QAA Major Review of Healthcare Programmes University of Surrey

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					                   QAA Major Review of Healthcare Programmes
           University of Surrey Clinical Psychology and Dietetics Provision
                              Self Evaluation Document



INTRODUCTION                                                                   3

A    SUBJECT PROVISION AND OVERALL AIMS                                        7
     Doctor of Psychology (PsychD) in Clinical Psychology                      7
     BSc (Hons) Nutrition/Dietetics                                            7

B1   EVALUATION OF SUBJECT PROVISION – DOCTORATE IN CLINICAL
     PSYCHOLOGY (PSYCHD)                                                       9
     Academic and Practitioner Standards                                       9
     Learning Outcomes                                                         9
     Curriculum                                                               10
     Assessment                                                               13
     Student Achievement                                                      15

B2   EVALUATION OF SUBJECT PROVISION – B.SC. (HONS)
     NUTRITION/DIETETICS                                                      17
     Academic and Practitioner Standards                                      17
     Learning Outcomes                                                        17
     Curriculum                                                               19
     Assessment                                                               21
     Student achievement                                                      23

C    QUALITY OF LEARNING OPPORTUNITIES                                        25
     Teaching and learning                                                    25
     Student Progression                                                      28
     Learning Resources and their Effective Utilisation                       30

D    MAINTENANCE AND ENHANCEMENT OF STANDARDS AND QUALITY                     35

E    CONCLUSION                                                               39

     APPENDIX 1. PROGRAMME SPECIFICATION FOR DOCTOR OF
     PSYCHOLOGY (PSYCHD) IN CLINICAL PSYCHOLOGY                               41

     APPENDIX 2. PROGRAMME SPECIFICATION FOR BSC (HONS)
     NUTRITION/DIETETICS                                                      55

     APPENDIX 3. PSYCHD PRACTICE PLACEMENT PROVISION                          59

     APPENDIX 4. DIETETICS PRACTICE PLACEMENT PROVISION                       61

     APPENDIX 5. PSYCHD STUDENT PROGRESSION DATA                              73

     APPENDIX 6. DIETETICS STUDENT PROGRESSION DATA                           75

     APPENDIX 7. PSYCHD FURTHER STUDY AND EMPLOYMENT STATISTICS
                                                               77

     APPENDIX 8. DIETETICS FIRST DESTINATION DATA                             89
                                                                               1
APPENDIX 9. GLOSSARY OF TERMS AND ABBREVIATIONS                                        93

APPENDIX 10. LIST OF SUPPORTING DOCUMENTS                                              95
Documentation submitted to the Review Panel with the SED                                95
Supporting documents available at Review Panel visit listed by footnote number          95
Additional supporting documents available at Review Panel visit not listed as footnotes 99




                                                                                        2
     INTRODUCTION

1.   The University of Surrey was established by Royal Charter in 1966 and moved to its present
     location on the outskirts of Guildford in 1970.

2.   The University has a strong tradition of research, with 60% of its research-active staff rated as
     “world class” in their respective fields. The University remains committed to its vision of
     “Working for the World” and in its Strategic Plan1 identifies the University as being ‘research-
     led’ and ensuring good links with placement providers.

3.   In August 2002, the University restructured and established the following Schools:
           • School of Arts, Communication and Humanities
           • School of Biomedical and Molecular Sciences
           • School of Electronics and Physical Sciences
           • School of Engineering
           • European Institute of Health and Medical Sciences
           • School of Human Sciences
           • School of Management
           • Postgraduate Medical School.
     and introduced a new management committee structure2.

4.   There is an identified committee structure for the management of quality and standards3. The key
     quality assurance procedures are set out in full in the Academic Standards Guidelines, which are
     published annually in the University Calendar4 and are accessible via the internet for internal and
     external scrutiny5. Established originally in October 1992, the Guidelines are reviewed and
     revised regularly reflecting the University’s premise that they must evolve over time and
     incorporate perceived best practice in response to external and internal expectations.

5.   The Doctoral Clinical Psychology 3 year Programme (the PsychD) falls within the School of
     Human Sciences and the BSc (Hons) Nutrition/Dietetics 4 year Programme falls within the
     School of Biomedical and Molecular Sciences. These Programmes exist in their respective
     professional and organisational environments and have established relationships with key
     stakeholders within those environments. The Programme structures are shown in Diagrams 1 and
     2 (1 = PsychD; 2 = Dietetics). Both Programmes have external accreditation with the respective
     professional/statutory bodies6 7.

6.   Partnership working between the Trusts, the Schools and the Purchasers is central to the
     development, delivery and review of the Programmes8 9. Trainees10 and Students10 are able to
     contribute to the development of the Programmes via various committee structures, academic and
     placement feedback opportunities. The Surrey and Sussex Strategic Health Authority (SySx
     SHA) has initiated quarterly contract meetings and an annual review process to ensure the

     1 University of Surrey Strategic Plan
     2 University of Surrey Senior Management Structure
     3 University of Surrey Committee Structure for the Management of Quality and Standards
     4 University of Surrey University Calendar
     5 http://libweb.surrey.ac.uk/calendar/
     6 Accreditation report from BPS 2005
     7 Report of the Quinquennial Course Approval Visit by the Dietitians Board, 2001
     8 Minutes of the PsychD Programme Stakeholders’ Meetings
     9 Minutes of Dietetics Stakeholders Group meetings
     10 In this SED document the term Trainees refers to those enrolled in the PsychD Programme in Clinical Psychology and

        the term Students refers to those enrolled in the Bsc (Hons) Nutrition/Dietetics
                                                                                                                             3
                                                                                                                       Reporting Lines

                                                                                                                       Links

                                                              University
         British Psychological                                                                                 Surrey and Sussex Strategic
                Society                                                                                             Health Authority

                                                                                                       North Central
                                                                                                       London WDC



    Curriculum Development                      Board of Studies / Training
  Meetings Regional Psychologists               Committee NHS/HEI/SySx                               Stakeholder Group
                                                           SHA                                        NHS/HEI/SySx
                                                                                                           SHA
                                                                                                                                  Team Trainee
                                                                                                                                    Meetings

      Placement Development
             Meetings
                                                                                                       Course Team
                                                                      Employers Meeting




               Examination                Selection
                 Board                    Meetings
                                                                                          Academic              Research                 Clinical
                                                                                           Tutors                Tutors                  Tutors

    Psychological services within                     Kent, Surrey and Sussex
      Surrey, West Sussex and                          Head of Psychology
        South West London
       (Placement Providers)                                                                                     Trainees


Diagram 1. Partnership Structure relating to the PsychD Programme
Collaborative working between the Regional Psychologists, Strategic Health Authority, Trainees and Higher Education Provider


                                                                                                                                                    4
                                                      Health Professions Council                                Reporting Lines

                                                                                                                Links


                      Re-structured Programme Approval, 2002                              Annual Programme Report
                             Quinquennial Review, 2001                                   Graduates apply for registration



               Department of Health                                                                       British Dietetic Association
                 Major Review via QAA                                                                    Devolving placement allocation process to
                                                                                                                   HEI’s Sept 2005



                                                                       University
                                                                                                             Placement Approval, Quality Monitoring and Support
                            Commissioning




      Strategic Health Authorities                         Stakeholder Group                           Practice Placement Partners
              Surrey/Sussex                                                                                     NHS Trusts
      and Devon & Cornwall WDC

                                                        Practice Placement Facilitator



Diagram 2. Partnership Structure relating to the Dietetics Programme
Relationships with the NHS and Professional Bodies



                                                                                                                                                          5
      Programmes meet the requirements of NHS policies and priorities. SySx SHA attend stakeholder
      meetings.

7.    The SED has been developed jointly by Programme staff and Trust representatives, and a draft
      was made available to PsychD trainees and Dietetic student representatives for comment. The
      Programme teams, with the help of the practice review facilitator (Anne O’Connor – Quality
      Assurance Manager SySx SHA) liaised with partner clinical placement providers through the
      designated professional advisors, heads of service and SySx SHA colleagues to ensure that health
      service providers throughout Surrey and Sussex were given the opportunity to contribute to the
      preparation of the SED.

8.    The SySx SHA contracts with the School of Human Sciences for PsychD Clinical Psychology
      Programme and with the School of Biomedical and Molecular Sciences for the BSc (Hons)
      Nutrition/Dietetics Programme.

9.    The SySx SHA meets quarterly with leads of both Programmes to discuss and monitor education
      commissioning arrangements. Stakeholder Groups, with membership from NHS Trusts, the
      University and the SySx SHA continue to provide excellent partnership working.

10.   A close relationship exists between both Schools and the SySx SHA. Enhanced collaboration is
      evident in relation to a wide range of quality issues and initiatives including:
              •      funding for the PsychD Programme Liaison Clinical Tutor to improve the link
                     between theory and practice;
              •      joint working to identify additional placement opportunities and improving capacity
                     via funding for a practice placement foundation, particularly in Dietetics where the
                     British Dietetic Association is due to end its centralised placement role and a
                     Practice Placement Facilitator has been funded;
              •      development of service level agreements for the trainees with the Department of
                     Psychology clarifying responsibilities of the University and the placement Trusts;
              •      the Department of Psychology is working with the SySx SHA to develop a
                     Statement of Equivalence Programme to meet the requirements of the British
                     Psychological Society which will enable individuals trained abroad to practice
                     within the UK.

11.   The SySx SHA together with employers, service users, regional colleagues, professional bodies
      and Health Professionals Council (HPC) partners (for Dietetics) are involved in Programme
      developments and accreditation.




                                                                                                       6
      A       SUBJECT PROVISION AND OVERALL AIMS

      Doctor of Psychology (PsychD) in Clinical Psychology

12.   The PsychD Programme integrates academic and research learning opportunities with those of the
      clinical placements. The trainees undertake five clinical placements over the three years. They
      spend 3 days a week on placement and 2 days at the University throughout the entire three years.
      In the first year the trainees have a year long placement and in subsequent years four six month
      placements.

13.   The SySx SHA has agreed three new commissions for 2005/6. The first year intake will be 28,
      with 25 and 24 in the second and third years.

14.   The primary aim of the PsychD Programme (the Programme) is to educate and train graduate
      psychologists to qualify as chartered clinical psychologists, in accordance with the requirements
      prescribed by the British Psychological Society (BPS); thereby equipped to practise competently
      and safely within the NHS.

      In this context, the broader aims of the Programme (Appendix 1) are to develop and train
      practising clinical psychologists who are:
            •      able to understand, evaluate and utilise a broad theoretical perspective and draw upon
                   a wide psychological knowledge, scientific and research base;
            •      able to select psychological theory, research and practice that is appropriate to the
                   context in which they are applied;
            •      able to maintain and deliver high quality, reflective clinical practice;
            •      able to function effectively, professionally and responsibly in a variety of social,
                   cultural, inter-professional and organisational environments;
            •      aware of and responsive to the changing needs of the profession within the larger
                   organisational contexts within which it operates;
            •      sensitive and responsive to client and broader societal needs;
            •      able to understand and communicate effectively the role of clinical psychology in a
                   variety of social, cultural and organisational contexts.


      BSc (Hons) Nutrition/Dietetics

15.   The Programme integrates credit-bearing academic study with 3 professional practice placements
      as follows:
             •    1st year, 11 core Level 1 modules and one option. Placement A – 4 weeks at end of
                  year;
             •    2nd year, 12 core Level 2 modules;
             •    3rd year, Placements B and C – twelve weeks each with a University-based Problem-
                  based Learning block (six weeks) positioned between the placements;
             •    Final year, 8 core Level 3 modules, an option module and a research project
                  equivalent to 3 modules.

16.   Placements are provided through partnership arrangements between the University and NHS
      Trusts, both in the immediate region, and further afield in the UK.

17.   In 2004/05 there are 164 full time students enrolled throughout the Programme: 41 in 1st year,
      54* in 2nd year, 34 in 3rd year and 35 in 4th year. The majority of students are commissioned by
      the SySx SHA (*an additional cohort of 20 student commissions from the Devon, Cornwall and
      Somerset WDC was taken in 2003/04).


                                                                                                       7
18.   Graduates of the Programme are eligible to apply for registration as Dietitians with the Health
      Professions Council (HPC) and to transfer their student membership to full membership of the
      British Dietetic Association.

19.   The following aims of the provision relate to the broad context of the Programme and supplement
      those in the Programme Specification (Appendix 2):

      To produce new entrants to the Dietetic profession who are fit for purpose, practice and award by:
            •      working collaboratively with the SySx SHA, NHS Trusts and other stakeholders to
                   innovate and continually develop the Programme to ensure graduates meet the
                   needs of NHS employers, reflecting the University of Surrey’s reputation as an
                   institution that excels in preparing students for the workplace;
            •      enabling graduates to meet the HPC’s Standards of Proficiency and thus be eligible
                   to register and practise as a Dietitian;
            •      meeting the QAA Benchmark Statement: Healthcare Programmes: Dietetics and
                   enabling students to meet the University requirements for the award of the BSc
                   (Hons) Nutrition/Dietetics.

      To emphasise the development of:
           •       basic skills;
           •       a model of practice emphasising an evidence based approach, critical analysis and a
                   planned process of problem solving;
           •       work management skills;
           •       attitudes and skills to support reflective practice and life long learning.

      To educate and train Dietitians for the future. Each student should develop:
           •       an understanding of and confidence in professional practice;
           •       an insight into the potential and limitations of their personal practice of Dietetics
                   within the legal, ethical and professional standards framework;
           •       a sense of responsibility towards and willingness to contribute to, the community
                   and the profession;
           •       the ability to work in healthcare and other workplaces using a multidisciplinary
                   approach with an openness to the development of new work practices and models;
           •       an awareness of the broader horizons of Nutrition and Dietetics and the contribution
                   of these fields to the welfare of the community.




                                                                                                      8
      B1              EVALUATION OF SUBJECT PROVISION – DOCTORATE IN CLINICAL
                      PSYCHOLOGY (PSYCHD)


      Academic and Practitioner Standards

      Learning Outcomes

20.   On successful completion, graduates of this NHS funded Programme will:

                  •    have developed a high level of professional skill founded upon the integration of
                       psychological theory, research and practice;
                  •    be able to draw upon a wide theoretical and research knowledge base and to apply
                       this appropriately in their clinical practice;
                  •    have acquired an advanced understanding of research theory and methodology and a
                       commitment to the application of these principles in the evaluation and development
                       of clinical practice;
                  •    use formulation and complex problem-solving skills, utilising psychological theory
                       and research and their clinical application;
                  •    have a rigorous, disciplined and reflective approach to clinical practice alongside an
                       understanding of and sensitivity to the needs of the individual and diverse client
                       groups, across the ability / age ranges;
                  •    be committed to the implementation of equal opportunities in all aspects of their
                       professional practice;
                  •    consult with service users, carers, ex-service users and ex-carers;
                  •    be able to work effectively within a variety of professional and inter-professional
                       contexts, appropriate to the organisational structures, systems and processes in which
                       they are working;
                  •    be aware of and responsive to, professional issues and the changing needs of the
                       profession, and work actively to promote service development;
                  •    follow the ethical guidelines of the British Psychological Society and practise within
                       the limits of their own knowledge and competence;
                  •    have a commitment to continued professional development, life long learning and
                       reflective practice in order to improve their practice throughout their career.

21.   The Programme Specification (Appendix 1) indicates the specific competencies that must be
      obtained by the trainees, such as the subject knowledge and skills, core academic and research
      knowledge, values, and personal and transferable competencies.

22.   The learning outcomes are designed to enable trainees to undertake the many roles of a qualified
      clinical psychologist; clinician, researcher, trainer/teacher, consultant and manager, and to be
      competent in the core skills of assessment, formulation, intervention, evaluation and research and
      communication. A competency model underpins training. The learning outcomes are set out in the
      Programme Specification and are informed by BPS practitioner standards11 and the QAA
      Benchmark Statement for Clinical Psychology Programmes.




      11   Criteria for Accreditation of Postgraduate Training Programmes in PsychD BPS, 2002



                                                                                                           9
23.   The Programme curriculum and placement organisation are informed by external sources12 13 14 15
      16 17 18 19 20
                     . The purchasers (commissioners) have encouraged and supported these activities.

24.   The Course Handbook and Programme Regulations21 as well as the Supervisor’s Handbook22 and
      Placement Handbooks23 disseminate the learning outcomes. The teaching module learning
      outcomes are disseminated with the timetables.

