The Basics of Grant Writing by bwk16324

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									                            The Basics of Grant Writing

Read over the sample grant application and the Request for Proposal (RFP). Answer the
following questions (three to five minutes of individual study, then group discussion will
follow for each question).

Process of Planning

List the risk and protective factors found in the grant application that indicate a need for
the program.




Guidelines: Use hard data to argue for need. 2) Utilize your community assessment to
secure data. 3) Keep a file of county data from multiple sources for quick references
when you sit down to write your grant. See Racial and Ethnic Health Disparities in
Colorado, 2005

How has the writer of the grant argued that the issue of suicide is a priority for this
community?




Guidelines: Compare your data to other towns, counties or states. Report on town
meetings or coalition discussions. Work in your community with other stakeholders to
develop a community assessment that identifies priorities of need in the community.

Does the application indicate the type of services currently provided in the community
that address suicide?




Guidelines: Keep a resource directory handy. If you community does not have a
resource directory of health and social services availability, develop one as part of a

                                                           John Lopez, Fall 2005 Grant Writing Workshop
                                      Sponsored by the Office of Health Disparities, Office of Local Liaison
grant objective. If you were the funder, would you what to know what current services
are available in the community that address suicide?

In the grant proposal, who is the target group to receive services?




Guidelines: Describe your target group with clarity. Be specific. Universal – the entire
population, Selective – a subset of the population deemed to be at risk of engaging in
destructive behavior and Indicated – the group already involved in the destructive
behavior.

The application plans to implement the ASIST program, SAFE:TEEN, Yellow Ribbon
and RAPP. Some are described as Best Practices. What are “Best Practices? What are
guiding principles?




How will the different programs be evaluated? Does the request for proposal (RFP) ask
for this information?




                                                          John Lopez, Fall 2005 Grant Writing Workshop
                                     Sponsored by the Office of Health Disparities, Office of Local Liaison
The applicant has seven objectives listed. Which are “process objectives” (measuring
project director or project staff activities) and which are “outcome objectives” (measuring
the effects on the client)?


           Process objectives                                   Outcome objectives




Write up a possible measurable outcome objective.




The RFP does not request evidence of applicant’s investment in culturally sensitive
intervention. Is there, however, any indication of the applicants level of cultural
sensitivity?




Guidelines: See “Developing Cultural Competence in Disaster Mental Health
Programs” See handout “Cultural Sensitivity”




                                                         John Lopez, Fall 2005 Grant Writing Workshop
                                    Sponsored by the Office of Health Disparities, Office of Local Liaison
                                 Proposed Grant Budget

Operating expenses:
   Curriculum expenses:
       Curriculum (ASIST, SAFE:TEEN, YELLOW RIBBON, RAPP) $ 18,000
   Program expenses:
       Salaries (Project Coordinator, .75 FTE) ……………………….   24,800
       Fringe benefits …………………………………………………                   6,200

       Total program expenses ………….……………………………                                                 $ 49,000

    General and administrative expenses:
      Office supplies …………………………………………………                                              $ 1,000

        Total general and administrative expenses ……………………..                               1,000

 Total operating expenses …………………………………………….                                                   $ 50,000

Critique the budget for the proposed grant plan




Guideline: Keep in mind that most Proposal Requests will give you direction in how to
categorize costs. Follow the proposal request guidelines. Use the categories below only
when the guidelines do not give specific requirements.


Note the following categories for placing budget line items. In group discussion
determine where you put each different budget items.

Equipment – Computers, desks, chairs, office machines, cell phones (items that are
normally over $500, often referenced as “fixed assets”).

Personnel – Program director, case managers, counselors. There may be a separate
section for support staff and administration. In a grant proposal, often all personal are
listed in the same area.

Fringe Benefits – health insurance, employer’s part of employee taxes

Consultants often are listed in a separate category from “Personnel.” This group may
include people who are implementing a program that are not employees, outside program
evaluators and people brought in for staff training.
                                                          John Lopez, Fall 2005 Grant Writing Workshop
                                     Sponsored by the Office of Health Disparities, Office of Local Liaison
Travel – mileage, auto rentals, hotel, taxi, airfare, and per diem (normally, they are costs
related to staff, but may include high priced transportation costs, such as bus rentals for
client field trips).

