Jay Treaty. In addition, he was the first President of The Easton Bank, a leader of the
campaign to build the Delaware River Bridge in 1806,2 and made crucial donations to
found Easton‟s Library Hall3 and the Easton Trinity Episcopal Church.4
       Originally, the house on this lot was one-half of a Federal style Duplex, with the
other half at what became 208 Spring Garden Street. The porch served both units, but
was moved over to the remaining unit at No.208 when this one (at No.206) was torn
down or remodeled.5
        In 1843, this “Stone Messuage or Tenement” became the sole property of Dr.
Charles Innes, who partitioned it from an inherited estate.6 Dr. Innes, a resident of
“Millionaire‟s Row” (North Third Street),7 apparently rented out the Spring Garden
Street house. In 1855, it was the home of Hon. Washington McCartney,8 President Judge
of the Third Judicial Circuit of Pennsylvania from 1851 until his death,9 and founding
father of Easton‟s public high school.10 Judge McCartney died in 1856.11
                                            2


        Judge McCartney (1812 – 1856), was a celebrated Professor at Lafayette College,
as well as a lawyer in Easton.12 He was a prodigious scholar. Originally graduating as
valedictorian of his college class (at Jefferson College in Western Pennsylvania), he
wrote his address to the graduating class in English, French, Latin, Greek and ancient
Hebrew.13 He was a professor of mathematics and modern languages at Jefferson, and
for most of his career a professor of mathematics at Lafayette College in Easton.14 His
Differential Calculus was “for many years . . . the text-book on that subject used in our
best colleges.”15 He also conducted a law school in Easton, not connected with Lafayette
College.16 Despite his accomplishments, however, he was not a wealthy man, and much
of his estate at death consisted of his law and mathematics books.17
       Judge McCartney and his landlord, Dr. Charles Innes, served together on the
School Board committee that planned the organization of Easton‟s McCartney High
School.18 Dr. Innes had a family connection in legal circles: his sister, Mary E. Innes,
married prominent Easton lawyer Matthew Hale Jones.19 Jones later purchased the Innes
home on Millionaire‟s Row, and then sold it to his son-in-law, Judge William Sebring
Kirkpatrick. Judge Kirkpatrick, as a young man, had studied law in the offices of
Attorney Henry D. Maxwell (Sr.), and later was the senior partner in the law firm of
Kirkpatrick & Maxwell with Attorney Henry D. Maxwell (Jr.).20
       Judge McCartney‟s wife, Mary, was a daughter of Sarah Maxwell (who lived next
door) and a sister to Easton lawyer Henry D. Maxwell (Sr.).21 Mrs. McCartney is known
today for her pictures of early Easton. [See separate www.WalkingEaston.com entry for
208 Spring Garden Street for further history of artist Mary Elizabeth Maxwell
McCartney, and her mother, Sarah Maxwell.]
        Judge McCartney died in 1856,22 his widow moved in next door with her mother,
Sarah Maxwell,23 and the McCartney home was then taken over by his wife‟s brother,
Henry D. Maxwell (Sr.).24 Henry Maxwell also took Judge McCartney‟s judicial job
until the end of 1857, and again from 1862-63.25
        Henry had been born in Flemington, NJ in 1812.26 His granduncle had been a
British officer in the French and Indian War – with Braddock, and with Wolfe at Quebec
– and later became a Brigadier General in Washington‟s army during the Revolution.27
Henry‟s father, a New Jersey lawyer, died when he was only 15 years old,28 and he had to
give up his dream of attending Princeton College.29 Young Maxwell also obtained an
appointment through family connections as a Midshipman in the United States Navy, but
due to his Mother‟s opposition he had not taken up the appointment, and he formally
resigned it in 1830.30 After obtaining legal training from several practicing lawyers in
New Jersey (including his cousin, Hon J.P.B. Maxwell in Belvidere), Henry dutifully
came to live in Easton where his mother had moved in 1833, in order to help her raise her
large family. Henry opened a law practice in Phillipsburg in 1834, and joined the
Northampton County bar in Pennsylvania and practiced as an associate of Easton lawyer
and politician James Madison Porter by 1835.31 Henry became successful as a lawyer in
Easton, becoming the Deputy Attorney General for Northampton County in 1848-49,32
and ultimately the first President of the Bar Association of Northampton County.33 In
1842, be was appointed the Quarter Master General for an encampment of local military
groups in 1842, and thereafter “[t]he popular title of General was then accorded to him”
until he became a Judge. Maxwell took an appointment in 1850 as the U.S. Consul in
                                             3


Trieste (then part of Austria, now in Italy), but returned to Easton the following year.34
He was the President of Council for the Borough of Easton from 1853 – 56.35 At that
time, he lived on North 2nd Street, near bookseller William Maxwell,36 his brother.37
Maxwell was also the organizer of the original Y.M.C.A. in Easton in 1856. He became
the Y.M.C.A. President in 1860, but the organization‟s development was interrupted as
young men left Easton for the Army during the Civil War.38
         On the Saturday evening following South Carolina‟s attack on Fort Sumter in
1861 (which started the American Civil War), Judge Maxwell delivered a patriotic
address to mass meeting at the old Courthouse in Centre Square. “The building was
packed and people stood outside despite heavy rain” to hear Maxwell‟s address.39 Prior
to that time, Northampton County (which had been “predominantly Democratic and
agrarian” had held “Mass peace meetings . . . at which compromise was urged without
bloodshed”, but the Fort Sumter incident caused “indignant citizens” to begin
preparations “to support the „Republican war‟”.40
          A young William Sebring Kirkpatrick studied law in his office – the same
           William S. Kirkpatrick who later became a Judge and the senior partner in
           Kirkpatrick & Maxwell, the firm in which Henry D. Maxwell‟s son would
           later practice law (see below).41
In 1856 (as noted above), after the death of his brother-in-law Judge Washington
McCartney, Henry Maxwell took over the rental of Judge McCartney‟s half of the
duplex, with his Mother (and two sisters) living in the other half. Before the inauguration
of the modern street numbering scheme in 1874, the duplex was listed as 42-44 Spring
Garden Street, with Henry Maxwell‟s house being designated No.42.42
        Henry Maxwell‟s mother, Sarah Maxwell (living next door), died in 1866.43
After her death, Henry D. Maxwell moved away to Bushkill Street.44 It was apparently
while living on Bushkill Street that Henry Maxwell closed his lawyer‟s office one day
with a card on the door which read: “House on fire, will be back in 30 minutes.”
