Using LaTeX for Scientific Writing by ubs38493

VIEWS: 15 PAGES: 22

									Using LaTeX for Scientific Writing




                Andrew Page


     National University of Ireland Maynooth

                     8/2/06
       What is the problem here?
Making a document “look good” can take time
–   Reduces time spent on content
MS Word – Popular document creator
–   WYSIWYG ­ What you see is not always what you get!
–   Binary format, if it gets corrupted your in big trouble
–   Equations hard to create
–   Doesn't look anything like book quality
–   Only works properly on Windows
            Latex to the rescue
Latex handles all the formatting/presentation
–   Allows you to concentrate on content
Produces “book quality” documents
Excellent support for formula & equations
Plain text – can be read in 20 years time.
Handles labeling references, figures, tables 
Platform independent
              What is Latex?
Markup language (think HTML)
Separates content from presentation
Follows good document design rules
Standard in sciences, engineering and maths
Open source
                 What do I do?
Create plaintext latex file using normal text editor
Compile to create
–   PDF
–   Postscript
–   HTML
–   Etc.....
                      Editors
Any text editor will do (notepad, context, emacs)
Windows
–   WinEdt – 30 day free trial (shareware)
Linux
–   Kile – open source (GPL) 
                                            Your thesis
\documentclass[12pt, a4paper]{report}
\usepackage{epsfig}

                                        Use Des’s template
\usepackage{setspace}

\begin{document}
\doublespacing                          ●
                                            http://www.minds.nuim.ie/~dez/latex
\include{titlepage}
\include{abstract}                      Things you get for free:
\tableofcontents
\listoffigures
                                            –   table of contents 
\listoftables
                                            –   list of figures 
\include{introduction}
\include{design}                            –   list of tables 
\include{testing}
\include{experiments}
\include{conclusion}
                                            –   bibliography
\appendix
\include{requirements}
\end{document}
                            Basic structure

 \documentclass{article} 
 \begin{document} 

 Hello World!
 \end{document} 



Save this file.

Run:
latex docname.tex   ­ compile the document, creates a dvi file
yap docname.dvi  ­ lets you view the compiled document
dvipdf docname – convert the document to a pdf
                                                Sections
\section{Introduction}
 Hello World!
                                                Like HTML <h1> </h1>..... 
                                                also \chapter{Testing}
\section{Experiments}
Results of my experiments. This is where you 
put in meaningful content but I cant be 
bothered.

A blank line between text means a new 
paragraph. So its quite easy to view and 
organise your work. 

\subsection{Random experiment}
This is a subsection.

\subsubsection{A sub sub section}
I think you get the idea now!
                                         Text Faces

% this is a comment that doesnt get included in your document 

This is \textbf{bold text within a sentence}. \\  
This is \textit{text in italics}. \\
This is \texttt{typewriter text}. \\
 
                                                 Labels
\section{Experiments}\label{sec:experiments}
Results of my experiments. This is where you 
put in meaningful content but I cant be 
bothered.

\subsection{Random experiment}
This is a subsection. I would like to refer to the 
previous section but might move this 
subsection around so I don't want to have to go 
changing section numbers all the time, so I can 
just refer to it as Sect.~\ref{sec:experiments}.


  Inserts correct numbers when referring to sections, figures, or tables.
  Saves time and hassle.
                                     Lists

       Bullet points                         Numbered List

\begin{itemize}                         \begin{enumerate}
  \item This is a list, oh my god!        \item This is a numbered list
  \item This is a second list item        \item Katie Holmes
\end{itemize}                             \item Definitely Katie Holmes
                                          \item Definitely
                                        \end{enumerate}
                                             Maths
This is a maths environment within a sentence, so superscript is $ j^{6+3} $,
subscript is $ i_{m} $ and both are $ p^{2}_{8} $.  

More symbols $\beta \tau \chi \psi \Sigma \Omega \neq \oplus $ within a sentence.

The error $i$ is given as $E_{i} = \sqrt{ \sum\limits_{j=1}^{M} \left| \psi ­ \left(L_{j,i} + 
\sum\limits_{y=1}^{N}((\frac{t_{y}}{P_{j}})+\Gamma^{c}_{(y,j)})\right)\right|^{2}}$ 
where $\Gamma^{c}_{(y,j)}$ is a cost of a task $y$ on processor $j$. 
                                                Tables

\begin{tabular}{|l|l|r|c|}
\hline
Type         & Sides & Diameter & X \\
\hline
square       & 4       & 4.1           & 1.763 \\
triangular  & 3       & 6.2           & 1.648 \\
diamond    & 4       & 3.8           & 1.479 \\
\hline
\end{tabular}



      Only tricky thing in Latex.  
                         Figures
2 ways to insert figures
 –   epsfig: uses EPS files – perfect quality when scaled.
 –   includegraphics: JPG and PNG
      ●
          creates PDFs directly using pdflatex
Graphs ­> Matlab
Creating your own diagrams ­> OpenOffice
Converting existing figures ­> The Gimp
            epsfig
\documentclass{article} 
\usepackage{epsfig}
\begin{document} 

\begin{figure}
  \centering
  \epsfig{file=speedupphoton.eps}
  \caption{Speedup graph}
  \label{fig:speedupphoton}
\end{figure}

\end{document} 
    Bibtex ­ references
I'm citing a journal paper~\cite{Anderson2001}.




 @ARTICLE{Anderson2001,
  author =       {D. Anderson and J. Cobb and E. Korpela and M.                                  
Lebofsky and D. Werthimer},
  title =           {Massively distributed computing for {SETI}},
  journal =      {Computing in Science \& Engineering},
  year =          {2001},
  volume =     {3},
  number =     {1},
  pages =        {78­­83},
  month =       {Feb}
}
                Conclusion
Steep initial learning curve (1 day)
Latex will save you time
Easy to do equations
Thesis will be ‘book quality’
                   Links
www.latex­project.org  ­ Project webpage
www.miktex.org  ­ Windows Latex installer
www.winedt.com  ­ Windows editor
www.gimp.org ­ Image editor/converter
www.openoffice.org  ­ Office suite
http://www.minds.nuim.ie/~dez/latex
                 Questions?
Thesis example: minds.nuim.ie/~dez/latex/
If you have problems:
–   RTFM
–   use Google
–   Post on Minds newsgroups

								
To top