25.   The Programme team have consulted extensively26 on how the Programme should meet the
      changes required by the new BPS accreditation guidelines and the QAA Benchmark Statements.
      Additionally there has been a series of workshops for clinicians in each of the specialist areas to
      ensure the viability of the collaboratively developed placement proposals. The Programme team
      works exclusively to maintain, extend and enhance this collaboration to ensure that the learning
      outcomes are responsive to changes in NHS delivery.
                                 24 25 26 27 28
26.   Frequent monitoring                         ensures the Programme’s success in meeting its stated aims and
      objectives.


      Curriculum

27.   The design of the curriculum has been driven by the established learning outcomes, derived from
      the BPS’ professional standards, the QAA/NHS Subject Benchmark Statements for Clinical
      Psychology and service users29 and their specific needs. Additionally, the requirement to support
      the development of an integrative approach to practice across the three years of training has been
      effected by covering core competencies alongside the teaching of practice models and their
      applications to diverse client groups across a variety of NHS service settings. The modules are
      convened jointly by Programme staff and practising clinicians ensuring that the curriculum
      reflects changes in practice. In this way academic teaching is integrated with placement learning30
      31
         . The Programme has recently been assessed and recommended for re-approval by the BPS 32.




      12  Department of Health and NICE Guidelines,
      13 the National Service Frameworks
      14 The Ten Shared Capabilities
      15 the BPS Code of Conduct
      16 the DCP Professional Practice Guidelines and Research Governance
      17 Visiting lecturers, clinical supervisors, markers and examiners, the Strategic Health Authority and the Service User

         Advisory Group
      18 Curriculum planning meeting
      19 Letters following Placement meetings with supervisors
      20 Supervisors working groups
      21 Course Handbook & Programme regulations 2004/5
      22 Supervisor’s Handbook 2005
      23 Placement Handbooks 2005
      24 University of Surrey Academic Standards Committee Report
      25 Ongoing Quality Enhancement Report QAA 2005
      26 Roll over of the SySx SHA Contract for the Programme with the commissioners
      27 Board of Studies Minutes- the last year of minutes demonstrates the Programme Team’s commitment to providing

         feedback to the committee on progress on aspects of the Programme’s development and response to recommendations
      28 Team trainee minutes- the 2005 minutes are examples of the two way process of hearing of challenges and concerns as

         well as positive feedback and being able to respond
      29 Service Users actively contribute to the severe and enduring mental illness module of teaching through joint presentations

         with Clinical Psychologists
      30 Curriculum timetables 2002-3, 2003-4 and 2004-5
      31 Curriculum modules 2002-3, 2003-4 and 2004-5
      32 Accreditation Reports BPS 2005 March 2002




                                                                                                                                10
28.   The Programme has a developmental, life span, self reflective scientist practitioner approach to
      training, taking each trainee’s prior professional experiences into account in devising their
      training. Throughout the training all trainees have the same academic and research teaching whilst
      their clinical experiences are organised to ensure that they gain the entire complement of
      competencies required to qualify. The rationale for the design is to promote self awareness and
      confidence in the arena of transferable skills and to facilitate a framework for life long learning.

29.   The Programme has been developed and is reviewed annually in collaboration with stakeholders33
      34
         and a strength of the curriculum is that it is highly responsive to feedback from trainees and
      lecturers35 36 37. This has resulted in a strong emphasis on professional issues, service user
      perspectives and transferable skills that are ethically accountable. The curriculum pays special
      attention to issues of lifespan development, diversity and difference, and the client-centred
      approach to care13 38 39 40. The academic and research curriculum is integrated with placement
      learning.

30.   Changes to the Programme have resulted from trainee feedback and the need to meet new
      professional criteria as well as external drivers41 42. There has been national pressure for PsychD
      Programmes to expand to meet the Workforce agenda within the NHS. Expansion necessitates a
      review of training practice to accommodate the increases in commissioning. The number of
      practice placements remains relatively static. In order to ensure the availability of placements new
      supervisor models and new practice placements are being generated, both locally and nationally.
      The changes to the curriculum have been significant and have been validated by the University43
      and accredited by the BPS. We are continuing to develop our approach to involving service users
      in the design and delivery of the curriculum as a response to the clinical governance agenda44 45 46.

31.   The Programme has introduced a six week induction period, prior to the first placement, to
      provide the platform for training and to support trainees either gaining new clinical skills or
      consolidating previously acquired skills. These competencies facilitate their ability to make the
      most of their clinical experience from the outset47. Early informal feedback from supervisors has
      been positive with specific comments referring to trainees being more equipped to interview
      clients at the outset of the placement. The extended induction period provides a focus on the
      individual and the context in which they operate. As a consequence there is a focus on therapeutic
      approaches, which require one-to-one intervention. This foundation is expanded upon in year two
      with the introduction of systemic and organisational models. The third year addresses advanced
      therapeutic competencies.

      33 In 2004 the Programme in collaboration with the SySx SHA piloted the OQME process. It is anticipated that this process
         will continue in future.
      34 It is anticipated that the Service Users and Carers group will contribute to the OQME process in the future. In this 2004

         review the service Users and Carers group was just evolving.
      35 Trainee feedback on lectures
      36 Lecturer feedback on trainee participation
      37 List of Stakeholders
      38 List of invited speakers
      39 List of markers workshops
      40 Board of Studies 10th May 2004
      41 Criteria for Accreditation of Postgraduate Training Programmes in PsychD BPS, 2002
      42 National Service frameworks,

         http://www.dh.gov.uk/PublicationsAndStatistics/Publications/PublicationsPolicyAndGuidance/PublicationsPAmpGBr
         owsableDocument/fs/en?CONTENT_ID=4096400&chk=scr6tN
         http://www.dh.gov.uk/PublicationsAndStatistics/Publications/PublicationsPolicyAndGuidance/PublicationsPAmpGBr
         owsableDocument/fs/en?CONTENT_ID=4096710&chk=yLadyI
      43 Surrey PsychD Programme changes
      44 Creating \ patient led NHS Delivering the NHS improvement plan March 2005

         http://www.dh.gov.uk/PublicationsAndStatistics/Publications/PublicationsPolicyAndGuidance/
      45 Minutes of Service User and Carer Advisory Group
      46 Minutes of Trainee Forum in relation to Service Users and Carers
      47 Induction Block outline




                                                                                                                               11
32.   The academic elements48 have been reorganised and are outlined in the PsychD Clinical
      Psychology Curriculum Programme Changes 2004 Entry document to ensure that the most
      appropriate knowledge is available to support trainees’ clinical work. For example, violence at
      work and risk assessment is introduced at induction. Other changes have supported the core
      philosophy which incorporates the service user at the centre of the learning experience through
      the implementation of case discussion groups and problem based learning exercises, development
      of self-reflection, and an appreciation of diversity49.

33.   This developmental approach is also illustrated in the practice placements50.

34.   The methods of study allow trainees to develop and evolve. They have opportunities to gain
      feedback from a range of assessment approaches51. The placement experience provides carefully
      organised opportunities to gain clinical and evaluative skills. The trainees receive weekly
      supervision and gain formative assessment prior to the mid and end stages of the placement
      summative assessment process52.

35.   Fitness for purpose, practice and award is ensured by the teaching and assessment of
      competencies. The effectiveness of the curriculum in helping trainees achieve the intended
      learning outcomes is monitored via performance in assignments53 and on placement via trainee
      and supervisor feedback.

36.   The research curriculum is specifically designed to develop research competence and skills of
      critical appraisal, suitable for doctoral level practice and the needs of a scientist practitioner
      profession. The teaching in this area has been recently altered to ensure that the trainees are taught
      both qualitative and quantitative methods prior to making decisions for their Major Research
      Projects. Knowledge of both approaches allows the trainees to make more informed choices for
      their work54 55 56.

37.   The academic and placement experiences support one another and provide a coherent experience
      to facilitate skill development in the specific areas.

38.   Following graduation, trainees are required to engage in lifelong learning and reflective practice
      in line with BPS57 and NHS policy58. The Programme team provides advice on employment
      opportunities and continuing professional development, through timetabled sessions which are
      supported by informal discussion in the third year and at the end of Programme review meeting.
      Teaching supervision skills and systemic consultancy in the final year assists trainees in this
      process.




      48 Surrey PsychD Programme Changes
      49 Curriculum timetable
      50 Placement outline
      51 Assessment schedule
      52 Placement Evaluation forms
      53 Marking forms for :- essays, case reports, problem based learning ,research
      54 Timetables 2004 and 2005
      55 Research Teaching module
      56 Research section of the Course Handbook and Programme regulations
      57 BPS Code of Conduct
      58 Working together, learning together: a framework for lifelong learning for the NHS November 2001

         http://www.dh.gov.uk/PublicationsAndStatistics/Publications/PublicationsPolicyAndGuidance/PublicationsPolicyAnd
         GuidanceArticle/fs/en?CONTENT_ID=4009558&chk=tCWmaW



                                                                                                                      12
      Assessment

39.   The assessment framework for the Programme provides opportunities for the trainees to gain both
      oral and written feedback59 in the following areas: personal and professional development60; self-
      reflection; clinical skills development61; integration of theory and practice; designing and
      completing clinical assessment and interventions; research and evaluative skills62.

40.   The assessment framework conforms to the requirements of the University regulations63 and the
      QAA Code of Practice and addresses the learning outcomes. The assessments are mapped on to
      the learning outcomes in the Programme Specification. Successful completion of the Programme
      and award of the Doctorate depends on successful attainment of all competencies and units of
      assessment.

41.   The assessment framework reflects the developmental nature of the Programme, requiring
      evidence of growing complexity and sophistication in thinking, writing and clinical practice as
      reflected in the core competencies, such as progression in models of psychotherapy and levels of
      analysis. Trainees are expected to produce work of a publishable standard.

42.   The assessment framework is clearly articulated including procedures for failure and appeal21.
      The framework includes a detailed timetable for the submission of work64. The Programme Team
      consult with each trainee cohort to ensure the submission deadlines are manageable in relation to
      their overall work load65. Procedures are in place to ensure fairness, consistency and quality66.

43.   All academic assignments are assessed in accordance with written criteria that are made available
      to trainees, markers and examiners67. Formative assessment is provided to trainees through
      detailed written feedback on all their assessed work and in planned meetings with their academic,
      research and clinical tutors, in the context of the annual appraisal process68. The Provisional
      Grade allows trainees to make referencing and grammatical changes to their written work, prior to
      presentation in their portfolio. At present, work is assessed through a grading system69 although,
      at the time of writing, the Programme Team is planning to consult and, if agreed, seek ratification
      of their proposal to move the Programme to a pass/fail criterion only70. In this way, it is hoped to
      place more emphasis on qualitative developmental feedback as a way of improving standards. The
      mark sheets will have space for significant comment and markers will be invited to annotate the
      assignments. This provides a realistic experience of life long formative feedback whether in the
      arena of clinical or academic life and will enhance standards.

44.   The Programme Team, SySx SHA and regional psychologists make a positive commitment to
      support all trainees in achieving their personal goal of qualifying, while mindful of the gate

      59 The trainees receive feedback from their peers in the problem based learning exercises and the case discussion groups.
         They receive feedback from Programme staff on assignments and gain oral and written feedback on placement skill
         development. These elements are brought together in the annual appraisal
      60 Personal and Professional Development policy, Course Handbook and Programme Regulations
      61 Case discussion group and Problem Based Learning Rationale
      62 Programme specification for PsychD in the appendix
      63 Section F University Calendar https://remote.surrey.ac.uk/,DanaInfo=.apptweqFz201p-

         MorP.2+pls/portal/docs/PAGE/CALENDAR/2F_CREAM_04-05_DEFINITIVE_VERSION.PDF QAA Code of
         Practice for the assurance of academic quality and standards in higher education Section 6: Assessment of students, May
         2000
      64 Assessment Schedule outline
      65 The Programme emailed trainees regarding the submission deadlines. Feedback was responded to either through changing

         deadlines or providing explanations at team trainee meetings for the inability to alter the set deadline.
      66 Marking guidelines, marking workshops and moderated marking
      67 PBL, case report and essay, SRRP and MRP guidelines
      68 Trainee Appraisal Form
      69 Grading Scheme for Assessments
      70 Board of Studies Minutes from meeting on 25th July 2005




                                                                                                                             13
      keeping function we have for the profession. Following qualification trainees are able to practise
      independently. The Service Users of psychological services tend to be vulnerable and could be
      easily abused. The Programme Team need to ensure it has confidence in both the professional
      behaviour and the competence of its qualifying professionals and as a consequence takes this
      responsibility seriously and ensures fitness to practise. On occasion trainees will be required to
      undertake additional placement experience to address identified learning needs. There are specific
      failure criteria in relation to professional behaviour71.

45.   Assessment is continuous and covers all aspects of the learning outcomes72. The pass mark of
      50% for the Programme is in line with the University General Regulations, whilst self reflective
      accounts are marked on a pass/fail basis.

46.   Agreed procedures and criteria are established between University tutors and placement providers
      for the assessment of clinical practice73. This process is supported by University staff.

47.   The research assessments are an integral element of the assessment framework. Changes
      nationally in the way in which research is ethically approved have resulted in the adoption of new
      procedures. The outcome has resulted in an increase in the time frame to gain ethical committee
      and research and development approval within Trusts. Attempts to address this challenge have
      been made through raising the issue nationally with the Group of Trainers in Clinical Psychology.
      Research tutors have liaised with a local research and development and ethical committee to
      establish ways in which the research projects can be facilitated through this process. Trainees
      have been made aware of the additional time frame required.

48.   To facilitate standard setting, two external examiners are appointed to each year group, and follow
      a cohort through the three years of training. This provides an opportunity for the examiners to
      observe both standards and the progression of trainees. It affords the Programme the opportunity
      of having senior and experienced examiners well used to the Programme and always available,
      should the need to confer arise. All year group examiners meet at the annual Examination Board
      and have an opportunity to discuss standards with each other and the team74. Trainees are given
      high quality feedback on their assignments75. The external examiners have been constructive in
      their comments76.

49.   Consistency in assessment across placement supervisors is addressed by Supervisor Workshops
      that introduce supervisors to the assessment procedures and give them opportunities to practise
      using them77. Clinical tutors also provide support and training for clinical supervisors via the
      regular placement visits and in their link role to groups of local supervisors.

50.   The assessment profile has changed over the last year following consultation with the
      stakeholders78. The aim has been to provide greater self-reflective opportunities and to assess
      outcomes by more than one means. The introduction of PBL Reflective Accounts and Case
      Discussion Groups has resulted in the removal of some of the essays to prevent overload and
      reduce opportunities for plagiarism. Verbal and written feedback on the submitted assignments

      71 See the Course Handbook and Programme regulations page 26, section 9
      72 Assessment outline and Programme Specification
      73 Evaluation of Clinical Placement
      74 List of External Examiners
      75 Sample of feedback from External Examiners The views can reflected in the following comments ’the quality of the work and

         the feedback provided by the course staff on assessments was generally of a high standard and suggests that the trainees have been exposed to
         teaching of an appropriate standard and quality’ Professor Graham Turpin
         I find the comments provided by the markers to be informative, Dr Barbara Hedge
         Dr Latchford reports the trainees are performing at an appropriate level in their submissions. In addition he stated ’some of
         the essays were in fact extremely well written. I felt that the marking system was fair and trainees provided with helpful feedback.’
      76 External Examiners reports
      77 Timetable of Supervisor workshops
      78 This as a result of the new core competency criteria developed by the BPS




                                                                                                                                                  14
      has indicated that the methods have been challenging and resulted in effective learning
      opportunities79. Informal feedback from the Accreditation Visit by the BPS raised the issue of
      whether the Programme wanted to reduce the assessment load. This feedback has been noted and
      will be integrated into discussions following the implementation of the core competency
      framework across the three years.


      Student Achievement

51.   The Programme is able to demonstrate that trainees achieve the intended learning outcomes
      within each module and maintain high standards in academic and practice performance.
      Performance of all trainees is fed back to the Board of Studies, the Stakeholders Group and to the
      Strategic Health Authority. Issues of attrition and specific trainee performance are responded to
      by the Programme team and, if necessary the external examiners.

52.   The University awards a Doctorate in Clinical Psychology to all trainees who pass all the
      elements of the assessment framework. This achievement makes postgraduates eligible for
      Chartered Status within the BPS.