According to the fellow lawyer relating this story, the only explanation for the card was
that the “Duration of fire [was] fixed by Henry D. Maxwell and the Almight[y]
beforehand by pre-trial conference.”45 Judge Maxwell died in 1874.46
        After he moved, Judge Maxwell‟s house was leased to other tenants outside the
Maxwell family. When the modern numbering scheme was adopted in 1874, it was
assigned No.206 Spring Garden Street as the residence of John Alshouse.47 In the very
early 1880s, Dr. Jacob Ludlow (once General U.S. Grant‟s physician) lived and practiced
here,48 but he appears to have moved to 244 Spring Garden Street in 1882.49
       In 1880, Dr. Charles Innes died.50 In 1882 his son, Edward Innes, sold off the
family home on Millionaire‟s Row to his Uncle Matthew Hale Jones,51 and sold the
Spring Garden Street house to merchant Floyd S. Bixler52 (1843 – 193353).
        Floyd Bixler‟s grandfather was jeweler/clockmaker Christian Bixler III (who
founded the Easton Bixler dynasty). Floyd Bixler‟s father was Daniel L. Bixler.54 Unlike
many of the other Bixler family members, Floyd did not go into the jewelry trade, but
instead started work in 1858 for Captain Jacob Hay‟s dry goods firm. Bixler became
                                            4


Hay‟s partner in 1874.55 After Bixler was made a partner, he moved into a house on 14th
Street,56 in the mansion park development created there by Captain Hay.57
         In 1880, Bixler left Captain Hay to open his own firm, in partnership with James
W. Correll.58 In the early 1880s, Bixler also left Hay‟s mansion park on 14th Street. As
mentioned earlier, he purchased the Spring Garden Street home in 1882, but in 1884 his
residence was on North Second Street,59 and only in the following year (1885) was he
listed at the Spring Garden Street address.60
          This address sequence suggests a period of time during which Bixler may
           have had the Spring Garden Street house extensively renovated.
          Renovation in the early 1880s is also consistent with the Queen Anne style of
           architecture of this town house was popular in the period 1870 – 1910.61 That
           style was not in vogue when Dr. Charles Innes had acquired sole ownership of
           the house in 1843 (see above), and it is unlikely that Innes made such
           extensive renovations to a rental property. Accordingly, it seems likely that
           the “Stone Messuage or Tenement” of Innes‟s day was still the other half of
           the Duplex, and the Floyd Bixler constructed the structure that appears on the
           property today.
          In 1892, Bixler also purchased the corner property next door (at Second
           Street). He added a portion of that land to the Floyd Bixler Residence
           property,62 but in the following year (1893) he conveyed most of the corner
           property to his Aunt, Emma Bixler,63 where she built her fabulous 204 Spring
           Garden Street mansion.64
Meanwhile, in 1885-86 the Bixler & Correll dry goods firm worked with builder John
Knecht, in conjunction with the Masons, to have the Knecht Building constructed for its
needs. They expanded their space in the building in subsequent years.65 Correll
withdrew from the partnership to conduct his own firm in 1896 or ‟97.66 Bixler
continued his business as the F.S. Bixler Company at the same South Third Street
location. In 1902, he moved his firm to 126-30 South Third Street,67 which by 1925
included wholesale dry goods, hosiery and notions, and also the manufacture of pants and
overalls.68
          In 1907, Floyd Bixler (or his son, E. Stanley Bixler) also acquired Matthew
           Orr‟s retail dry goods store (306-12 Northampton Street, now part of the Two
           Rivers Landing location).69 Bixler‟s son, E. Stanley Bixler, and his grandson,
           S. Fordham Bixler, both later became Chairman of the Board of Orr‟s
           Department Stores.70
       Floyd Bixler was also an Easton historian, writing (among other things) a history
of Easton‟s early taverns, and a history of the Bixler family.71 He served on the
Executive Committee of the Northampton County Historical & Genealogical Society
when it was founded in 1906.72
       Floyd Bixler continued to live in the Spring Garden Street house until after
1920.73 By 1925, however, he had moved to 722 Carrell Street,74 and sold the Spring
Garden Street property to investor Frank Kurlansik,75 who lived in the house.76 [Mr.