Operating Expenses – Curriculums purchased, trips for students, meal costs for clients.

Indirect Costs – a percentage allowed for agency to recoup costs for staff time and
supplies already offered. Infrastructure costs, such as accounting, financial reporting,
audit, secretarial services, outside supervisory expenses, use of office machines, and
some office supplies not purchased by the project. “Indirect Costs” are often found under
the category of “Operating Expenses.” Sometimes this category is called “overhead
costs” or “administrative costs.”

Capital Outlay – costs for items that are over a set amount, such as “over $1,000”

                      More information on categorizing line items

Operating expenses:
    Curriculum expenses:
       Curriculum ………………………………………………………
    Program expenses:
       Salaries ……………………………….. ………………………
       Fringe benefits ………………………………………………..
       Promotions
         Total program expenses ………….…………………………
    General and administrative expenses:
       Office supplies …………………………………………………
       Office Salaries …………………………………………………..
       Rent ……………………………………………………………..
       Insurance ………………………………………………………..
       Depreciation of office equipment ……………………………….
    Equipment:
       Computer ………………………………………………………..
    Travel/Training:
        Trip to Public Health Conference ………………………………
          Total general and administrative expenses …………………...
 Total operating expenses ……………………………………………..




                                                          John Lopez, Fall 2005 Grant Writing Workshop
                                     Sponsored by the Office of Health Disparities, Office of Local Liaison
Write a budget justification for the planned program. Note the suggestions for writing a
budget justification below.




BUDGET JUSTIFICATION

        Use this section to your advantage. Use this space to continue a persuasive
        presentation of your proposal.

        Write to two audiences in this section. 1) What information does the accountant
        need for clarification? 2) What do the grant evaluators (people who may have a
        limited understanding of budget categorization) need to know to understand how
        you will spend the money if it is awarded to you?


Write a budget justification that explains the items in your budget. Write to answer the
question, “What other information would I need if I were funding this project?”

Example: The current project director is working .25 FTE on another project.

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                                                         John Lopez, Fall 2005 Grant Writing Workshop
                                    Sponsored by the Office of Health Disparities, Office of Local Liaison
Tidbits on the Art and Politics of Grant Writing

   Build a relationship with funders. Do not be timid in attempting to establish rapport.
          o Some folks who write grants embrace a belief that “People give money to
               people.” Consequently, they look for ways to get to know the funders as
               individuals.
          o Some believe that in regard to private foundations, the relationship is more
               important than the quality of writing of the proposal.
          o Before first contact with a funder, do your homework. Learn as much
               about the funding organization as possible, via brochures and the Internet.

   When applying for state or federal funds, it never hurts to have your Congressman or
   Senator send a letter of support to the funding agency. You can also include their
   letter in your group of letters of support. This letter should include a recommendation
   that states that your organization is doing good work in the region.

   Peers can be helpful in building credibility with foundations. Ask them, if they have
   been funded, to put in a good word both informally and in letters of recommendation.

   Even though funding is often limited, remember that foundations want to fund good
   programs that fit their own aspirations. Make it easy for them to fund you by writing
   a grant that is well organized, easy to read, covers all the areas that they request, fits
   their interest areas and is sent in on time.
           o Many funding agencies will actually provide you with direction and
               feedback. Some will even edit your grant for you. Build a relationship
               with the funding agency contact and then ask them for specific help.
           o Some will provide referrals to other organizations that have been funded
               so you can request a copy of their successful proposal.

   Look for people to be on your Board of Directors that have contacts with foundations.
   They are an excellent resource.

   Here in Colorado, attend Philanthropic days. Meet the funders. Have your plan for
   funding clearly mapped out in your mind. When you meet funders, tell them of your
   plan and get feedback from them. Go fishing for the right funder that wants to be
   involved with your ideas.

   In rural communities, meet regularly with other non-profit social and public health
   agencies. If your county bureaucracy allows, collaborate on grants with other
   agencies. Avoid duplication of services by knowing what other people are doing in
   the community.




                                                          John Lopez, Fall 2005 Grant Writing Workshop
                                     Sponsored by the Office of Health Disparities, Office of Local Liaison

								
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