53.   The Programme’s indicators highlight the consistent high quality of the Programme as the
      Trainees perform well in all areas. They are as follows:-

              Year of        Number in          Attrition           NHS Independent                 Other*
             Qualifying        year                                       Mental
                                                                 employment
                                                                           Health
                                                                           Sector
              2004            24              0            87.5%           8.4%                     4.1%
              2003            24              0            83.4%             0                      16.6%
              2002            20              1             95%              0                       5%
      *A significant proportion of this figure can be accounted for by maternity leave

                  •      First employment data as outlined in the table above;
                  •      Academic and placement assessment results80;
                  •      Trainees achieve a high level of clinical skills and are evaluated positively by
                         supervisors81;
                  •      The external examiners have commented on the appropriate standard of work of
                         the trainees and the exceptional quality of some trainees, including specific
                         recommendations that some publish their research82;
                  •      Positive feedback from Board of Studies, Stakeholder Committee meetings and
                         Purchasers/Commissioners83 84;
                  •      External examiner reports85;
                  •      Informal feedback from heads of service;
                  •      The Programme is proud of the informal commendations received from the recent
                         BPS visit86 and the University of Surrey Academic Standards Committee visit87
                         and OQME88;

      79 Trainee feedback from first PBL exercise, Relationship to Change
      80 PsychD Marking sheets presented to Examination Board
      81 PsychD placement Evaluation forms
      82 Examination Board minutes 2004 and 2005
      83 Minutes of Stakeholder meetings, the 2004/5 minutes highlight strengths on the Programme
      84 Board of Study Minutes 2004/5 highlight strengths on the Programme
      85 External Examiner reports
      86 Accreditation visit report of the BPS
      87 Report of the Academic Standards Committee 2005
      88 OQME Report 2005




                                                                                                             15
                     •       The Programme is undertaking new selection criteria in an attempt to widen
                             access to the profession89.

54.   Specific, tailored learning opportunities are developed with the trainees should they need to take
      time away from the Programme. The most usual reason for this is maternity leave. The SySx SHA
      has supported the trainees by extending their paid employment. The Programme has made the
      necessary adjustments to the proportion of time they work to allow for family commitments. In
      adopting this approach trainees who have been on maternity leave and returned have completed
      training successfully. Other trainees who require time out for ill health or other personal issues are
      supported and are facilitated in their return to ensure that they are successful in completing the
      course.

      Key Strengths and Challenges

55.   The PsychD programme has been in receipt of a number of constructive reviews. These and the
      Programme team consider that the Programme has a number of significant strengths and has
      challenges to ensure that we continue to be a successful Programme.

56.   We identify the following strengths in our provision:
           •      Partnership working with the large variety of stakeholders;
           •      The level of communication with external examiners in ensuring their participation in
                  the process of essay choice, and in resolving issues of poor performance;
           •      Widening access to the Programme through developing new selection criteria;
           •      Increased time for induction to enhance skill development in preparation for client
                  contact;
           •      Engagement with service users to develop their meaningful participation in the
                  Programme;
           •      Commitment to integrating theory and practice;
           •      Responsiveness to trainees’ needs;
           •      Low attrition rates with trainees taking employment opportunities within the Public
                  Services.

57.   We recognise and are working to meet the following ongoing challenges:
           •     Continuing to develop new placements to meet the request for further commissions;
           •     Enhancing partnerships with placement providers with a view to developing clear
                 responsibilities for the provision of placements;
           •    Curriculum development to meet the competencies requirements in years two and
                 three;
           •     Discussing with the Stakeholders, including the external examiners, their role within
                 the Programme and determining processes to ensure their recommendations are
                 documented;
           •     Developing a business case and securing financial resources to support employment
                 of a member of the Programme team who will be able to take forward the large
                 agenda for Service User Carer involvement. The post holder will have utilised mental
                 health services.




      89   Selection policy 2005



                                                                                                         16
      B2          EVALUATION OF SUBJECT PROVISION – B.SC. (HONS)
                  NUTRITION/DIETETICS

      Academic and Practitioner Standards

      Learning Outcomes

58.   The intended educational outcomes meet the expectations of standards published by the relevant
      regulatory and professional bodies90 91 92 93 94 and have regard to other guidelines relevant to the
      profession95 96.

                Knowledge and understanding – will achieve:

                KU 1                    A good breadth of knowledge in the key concepts of the biological,
                                        physical, social, psychological and clinical sciences which are
                                        relevant to Dietetics;
                KU 2                    An understanding of the application of nutritional concepts at
                                        biochemical, organismal and population level and the metabolic
                                        basis of food demand through the life cycle, in both health and
                                        disease;
                KU 3                    Appreciation of the nutritional demands of individuals and
                                        populations and development of critical awareness of current dietary
                                        recommendations;
                KU 4                    An understanding and development of the skills required to perform
                                        laboratory-based investigations commonly used to assess nutritional
                                        status;
                KU 5                    A knowledge of the nutrient and non-nutrient content of food and
                                        beverages and how they affect health;
                KU 6                    An understanding of the principles and key components of
                                        nutritional science and how theoretical concepts may be translated
                                        into relevant and applied Diet therapy and Dietary modification;
                KU 7                    Appropriate knowledge to allow students to practise within the legal
                                        and ethical boundaries of their profession;
                KU 8                    An understanding of what is required of practitioners by the Health
                                        Professions Council.

                Cognitive skills - able to:

                CS 1                    Find and critically evaluate scientific literature and other appropriate
                                        sources of material;
                CS 2                    Critically evaluate research design and the methods commonly used
                                        in nutrition research;
                CS 3                    Use acquired knowledge and appropriate skills to make professional
                                        judgements.




      90 HPC Standards of Proficiency 2003
      91 HPC (Dietitians Board) Course Requirements and Guidelines for Pre-registration Courses Leading to State Registration in
         Dietetics, 2000
      92 QAA/NHS Subject Benchmark statement: Healthcare Programmes: Dietetics
      93 QAA/NHS Framework for Higher Education Qualifications
      94 BDA Professional Standards for Dietitians, 2004
      95 HPC Standards of Conduct, Performance and Ethics 2003
      96 European Academic and Practitioner Standards for Dietetics, 2005




                                                                                                                             17
               Practical skills - able to:

               PS 1                    Demonstrate competence in commonly used nutrition research
                                       methodology;
               PS 2                    Gather, analyse and interpret qualitative and quantitative data;
               PS 3                    Effectively communicate both orally and in writing;
               PS 4                    Learn independently;
               PS 5                    Take responsibility for planning and organisation of work both their
                                       own and in a team;
               PS 6                    Demonstrate effective and appropriate skills in communicating
                                       information, advice, instruction and professional opinion to a wide
                                       range of the population including clients, carers and other health
                                       care professionals.

               Key / transferable skills - able to:

               TS 1                    Communicate ideas, principles and theories effectively by oral,
                                       written and visual means;
               TS 2                    Work effectively and independently on a given project or task;
               TS 3                    Work effectively in small groups and teams towards a common
                                       goal/outcome;
               TS 4                    Apply basic statistical and numerical skills to nutritional data;
               TS 5                    Use Information Technology e.g. WWW, CD-Rom databases, word
                                       processors and statistics packages;
               TS 6                    Use self reflection as a meaning of learning and of improving
                                       performance and effectiveness in clinical practice.

59.   Key Programme staff are members of the Dietetic profession, are involved in research and clinical
      practice and engaged in professional organisation activities97. As such, the team has ‘ownership’
      of and commitment to the standards that apply to the profession. This Programme is distinguished
      from others by the strong emphasis on the biological and chemical sciences that underpin
      nutrition and health care, arising from the multidisciplinary scientific milieu of its home within
      the School of Biomedical and Molecular Sciences.

60.   The relevance and validity of learning outcomes are maintained through the internal98 and
      external99 100 contexts in which they are developed and reviewed. Proposals for changes in the
      direction or emphasis in academic learning outcomes arise from the Programme team’s ‘reading’
      of this educational and professional environment and feedback from stakeholders. The
      Programme uses learning outcomes for placements that were developed by the HPC in
      consultation with the profession.

61.   The academic learning outcomes (Appendix 2) are well matched with the HPC guidelines for
      knowledge and skills101.



      97 Job descriptions and Curriculum Vitae of Dietetic Programme staff
      98 The Programme team are highly professionally oriented. Annual Programme Reviews are carried out within the wider
         supportive structure of the School and in accord with the University framework, see Nutrition Programmes Review
         minutes, 2002-05
      99 The relationship of the Programme Team with professional colleagues and other stakeholders, feedback from placement

         providers as representatives of NHS employers and published documents (see footnotes 90,91,92,94,95)
      100 External examiners reports
      101 A mapping exercise carried out when the Programme was restructured to implement the new placement model

         demonstrates the match between the Dietitians Board requirements and the learning outcomes of this Programme
         (February 2002)



                                                                                                                          18
62.   Specific learning outcomes for each component of the Programme are disseminated to students
      and staff through Handbooks prepared for each of the academic levels102 and clinical
      placements103 and in the module descriptions available on the internet104. The appropriate
      handbook is distributed at the start of each academic year to students and all the school staff
      involved in the particular level. These learning outcomes provide a reference point for lecturers
      and tutors to determine the direction of their teaching and for students to clarify the objectives of
      their work. The Programme is structured to ensure that the specific learning outcomes identified
      as prerequisites for each placement can be achieved in time.

63.   Progress, development and demonstration of skills are reviewed during practice placements by
      placement assessors and by students against the specific learning outcomes using an agreed
      format105. The records of student progress pre-placement and at the end of placement106 are an
      important focus for communication about learning objectives and outcomes between placement
      supervisors, assessors and University staff.

64.   The Programme team has introduced ULearn107 delivery with the aim of enhancing student
      achievement of learning outcomes. In the learning modules delivered by ULearn, specific learning
      objectives are identified for each week and in turn for each of several online lessons within the
      week. This approach facilitates sequential learning and ensures that learning content, activities,
      informal self-assessments and formal assessments relate to each other and to the overall module
      outcomes. Students undertaking ULearn modules in their final year reported that this helped them
      make more effective use of learning outcomes .

65.   The high quality research projects undertaken during the final year are evidence of achievement
      of research-related learning outcomes. Students are able to identify topics from a broad spectrum
      of clinical and nutritional sciences108. Supervision is provided by University academics. Where
      appropriate to the nature of the project, NHS clinical practitioners act as co-supervisors. These
      arrangements ensure that students have access to expertise related to their topic and that they
      obtain consistent support in meeting the School project requirements. They also help extend the
      numbers and variety of projects that can be offered (with a view to managing the larger cohort
      undertaking their projects in 2006/07).


      Curriculum

66.   The academic curriculum is developed and maintained in accordance with the University modular
      framework109 and external requirements90 91 92 94 95 and is driven by educational outcomes. It is
      integrated with placement learning. The curriculum is adjusted as an outcome of ongoing
      review110. Changes are ratified by the Board of Studies111.




      102 Level 1, 2 and 3 Handbooks 2004/05
      103 A, B and C Practical Placement Handbooks 2004/05
      104 Full module descriptions are available at: http://www.open.mis.surrey.ac.uk/misweb/modules/sasm03BS00.htm
      105 Sample placement assessment tools
      106 Higher Education Review forms Pre-placement A, B and C and Review of Placement forms A, B and C
      107 ULearn is the ‘brand name’ of the University of Surrey online Managed Learning Environment based on WebCT Vista 3.

         Teaching via ULearn was introduced at all levels of the Programme in 2004/05. See also Teaching and learning
      108 Final year project topics for recent years
      109   General Regulations, Calendar 2004-05, Part Two, Section F, pp F/34-48 (First Degrees)
      110Proposals for change by the Programme team are discussed at the Annual Programme Review where feedback from
         academic and placement assessments and input from students and teaching staff is considered (see Nutrition Programme
         Review minutes, footnote 98)
      111Minutes of the SBMS Undergraduate Board of Studies, 2002-05




                                                                                                                           19
67.   The basic rationale is to develop students’ skills as nutrition scientists then build on these skills to
      produce competent Dietetic practitioners. Fitness for purpose, practice and award is ensured by
      the teaching and assessment of safe practice and competency in both University and practice
      settings.

68.   Early in the Programme, the curriculum emphasises development of basic food, nutrition and
      health-related knowledge and skills. In levels 2 and 3 the emphasis of the curriculum changes to
      developing an integrative approach to practice112. Students are introduced to reflective learning
      principles in level 1. They are required to maintain and use a reflective diary throughout their
      University and placement programme, and are increasingly led toward self-directed learning in
      preparation for reflective practice and life long learning in the work place113. An aim for the final
      year is that students build on the concepts introduced earlier in the academic Programme, using
      their clinical experience as an integrating framework, to develop higher levels of understanding of
      nutrition and health. Level 3 also aims to further develop the research and evidence-based
      approach in students through their research project and lectures that highlight the specific relevant
      research interests of staff114.

69.   The Dietitians Board published guidelines for a new approach to placement provision in
      November 200091. The initiative was driven by a shared acceptance by placement trainers and
      University tutors that shorter placement periods might help alleviate the predicted shortage of
      placements (as trainers might find them easier to accommodate) and would improve the
      integration of academic and practical elements of Dietetic education115. The new structure
      replaced the previous 8 week catering and 31 week Dietetic placement block in the third year with
      three distributed periods of Dietetic placement.

70.   While a considerable undertaking, the School and the Programme team enthusiastically embraced
      the new direction, taking the opportunity to thoroughly revise the Programme116. Many of the
      resulting changes are supported by feedback obtained in 2005 from final year students completing
      the old-style structure contrasted to those undergoing the new approach117. The University118 and
      Dietitians Board119 approved the restructured curriculum in 2002; implementation commenced in
      the 2002/03 academic year and is now complete. The revised academic curriculum integrates with
      the specific needs and objectives of each placement period.

71.   Changes to the first year were made to prepare students for Placement A. In particular, there is
      now an increased focus on food service management and food skills and the earlier introduction
      of specific teaching on critical review skills, reflective practice and team work. BS117 Nutrition
      (macronutrients) was also moved to the Spring semester to better build on the foundation
      provided by chemistry and biochemistry in the Autumn semester. Commencing in 2004/05,
      ULearn delivery of BS120 Practical Nutrition Skills and BS121 Applied Nutrition has enabled us
      to provide support for more intensive development of food skills through individual and group
      activities supported by interactive and graphic/video-rich content online120.


      112 Practice which is client-centred and focused on cooperative problem-solving
      113 As required by the BDA, HPC and by NHS policy
      114 Lecture Programmes in Level 3 Handbook
      115 The Programme Director Dr Jacki Bishop was a member of the joint BDA/CPSM working party that developed and

         published the guidelines in a consultative process, see paper: Pre-registration education and training for Dietitians. Report
         and recommendations from the British Dietetic Association/CPSM Dietitians Board Joint working Party, February 1996
      116The plans for the restructure are reported, see submission to the then Dietitians Board in 2001. Programme development

         was supported by the School by the ‘super-numerary’ appointment of a Dietetic education consultancy during 2001 and
         2003-05
      117 Feedback from final year students, May 2005
      118 Outcome of The University of Surrey Validation Process
      119 Report of the Dietitians Board 2002 on the restructuring of the Dietetics Programme
      120 see later Section C Teaching and Learning




                                                                                                                                   20
72.   The second year of the programme now provides an earlier introduction of a working knowledge
      of the range of food habits and health issues relating to diet in the community, basic dietary and
      anthropometric assessment skills, appreciation of the role of nutrition in preventing and managing
      disease and basic skills in education and counselling. This meets the prerequisites of Placement B.

73.   In the third year, a six week University-based block (Applied Dietetics 2) has been introduced
      between Placement B and Placement C . This is an intense teaching module that reflects on the
      practical experience and further develops knowledge and skills using a Problem Based Learning
      approach.

74.   Few changes were required in the final year. The Health Promotion aspects previously covered in
      a Level 3 module entitled Public Health Nutrition and Health Promotion are now covered at Level
      2 in BS238 Nutrition Education and Health Promotion. This has made way in the final year for
      inclusion of some national and international social and economic issues in the revised module
      BS324 Public Health Nutrition.

75.   Teaching in the placement Programmes follows internal121 and external122 guidelines and reflects
      the HPC Standards of Proficiency for Dietitians . ‘Facilitation of Learning’ courses are provided
      for placement trainers by University of Surrey-based placement facilitators123. Some placement
      trainers have recently identified a lack of knowledge of the academic content of the
      Programme124. This is currently being looked at more closely by our Surrey based placement
      facilitators. We are addressing this by making the Trainers Forum an annual event, providing
      more information to the Stakeholders Group and having a member of the Stakeholder Group
      attend the Annual Programme Review within SBMS.


      Assessment

76.   Successful completion of the Programme and award of the BSc (Hons) Nutrition/Dietetics degree
      depends on attainment of all competencies and units of assessment and confirmation of fitness to
      practice. The performance standard required reflects professional and regulatory body
      requirements and the Framework for Higher Education Qualifications.