Kurlansik was the owner of the Kurlansik Building at 118 Northampton Street, among
                                                   5


other things.77] Floyd Bixler retired in 1928, and his firm was discontinued.78 He died
five years later (in 1933) in his Cattell Street home, one day after his 90th birthday.79
        After Bixler‟s death, the Spring Garden Street house was reacquired from
Kurlansik by Floyd Bixler‟s daughter,80 Esther D. Bixler, in 1931,81 and retained by the
Bixler family until 1960.82 Among other tenants, it housed the Adams Funeral Home in
the 1930s, before that establishment moved to the Bull Mansion at 226 Bushkill Street in
1943.83


1
       Deed, John and Richard Penn to Samuel Sitgreaves, G2 86 (25 Jan. 1800)(Lot No.59; also
       included Lot Nos.80 and 240 for sale price £75); Deed, John and Richard Penn to Samuel
       Sitgreaves, G2 516 (15 Dec. 1802)(Lot No.61). Compare A.D. Chidsey, Jr., The Penn Patents in
       the Forks of the Delaware Plan of Easton, Map 2 (Vol. II of Publications of the Northampton
       County Historical and Genealogical Society 1937) with Northampton County Tax Records map,
       www.ncpub.org.
2
       Biographical Directory of the United States Congress, “Samuel Sitgreaves”, searchable from
       bioguide.congress.gov/biosearch/biosearch.asp (accessed 3 Jan. 2005); David B. Stillman, Easton
       in the First Half of the Nineteenth Century, Paper presented to the Northampton County Historical
       Society 17 Jan. 1946, Historical Bulletin of the Northampton County Historical & Genealogical
       Society, No. 3 (Sept. 1947) (avail. Marx Room, Easton Public Library), at 3, 6-7; Rev. Uzal W.
       Condit, The History of Easton, Penn‟a 148-49 (George W. West 1885 / 1889); Ethan Allen
       Weaver, “The Forks of the Delaware” Illustrated xxi, xxvi (Eschenbach Press, Easton, PA, 1900);
       Papers Read Before the Northampton County Historical & Genealogical Society, The Old County
       Courthouse and other Northampton County History 18 (1964).
3
       See Easton Area Public Library Website, www.eastonpl.org/, “Our History” (accessed 3 Jan.
       2005); Dr. Elinor Warner, Easton, Pennsylvania Walking Tour, for Pennsylvania Art Education
       Association Conference 2000, www.kutztown.edu/paea/paeaconf/2000/easton/walk_tour.html
       (accessed 4 Jan. 2005).
4
       Warner, Easton Walking Tour, supra; Rev. Uzal W. Condit, The History of Easton, Penn‟a 152
       (George W. West 1885 / 1889).
5
       Interview with William Oliver Andes III (Archive), 9 August 2007 (based in part on an old picture
       of the house that he had seen). See also Deed, [Rev.] Samuel Sitgreaves and James Linton,
       Executors of the Will of Samuel Sitgreaves, to Mary Ralston, E5 263 (1 Apr. 1829)(describing
       the property now numbered 208 Spring Garden Street as ending at the partition wall dividing it
       from the “adjacent Building now the Property of Robert Innes”) ; Deed, Mary Ralston to Sara
       Maxwell, A6 258 (9 May 1835)(same).
6
       Deed Poll, Peter Steckel, Sheriff, to Charles Innes B7 169 (28 Nov. 1843)(“amicable Action of
       Partition”; other heirs took property on the “Bethlehem Road” plus a payment to cover the
       difference in property valuations); see also D.G. Beers, Atlas of Northampton County
       Pennsylvania, Plan of Easton (A. Pomeroy & Co. 1874)(“Dr. Innes”).
7
       See separate entry for the Dr. Innes Residence, 20 North Third Street.
8
       C[harles] Kitchen, A General Directory of the Borough of Easton PA 40 (Cole & Eichman‟s
       Office, 1855)(Washington McCartney‟s home at 42 Spring Garden Street).
9
       See M.S. Henry, History of the Lehigh Valley 425 (Bixler & Corwin 1860); Frank B. Copp,
       Biographical Sketches of Some of Easton‟s Prominent Citizens 16 (1879); Seldon J. Coffin, The
       Men of Lafayette 1826 – 1893: Lafayette College, Its History, Its Men, Their Record 25-26 n.†
       (George W. West 1891).
                                                  6



10
     See separate entry for North Second Street, for further information concerning Judge Washington
     McCartney and the Easton public high school.
