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Planning Your Boot Camp Fitness Program

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					Planning Your Boot Camp Fitness Program
There are various elements that go into creating a bootcamp fitness
Program. I will walk you through the process of creating your own
Program. At the very end of this section, you’ll find sample bootcamp workouts that you
can use as examples or implement as your own. So let’s get on with it . . .

Types of Exercise
There are five basic types of exercise and you may include some or all of them in your
boot camp program, depending on what you’re trying to achieve. Exercise categories
include:
       Resistance Training—Develops strength and power, and endurance to a lesser
       degree. Examples: pushups, pull-ups, sit-ups, body squats, any exercise using
       dumbbells, barbells, or resistance bands and tubes.
       Cardiovascular Training—Develops heart and lung efficiency and endurance.
       Examples: running, biking, swimming, aerobics, Tae Bo, and any activity done at
       an elevated heart rate for an extended period of time.
       Agility & Speed Training—Develops fast movement and precision reflexes.
       Examples: sprints, running sideways or backwards, running tires and obstacle
       courses, shuffles, martial arts movements.
       Plyometrics—Develops power in movement and resilience. Examples:
       vertical jumps, long jumps, medicine ball exercises, hopping, skipping.
       Stretching—Develops flexibility. Examples: hurdler’s stretch, most yoga poses,
       toe touches.

Fat Loss and Exercise Types
Cardiovascular exercise does the most to burn fat during exercise. Cardiovascular
exercise, like running, quickly depletes the energy stores that muscles prefer to use and
forces them to burn fat for energy. Studies show that cardiovascular exercise burns the
most fat when done at a moderate pace that increases heart rate, but allows the trainee to
hold a conversation. Fat burning due to cardiovascular exercise stops soon after heart rate
and breathing rates return to normal.
Resistance training burns little fat during the exercise compared to cardiovascular
exercise, but has longer lasting fat burning effect on the body. An increase in metabolism
from resistance training can last for hours and resistance training increases muscle size
and density, which causes the muscle to burn more calories every time it’s used. Muscle
growth results in a more or less permanent increase in calorie consumption, which is
essential to long-term fat loss.
Agility, speed and plyometric training can burn fat like cardiovascular exercise when it
raises the heart rate high enough for an extended period. They can also spur muscle
growth and its resulting calorie consumption, similar to resistance training, but not as
effectively. Stretching has little impact on fat loss, though when done with enough
intensity, stretching can increase metabolism and overall calorie consumption. For a boot
camp program that catches fat in the crossfire, emphasize resistance training and
cardiovascular work.
Equilibrium
A major source of problems affecting the skeletal and muscular systems of the body is
   muscle imbalances. A muscle imbalance occurs when muscles on one side of a joint
   are significantly stronger or more developed than those on the opposite side. Avoid a
   program that promotes muscle imbalance by including resistance exercises for all of
   the following muscle groups:
�� Chest, shoulders & triceps—push-ups, bench dips, bench press, military and
over head presses
�� Upper Back & biceps—pull-ups, rows, shrugs
�� Abdomen—sit-ups, crunches, leg raises
�� Lower Back—Good mornings, modified cat stretch, locust, cobra
�� Thighs—squats, deadlifts, lunges, leg press
�� Hamstrings—straight leg deadlifts, good mornings, lunges


Compound vs. Isolation Exercises
One of the things that separates boot camp fitness programs from typical gym programs
is the emphasis on compound exercises. Where many fitness club programs with
resistance training emphasize isolation exercises, which involve exercising the muscles
for only one joint at a time, the efficiency required of boot camp programs demands the
use of compound exercises that utilize multiple joints and muscle groups at a time. For
example, the barbell curl is an isolation exercise that works the biceps, while the pull-up
is a compound exercise that works the biceps, lats in the upper back, and the serratus.
Nearly all of the exercises included n the next section are compound exercises.

Cadence
Cadence refers to the tempo or speed at which trainees perform repetitions. In the
military, recruits do their push-ups and other calisthenics to the same beat—usually
dictated by the drill instructor. You may wish to do the same with your boot camp
platoon. Or, you may want to let trainees do them at their own speed and tempo. If you
are dictating the cadence, you can control the intensity of the exercise by speeding up or
slowing down the cadence.