77.   Assessment practices in the academic Programme conform to the requirements of University
      Regulations and the QAA Code of Practice125 promoting fairness, quality and consistency in
      assessment procedures. The appropriateness of the assessment practice is confirmed by positive
      internal126 and external reviews and reports127. The assessment strategies are laid out, module by
      module, in the Level 1, 2 and 3 Handbooks which also contain extracts of the Programme
      Regulations describing procedures for failure and appeal.

78.   The assessment strategies relate to the nature of the attributes to be measured128. Assessments of
      student performance are based on student achievement of intended learning outcomes. The
      assessment strategies reflect sequential development of knowledge and skills. Examinations are
      used to assess the quality and quantity of student performance across the curriculum. While
      coursework is primarily diagnostic and formative in nature, aimed to provide timely and useful


      121 The University of Surrey Notes of Guidance for Placement Learning
      122 QAA Code of Practice for Placement Learning
      123 recent Facilitation of Learning Course programmes and attendance lists
      124 Outcomes of Trainers Forum, May 2005
      125 QAA Code of Practice for the assurance of academic quality and standards in higher education Section 6: Assessment of

         students, May 2000
      126 Board of Examiners, ASC
      127 External examiners, HPC (Dietitians Board) accreditation process
      128 Table showing application of assessment strategies




                                                                                                                             21
      feedback that facilitates action by tutors and students, it is also summative in that it contributes to
      the overall assessment and award.

79.   Written criteria for assessment of University coursework assignments are made available to
      students, markers and examiners .

80.   Students have commented on the usefulness of frequent and rapid feedback. Feedback strategies
      have been under some focus by members of the Programme team. Student expectations of
      feedback on coursework are a significant demand on academic staff. Provision of immediate
      feedback through use of automatically marked ULearn self-tests is identified by students as useful
      but it might set an unrealistic standard for tutor marked coursework. Some useful guidance for
      further development of assessment and feedback has been identified and discussed by the
      Programme team and at the Annual Programme Review. A consultation document has been
      prepared129 and the issue referred to the Board of Studies for action, (November, 2005).

81.   Assessment of clinical competence in practice is carried out by placement supervisors using the
      national criteria and is monitored by Dietetic members of the Programme team. Dietetic
      practitioner status ensures that those making and monitoring assessments are well aware of the
      professional body and employer requirements. This promotes the relevance of their assessments
      to the ‘real world’.

82.   Each student is visited during Placement B by a member of the Programme team who is a
      registered dietitian and students on placement C may also be visited. A visit includes a review of
      assessments completed to date with the trainer and the student. Clinical supervisors complete a
      Review of Placement form, based on the agreed HPC criteria, which is signed by the student.
      Students retain a copy in their placement portfolio130 and return a copy to the University. Student
      placement portfolios for each placement reflect the range of their clinical experience and their
      skills development . These portfolios are reviewed by the Programme team after each placement.

83.   The University of Surrey Programme team members and placement trainers have made
      considerable progress working on developing and implementing common formative and
      summative assessment tools as part of the transition to a stronger partnership131. This work takes
      place at Supervisor Workshops and visits to individual placement sites. The National Facilitators
      Group132 have produced exemplar assessment tools which are widely accepted. There are slight
      differences of approach in different centres and some centres have modified their assessment
      forms to reflect their particular clientele and setting133.

84.   Examination scripts, coursework and research projects contributing to the final award are
      available for review by the external examiners . There are three components that are averaged to
      produce the final year project mark:
              •        the academic supervisor’s assessment of practical performance, formulation of
                       literature review and use of resources;
              •        the academic supervisor’s assessment of the thesis as a piece of scientific writing;
              •        the internal examiner’s (another academic supervisor with relevant expertise)
                       assessment of the thesis as a piece of scientific writing.
      Final year students selected for viva voce examination by external examiners include all first class
      students, those within two marks who could be considered for elevation to the next class and
      generally also a sample typical of each degree class. Students can only benefit from viva voce
      examination.


      129 SBMS Consultation document ‘Feedback: a proposed agenda for change’ May 2005
      130 Example of Placement portfolio
      131 Examples of assessment tools
      132 membership of National Facilitators Group
      133 Sample placement assessment tools




                                                                                                          22
      Student achievement

85.   Student achievement is monitored and recorded at School level (Boards of Examiners) and
      documented centrally in the Examinations Office of the University Registry. Data on student
      achievement are routinely sent to the SySx SHA134, the HPC135 and the BDA136.

86.   Appendix 6 summarises recent data on student achievement. Issues relating to student
      achievement are discussed and responded to by the Programme Team and others, including at
      Annual Programme Reviews and meetings with SySx SHA representatives and stakeholders

87.   Attrition rates have been consistent in recent years and approximate the national average. Most
      withdrawals are due to personal circumstances, including financial issues. In the ranking of
      reasons for failure to continue, student decision to transfer to another career path is followed by
      academic failure, followed then by illness. While there are few recurring themes indicating the
      need for action, financial difficulty during clinical placement and loneliness or other problems
      associated with living on-campus, have been cited by some students as contributing to their
      consideration of withdrawal from the Programme. Students who raise financial problems are
      referred by Programme staff to Student Support Services to ensure they are accessing all
      appropriate financial support. The Programme Director has raised the issue of isolation and
      related campus residential environment issues with the Dean of Students who is taking this
      forward137.

88.   Award of the BSc (Hons) Nutrition/Dietetics entitles graduates to apply to the HPC for
      registration as a Dietitian and to the BDA for full membership.

89.   We identify the following strengths in our provision:
             •        the curriculum, driven by learning outcomes that are responsive to the
                      professional environment, that prepares Dietitians fit for purpose, practice and
                      award;
             •        the multidisciplinary School environment that supports our emphasis on the
                      underpinning nutritional sciences;
             •        the effective links to clinical Dietetic departments;
             •        the effective approach to placement recruitment and support;
             •        the commitment to on-going development and innovation in the Dietetics
                      Programme;
             •        the high level of good quality applicants;
             •        the consistently high levels of academic and professional achievement of students
                      and graduates.




      134 Programme Report to SySx SHA, 2004-05
      135 Programme Report to HPC, 2002-03 and 2003-04
      136 Programme Report to the BDA, 2003-04
      137 Correspondence with Dean of Students




                                                                                                      23
90.   We recognise and are working to meet the following ongoing challenges in our provision:
             •       a transition to the new placement model and philosophy of practice-based
                     education in Dietetics;
             •       establishing more localised placements with the aim of regional self-sufficiency;
             •       implementing the quality monitoring process for practice placements, the
                     guidelines for which have been developed in association with the national
                     University Dietetic Education Group;
             •       enhancing partnership with placement providers;
             •       a transition to common assessment criteria within and between placements;
             •       further developing assessment strategies to help balance student feedback
                     requirements and marking workload;
             •       recruiting suitably qualified staff;
             •       the financial impact of the placement Programme on students;
             •       the impact on student attrition of social isolation and similar issues relating to the
                     campus residential environment.




                                                                                                        24
      C           QUALITY OF LEARNING OPPORTUNITIES

      Teaching and learning

91.   The University Teaching and Learning Strategy138 provides the broad context for on-going
      development of the teaching and learning approach of the Programmes. Both SHS and SBMS
      have actively supported innovation and further development of the Programmes139 140.

92.   The PsychD Programme responded positively to the core competencies learning agenda by
      introducing a rich variety of teaching methods, didactic, PBL exercises, case discussion groups
      and inter-professional learning opportunities, supervisor modelling and feedback workshops
      within the academic curriculum and on clinical placements141. All trainees follow the same
      academic learning curriculum, although placement provision is determined by training needs and
      the need to develop specific clinical competencies, within the BPS core competencies framework.
      As far as is possible, trainees are involved in the decision making around selecting placements.
      The teaching and learning is based on trainees’ existing competencies and encourages both
      independent learning and group based learning.

93.   2004/05 has seen the introduction to the Dietetic Programme of a more student-centred and active
      learning approach with the implementation of e-learning at all levels of the Programme142 and the
      use of a Problem-based Learning (PBL) block143. In response to the University and SBMS
      strategy of promoting post-graduate studies144 and the School’s assessment of future workforce
      requirements, the Dietetic Programme team has prepared a proposal for a Post-graduate Diploma
      in Dietetics. Development of this new Programme is currently on hold but is likely to proceed if a
      commitment to sufficient commissioned places can be obtained.

94.   The Programmes benefit from residing within large and varied Schools with excellent RAE
      ratings145. They are able to draw on the wide range of high calibre staff for teaching, provision of
      student support and supervision of research projects146.

95.   Both Programmes are responsive to the ‘real world’ as a corollary of their strong vocational focus.
      Teaching and supervision are rooted within the NHS which provides the context for
      trainees/students to have excellent opportunities to integrate their teaching and learning
      experiences: academic, clinical and research147 into a client-centred approach. Placement
      supervisors practise within the NHS, as do most of the visiting lecturers, all clinical psychologists
      on the PsychD Programme and some Dietetic staff97 148. The Programmes keep pace with
      professional and educational developments.


      138 Teaching and Learning Strategy, University of Surrey (October 2003)
      139 SHS/PsychD proposal for Statement of Equivalence training
      140 SBMS successfully obtained FSDLT funding support for development of a School e-learning strategy, primarily in

         response to enthusiasm for this teaching approach in the Dietetic Programme team. The School has also appointed a
         ‘supernumerary’ Dietetic education consultancy over recent years
      141 On clinical placements the competencies are set within the trainee evaluation forms. Supervisors provide formative

         feedback to the trainees on the core competencies which include an assessment, formulation, interventions and
         communication. The Programme is undergoing a process of enhancing the placement handbooks so as to incorporate the
         core competency framework. The adult mental health handbook has been completed and the child and learning disability
         handbooks are being finalised. The older adult handbook has been timetabled for completion in 2005/6
      142 Overview of implementation of ULearn in Dietetics
      143 Outline of PBL block (Applied Dietetics 2)
      144 SBMS Strategic Plan
      145 SBMS Strategic Plan 2005-09
      146 SBMS draws on a diversity of scientific and educational expertise to support teaching and research in the health and

         nutrition sciences . The learning environment is, in this sense, interdisciplinary.
      147 see earlier sections on the respective Curricula
      148 Curriculum vitae of PsychD teaching staff




                                                                                                                           25
96.   The PsychD Programme is at the forefront of having Service Users and Carers as part of the
      decision making and design of the Programme. The project149 is in its early stages but has already
      influenced specific modules of teaching150, selection151 and some trainee research. This initiative
      is being disseminated to other local and national Clinical Psychology Programmes.

97.   Regular training workshops152 are provided for clinical psychology supervisors to ensure they are
      kept up to date and are aware of their responsibilities within Programme requirements and to
      support their continuing professional development. Supervisors highly value these workshops
      and attendance is high. The workshops are monitored and changes to the content and format of the
      workshop are made in response to their supervisor feedback153 154. The workshops are evaluated
      for the acquisition of knowledge and confidence to supervise. The supervisors value the
      workshops which are well attended. The Programme is responsive to the supervisors’ suggestions
      for specific topic areas for the workshops.

98.   Dietetic teaching staff have been leaders in implementation of ULearn in SBMS155. While most
      modules are delivered by traditional methods, some are almost entirely delivered online; in others,
      online components supplement traditional teaching 156. While under continual refinement based
      on student, staff and external feedback and outcomes, these modules generally evaluated well in
      the first year of implementation157. The evaluation highlights some particular benefits for all
      students such as flexibility in study patterns and immediacy of feedback. In response to student
      feedback and following discussion at the Programme Review meeting158 changes are being made
      for the next delivery of these modules.

99.   The new PBL block (Applied Dietetics 2) engages students in constructing frameworks for client-
      centred problem solving and case management, and subjecting their skills and judgement to
      critique and discussion by peers and supervisors, within a context of reflective professional
      development. While practitioners have always been involved in the academic Programme as guest
      lecturers, this input has been extended in the PBL block with Dietitians from a number of clinical
      Dietetic departments involved as facilitators and resource professionals. The PBL block has
      enabled the Programme to further its commitment to inter-disciplinary education. Hitherto,
      opportunities for learning with students of other allied health professions have been largely
      limited to placement sites. The case-management focus of the PBL block has provided an
      excellent opportunity for shared learning with PsychD trainees. This was well received by
      students and staff159. It is anticipated that the independent formal evaluation will be available by
      the time of the review visit. While staff and students went into the shared learning experience with
      some reservations, the positive experience augers well for future collaborations with PsychD, and
      potentially with nursing colleagues.




      149 See Service Users and Carers Forum minutes and the minutes of the trainees forum on Service Users and Carers
      150 See Severe and enduring mental distress module outline
      151 See Selection Policy
      152 In line with the Criteria for the accreditation of postgraduate training Programme in PsychD
      153 Supervisor Workshop Programme timetable
      154 Supervisor feedback
      155 Minutes of the ULearn Project Steering Group and FSDLT ULearn project bid
      156 An online demonstration of the modules using ULearn will be available to reviewers on their visit to the University
      157 ULearn evaluation reports
      158 Minutes of Nutrition Programmes Review May 2005
      159 Preliminary report of PBL block evaluation




                                                                                                                                26
100. StepDiet has been another successful innovation developed by the Dietetic Programme team.
     StepDiet is a computer-based case management system used extensively in the Practical and
     Applied Dietetics modules at level 2. The Programme, supported by an extensive study guide,
     uses diabetes management as a model for teaching Dietetic practice skills. The Programme
     evaluation was supported by the Kent, Surrey and Sussex Workforce Development
     Confederation, and has been reported in the literature160. StepDiet has been acquired by other
     Universities.

101. The Programmes also respond to the specific needs of individual students and subgroups161 162.

102. The PsychD Programme has effective partnership arrangements with placement providers to
     develop new placements. The placement co-ordinator post supports this work as does the liaison
     tutor post with South West London and St Georges NHS Trust. This allows for effective
     communication with Trusts in providing appropriate learning experiences. Health and Safety both
     on placement and at the University is seen as paramount. A new integrated Health and Safety
     Policy has been developed for trainees163. Health and Safety teaching is included in the new six
     week induction module and all supervisors are required to discuss the Trust Policy with trainees
     as part of their induction to placements164. The Programme has a positive collaborative
     partnership with the SySx SHA. The two organisations have worked to ensure that all placement
     trusts have signed the SLA. This has been a protracted process and a challenge as some Trusts
     have refused to accept all elements of the SLA. The SySx SHA Placement Contracts manager is
     advising on this, through our quarterly Stakeholders Meeting.

103. In Dietetics, the new placement structure allows for more integration between academic and
     practical learning and provides excellent opportunities to enhance student learning outcomes and
     the overall experience for all participants. However, it has placed a heavy burden of change on
     University and Trust staff. It has coincided with devolution to universities of responsibility for the
     organisation and quality assurance of Dietetic placements. University staff are aware also of the
     simultaneous additional demands on providers due to the NHS Agenda for Change. The
     placement facilitator role is proving crucial in helping the Programme partners work through the
     adjustments while meeting the shared objective of high quality learning experiences for students.

104. The Dietetic Programme team look forward to advancing the shift to more localised placements.
     The dispersed nature of our current placement schedule165 increases the difficulty of effective
     partnership between University and Trust staff. Consideration is being given to resurrecting the
     Newsletter for trainers issued in 2002166 to reinforce the relationship and training built up through
     personal visits and Trainer Forums. An online peer and tutor support facility has recently been
     introduced for students while they are on placement to provide a very practical integration of the
     academic and practical learning environments. Our consultations with trainers have highlighted
     many other ways we can build more constructive environments and relationships that will not
     only enrich learning outcomes for students, but allow creative and rewarding collaborations for

      160 Herriot AM, Bishop JA, Kelly M, Murphy M and Truby H 2003 Evaluation of a computer assisted instruction resource
         in nursing education. Nurse Education Today 23, 537-545
         Herriot AM, Bishop JA and Truby H 2004 The development and evaluation of Student Training, Education and Practice
         for Dietetics CD-ROM: a computer-assisted instruction programme for dietetic students. J Hum Nutr Dietet 17, 35-41
      161 The PsychD Programme has a range of support structures for the trainees both at the University and on placement. See

         the Personal and Professional Development Policy. Additionally Trainees can seek meetings with Tutors in relation to
         any aspect of the Course. The Research and Clinical Tutors have ‘open clinic’ which facilitates immediate access to
         resolve difficulties.
      162 In the Dietetics Programme for example, a food skills course has been developed for students with English as a second

         language, specific placement support has been developed for a student with dyslexia.
      163 Health and Safety Policy 2005. This draws together the Policies of the University, the Surrey Borders Partnership NHS

         Trust, the employer and Placements
      164 Placement contract and supervisor responsibilities
      165 Schedule of Dietetic Placements
      166 Newsletter for dietetic placement trainers 2002




                                                                                                                             27
      practitioners and educators167. To this end the School has participated in joint bids for Dietetic
      consultant positions with clinical department partners168.