11
     Henry, History of the Lehigh Valley, supra at 425.
12
     Seldon J. Coffin, The Men of Lafayette 1826 – 1893: Lafayette College, Its History, Its Men,
     Their Record 25-26 n.† (George W. West 1891); accord, Michael C. Schrader, Bench and Bar,
     Vol. V of Two Hundred Years of Life in Northampton County, PA. A Bicentennial Review 86
     (Northampton County Bicentennial Commission 1976)(born 24 Aug. 1823, died 15 July 1856).
13
     Michael C. Schrader, Bench and Bar, Vol. V of Two Hundred Years of Life in Northampton
     County, PA. A Bicentennial Review 87, 90 (Northampton County Bicentennial Commission
     1976)(quoting a 1948 speech by Douglas M. Moffat, Judge McCartney‟s grandson).
14
     Schrader, Bench and Bar, supra at 87.
15
     Seldon J. Coffin, The Men of Lafayette 1826 – 1893: Lafayette College, Its History, Its Men,
     Their Record 25-26 n.† (George W. West 1891).
16
     Coffin, The Men of Lafayette, supra at 59.
17
     Michael C. Schrader, Bench and Bar, Vol. V of Two Hundred Years of Life in Northampton
     County, PA. A Bicentennial Review 91 (Northampton County Bicentennial Commission
     1976)(quoting a 1948 speech by Douglas M. Moffat, Judge McCartney‟s grandson).
18
     Frank B. Copp, Biographical Sketches of Some of Easton‟s Prominent Citizens 3 (Hillburn &
     West 1879).
19
     See William Weiss & James Wright, “Karas Building Is A Family History”, EASTON EXPRESS,
     Monday, 31 Dec. 1979, p.11, col.1; see also Deed Poll, Peter Steckel, Sheriff, to Charles Innes B7
     169 (28 Nov. 1843)(Mathew Hale Jones‟s wife was Mary E. Innes).
20
     William J. Heller, II History of Northampton County and The Grand Valley of the Lehigh
     Biographical Section 20 (The American Historical Society 1920). See separate entry for Dr.
     Charles Innes Residence, 20 North Third Street, and sources cited therein. See generally separate
     entry for Maxwell Mansion, 208 Spring Garden Street.
21
     See Henry, History of the Lehigh Valley, supra at 425 (Judge Washington McCartney was Henry
     D. Maxwell‟s brother-in-law); Obituary, “Mary E. Maxwell”, EASTON DAILY EXPRESS, Tuesday,
     26 Dec. 1893, p.3, col.5 (“relict” of Hon. Washington McCartney was the daughter of William
     Maxwell of Flemington, sister of Lydia Maxwell, and brother of William Maxwell); 1880 Census,
     Series T9, Roll 1161, p.379B (M. McCartney (age 64) and L.D. Maxwell (age 59), sisters, with
     the McCartney children); Michael C. Schrader, Bench and Bar, Vol. V of Two Hundred Years of
     Life in Northampton County, PA. A Bicentennial Review 92 (Northampton County Bicentennial
     Commission 1976)(Henry D. Maxwell was Washington McCarthy‟s brother-in-law).
     See also Schrader, Bench and Bar, supra at 88, which quotes at length a 1948 speech by Douglas
     M. Moffat (Judge McCarthy‟s grandson) to the effect that the Judge “married my grandmother,
     Elizabeth Maxwell, in the Presbyterian Church at Easton on April 18, 1839.” Mrs. McCartney‟s
     Obituary (cited above) listed her name as “Mary E. Maxwell”, and she must have been known
     within the family by her middle name of Elizabeth, rather than her first name of Mary.
22
     Obituary, “Mary E. Maxwell”, EASTON DAILY EXPRESS, Tuesday, 26 Dec. 1893, p.3, col.5 (her
     husband, Hon. Washington McCartney, had died in 1856); Henry, History of the Lehigh Valley,
     supra; Frank B. Copp, Biographical Sketches of Some of Easton‟s Prominent Citizens 16 (1879).
     See generally separate entry for 45 North Second Street, for further information concerning Judge
     Washington McCartney and the Easton public high school.
23
     See 1860 Census, Series M653, Roll 1147, p.238 (Sarah Maxwell, age 65, at 44 Spring Garden
     Street, with Mary E. McCartney age 46, Lydia D. Maxwell age 45, Sarah Maxwell age 37, Anna
     R. Maxwell age 14, Henry M. Maxwell age 12, and Helen Maxwell age 8); see also Article, “The
                                                7



     New Numbers”, EASTON DAILY FREE PRESS, Friday, 5 Dec. 1878, p.3 (208 Spring Garden Street
     assigned to “Mrs. McCartney”); 1880 Census, Series T9, Roll 1161, p.379B (M. McCartney (age
     64) and L.D. Maxwell (age 59), sisters, with the McCartney children).