Expect the Unexpected
Another trait that sets boot camp programs apart from the typical fitness club program is
the variety of exercises, intensity, and schedule. Here are six ways to add variety to your
program:
1. Train different body parts on different days. This works best in a 5-day-per-week
    program. For example, train upper body on Mondays, Wednesdays and Fridays; and
    train lower body on Tuesdays and Thursdays.
2. Train using bodyweight exercises on some days and weighted exercises on other
    days. This variation strategy works well with 3-days-per-week programs. i.e. train
    with bodyweight exercises on Monday and Friday, and train with dumbbells or
    resistance bands on Wednesday.
3. Schedule resistance training some days and cardio on other days. This really works
   well for 5-day programs, because you can work resistance hard two or three days and
   rest in between those days by doing cardio instead.
4. Do basic exercises, such as push-ups and pull-ups, some days and power exercises,
   like power cleans and vertical jumps, on other days.
5. Vary the forms of exercises from day to day. For example, do standard pull-ups one
   day, and wide-grip pull-ups, narrow-grip pull-ups, and commando pull-ups on other
   days.
6. Alternate light days and heavy days, i.e. work with high intensity on some days and
   low intensity on other days.


Progression
Because this is boot camp and not nursery school, you’ll want to progress fairly quickly
to a more difficult program. Progression is essential to growth and development. The
body adapts and stagnates in ability fairly quickly, so you have to continually challenge it
to keep muscles growing and metabolism advancing. Here are six ways to add
progression to your program:
1. Add 1 rep to each exercise each session, or 5 reps to each exercise each week.
2. Increase the percentage of standard or strict form repetitions in a set. For example, if
    you’ve set a goal of 30 push-ups and trainees on average do standard push-ups for
    half of those, require them to increase that number to 17 or 20.
3. Switch to more difficult versions of an exercise. For example, replace standard
    pushups with wide-grip pushups or pushups with feet elevated. Or let them move
    from pushups with feet elevated, to standard to modified push-ups in order to
    complete the set.
4. Use ladders and increase by one step each week. A description of ladders is later in
    this section.
5. Reduce the length or frequency of rest periods between sets or exercises, i.e., if
    trainees are used to 2-minute breaks between exercises, reduce them to 1 minute.
6. Increase the cadence or decrease the amount of time trainees have to reach the goal.


Intensity
In the early weeks of your program, you’ll want to start with a relatively low intensity,
and progressively increase the average intensity each week.
You can increase the intensity of a workout in three ways:
1. Use more difficult exercises or increase resistance (weight).
2. Decrease the length or frequency of rest periods.
3. Increasing the tempo or speed of repetitions (see Cadence above).
Likewise, you can decrease the intensity of a workout in three ways:
1. Use easier exercises or decrease resistance (weight).
2. Increase the length or frequency of rest periods.
3. Decreasing the tempo or speed of repetitions (see Cadence above).
Daily Training Strategies
Exercise order
When deciding what order to schedule the exercises in a session, consider the following:
1. Start with resistance exercises, which require more control and effort, and work
   toward cardiovascular exercise, which consumes energy too quickly to do before
   resistance work. If you include power exercises, plyometrics, and speed & agility
   training schedule them in that order between resistance and cardio exercises.
2. Break periodically for stretching and allowing trainees to catch their breath. If you
   use low-rep sets schedule rest/stretch periods after every 3 to 5 sets. If you use high-
   rep sets, schedule short periods after every set.
3. After a warm-up, start with some low intensity exercise before you get into high
   intensity work. Alternate between high and low intensity periods and end with a low-
   intensity period before the cool-down at the end.


Ladders
Ladders are one way of breaking down high-repetition sets to make them more
manageable by beginning trainees. They are used extensively in military physical training
programs. With ladders trainees start by doing 1 rep, take a 15-second rest, do 2 reps and
continue on in this fashion until half the set is done or the trainee cannot complete the
mini-set. Then they work back down the ladder doing one rep less than the last mini-set
until they reach zero. So, a set of 25 reps would be broken down into the following
minisets:
1-2-3-4-5-4-3-2-1 with 15-second rests in between.

Circuits
Circuit training is another way to break down large quantities of repetitions while
    keeping the intensity high. In a circuit, several exercises are scheduled in rapid
    succession with only a few reps of each. Trainees are allowed little to no rest between
    exercises, but get a rest period after completing all the exercises in the circuit. Then
    trainees repeat the circuit a designated number of times. Here’ an example of a
    circuit:
Pull-ups 10 reps
Push-ups 10 reps
Sit-ups 10 reps
Bodyweight squats 20 reps
Bench Dips 10 reps
Good Mornings 10 reps
2 minute rest
(repeat 3 times)


3DayBoot Camp Workout
This 3day boot camp calls for a day of rest between each workout day and two days off between
weeks.Progression from week to week should be increasingly difficult versions of the exercises,
such as advancing to strict standard pushups from incline or elevated pushups or doing more
jogging than walking.For resistance exercises, the number of reps in each set or the resistance
(weight) can be increased. To progress in circuits, do more circuits.