105. Developments in Trusts’ Research and Development policies and changes to ethical committee
     scrutiny have created substantial delays for the PsychD trainees proceeding with their research
     projects. This has been recognised as a national problem169. The PsychD Programme Team are
     responding to these challenges by speaking with colleagues within the University, and with the
     SySx SHA and additionally with the Regional Heads of Psychology Advisory Group and
     Stakeholders Committee. The School of Human Sciences has developed an ethical committee
     with devolved responsibility from the University’s Ethics Committee to help support the research
     process and the Senior Research Tutor has had discussions with one Trust to identify ways to
     facilitate the process. The School of Human Sciences has its own procedures and information is
     available on the Human Sciences Homepage.

106. The two Schools are committed to the University’s comprehensive teaching support system which
     provides skill development and supervision for new academic teaching staff170. Staff undergo
     regular performance reviews and proactively pursue continuing professional development
     programmes. Their skills are enriched by clinical involvements, research interests and on-going
     scholarship. Staff teaching on both Programmes are engaged with external professional
     organisations and have a variety of interests and expertise which provides excellent role models
     and enhances responsiveness of the Programmes to changes in the professional and educational
     environment. Dietetic Programme staff have been recognised within the University for best
     practice in teaching and have presented and published papers on teaching developments171 172.


      Student Progression

107. Access to the two courses is transparent and rigorous. Admission to the PsychD Programme
     operates through a National Clearing House for Clinical Psychology. The entry criteria are
     specified in the Clearing House Handbook173. Students apply to the Dietetics Programme through
     the UCAS system.

108. The number of high quality applicants to both courses is high and competition fierce.

                      2005/06                       Applicants                    Places
                      PsychD                        419                           28
                      Nutrition and                 300                           42
                      Dietetics

109. The Selection Policy for the Programmes specifies a transparent and systematic process for
     trainee/student selection174 175. The Programme Team are committed to widen access to the
     Programmes.




      167 Nutrition and Dietetics Trainers’ forum outcomes
      168 Portsmouth NHS Trust & Dartford NHS Trust
      169 Promoting Good Practice in NHS Research, The Psychologist 18, (332) June 2005
      170 Post Graduate Certificate in Academic Practice
      171 Recognition of teaching practice in Dietetics, H. Truby and others
      172 Presentations and publications on developments in the Nutrition/Dietetics teaching programme
      173 Clearing House Handbook Surrey PsychD Entry 2006
      174 Selection Policy PsychD 2005
      175 Selection Policy Dietetics 2005




                                                                                                         28
110. The PsychD Selection Committee for the PsychD Programme recognises that the age, gender and
     ethnic balance of the training cohort does not match national and local population profiles. After
     consultation and review with all stakeholders, the Human Resources departments of the
     University and Surrey and Borders Partnership NHS Trust176, and with Dr. Purvis, Course
     Director Occupational Psychology177, the Selection Committee implemented revised criteria for
     the 2005 intake in an effort to increase diversity. A recent innovation has been adopted whereby
     two consultation meetings for potential applicants were publicised locally through Trusts and
     colleges to encourage those from non-traditional routes to apply. These consultation meetings are
     being evaluated by two trainees. The key finding indicated that attendees at these meetings were
     not as diverse as we had hoped. All the findings were presented to the Programme team178. An
     action plan is in the process of being developed to address the issues raised.

111. In the Dietetic Programme the widening participation programme has resulted in an increase in
     the number of mature students, who have generally completed Access to Science courses,
     introducing varied occupational and experiential backgrounds to the student cohorts. Dietetics has
     been designated a ‘shortage occupation’ in the UK by the Home Office. Commissioned places are
     not currently offered to students who have been resident outside the UK for the last 3 years in
     accordance with NHS policy.

112. All contracted places for both Programmes are consistently filled. Where the opportunity arises,
     and in consultation with the SySx SHA, it is sometimes possible to transfer students into the
     Dietetics Programme from the closely related Nutrition Programme to replace students who
     withdraw.

113. The selection and interview process179 for the PsychD Programme is conducted in partnership
     with regional psychologists and has input from service users and carers180. This provides for a
     thoughtful and challenging process which is able to discriminate between candidates. Trainees
     provide support and information for candidates on the day of the interview. Verbal feedback from
     candidates invited for interview is highly positive.

114. Admission to the Dietetic Programme is essentially a three stage process: selection for interview
     based on academic profile; selection for an offer based on interview outcome; acceptance of offer.
     A spot survey of first year students in 2005 provided positive feedback on the interview
     process181.

115. Verbal feedback on interview performance is offered to successful and unsuccessful candidates on
     both Programmes.

116. Induction programmes182 183 are in place for both Programmes to prepare the trainees and students
     for the Programme requirements. The PsychD trainees receive both employment related
     induction184 as well as academic, research and clinical induction. This six week period together
     with the Course Handbook and Programme Regulations provides a solid foundation for their
     training experience.



      176 The Trainees employing NHS Trust
      177 Dr Purvis Consultation document on selection
      178 Team meeting minutes 6th June 2005
      179 PsychD Selection policy and processes
      180 Service User and Carer Forum provided questions for the two interview panels
      181 survey of first year Dietetic students’ reasons for selecting The University of Surrey Programme
      182 PsychD Induction Programme timetable 2005
      183 Dietetics Induction Programme 2005
      184 Trust employment procedures are followed including Criminal Record Bureau(enhanced) checks and occupational

         Health clearance



                                                                                                                        29
117. There is a comprehensive range of support mechanisms for the trainees and the students. The
     PsychD Programme has developed a personal and professional developmental policy185.

118. For the PsychD trainees this is articulated within the policy for personal and professional
     development186 and was commended within the OQME report. The Dietetic Programme
     participated in the pilot of the University of Surrey Personal Development Portfolio (PDP)
     scheme in 2003 and a personal tutor is assigned to each student to continue academic and pastoral
     support.

119. The completion rates for both Programmes are high.

120. Trainee and student progression is determined by the appropriate Boards of Examiners in
     accordance with the University Regulations.

121. Regular placement reviews187 188 ensure the trainee/student gains feedback on his/her clinical
     progression and has an opportunity for reflection on their experiences as well as addressing future
     learning needs.

122. The PsychD trainees currently have two appraisals during the second and third years of the
     Programme. The Programme is introducing one in the first year at the end of induction to
     facilitate the identification of specific learning needs at an early stage given the diversity of
     trainees’ earlier employment experience.

123. Dietetic students are individually briefed/debriefed before and after each practical placement by a
     dietitian member of the programme team who is not their personal tutor (prior to 2004 debriefings
     took place on a group basis). The individual approach gives students the opportunity to develop a
     relationship with another member of academic staff who is a registered Dietitian.


      Learning Resources and their Effective Utilisation

124. The Programmes ensure their trainees/students have access to quality learning facilities through a
     combination of central general facilities and specific facilities provided within the Schools. The
     University’s Information Services, incorporating Library Services, Information Technology, (IT),
     Services and the Centre for Learning Development (CLD), provide resources and services to
     support both students and staff189. The Library has a significant proportion of its services on-line,
     including the majority of periodicals, support for distance learners (DiLIS)190 and support for
     undergraduate information skills191. In 2004/05, in response to demand, additional open-access
     computing facilities were provided and Library opening hours were extended192. A number of
     facilities e.g. the open-access computer rooms in the AP Building, library telephone information
     and book renewal are now available 24 hour/7 days a week.

125. The combination of the individual Programme induction activities and tutor support, ensures that
     trainees/students are provided with the basis to know how to use the resources relevant to their
     Programme.

      185 The policy articulates how trainees can gain support from the academic, clinical and research tutors, mentors, University
         counselling service, supervisors and where to gain help from
      186 Policy for Personal and Professional Development
      187 PsychD Trainees mid and end of placement meetings reports
      188 As well as scheduled visits on dietetic placements, should a student or supervisor contact the University voicing a

         concern a further visit will be made.
      189 University of Surrey Self-Evaluation Document, QAA Institutional Audit 2004, paras 133-149
      190 Distance Learners Information Service, http://www.surrey.ac.uk/library/dilis/lib_services.shtml
      191 Online Information Skills tutorial, http://lib1web.lib.surrey.ac.uk/libskills/
      192 During semester the library is open 97.5 hours a week, 17 hours per day Monday to Friday and 12.5 hours over the

         weekend (23.5 of these hours are not serviced by library staff)



                                                                                                                                 30
126. The University has implemented ULearn as the central component of the evolving Managed
     Learning Environment that will integrate subject specific learning materials and activities with
     Library services and Registry information. Use of the system is actively supported by IT Services
     and CLD and, in line with its IT Strategy193, the University is expanding open access computer
     facilities (ratio maintained at 1:5 students or better) and wireless web access areas to keep pace
     with uptake.

127. Students using ULearn in the Dietetic Programme are provided with a face-to-face e-learning
     induction session on the system, face-to-face and online tutorials and e-tutor support.

128. Staff and trainees/students benefit from an excellent service from the liaison librarians. Each
     Programme is supported by an extensive collection of relevant texts and periodicals, and systems
     are in place to remind teaching staff each semester to update the holdings. While student feedback
     occasionally points to problems, e.g. accessing certain textbooks at peak times194, such temporary
     difficulties are generally addressed promptly when brought to the attention of staff. On the
     PsychD Programme problems in accessing material is drawn to the liaison librarian’s attention at
     the Trainee/Team meetings. This communication has been positive in resolving problems and
     considering new needs of trainees195. The undergraduate Dietetics Programme, ensures the first
     year student can critically evaluate literature and web resources, e.g. in BS119 key skills.

129. Trainees and students on placement have access to library, internet and computing facilities in the
     Trust hospitals. In Dietetic placements students can access the recently developed online support
     in ULearn to supplement the resources and peer/supervisor support available in placement.
     Problems experienced by some Dietetic students gaining adequate IT access in a few
     placements196 are being resolved.

130. Surrey and Sussex and Kent and Medway SHAs have responsibility for the strategic development
     of library and knowledge services in their areas and are major investors in Trust library services
     via the Library Services Agreements managed by the Kent, Surrey and Sussex (KSS) Head of
     Library and Knowledge Services Development.

131. From 2005, SySx SHA are introducing the use of the HeLicon (Health Libraries & Information
     Confederation) Accreditation Tool as the quality assurance standard and performance
     management tool for all health library and knowledge services (LKS) in KSS. All library and
     knowledge services will be accredited on a three-year cyclical Programme and a timetable for the
     initial Accreditation visits has been agreed with the Library Services Managers in the SySx SHA.

132. Both the Programmes’ teaching staff and trainees/students use both central teaching rooms
     (ranging from raked lecture theatres to flexibly furnished seminar rooms) and special purpose
     school teaching rooms and facilities. Photocopy and printing facilities, and dedicated and open-
     access computing rooms are available centrally. Efficient central booking arrangements apply,
     supported by the University’s timetabling software197. Equipment support is provided by central
     Audio-Visual Services, IT support and the School’s IT support team.




      193 The University of Surrey IT Strategy,
         http://portal.surrey.ac.uk/pls/portal/docs/PAGE/ITSERVICES/ABOUT/POLICY/UITSTRATEGY/UNIS%20IT
         %20STRATEGY%20V1.PDF
      194 Student Assessment of Module forms from Dietetic Programme
      195 A new journal was ordered and a subscription to psychological books was taken up
      196 Student Feedback on Post ULearn Evaluations, May 2005.
      197 University of Surrey Self-Evaluation Document, QAA Institutional Audit 2004, paras150-154.




                                                                                                     31
133. The PsychD Trainees also have access to a Psychometric test library, a PG common room, £200
     towards research costs and a £250 budget for conference attendance. Travel expenses follow
     Whitley guidance and are poor (23p per mile). This rate has remained consistent for over 10
     years.

134. A new flexible teaching room with 30 laptop computers has been established within SBMS and is
     regularly used by the Nutrition/Dietetics Programmes to supplement centrally available computer
     labs for student work on ULearn. The PsychD trainees have access to the recently refurbished
     computer room within the Psychology Department.

135. The Programmes retain cohesive teams of high quality teaching staff and maintain high ratios of
     professionally qualified staff to trainees/students198. The Schools provide administrative support
     to each of the Programmes199 200. The teaching Programmes benefit from informal as well as
     formal collaborations within the staff team, sharing specific skills and expertise.

136. The PsychD Programme has access to national and regional expertise across the life span
     development and within specific contexts. The Programme has 96 invited lecturers201 in addition
     to the Programme Team. Each module is co-convened with either an individual or groups of
     Clinical Psychologists ensuring that the trainees have access to local expertise and variation in
     module design and delivery202. The entire academic Programme is overseen by the Academic
     Director who ensures that the intended learning outcomes are achieved.

137. The Dietetic Programme also uses the wide range of subject expertise within the School of
     Biomedical and Molecular Sciences, supplemented by specialist staff from other Schools and
     external practitioners with specific expertise as guest lecturers as listed in the Course Handbooks.
     The coordinating roles of Module and Level Organisers are described in the Handbooks. Staff
     have access to excellent support and facilities, within the School (e.g. administrative support
     coordinated by the School Manager, teaching support from the Director of Undergraduate
     Teaching and Learning) and centrally (in particular from the Centre for Learning Development).
     The relationship with Dietitians from the Portsmouth Hospital NHS Trust203 is particularly
     effective in this regard, the value of which is recognised by both staff and students.

138. Securing adequate numbers of quality placements in the face of continuing expansion of the
     Programmes is an on-going challenge for the University and its SHA and NHS partners.

139. The continuing expansion agenda for PsychD will require a multi-focussed approach to address
     the placement restrictions. Processes are in place to clarify the extent of the challenge and to
     secure pathways to address the problem. Meetings have been organised with SySx SHA, Chief
     Executives of the large Mental Health and Learning Disability Trusts, Heads of Psychology
     Services, Local Special Interest Groups and Faculties. There is awareness that local Trust mergers
     and the Agenda for Change may also affect placement provision due to financial constraints.




      198 1 Registered Dietitian to 9.8 students (based on the largest year cohort). The Dietitians Board traditionally required a
         ratio of 1:12.
      199 SBMS has an undergraduate office with 6 staff. Dietetic students are a high proportion of SBMS students and provide

         the majority of their work
      200 In recognition of the significant administrative workload for the head of the Dietetic Programme team, a Programme
      Manager post has been established – see Job Description
      201 List of invited lecturers
      202 The Programme is located within the academic department of psychology, which hosts the MSc in Health Psychology,

         Occupational Psychology, Forensic Psychology, and the Doctorate in Psychotherapeutic and Counselling Psychology.
         Such proximity fosters shared teaching and project work across the sub-discipline boundaries.
      203 Contract with Portsmouth Hospitals NHS Trust




                                                                                                                                     32
140. There is a pool of approximately 290 PsychD supervisors who are eligible to be ‘the responsible
     supervisor’204 205 for the PsychD Programme and can offer placements across the specialities. At a
     local level the resource issues are being addressed by developing closer working relationships
     with supervisors through the link clinical tutor scheme and the appointment of a Trust liaison
     tutor in one of the largest Trusts to which the Programme relates.

141. The PsychD Programme develops placements with supervisors and monitoring and support is
     offered to supervisors206. The relatively limited geographical spread of placements allows the
     Programme to have effective relationships with supervisors which allows for informal feedback
     and clear communication.

142. The Dietetic Programme works within a national framework for placement approval, monitoring
     and support, based on the high standards agreed by the University Dietetic Education Group207.
     The approval and monitoring process examines the suitability of the proposed student experience
     to meet the intended learning outcomes at the level of the placement in question. While there are
     scheduled visits to students and their trainers during placements208, the diverse geographical
     location of our placement providers hinders the establishment of close relationships with all
     individual student trainers. However, this is addressed by supplementing tutor visits with contact
     by the Placement Facilitators and by holding regular regional training forums and the use of mail
     and email communications to elicit and respond to feedback .

143. Accommodating the larger Dietetic student cohort recruited in 2003/04 has been challenging. The
     additional demands on resources throughout the Programme have been successfully managed to
     date and planned for the future. Key issues have been arranging suitable teaching rooms, double
     and triple teaching those sessions where smaller groups are appropriate, arranging adequate
     placements, planning for an expanded PBL block in 2005/06 and planning for supervision of
     additional research projects in 2006/07.