24
     Compare William H. Boyd, Boyd‟s Directory of Reading, Easton, [Etc.] 126 (William H. Boyd
     1860)(Henry D. Maxwell at 42 Spring Garden Street) with C[harles] Kitchen, A General Directory
     of the Borough of Easton PA 40 (Cole & Eichman‟s Office, 1855)(H.D. Maxwell at 55 North
     Second Street). See also 1860 Census, Series M653, Roll 1147, p.238 (listing Henry D. Maxwell
     as a separate family and household, the next number over from his Mother‟s Census entry).
25
     Michael C. Schrader, Bench and Bar, Vol. V of Two Hundred Years of Life in Northampton
     County, PA. A Bicentennial Review 93 (Northampton County Bicentennial Commission 1976);
     Henry, History of the Lehigh Valley, supra; Frank B. Copp, Biographical Sketches of Some of
     Easton‟s Prominent Citizens 16 (1879).
26
     William J. Heller, II History of Northampton County and The Grand Valley of the Lehigh
     Biographical Section 20 (The American Historical Society 1920); Michael C. Schrader, Bench
     and Bar, Vol. V of Two Hundred Years of Life in Northampton County, PA. A Bicentennial
     Review 92 (Northampton County Bicentennial Commission 1976).
27
     M.S. Henry, History of the Lehigh Valley 424 (Bixler & Corwin 1860); but see Michael C.
     Schrader, Bench and Bar, Vol. V of Two Hundred Years of Life in Northampton County, PA. A
     Bicentennial Review 92 (Northampton County Bicentennial Commission 1976)(states this officer
     was Judge Henry Maxwell‟s grandfather).
28
     Frank B. Copp, Biographical Sketches of Some of Easton‟s Prominent Citizens 16 (1879). This is
     consistent with an 1812 birth date for Henry, and an 1828 death date for his father.
29
     Henry D. Maxwell (compiler), The Maxwell Family – Descendants of John and Ann Maxwell
     1701 – 1894 49, 78 (1895)(copy in Marx Room, Easton Area Public Library).
30
     Henry, History of the Lehigh Valley, supra at 426; Maxwell, The Maxwell Family, supra at 78;
     see also Michael C. Schrader, Bench and Bar, Vol. V of Two Hundred Years of Life in
     Northampton County, PA. A Bicentennial Review 92 (Northampton County Bicentennial
     Commission 1976).
31
     Henry, History of the Lehigh Valley, supra at 425; Frank B. Copp, Biographical Sketches of
     Some of Easton‟s Prominent Citizens 16 (1879)(boarded with his Mother in Easton); Michael C.
     Schrader, Bench and Bar, Vol. V of Two Hundred Years of Life in Northampton County, PA. A
     Bicentennial Review 92 (Northampton County Bicentennial Commission 1976)(came to Easton
     in 1834). See generally separate entry for 53 North Third Street, for a history of James Madison
     Porter, Judge and founder of Lafayette College.
32
     See Heller, II History of Northampton County, supra at 20; see Maxwell, The Maxwell Family,
     supra at 78.
33
     Michael C. Schrader, Bench and Bar, Vol. V of Two Hundred Years of Life in Northampton
     County, PA. A Bicentennial Review 93 (Northampton County Bicentennial Commission 1976).
34
     Henry, History of the Lehigh Valley, supra at 426; Frank B. Copp, Biographical Sketches of
     Some of Easton‟s Prominent Citizens 16 (1879); Article, “Henry D. Maxwell, Esq.”, EASTONIAN,
     Thurs., 27 Feb. 1851, p.2, col.5 (resumed practice of law “since his return from Austria”).
35
     Michael C. Schrader, Bench and Bar, Vol. V of Two Hundred Years of Life in Northampton
     County, PA. A Bicentennial Review 93 (Northampton County Bicentennial Commission 1976);
     see C[harles] Kitchen, A General Directory of the Borough of Easton PA 6 (Cole & Eichman‟s
     Office, 1855).
36
     C[harles] Kitchen, A General Directory of the Borough of Easton PA 40 (Cole & Eichman‟s
     Office, 1855)(President of Council). Henry D. Maxwell lived at 47 North 4 th Street (at the SE
     corner with Spring Garden Street, where the Brady Mansion now stands at 79 North 2nd Street),
                                                 8



     while brother William Maxwell lived at 55 North 2 nd Street (now 111 North 2nd Street). See
     www.WalkingEaston.com entries for those addresses, and sources cited therein.
37
     See Obituary, “Mary E. Maxwell”, EASTON DAILY EXPRESS, Tuesday, 26 Dec. 1893, p.3, col.5
     (her brother was William Maxwell, her sister was Lydia Maxwell). Since Mary E. (Maxwell)
     McCarthy and Lydia D. Maxwell were daughters of William and Sarah Maxwell and sisters of
     Henry D. Maxwell (Sr.) (see above), that in turn makes William Maxwell a brother to Henry D.
     Maxwell.
38
     Henry, History of the Lehigh Valley, supra at 426; Frank B. Copp, Biographical Sketches of
     Some of Easton‟s Prominent Citizens 16 (1879). See also separate entry for 11 Centre Square,
     detailing the later history of the Y.M.C.A. organization.