DAY ONE
Power Warmup:
Hang from hips 30 sec.; hulastyle
hip circles, 10 each direction; shoulder shrugs, 10
each direction; arm circles, 10 each direction; Hindu squats, 3050;
triangle stretch, hold for 5 long breaths
on each side; windmills, 2640;
knee hugs, 10 sec. on each side; 2leg
ankle hops, 30; calf stretch, 5 slow
breaths each leg; quad stretch, 5 slow breaths each leg; jumping jacks, 50; drink water.

Workout:
Pushup Ladders: 12321
2min.
rest
Pullup
Ladders: 12321
2min
rest
25 crunches,
25 leg raises,
2 min cobra stretches
30 body or Hindu squats,
15 Good Mornings,
1 min water break
5 Modified cat stretches each side
30 vertical jumps,
1min water break
15 min. jogging/walking

DAY TWO
Power Warmup:
Hang from hips 30 sec.; hulastyle
hip circles, 10 each direction; shoulder shrugs, 10
each direction; arm circles, 10 each direction; Hindu squats, 3050;
triangle stretch, hold for 5 long breaths
on each side; windmills, 2640;
knee hugs, 10 sec. on each side; 2leg
ankle hops, 30; calf stretch, 5 slow
breaths each leg; quad stretch, 5 slow breaths each leg; jumping jacks, 50; drink water.
Workout:
15 Dumbbell/Resistance Band Overhead Press x
3 sets, 1 min. rest between sets
15 Dumbbell/Resistance Band Chest Flies x 3
sets, 1 min. rest between sets
30 Dumbbell/Resistance Band Squats, 1
min rest
15 Dumbbell/Resistance Band Lunges
per leg, 1 min rest
20 Dumbbell/Resistance Band oneleg
deadlifts per leg,
25 Bicycle crunches x 2 sets, 1 min rest
between
5 min walking
2 Dumbbell/Resistance Band CleanSquatPress
ladders 123454321
2 Dumbbell snatch ladders 123454321
1520
min jogging/walking

DAY three
Power Warmup:
Hang from hips 30 sec.; hulastyle
hip circles, 10 each direction; shoulder shrugs, 10
each direction; arm circles, 10 each direction; Hindu squats, 3050;
triangle stretch, hold for 5 long breaths
on each side; windmills, 2640;
knee hugs, 10 sec. on each side; 2leg
ankle hops, 30; calf stretch, 5 slow
breaths each leg; quad stretch, 5 slow breaths each leg; jumping jacks, 50; drink water.
Sure victory: How to design Boot camp workouts that blast fat & build power

Workout:
3 circuits:
10 pushups
10crunches
10pullups
10leg raises
1min rest
2 min stretch/rest
3 circuits:
10 good mornings
5modified
cat stretches
20body or Hindu
Squats
1min rest
2 min stretch/rest
2 circuits:
20 mountain climbers
15burpees
10vertical jumps
20 split squat jumps
2min rest

About The Author :
Georgette Pann, BS Health/Physical Ed., Physical Therapist Assistant, ACE Certified Personal
Trainer, Certified Sports Nutritionist. She is the owner of Nutrifitness Personal Training and
Nutrition Studio. She has coauthoredthe book “Sure VictoryHowto Design Boot Camp Workouts
that Blast Fat and Build Power” For more information: Http://thefitnessbootcamp.com.
She has also been profiled in the EBook”Fit Over 40” at: http://allyourstrength.com/fof/gpfof.html
You can view the NutriFitness website at: http://thenutrifitness.com
For more Bootcamp workouts and information on setting up and running a
profitable Bootcamp Fitness business:
Sure Victory: How to Design Boot Camp Workouts that Blast Fat and Build Power
http://www.thefitnessbootcamp.com
This book reveals how to take advantage of bootcamp fitness strategies and arms you with the
knowledge of how to design, plan and operate a fitness bootcamp. Sure Victory: How to Design
Boot Camp Workouts that Blast Fat and Build Power combines more than 30 years of fitness
experience at NutriFitness with indepth research into conditioning strategies of the U.S. military
and the secrets of successful boot camps fitness programs around the country. Whether you’re
an “average Joe” looking to get whipped into shape, or a fitness professional wanting to bring this
highly effective fitness approach to your clients, Sure Victory: How to Design Boot Camp
Workouts that Blast Fat and Build Power gives you everything you need to know about effective
boot camp fitness programs under one cover! Includes complete boot camp workout
programs,exercises descriptions/photos,nutrition stratagies and more! “
Http://thefitnessbootcamp.com

				
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Description: Planning Your Boot Camp Fitness Program