144. Widening participation is a principle to which both Programmes subscribe. The development of
     the Service User and Carer Advisory Group within the PsychD Programme has provided a
     meaningful development in addressing trainees’ awareness of Service Users’ and Carers’
     perspectives. Financial support for this initiative has been gained from the University of Surrey
     Widening Participation Scheme.

145. Trainees/students with special learning needs have access to additional resources to facilitate their
     learning. The University has a Disability policy209, a Disability Co-ordinator and a team of staff
     in the Additional Learning Support Unit. The Schools’ Special Needs Representatives link into
     this system. Detailed information is available to students and staff online210.The two Programmes
     are committed to facilitating access to learning and have had the opportunity to support a
     trainee/student in this way. A PsychD trainee with significant hearing loss has been supported
     through informing lecturers in advance of the lecture of the trainee’s requirements211. A student
     on the Dietetics/Nutrition Programme with a visual impairment was supported through the
     process of the provision of electronic lecture notes and hard copies in larger fonts.


      204 The definition of a responsible supervisor is a Clinical psychologist who has qualified for two years and has been on the
         introduction to supervisor training workshop held at the University by Programme Team members
      205 List of Supervisors, their specialties and locations
      206 Placements are monitored through written feedback from trainees at the end of placement. Supervisors are supported

         through a range of supervisor workshops and alternative communications as required
      207 Minutes of the National University Dietetic Education Group
      208 Schedule of dietetic placement visits
      209 The University of Surrey Federal Disability policy

         http://www.surrey.ac.uk/dsg/documents/Federal_Disability_Policy.pdf
      210Student guide to disability http://www.surrey.ac.uk/dsg/student_information.html

      Staff guide to disability http://www.surrey.ac.uk/dsg/
      211 Information leaflet to all lecturers on trainee who is deaf and relies on lip reading




                                                                                                                                 33
34
      D        Maintenance and Enhancement of Standards and Quality

146. Each Programme is subject to three different regimes for quality monitoring: the University’s
     internal processes; those processes undertaken in partnership with SHAs; and those belonging to
     the particular professional/statutory body.

147. The Programmes are embedded within the University’s quality assurance framework and
     managed through the associated committee structure212. The Academic Standards Committee
     (ASC) is responsible to the Senate for overseeing the University’s quality assurance
     management213. One of the University’s key quality assurance procedures is Programme
     approval, which involves a process of initial programme validation and subsequent periodic
     review. The procedures are managed by the Validation Board214. The Student Progress and
     Assessment Boards (SPABs)215 have oversight of student progression and make recommendations
     for awards to the Senate Awards Committee 216. SPABs are also responsible for the approval of
     external examiners and assure consistent standards in the experience of such appointees.

148. The regulatory and guidance frameworks are provided in the form of the University’s General
     Regulations217 and comprehensive Academic Standards Guidelines. The Regulations and
     Guidelines are in turn informed by the QAA’s Academic Infrastructure – the various sections of
     QAA’s Code of Practice; the Framework for Higher Education Qualifications (FHEQ); Subject
     Benchmark Statements; and Programme Specifications. Taken together, and reinforced by
     PRSBs’ own professional standards, the regulations and guidelines combine to ensure that the
     University’s Programmes have adopted standards which are fit for purpose, transparent, reliable,
     and comparable with other Programmes elsewhere, and responsive to change.

149. The Programmes are supported by committee structures which monitor, evaluate and develop the
     curriculum218 219. The Boards of Studies and the Examinations Boards have appropriate
     membership220 221 to ensure that both academic and practice placement learning opportunities are
     responsive to feedback and to developments in the specialist areas. The Boards of Studies approve
     annual Programme objectives based on feedback from internal and external stakeholders.

150. Trainee/Student evaluation and feedback are gathered after lectures and placements 222. This
     information is collated, reviewed and appropriate action taken when required. The
     trainees/students have representatives on the Programme committees/forums. On the PsychD
     Programme the individual cohorts of trainees and staff meet monthly to share information and
     address issues as they emerge. The current system is under review following a staff/trainee away
     day where alternative models were proposed which would facilitate greater cross year learning
     involvement. In the Nutrition/Dietetic Programme, the annual Nutrition Programme Review
     meetings are the hub of the internal quality cycle. The University has developed and trialled a
     Student Course Evaluation Questionnaire (SCEQ) and it is anticipated that the results of the first
     University-wide survey will be available late in 2005.


      212 University of Surrey Committee Structure for the Management of Quality and Standards (previous footnote 3)
      213 Academic Standards Committee: Membership and Terms of Reference, Calendar 2004-05, Part One, ppC/55-56
      214 Validation Board: Membership and Terms of Reference, Calendar 2004-05, Part One, pp C/69-71
      215 Student Progress and Assessment Board (Taught): Membership and Terms of Reference, Calendar 2004-05, Part One, pp

         C/65-66; Student Progress and Assessment Board (Research): Membership and Terms of Reference, Calendar 2004-05,
         ppC/66-68
      216 Senate Awards Committee: Membership and Terms of Reference, Calendar 2004-05, Part One, p C/62
      217 General Regulations, Calendar 2004-05, Part Two, Section F, pp F/34-48 (First Degrees) and pp F/76-88 (Practitioner

         Doctorate Degrees)
      218 UniS Teaching Policy Development Committee
      219 SBMS Curriculum Review and Development Committee
      220 Membership of PsychD Board of Studies
      221 Membership of SBMS Board of Studies
      222 Debriefing sessions are scheduled after each dietetic placement




                                                                                                                           35
151. External examiners moderate the marks awarded to trainees/students and are required to provide
     comment on both the feedback the trainees/students receive and the standard of assessments. In
     the case of the PsychD Programme the examiner is required formally to sit on a review panel223
     should a trainee fail a practice placement. Students in the Nutrition/Dietetics Programme who do
     not pass their B or C placement can undertake further training prior to graduation. Those who
     subsequently fail or choose not to undertake further training may transfer to the B400 Nutrition
     Programme and, on successful completion of Level HE3, graduate in Nutrition. Such students will
     not be eligible for registration as a Dietitian with the Health Professions Council.

152. The Academic Standards Committee recently reviewed the management structures and supporting
     documentation for both Programmes224 225. Each review report identifies a number of areas of
     good/best practice and has made recommendations for action, to which the Programme teams
     have responded positively226 227.

153. The Programmes are linked with the commissioners and other stakeholders ensuring effective
     review and feedback. Meetings with the SySx SHA commissioners and other PsychD and Dietetic
     stakeholders8 9 occur regularly to discuss both the contract and practice placement strategy. These
     discussions are also a valuable means of transmitting the University’s needs relating to placement
     quality and quantity to the SYSX SHA and Trusts. The need to expand PsychD places, both
     traditionally and through a SOE Programme have necessitated discussion regarding provision of
     additional quality placements. The Programme is addressing this through discussion with Heads
     of Psychology services across the geographical area served by the Programme. The SySx SHA
     has also facilitated this process with a year’s extension to the Liaison Tutor post in South West
     London Mental Health Trust. The SySx SHA with the PsychD Programme has developed a
     service level agreement which sets out Programme, employers’ and Trust’s responsibilities228.
     The transition of greater responsibility for organising and monitoring Dietetic placements to the
     University has been discussed earlier.

154. Meeting the local mental health workforce agenda has resulted in commitment by the SySx SHA
     to develop a new Programme. The local stakeholders including the SySx SHA requested this
     initiative for individuals who qualified in Europe and in other continents to support them in
     gaining sufficient skills to be able to gain eligibility for Chartered Status with the BPS229. This
     Programme is known nationally as the Statement of Equivalence (SOE). The Programme staff are
     anticipating that the SOE Programme will start in May 2006 and will have an annual intake of ten.
     Candidates will have individually tailored Programmes commensurate with the learning needs
     identified at the outset of the Programme and agreed with the BPS.

155. Each Programme is acting on the outcomes of the recent OQME process230 231.

156. The BPS accreditation team, 2005, have formally recommended the PsychD Programme for a
     further 5 year period of accreditation. The course was commended for its relationships with
     supervisors, commitment to integrating theory and practice, engagement with service users and



      223 Clinical placement review panels determine whether a trainee following failing a practice placement is given a further
         opportunity to gain clinical experience and competencies or is required to leave the Programme. Usual practice is for the
         trainee to have a second opportunity but a second failure would necessitate leaving the Programme and constitute a
         failure
      224 Report of a Visit to: The PsychD Programme (School of Human Sciences), QAEO (18 January 2005)
      225 Report of a Visit to: The Nutrition/Dietetics Programme (School of Biomedical and Molecular Sciences), QAEO (10 March 2005)
      226 Report on action on recommendations of ASC Review for PsychD Programme June 2005
      227 Report of action on recommendations for Dietetics Programme following ASC visit March 2005
      228 Service Level Agreement PsychD
      229 Statement of Equivalence business case
      230 Abstracts of two trainee evaluations new innovations in selection
      231 Response to 2005 Dietetics Programme OQME process action report




                                                                                                                                   36
      responsiveness to trainees’ needs. Conditions and recommendations arising from the visit are
      being addressed232.

157. The Dietetics Programme has responded to recommendations from the 2001 Dietitians Board
     Review233.

158. PsychD placements are monitored by the Programme staff and feedback from trainees is acted
     upon through the partnership with placement providers. The quality is also addressed at mid-
     placement visits and through the end of placement reviews. Additionally, an audit of placements
     being offered has been undertaken to establish whether they are able to meet the resource
     standards set by the BPS234. Often placements not being currently used are due to resource
     limitations. The Heads of Service and Chief Executives are engaging in a series of meetings to
     develop a collaborative solution to this challenge. Quality is enhanced through a variety of
     workshops, individual meetings, completion of feedback forms and written communication.
     These processes have evolved following extensive consultation with supervisors. As a result of
     placement supervisor feedback, workshops on formulation, psychometric assessment and group
     supervision as well as ‘refresher’ workshops have been arranged235 236.

159. Responsibility for quality assurance activities in Dietetic placements has been transferred from the
     HPC to HEIs from April 2005. The Dietetics Programme team has been involved in the
     development of a National Placement Quality Approval Tool 237 and we are awaiting the results of
     the OQME pilot to inform the standards to be used for annual monitoring. The School is in the
     process of appointing a new staff member to take on responsibility for placement approval and
     annual quality monitoring processes by December 2005. The Dietetics team looks forward to the
     opportunity these developments provide for partnership working with placement providers.

160. The University of Surrey probationary teaching scheme supports quality in teaching. Academic
     teaching staff new to the profession are now required to undertake the University’s 60 credit
     Postgraduate Certificate in Academic Practice (PGCAP). The PGCAP involves formal classroom
     observations. Peer review has been implemented within the PsychD Programme for external
     lecturers who are new to the Programme, Programme staff who request this input and lecturers
     whose annual appraisals have identified this as a learning objective. The PBL innovation has been
     a stimulus to Dietetics Programme staff to advance the SBMS agenda for peer review of teaching.
     In the past, outside the probationary teaching period, peer review of teaching has been ad hoc.
     While the School approach is still under development within the University of Surrey framework,
     staff have begun peer reviews of their contributions to teaching and group facilitation using tools
     adapted from the probationary scheme238.

161. All staff have an annual Staff Development Review leading to a personal development plan. This
     is inextricably linked to the Programme needs. This process provides an opportunity to ensure that
     the Programme teams are able to be responsive to changes in the evidence base for the two
     disciplines and are competent in the use of new technologies. The need to publish teaching and
     learning developments as well as research has necessitated a project approach within the PsychD
     Programme team to facilitate this; for example, the Programme is at the forefront of service user
     involvement in training and this work needs to be disseminated to the wider training community.




      232 Action on recommendations arising from BPS review June 2005
      233 Action on recommendations of the Dietitians Board Review 2001.
      234 PsychD Programme placement Audit
      235 Specialist regional specialist interests groups and the national group of trainer (GTiCP)
      236 PsychD Programme list of supervisor workshops
      237 National Placement Quality Approval Tool
      238 Peer review forms for teaching and group facilitation in the PBL block




                                                                                                      37
162. Programme staff act as external examiners to other UK universities239 and contribute to a range of
     local, regional and national bodies240 241. This ensures that the Programmes are appraised of new
     developments in the professions as well as teaching and learning methods.




      239 External examiner appointments, BDA appointments and HPC visitor status of members of the Dietetic Programme
         team
      240 PsychD Programme staff , external examiner appointments, QAA reviews and roles within other local, regional and

         national professional committees
      241 Nutrition/Dietetic Programme staff participate in the National Dietetic Educators Group and the annual BDA national

         forum on education and training



                                                                                                                           38
      E       Conclusion

163. We are pleased to submit this SED as evidence for effective delivery of learning outcomes in the
     PsychD and BSc (Hons) Nutrition/Dietetics Programmes as described in the relevant Programme
     specifications. We are confident that the SED, supported by supplementary documentation
     available to the Review Team will demonstrate that the Programme teams are well able to meet
     the quality assurance requirements of the NHS, the BPS/HPC, and all other relevant reference
     points. The SED reflects views of Trusts, Purchasers, University, trainees/students and
     Programme teams.




                                                                                                  39
40
Appendix 1. Programme Specification for Doctor of Psychology (PsychD) in
Clinical Psychology

                  PROGRAMME SPECIFICATION FOR
                   PsychD CLINICAL PSYCHOLOGY
Awarding institution:                  University of Surrey

Supervision setting:                   University of Surrey and NHS Trusts within Surrey and

                                       Sussex and South West London

Final award:                           Doctor of Psychology

Programme title:                       PsychD Clinical Psychology

QAA benchmark statement:               September 2004

Date of production:                    March 2005

Main educational statements:

Programme aims:


PROGRAMME PHILOSOPHY, AIMS AND OBJECTIVES

The Programme philosophy embodies several elements. There is the recognition that the practice of
Clinical Psychology derives from a number of theoretical models that in turn rest upon a theoretical
and empirical knowledge base. As a result, the Programme has a commitment to provide knowledge
and competence in different psychological theoretical perspectives, and also a commitment to their
further development at the level of both theory, research and practice in a context of cultural
awareness and sensitivity. We seek actively to promote a coherent synthesis of up to date evidence
based psychological practice and practice based evidence with the relevant clinical theory and
research. We will encourage the development of reflective, rigorous and innovative thinking and its
application to all aspects of professional psychological practice, with a commitment to personal and
professional development at the centre of our approach. We aim to promote a learning and teaching
environment that will be supportive to trainees, will recognise their individual needs, and that will
incorporate mutual contributions of respect, understanding and communication so as to enhance the
development of both trainees, staff and the Programme. We are committed to the principle of equal
opportunities in all aspects of selection, recruitment and training of trainees, contributors to the
Programme, and Programme staff. We seek to maintain and further develop a Programme that is co-
owned with Stakeholders including the active participation of service users in all aspects of the
Programme and that is responsive to the changing needs of the Profession, within the context of
publicly funded services. We, therefore, aim to train psychologists who are:

a.      able to utilise, integrate and evaluate a broad theoretical perspective including the major
        models of psychotherapy and draw upon a wide psychological knowledge, scientific and
        research base;

b.      able to select psychological theory (and other social science theory as appropriate), research
        and practice that will be appropriate to the diverse contexts in which they are applied;




                                                                                                   41
c.      committed to the maintenance and delivery of                   high quality clinical practice;

d.      consultation/collaboration with service users;

e.      able to function effectively, professionally and responsibly in a range of social, cultural and
        organisational environments;

f.      aware of, and responsive to, the changing needs of the Profession within the larger
        organisational contexts within which it operates;

g.      sensitive and responsive to difference and diversity in client and population needs across the
        lifespan;

h.      able to understand, and effectively communicate, the role of clinical psychology in a variety
        of social, cultural, and organisational contexts; and

i.      able to integrate a scientist practitioner/reflective practitioner approach in their work.