39
     Edward P. Kennedy, Government, Vol. III Two Hundred Years of Life in Northampton County,
     PA. 59 (Northampton County Bicentennial Commission 1976). The actual date of the speech was
     apparently 18 April 1861. Kennedy, Government, supra at 40-41.
40
     Kennedy, Government, supra at 40-41.
41
     See Heller, II History of Northampton County, supra at 20.
42
     C[harles] Kitchen, A General Directory of the Borough of Easton PA 40 (Cole & Eichman‟s
     Office, 1855)(Washington McCartney‟s home at 42 Spring Garden Street); William H. Boyd,
     Boyd‟s Directory of Reading, Easton, [Etc.] 126 (William H. Boyd 1860)(Henry D. Maxwell at 42
     Spring Garden Street). See also 1860 Census, Series M653, Roll 1147, p.238. See separate entry
     for 208 Spring Garden Street for history of the Maxwell family.
43
     Record Book of Brainerd Presbyterian Church of Easton, Pennsylvania 33, 40 (copied in Easton
     Public Library May 1936)(designated Book A).
44
     See Fitzgerald & Dillon, Easton Directory for 1870-71 62 (Ringwalt & Brown 1870)(Henry D.
     Maxwell home on “Bushkill”; Wm Maxwell home at 32 Bushkill Street); Jeremiah H. Lant, The
     Northampton County Directory for 1873 96 (1873); see also D.G. Beers, Atlas of Northampton
     County Pennsylvania, Plan of Easton (A. Pomeroy & Co. 1874)(H.D. Maxwell); 1870 Census,
     Series M963, Roll 1382, p.6A, shows three Maxwell families in Easton – Henry D. Maxwell (Sr.)
     and William Maxwell (bookseller) with adjacent listings, and John Maxwell (listed on the same
     page with one intervening family).
     Henry Maxwell‟s home at 32 Bushkill Street was across the street from brother William
     Maxwell‟s home at 31 Bushkill Street (renumbered 140 Bushkill Street with the inauguration of
     the modern street numbering scheme in 1874), and also brother John Maxwell‟s home at the
     corner of Bushkill at North 2nd Street at 137 North Second Street. Route 22 now runs where
     Henry Maxwell‟s Bushkill Street home once stood. See separate www.WalkingEaston.com
     entries for 133-37 North 2nd Street and 140 Bushkill Street.
45
     “Address by Calvin F. Smith to the Memmbers of the Bench and Bar of Northampton County (29
     June 1945), in Michael C. Schrader, Bench and Bar, Vol. V of Two Hundred Years of Life in
     Northampton County, PA. 214 (Northampton County Bicentennial Commission 1976).
46
     Michael C. Schrader, Bench and Bar, Vol. V of Two Hundred Years of Life in Northampton
     County, PA. A Bicentennial Review 93-94 (Northampton County Bicentennial Commission
     1976)(died 5 Oct. 1874, in his 62nd year).
47
     Article, “The New Numbers”, EASTON DAILY FREE PRESS, Friday, 5 Dec. 1873, p.3.
48
     J.H. Lant & Son, Easton etc. Directory 1881-2 (1881)(alphabetical listing for Dr. J.R. Ludlow).
     See also 1880 Census, Series T9, Roll 1161, p.379B (Dr. R.H. Ludlow).
49
     See separate listing on the Ludlow family under the entry for 244 Spring Garden Street.
50
     Weiss & Wright, “Karas Building Is A Family History”, supra; Obiturary paragraph for Dr.
     Charles Innes, EASTON DAILY ARGUS, Friday, 26 March 1880, p.1, col.1.
                                                 9



51
     Weiss & Wright, “Karas Building Is A Family History”, supra; see Article, “Interesting
     Reminiscence, North Third Street a Third of a Century Ago”, EASTON DAILY FREE PRESS,
     Thursday, 20 Aug. 1885, p.3 (Matthew Hale Jones residence in 1885).
52
     Deed, Edward Innes, Executor of the Will of Charles Innes, to Floyd S. Bixler, D17 27 (2 Oct.
     1882). The property was willed to Dr. Charles Innes‟s wife, Matilda Mixsell Innes, as a life
     estate, and then to the couple‟s heirs. Id.
53
     Obituary, “Floyd Smith Bixler, 90, Dies; retired Wholesale Merchant”, EASTON EXPRESS, Friday,
     17 Nov. 1933, p.1, col.1; see Floyd Smith Bixler, The Vine and Background of Christian Bixler,
     3rd and Some Collateral Branches 113 (undated, typed by Edith Jane Stires, 1930 per data on
     p.15)(born 1843).
54
     Floyd Smith Bixler, The Vine and Background of Christian Bixler, 3rd and Some Collateral
     Branches 73, 113 (undated, typed by Edith Jane Stires, 1930 per data on p.15); Obituary, “Floyd
     Smith Bixler, 90, Dies; retired Wholesale Merchant”, EASTON EXPRESS, Friday, 17 Nov. 1933,
     p.1, col.1. See generally separate entries for the Bixler-Nightengale Building at 315-21
     Northampton Street; the Jones Building (Bixler‟s Jewelers) at 24 Centre Square; the
     Bixler/Laubach Mansion at 204 Spring Garden Street; and the Pomp/Bixler Building at 401
     Northampton Street.
55
     Obituary, “Floyd Smith Bixler”, supra; see Frank B. Copp, Biographical Sketches of Some of
     Easton‟s Prominent Citizens 235 (1879). See generally separate entry for the Hay Building, 339-
     41 Northampton Street.
56
     Compare Webb‟s Easton and Phillipsburg Directory 1875-6 27 (Webb Bros. & Co. 1875)(Floyd
     S. Bixler at J.Hay & Co., 339 Northampton Street, home at 675 Ferry Street) with J.H. Lant,
     Easton [Etc.] Directory for 1877 (M.J. Riegel 1877)(F.S.Bixler home on 14th Street); J.H. Lant &
     Son, Easton [Etc.] Directory 1879 58 (1881)(same); 1880 Census, Series T9, Roll 1161, p.475B
     (Floyd S. Bixler at unnumbered house on 14 th Street).
57
     See Rev. Uzal W. Condit, The History of Easton, Penn‟a 154-56 (George W. West 1885); Marie
     and Frank Summa & Leonard Buscemi Sr., Images of America: Historic Easton 72 (Arcadia
     Publishing 2000); Copp, Biographical Sketches of Some of Easton‟s Prominent Citizens, supra at
     234-35.
58
     Obituary, “Floyd Smith Bixler”, supra; see American Journal of Progress, “Greater Easton of To-
     day” 22 (originally printed c.1903 during Mayor B. Rush Field‟s second 2-year term, reprinted
     courtesy of W-Graphics)(Correll was 16 years in partnership with F.S. Bixler ending in 1896);
     W.M.R. Williamson (Mgr.), Ferris Bros. Northampton County Directory (Ferris Bros., Printers
     and Book Binders, Wilmington, Del., 1885)(alphabetical listing).
59
     J.H. Lant, Easton [Etc.] Directory for 1884-5 20 (1884)(F.S. Bixler of Bixler & Correll, home at
     217 North Second Street).
60
     W.M.R. Williamson (Mgr.), Ferris Bros. Northampton County Directory (Ferris Bros., Printers
     and Book Binders, Wilmington, Del., 1885)(alphabetical listing); accord, J.H. Lant, Easton [Etc.]
     Directory for 1883-4 13 (1883)(Floyd S. Bixler at 206 Spring Garden Street).
61
     Nancy J. Sanquist (Office of Preservation, City of Easton), Easton Architectural and Historical
     Survey Manual (August 1978).
62
     See Deed, Floyd S. Bixler to Frank Kurlansik, B54 252 (3 Feb. 1925)(conveying house at 206
     Spring Garden Street; recitals show two contiguous tracts, one of which derives from the
     Anglemyer purchase of 1892).
63
     Deed, Floyd S. Bixler to Emma E. Bixler, B24 232 (31 March 1892).
64
     See separate entry for 204 Spring Garden Street.
65
     See generally separate entry for the Knecht Building, 20-22 South Third Street.
                                                 10



66
     See Obituary, “Floyd Smith Bixler”, supra (1897); American Journal of Progress, “Greater Easton
     of To-day” 22 (originally printed c.1903 during Mayor B. Rush Field‟s second 2-year term,
     reprinted courtesy of W-Graphics)(began his own firm in 1896, occupying most of the Jones
     Building at 24 Centre Square; includes a portrait of Correll).
67
     Obituary, “Floyd Smith Bixler”, supra; see West‟s Directory for City of Easton Pennsylvania 166
     (Union Publishing Co. Inc. 1925).
68
     West‟s Directory for City of Easton Pennsylvania 166 (Union Publishing Co. Inc. 1925).
69
     See Frank Whelan, “A Grand Emporium Owen Rice Opened Mercantile in 1821”, MORNING
     CALL, 14 Feb. 1992, p.M-3 (Floyd Bixler purchased Orr‟s); Michael J. Thomas, “‟It won‟t be
     downtown‟ when Orr‟s closes tomorrow”, MORNING CALL, Friday, 1 Feb. 1991, p.B-1(Stanley
     Bixler purchased Orr‟s).
70
     See Frank Whelan, “A Grand Emporium Owen Rice Opened Mercantile in 1821”, MORNING
     CALL, 14 Feb. 1992, p.M-3; Michael J. Thomas, “‟It won‟t be downtown‟ when Orr‟s closes
     tomorrow”, MORNING CALL, Friday, 1 Feb. 1991, p.B-1; Obituary, “S. Fordham Bixler, 88,
     Chairman of Orr‟s Stores”, MORNING CALL, 14 Aug. 1991, p.B.10; see also Jennifer Heebner,
     “Preserving History, How Heirs to the 217-Year-Old Bixler‟s Jewelers Keep the Past Alive”,
     Jewelers Circular Keystone (trade publication) 107-08 (Oct. 2002)(Orr‟s was owned by Stanley
     Bixler). See generally Leonard S. Buscemi, Sr., Easton Remembered 65, 127 (Buscemi
     Enterprises 2007) and separate entry for Two Rivers Landing, 30 Centre Square.