Our core purpose is to produce high quality clinical psychologists who meet the requirements for
Chartered status with the British Psychological Society. Following on from this, we have a number of
objectives that will be achieved through collaboration with Stakeholders. These objectives have as
their purpose, the development of clinical psychologists who:

a.      have a high level of skills resting upon the integration of psychological theory, research and
        practice;

b.      are able to draw upon a wide theoretical and research knowledge base and to apply this
        appropriately in their clinical practice;

c.      have an understanding of research theory and methodology, and a commitment to the
        application of these principles in the evaluation and development of clinical practice;

d.      use formulation and complex problem solving skills utilising psychological theory and
        research and their clinical application;

e.      have a rigorous, disciplined and reflective approach to clinical practice alongside an
        understanding of, and sensitivity to, the individual and diverse needs of clients;

f.      are committed to the implementation of Equal Opportunities in all aspects of their
        professional practice;

g.      consult with service users and ex-service users;

h.      are able to work effectively within a variety of professional contexts whilst taking account of
        organisational structures, systems and processes;

i.      are aware of, and responsive to, professional issues and the changing needs of the
        Profession, and will work actively to promote service development;

j.      follow the ethical guidelines of the British Psychological Society and practise within the limits
        of their own knowledge and competence; and

k.      have a commitment to continued professional development, self care and reflective practice
        in order to improve their practice throughout their career.

These will be achieved by:


                                                                                                      42
(i)     Providing a comprehensive and responsive academic programme based on an integration of
        theory, experience, research and practice in clinical psychology. This will be facilitated by a
        collaborative approach from both health service clinical psychologists and the Programme
        staff and by consultation/involvement of service users.

(ii)    Providing research training and supervision. This will include a working knowledge of
        computer usage and statistics.

(iii)   Providing supervised clinical placements in the practice of clinical psychology with adults,
        older people, those with learning disabilities, children and families, and also in areas of
        advanced competencies.

(iv)    Providing a broad training in clinical and professional issues that enables trainees to practise
        in an ethical manner and with a high degree of professionalism and to pay attention to
        personal and professional development over their careers.

Service user involvement
The views of people who use mental health services, and their carers, form an integral part of our
understanding of mental distress. Consequently, service users and carers need to actively participate
within each component of the clinical training Programme. To this end, the course team have
recently entered into a dialogue with local user/carer groups about how to meaningfully and
pragmatically move this agenda forward. For the academic year 2004/5, a member of the course team
has the remit to develop the involvement of users and carers. During 2005/6, it is hoped that
funding will be available to employ someone with experience of using services/caring whose sole
responsibility will be to co-ordinate user/carer involvement across the Programme.




                                                                                                     43
44
                                                                             Programme Specification -
                                                                               Programme Outcomes
                                                                             PsychD Clinical Psychology

     PROFESSIONAL AUTONOMY AND ACCOUNTABILITY
     Knowledge and understanding                                            Teaching, learning methods and strategies                  Assessment/Evaluation
P1   The professional role of clinical psychology with organisations        Lectures and practical workshops (P1-6)                    Case reports (P1-6)
     and the contexts in which they work.
P2   Knowledge of British Psychological Society Code of Ethical             Individual supervision/placement learning (P1-6)           Essays (P1-6)
     Principles and Guidelines and DCP Professional Practice
     Guidelines.
P3   Awareness of legal and ethical responsibilities, Government            Case Discussion Groups (CDG) (P1-6)                        Problem Based Learning (PBL) presentation (P1-6)
     legislation on consent and practice guidelines and confidentiality
     in various contexts.
P4   Awareness of need to self reflect, be in tune with physical and        Discussions with Clinical, Academic, Research Tutors and   PBL reflective account (P4)
     emotional demands of work.                                             Mentors (P1-6)
P5   Awareness of need to maintain development of competence in             Annual appraisals (P4-5)                                   Placement review visits (P1-6)
     light of new evidence through continuing professional
     development.

P6   Awareness of how clinical decisions are made and how                   Placement Learning (P1-6)                                  Log book (P5)
     complexity is managed within teams.



     PROFESSIONAL RELATIONSHIPS
     Knowledge and understanding                                            Teaching, learning methods and strategies                  Assessment/Evaluation
P7   Awareness of roles of differing disciplines and how referrals are      Lectures and practical workshops (P7-11)                   Placement review visits (P7-11)
     managed.
P8   Awareness of how to effectively participate in teams, with other       Individual supervision/placement learning (P7-11)          Log book (P8-10)
     agencies to support the delivery of effective client care.

P9   Awareness of diversity and difference, including ethnicity, gender,    Case Discussion Groups (P7-11)                             Case Discussion Group Process Account (P7-10)
     age, poverty, class, sexual orientation and religion, and its impact
     on accessing services.




                                                                                                                                                                                          45
P10   Awareness of working effectively with service users and carers to   Problem Based Learning (P7-10)
      foster effective service planning and delivery.
P11   Awareness of appropriate written and electronic notes and data      Placement learning (P7-11)
      collection procedures.



      THE APPLICATION OF CLINICAL PSYCHOLOGY PRACTICE
      Knowledge and understanding                                         Teaching, learning methods and strategies                      Assessment/Evaluation
      Research component:
R1    The variety of research methods used in psychological enquiry       Lectures and practical workshops (R1-10)                       Multiple choice examination (R1,2,4,7,9)

R2    The epistemological foundations of the research process             Individual research supervision (R3-10)                        Assessed course work (R1-10):
R3    Critical appraisal of literature                                    Undertaking quantitative and qualitative research projects     SRRP research proposals (R7)
                                                                          (R3-10)
R4    Quantitative data analysis                                          Writing a literature review (R1-3, 8)                          Final major research reports (R3, 8, 9, 10)
R5    Qualitative data analysis                                           Presenting own research to NHS service, trainees, staff (R9)   Oral examination (R1-10)

R6    Formulating a research question and writing a research proposal     Writing LREC and COREC application form (R8, 10)               Feedback from presentations (R9)

R7    Service evaluations and audit                                       Writing SRRP and MRP for the portfolio (R1-7, 9)
R8    The practicalities of conducting research in the NHS, Research      Drop in research clinic (R4-5)
      and Development Committees, Ethics Committees
R9    How to present and discuss research findings in a variety of        Structured feedback on assessed course work (R3-7)
      contexts
R10   The British Psychological Society’s Code of Conduct, Ethical        Placement Learning (R1, 3, 7, 8, 10)
      Principles and Guidelines, the University Research Guidelines,
      Good Practice Guidelines for the Conduct of Psychological
      Research within the NHS.

                                                                          Discussion with Research Tutors (R1-10)
                                                                          Programme Handbook – section RG & BPS4 (R10)


      Academic component:
A1    A knowledge of fundamental psychological models to facilitate       Lectures and practical workshops (A1-10)                       Assessed course work (A1-10)
      assessment, formulation, intervention and evaluation




                                                                                                                                                                                       46
A2    The theoretical framework of 3 fundamental models of                   Key reference lists (A1-10)                             Psychometric practice report (A4)
      psychological therapy (cognitive behavioural, systemic and
      psychoanalytic/brief therapies).
A3    The application of fundamental psychological models to children,       Teaching handouts (A1-10)                               Essays (A1-3, 5-10)
      young people, working aged and older people. Those presenting
      with specific mental health difficulties, adjustment difficulties to
      physical health as well as other life events. Individuals with
      learning disabilities and those with acquired neurological
      problems. An awareness of clients with challenging behaviour.



A4    A knowledge of psychometric testing and its application through        Placement learning (A1 - 10)                            Placement evaluation (A4)
      the life span and with specialist groups
A5    Specific theories relevant to clinical psychology                      Skills based workshops (A1-10)                          Case reports (A1-10)
A6    The key features (and diagnostic criteria) of core psychological       Discussions with Academic and Clinical Tutors (A1-10)   PBL presentation (A1-10)
      problems
A7    The professional role of Clinical Psychologists within the             Structured feedback on assessed course work (A1-9)      PBL reflective account (A3, 9)
      organisations and contexts in which they work: NHS/Social
      Services/Voluntary sectors
A8    Legislation and governmental policies relevant to NHS and client       CDGs (Case Discussion Groups) (A1-9)                    Case Discussion Group Process Account (A1- 3)
      groups
A9    The effects of diversity and difference including ethnicity, gender,   PBL (Problem Based Learning) (A1-3, 6-9)
      age, poverty, class, sexual orientation and religion on mental
      health
A10   The evidence from which psychological theories and related             Diversity Workshops (A7-9)
      treatments have been developed and evaluated (see also R3)



      Clinical component:
C1    Clinical psychology as an applied science (see also A1-6, 9-10)        Lectures/workshops (C1-10)                              Placement Supervisor evaluation (C2-12)

C2    Clinical Psychology as a reflexive process (A7, 9)                     Supervision on practice placements (C2-12).             Clinical Tutor review (C2-12)
C3    The relevance of psychological theories to clinical practice (see      Specific contract for core and advanced competency      Clinical Tutor Placement visits (C1-12)
      also A2, 5, 8, 10)                                                     placmeents (C1-12)
C4    Theories and practice of assessment, formulation, intervention and     Experience gained on practice placements (C5-10)        Assessed course work (C1-12)
      evaluation with a variety of client groups (see also A1-4)




                                                                                                                                                                                     47
C5    Group/systemic theory and process with particular application to     Discussions with Clinical Tutors/Supervisors at placement       Case reports (C1-12)
      teamwork (see also A1-3)                                             visits C1-12)
C6    The evidence base of clinical practice (see also R3, A1-2, 4-5)      Placement reviews with Clinical Tutor (C1-12) and end of        Essays (C1-12)
                                                                           placement meetings with Clinical Tutor
C7    The role of clinical psychology in the NHS (see also R7-9, A5, 7-    Clinical Tutor clinics (C1-12)                                  PBL presentation (C1-12)
      8)
C8    Roles and responsibilities of other mental health and related        Written Reports/communications on practice placements           PBL reflective account (C1-12)
      professionals (see also, A7-8)                                       (C5-7)
C9    Organisational structure, funding and provision of mental health     Structured feedback on assessed course work (C1-5, 10)          Samples of placement correspondence (C1-4, 6, 11-12)
      and related services (see also A7-8)
C10   Clinical governance and is applicability to psychological practice   Programme Handbook – sections CG & BPS3 and 4 (C11-             Training overview form (competency monitoring) (C1-10)
      in the NHS                                                           12)
C11   The British Psychological Society’s Code of Conduct, Ethical         CDGs (C1-12)                                                    Clinical logbook (experiences monitored) (C1-10)
      Principles and Guidelines (see also R10)
C12   BPS DCP Professional Practice Guidelines                             PBL (C1-12)                                                     Annual appraisal (C1-12)
                                                                           Interprofessional learning (C1-12)
                                                                           Mentoring (C2, 7-8, 11-12)
                                                                           RPG (Reflective Practitioner Group) (C1-12)
                                                                           Placement contracts for core competency placements (adult
                                                                           mental health, child, learning disabilities and older people)
                                                                           (C1-12)



      SKILLS FOR CLINICAL PRACTICE
      Intellectual (thinking) skills                                       Teaching, learning methods and strategies                       Assessment/Evaluation
      Research component:
R11   Plan, conduct and report on a piece of original research             As outlined for R1-9 (Knowledge & Understanding)                Multiple choice examination (R13-17)
R12   Plan, conduct and report on a piece of service evaluation or audit   Viva practice session (R18)                                     Assessed course work (R10-19)

R13   Formulate and test hypotheses and research questions                 Programme Handbook (sections RG) (R11-19)                       Research proposals (R10,11 13-19)
R14   Critically appraise literature and evaluate research methods         Key references (R11-18)                                         Final research reports (R10-19)
R15   Choose appropriate statistical data analyses                         Teaching handouts (R11-18)                                      Oral examination (R10-19),
R16   Choose appropriate qualitative analyses                              Structured feedback from markers of assessed course work        Feedback from presentations (R17-19).
                                                                           (R10-18)
R17   Choose appropriate design for research questions                     Programme Handbook section BPS3 and 4 (R18)
R18   Defend own research decisions and analyses                           Qualitative research project (R11, 13-14, 16-19)




                                                                                                                                                                                                    48
R19   Consider issues related to ethical practice


      Academic component:
A11   Critically evaluate theoretical models and treatment approaches       Group exercises/discussions in workshops (A9,11-12-14)         Assessed course work (A9-12)

A12   Analyse and interpret evidence in a critical and self reflective      - as outlined for A1-10 (Knowledge and Understanding)          Psychometric practice report (A12)
      manner
A13   Distil essential features of a theory, argument or body of evidence   Observation of critical/analytic stance of lecturers (A9-12)   Essays (A9-16)

A14   Assess a theory, argument, body of evidence in terms of its           Guided reading prior to/subsequent to teaching (A9-15)         Case report (A9-16)
      practical, clinical and political implications
A15   Appreciation of difference and diversity                              Analysis of material for assessed course work (A9-15)          PBL reflective account (A12,14-16)
A16   Undertake professional work in an anti-discriminatory and anti-       Structured feedback from markers of assessed course work       PBL presentation (A12, 14-16)
      oppressive manner                                                     (A9-16)
                                                                            CDGs (A9-16)
                                                                            PBL (A9-16)


      Clinical component:                                                                                                                  Placement Supervisor evaluation (C13-16)
C13   Adapt and apply theoretical models to new clinical practice areas     As outlined for C1-12 (Knowledge & Understanding)              Clinical Tutor placement visits/reviews (C13-16)

C14   Critical and rigorous evaluation of clinical practice, services and   Observation of supervisor/other professionals on practice      Assessed course work (C13-16)
      settings (see also A9, 10, 12; R7-9, 12)                              placements (C9 -16)
C15   Translate complex psychological information for dissemination to      Structured feedback from markers of assessed course work       Case reports (C13-16)
      a range of colleagues in mental health or related professions in      (C12-14)
      service settings
C16   Rigorous consideration of issues relating to ethical practice         Practice placement presentations of clinical material (C14,    Samples of placement correspondence (C15)
                                                                            see also R7)
                                                                            Programme Handbook BPS3 and 4 (C14)
                                                                            CDGs (C13-16)
                                                                            RPG (C13-16)
                                                                            Mentoring (C16)


      Practical skills                                                      Teaching, learning methods and strategies                      Assessment/Evaluation
      Research component:
R20   Carry out a structured literature search                              As outlined for R1-10 (Knowledge and Understanding)            Multiple choice examination (R29-30)




                                                                                                                                                                                              49
R21   Write a literature review                                         Individual research supervision (R21-32)                        Completion of COREC and Ethics Committee Procedures
                                                                                                                                        (R21-22, 24-26)
R22   Write a research proposal                                         Practical classes in SPSS and qualitative data analyses (R27-   Assessed course work (R19-22, 27-32)
                                                                        32)
R23   Write a research report                                           Written guidelines - Programme Handbook , Section RG            Research proposals (R21-22, 24, 26)
                                                                        (R19-32)
R24   Write an ethics committee proposal                                Structured feedback on oral presentation of research to peers   Final research reports (R19, 20-22, 26-32)

R25   Write patient information and consent forms                       Structured feedback on writing skills from markers of written   Viva voce examination (R19, 20-32)
                                                                        assignments
R26   Negotiate access to study participants in applied NHS settings    Research Logbook (see Programme Handbook, Section RG            MRP literature review (R20-21)
                                                                        (R19-32)
R27   Devise and administer questionnaires                              Qualitative Research Project (R19-21, 23, 27-28, 31-32)         SRRP literature review (R20-21)

R28   Collect data                                                      PBL on ethical dilemmas in research (R19)                       SRRP audit (R20, 22-23, 28-30)
R29   Prepare quantitative data for analysis
R30   Conduct statistical data analysis using SPSS 30
R31   Conduct semi-structured interviews
R32   Transcribe and analyse interview data using qualitative methods



      Academic component:
A17   Carry out structured literature search (see also R20) using       Practical workshops using skills based teaching (A17-19)        Assessed course work:
      information technology and literature search tools
A18   Use written communication to convey knowledge and                 Written guidelines – Programme Handbook, Section AG             Essays (A17-19)
      understanding, critical evaluation, integration of theory and     (A17-19)
      practice, novel thinking and reflective practice (see also R20)
A19   Interprofessional learning and practice                           Structured feedback on writing skills from markers of written   PBL (A19)
                                                                        assignments (A18)
                                                                        Discussions with Academic Tutors where required (A18)           Case reports (A17-19)
                                                                        CDG (A18)                                                       CDG Process Accounts (A18)
                                                                        PBL exercise with Dietetics students (A19)


      Clinical component:
C17   Therapeutic relationship skills                                   Practical workshops using skills based teaching (as outlined    Clinical Tutor placement visits (C16-39)
                                                                        for C1-9, A1-9, Knowledge & Understanding)