71
     See Floyd S. Bixler, The History with Reminiscences of the Early Taverns and Inns of Easton,
     Paper read before the Northampton County Historical Society on Oct. 25, 1930, 13 (printed by the
     Society 1931); Floyd Smith Bixler, The Vine and Background of Christian Bixler, 3 rd and Some
     Collateral Branches (undated, typed by Edith Jane Stires, 1930 per data on p.15).
72
     Article, “Books, Relics, Tell of Life in the County, Historical Society Has Gathered Dates for 30
     Years”, EASTON EXPRESS, Saturday, 12 June 1937, Jubilee Section B p.13.
73
     See W.M.R. Williamson (Mgr.), Ferris Bros. Northampton County Directory (Ferris Bros.,
     Printers and Book Binders, Wilmington, Del., 1885)(alphabetical listing); George W. West
     (compiler), Directory of Easton, [Etc.] 52 (George W. West 1894); 1900 Census, Series T623,
     Roll 1447, p.63A; 1920 Census, Series T625, Roll 1609, p.94B.
74
     See West‟s Directory for City of Easton Pennsylvania 166 (Union Publishing Co. Inc. 1925)(at
     722 Cattell Street).
75
     Deed, Floyd S. Bixler to Frank Kurlansik, B54 252 (3 Feb. 1925). Kurlansik evidently gave a
     mortgage on the property back to Floyd Bixler. See Deed, Frank (Hilda) Kurlansik to Esther D.
     Bixler, D63 186 (22 June 1931)(recital).
76
     See H.P. Delano (compiler), West‟s Directory for City of Easton Pennsylvania 393 (Union
     Publishing Co. Inc. 1925); West‟s Easton, Pa and Phillipsburg, NJ Directory 349 (R.L. Polk &
     Co. 1930).
77
     See separate entry for Kurlansik Building, 118 Northampton Street.
78
     Obituary, “Floyd Smith Bixler”, supra.
79
     Obituary, “Floyd Smith Bixler”, supra; Article, “Funeral of F.S. Bixler”, EASTON EXPRESS,
     Saturday, 18 Nov. 1933, p.5, col.7 (died age 70 years and one day; funeral to be at his residence at
     722 Cattell Street).
80
     See 1900 Census, Series T623, Roll 1447, p.63A.
81
     Deed, Frank (Hilda) Kurlansik to Esther D. Bixler, D63 186 (22 June 1931). The Deed recites
     that Kurlansik‟s purchase was subject to a mortgage given by Kurlansik to Floyd Bixler – who
     was Esther‟s father. The existence of this mortgage, and the date, give rise to a speculation that
                                                 11



     Mr. Kurlansik may have been encouraged by the Great Depression to return the property to Miss
     Bixler instead of continuing to make mortage payments. It is known that Mr. Kurlansik, a liquor
     dealer prior to the advent of Prohibition, tried a number of professions during the Depression, and
     returned to the liquor business after Repeal. See separate entry for Kurlansik Building, 118
     Northampton Street.
82
     Deed of Trust, Esther D. Bixler to E. Stanley Bixler and Kenneth Ml Bixler, F69 612 (18 July
     1939)(trustees were Esther‟s brothers – see 1900 Census, Series T623, Roll 1447, p.63A); Deed,
     E. Stanley Bixler, Surviving Trustee, to Robert S. Gerstell and Herbert Orlandi, Jr., 119 143 (29
     Jan. 1960).
83
     See West‟s Easton, Pa and Phillipsburg, NJ Directory 106 (R.L. Polk & Co. 1932)(Charles F.
     Adams and wife Doretta C. Adams); Polk‟s Easton and Phillipsburg City Directory 1935 64 (R.L.
     Polk & Co. 1935)(same); Polk‟s Easton and Phillipsburg City Directory 1942-43 224, 507 (R.L.
     Polk & Co., Inc. 1942)(Mrs. Doretta Adams).
     Doretta Adams purchased the Bull Mansion in 1943. Deed, Helen B. (W. Henry) Harrison to
     Doretta Adams, G74 107 (16 Apr. 1943); accord, Polk‟s Easton and Phillipsburg City Directory
     1944-45 24 (R.L. Polk & Co., Inc. 1944)(Adams Funeral Home and residence of Director Mrs.
     Doretta C. Adams, widow of Charles F. Adams, at 226 Bushkill Street; also the residence of
     Robley W. Adams, US Navy).
     The 1930 City Directory showed the Adams Funeral Home, as well as the residence of Charles F.
     and Doretta C. Adams, at 60 North 4th Street. West‟s Easton, Pa and Phillipsburg, NJ Directory
     106 (R.L. Polk & Co. 1930). In 1925, the Adams Funeral Home had been at the corner of North
     4th and Spring Garden Streets – while the Adams Family had lived at 40 North 4th Street. West‟s
     Directory for City of Easton Pennsylvania 133 (Union Publishing Co. Inc. 1925).

				
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