                                                                                                                                                                                              50
C18   Able to demonstrate high quality patient/client care either           Supervision provided on practice placements (C16-39)            Placement Supervisor evaluation (C16-39)
      independently or as a member of a multidisciplinary or
      multiagency team
C19   Develop skills of self reflective practitioner                        Clinical Tutor placement visits (C7-31)                         Evaluation of competence in clinical testing (C26)
C20   Interview/questionnaire administration skills                         Experience gained on practice placements (C15- 39)              Clinical Logbook (C18, 20, 25-26)
C21   Develop psychological formulations of presenting problems which       Structured feedback on presentation/writing skills (C15-21)     Assessed course work:
      integrate information from assessments, from multiple services


C22   Use formulations and reformulations to inform intervention choice     Placement learning (C17-39)                                     Case reports (C15-28)
      and client participation with this process
C23   Use formulations to inform multidisciplinary teams' understanding     Clinical Logbook (C16,17,19,21,24-26, 33, 35)                   Samples of placement correspondence (C25)
      and communication with the client
C24   Observation of individual/groups/systems in clinical settings         Discussions with Clinical Tutors as required (C15-26, 34, 36,   Training overview form (C17-28, 33-34, 38-39)
                                                                            38)
C25   Written and oral communication                                        CDG (C16, 18, 21, 26-31, 38)
C26   Administration and interpretation of key standardised assessment      WAIS Practice (C26-27)
      instruments
C27   Accurate and appropriate interpretation of information gained         Mentoring (C18, 29, 30-31, 35-36, 38)

C28   Planning, therapeutic intervention and evaluation with individuals,
      couples, families and larger systems
C29   Professional, interpersonal and negotiation skills
C30   Setting and maintaining personal and professional boundaries
C31   Self-care and personal and professional development
C32   Transferable skills
C33   Providing consultancy
C34   Providing training
C35   Apply skills in an ethical and appropriate way
C36   Apply C15-31 in individual, group/systemic/organisational
      settings
C37   Manage the physical and emotional impact of clinical practice

C38   Demonstrate an appreciation of difference and diversity in clinical
      practice
C39   Demonstrate self and time management skills




                                                                                                                                                                                                 51
      Transferable skills                                                    Teaching, learning methods and strategies                     Assessment/Evaluation
      Integrative framework:
      Becoming a scientist-practitioner/ reflective-practitioner by:
T1    Functioning within an evidence based practice framework and a          Teaching, skills based workshops (T1-21) as outlined in R1-   Structured Feedback from presentations (T1-8, 13, 16-24)
      practiced based evidence framework                                     9, A1-10, C1-12 Knowledge and Understanding
T2    Summarising evidence from a variety of sources and basing              Formulating and developing research projects (T1,5, 8-10,     Clinical Tutor Placement visits (T1-7, 11-12)
      decisions on the outcome of this process                               12-15, 19-21)
T3    Application of integrated theory and practice                          Individual supervision (T4-5, 9, 10, 12, 19, 20, 15)          Placement supervisor evaluation (T1-16)
T4    Drawing on existing knowledge when solving new problems                Report writing (T1-7, 14-15, 17-18)                           Assessed course work:
T5    Defending one’s decisions within an evidence base of critical          Planning and writing Essays (T1-8, 14-16, 18-24)              Research reports (T1-9, 14-15)
      reflection, and cultural sensitivity
T6    Critical evaluation of theories, concepts, research and practice       Clinical Tutor placement visits (T1-7, 11-12, 15 - 21)        Essays (T1-3, 5-7, 14-15)

T7    Using self-reflective skills - developing reflective practice          Supervised placement experience (T1-8; 12-24)                 Research proposals (T2-3, 5-6, 11,14-16)
T8    Use of variety of data bases and literature search facilities          Structured feedback on Course work assignments (T1-21)        Case reports (T1-8, 10-12, 14-16)

T9    Use of research skills to generate new knowledge and                   Mentor scheme (T7, 11)                                        Oral examination (T1-3, 5-7, 13)
      understanding
T10   Application of data analysis to workplace settings – e.g.. Audit       CDG (T1-13, 17-18, 21)                                        PBL presentation (T1-13)

T11   Ethical accountability                                                 RPG (T1-16)                                                   PBL reflective account (T1-12, 14-16)
T12   Appreciation of difference and diversity/cultural attunement           PBL/Interprofessional learning (T1-24)


      Effective, accurate and economical verbal and written communication:
T13   Oral presentations                                                     Presenting research to NHS service, trainees, staff (T1-13)   Viva voce examination (T13)

T14   Written reports                                                        Structured feedback on course work assignments (T4-15)        Supervisor evaluation (T13-16)
T15   Use of word processing systems                                         Placement supervisor feedback on placement reports (T4-15)    Assessed course work:

T16   Use of IT and email systems                                            All written course work assignments (T14)                     SRRP/MRP research proposals/reports (T14-16)
                                                                             Communications between trainees and Programme staff           Essays (T14-16)
                                                                             (T13-16)
                                                                                                                                           Case Reports (T14-16)
                                                                                                                                           PBL presentation (T13)
                                                                                                                                           PBL reflective account (T14-16)




                                                                                                                                                                                                      52
      Function professionally within an ethical framework:
T17   Work collaboratively in teams, groups, systems, organisations        Teaching in workshop/group format (T15, 16 – as outlined in   Placement Supervisor evaluation (T17-18)
                                                                           R1-9, A1-10, C1-12 Knowledge and Understanding sections)


T18   Respect the views, rights, ethnic, cultural and social backgrounds   Practice placement supervision (T17-19)                       Case Reports (T17-18)
      of service users, carers and all colleagues
                                                                           Undertaking course work assignments/practice placements
                                                                           (T18-23)


      Apply professional, interpersonal and negotiation skills
T19   Negotiate effectively                                                Programme Handbook Section BPS3 and 4 (T22)                   Feedback on Qualitative Research Project (T17-18)
T20   Time management                                                      Service experience gained on practice placements (T19-23)     Placement Supervisor evaluation (T19-23)

T21   Multi-task and work to deadlines                                     Undertaking qualitative research project (T17-19)
T22   Follow BPS ethical and professional guidelines                       CDG (T17-19)
T23   Service user involvement in all aspects of commitment to practice    RPG (T17-21, 23)

                                                                           Mentor scheme (T18 - 21)
                                                                           Clinical Tutor meetings (T18 - 23)
                                                                           Academic Tutor meetings (T18 - 23)
                                                                           Research Tutor meetings (T18 - 23)
                                                                           Team/trainee meetings (T17 - 21)




                                                                                                                                                                                             53
54
         Appendix 2. Programme Specification for BSc (Hons) Nutrition/Dietetics

                      Programme Specification
1. Awarding Institution / Body                                       University of Surrey
2. Teaching Institution                                              School of Biomedical and Molecular Sciences
3. Accrediting Authority                                                     University of Surrey
4. Final Award                                                       BSc (Hons)
5. Name of Route/Pathway or Field                                    Nutrition & Dietetics
6. UCAS Code                                                         B401
7. QAA Benchmarking Group                                            NHS funded Healthcare Programmes
8. Date of production/revision                                       JAB 25/07/05

 9. Main educational aims of programme
    •    To provide opportunity for students to gain an understanding of sciences fundamental to Nutrition/Dietetics
    •    To further the students knowledge of the mechanisms underlying disorders with nutritional aetiologies at both the
         biochemical and molecular level
    • To provide a high quality education and training in the various aspects of Nutrition/Dietetics to ensure that
         graduates are prepared for the diverse, exciting and challenging posts available for dietitians within the NHS.
    • To further the students knowledge of the fundamental principles of Nutrition/Dietetics especially in areas in which
         they have had experience during clinical training and in which the School has achieved distinction in research
    • To provide the appropriate environment to encourage students to reflect on their experiences during academic study
         and clinical training and to help them acquire appropriate intellectual, scientific, technical and key transferable skills
         to promote self-directed and life-long learning.
    10. Programme outcomes - the programme provides opportunities for students to achieve and demonstrate the following learning and
    educational outcomes.

   Knowledge and understanding                                                   Teaching and learning strategies and methods
   1A good breadth of knowledge in the key concepts of the biological,           Core knowledge outcomes (1-8) are acquired through
   physical, social, psychological and clinical sciences which are relevant to   lectures, practicals, seminars, an interactive learning
   Dietetics
   2 An understanding of the application of nutritional concepts at
                                                                                 programme (Step Diet), tutorials and dissertation (Level 3
   biochemical, organismal and population level and the metabolic basis          Research project) supervision
   of food demand through the life cycle in both health and disease
   3 Appreciate the nutritional demands of individuals and populations           Assessment
   and develop critical awareness of current dietary recommendations             Knowledge and understanding is assessed via examination,
   4 An understanding of and development of the skills required to               coursework and the dissertation. Multiple choice questions
   perform laboratory-based investigations commonly used to assess               (MCQs) and short answer tests assess knowledge while
   nutritional status
   5 A knowledge of the nutrient and non-nutrient content of food and            practical reports, coursework essays, and oral presentations
   beverages and how they affect health                                          and examinations assess understanding
   6 An understanding of the principles and key components of
   nutritional science and how theoretical concepts may be translated into
   relevant and applied diet therapy and dietary modification
   7 Appropriate knowledge to allow students to practise within the legal
   and ethical boundaries of their profession
   8 An understanding of what is required of them by the Health
   Professions Council



   Cognitive (thinking) skills - able to:                                         Teaching and Learning Strategies and Methods
                                                                                  .
   9 Find and critically evaluate scientific literature and other                 Cognitive skills (9-11) are developed via lectures,
   appropriate sources of material                                                practical classes clinical practice, seminars and
   10 Critically evaluate research design and the methods                         dissertation supervision
   commonly used in nutrition research
   11 Use acquired knowledge and appropriate skills to make                       Assessment
   professional judgements                                                        Assessment (9-11) is via coursework, practical reports,
                                                                                  class tests and examinations as well as during the clinical
                                                                                  placements. Methods allow students to demonstrate their
                                                                                  ability to recognise the relative importance of information,
                                                                                  analyse and discuss in depth issues relevant to dietetics
                                                                                  and the nutritional care of a client. The dissertation allows
                                                                                  the student to demonstrate their ability to plan, execute,
                                                                                  analyse and report upon a piece of research work related
                                                                                  to Nutrition and/or Dietetics
                                                                                                                                        55
   Practical skills - able to:                                           Teaching and Learning Strategies and Methods
                                                                         Practical skills
   12 Demonstrate competence in commonly used nutrition
   research methodology                                                  (12-17) promoted through class activities, interactive learning
   13 Gather, analyse and interpret qualitative and qualitative          prgramme and the Level 3 dissertation
   data                                                                   Clinical placements allows students to practise and apply these
   14 Effectively communicate both orally and in writing                 skills
   15 Learn independently
   16 Take responsibility for planning and organisation                  Assessment of practical skills
   of work both their own and in a team
   17 Demonstrate effective and appropriate skills in                    (12-17) Assessment is via observation of practical skills in a
   communicating information, advice, instruction and                    laboratory setting and in clinical practice and the Level 3
   professional opinion to a wide range of the population                dissertation
   including clients, carers and other health care professionals




    Key / transferable skills - able to:                                 Teaching and Learning Strategies and Methods
    18 Communicate ideas, principles and theories effectively by oral,   (18-23) Proficiency in key skills is achieved through lectures,
    written and visual means                                             demonstrations, and hands-on experience for the students
    19 Work effectively and independently on a given project or task     Although key skills are taught practised and assessed in most of our
    20 Work effectively in small groups and teams towards a common       modules, they are reinforced via modules BS 119 and BS 240 which
    goal/outcome.                                                        concentrate on the key skills of communication, IT, numeracy and
    21 Apply basic statistical and numerical skills to nutritional       working with others
    data                                                                 Assessment
    22 Use Information Technology e.g. WWW, CD-Rom databases,            (18-23) through coursework (including assessed oral and written
    word processors and statistics packages
    23 Use self reflection as a meaning of learning and of improving     presentations, keeping a reflective diary), completion of practical
    performance and effectiveness in clinical practice                   assessments based on the key IT and numerical skills




    [Other skills may be defined here, as applicable]- able to:           Teaching and Learning Strategies and Methods
         24 Apply the science of nutrition to                             Lectures and tutorials, interactive learning programmes and clinical
            individuals and groups by translating                         practice
            theoretical concepts and principles into
            relevant and applied diet therapy and
            dietary modification                                          Assessment
         25 Practice in line with the HPC’s                               During clinical placements
            expectations of a health professional




11. Route/Pathway/Field requirements, levels, modules, credits and awards

The programme is modular and although normally offered in full-time mode, part-time study is possible. In the first and second years
(Levels 1 and 2) students cover compulsory modules that address the core requirements for Nutrition/Dietetics as derived from the
Requirements of the Council of Professions Supplementary to Medicine (now Health Professions Council) and the Benchmarking
Statements for Dietetics. There is a 4 week clinical placement following the academic component of Level One.
 The third year involves 2 clinical placements both of 12 weeks duration, separated by a 6 week period of reflection and learning in the
academic environment (UniS).
The final year (Level 3) comprises 8 core and 1 option module and a dissertation (Level 3 research project) which is the equivalent of 3
modules. All modules bear equal credit (10 Credits) with the exception of the dissertation which provides 30 Credits upon successful
completion. Option modules may not all be available due to timetabling constraints.

For the award of BSc (Hons) students must obtain 360 Credits, 120 Credits must be at Level 3 and 120 at Level 2. The final degree mark is
based on Level 3 mark contributing 70% and Level 2 mark, 30%. A viva voce examination can contribute 2% to qualifying candidates.
Students wishing to conclude their studies after one or two years may be awarded a Certificate of Higher Education in Biological Sciences
(120 Credits) or a Diploma of Higher Education in Biological Sciences (240 Credits). The subsidiary awards can be used to qualify for
entry to other programmes and appropriate credit received.
                                                                                                                                     56
Credit Level 3. Potential Awards –BSc (Hons) degree in Nutrition &
Compulsory modules              Optional modules                                                         Award requirements
BS 319 Growth & development                BS 310 Cancer biochemistry & Biology
BS 320 Regulation & disorders of           BS 314 Mechanisms of toxicity                                 360 Credits at least 120
energy & lipid metabolism                  BS 315 Regulatory toxicology                                  of which must be from
BS 321 Vitamins & minerals                 BS 327 Food safety                                            Level 3 modules with 30
BS 322 Epidemiology & nutrition            BS 331 Food microbiology                                      of these coming from the
research methods                           BS 332 Practical food microbiology                            final year project
BS 323 Practical nutrition                 BS 345 Sports nutrition
BS 324 Public health nutrition             BS 346 Biological rhythms
BS 325 Clinical nutrition                  BS 351 Regulation of metabolism, lipoproteins & diabetes
BS 326 Therapeutic nutrition

BS Pro Research Project (3 modules)




Professional training (Clinical Placements) - Description                                                Progression
                                                                                                         The A placement (4 weeks)
The 3 clinical placements are an integral and essential component of the                                 must be undertaken but is not
programme and must be carried out in NHS Trusts approved by the HPC for                                  assessed. Both B and C
dietetic student training. The learning outcomes and methods of assessment                               placement (each 12 weeks)
                                                                                                         must be completed
have been approved by the HPC and the students are fully briefed prior to                                satisfactorily to allow
each placement. Debriefing and the opportunity to reflect are timetabled into                            progression on the
                                                                                                         Nutrition/Dietetics
the academic component following each placement                                                          programme. Satisfactory
                                                                                                         achievement is measured using
                                                                                                         HPC approved assessment
                                                                                                         tools for the Learning
                                                                                                         Outcomes of each placement.



Credit Level 2. Potential Award – Diploma of HE in Biological Sciences

                                           Optional module                                              Progression
 Compulsory modules                        BS 236 Biochemistry: metabolism in health &disease            120 Credits required from
 BS 209    Physiology                                                                                   Level 2. Compensation
 BS 212    Pathology & medicine
 BS 213    Applied dietetics
                                                                                                        cannot be applied to
 BS 222     Nutrition (micronutrients)                                                                  modules,
 BS 224     Dietetics                                                                                   209,213,222,224,225,241
 BS 225     Practical dietetics                                                                         which must be passed prior
 BS 226     Food science                                                                                to B Placement.
 BS 230     Health psychology                                                                           Diploma requires 240
 BS 232     Biomedical sciences                                                                         Credits (120 at Level 2 or
 BS 238     Nutritional education &
 health promotion                                                                                       above)
 BS 240     NHS management &
 communication
 BS 241     Nutritional needs of
 population groups



Credit Level 1. Potential Award – Certificate of HE in Biological Sciences
                                                                                                         Progression
Compulsory modules (11 or
12)                                                                                                      120 Credits required
BS 101 Chemical Foundations (if no A-         Optional modules
                                              BS 102    Organic chemistry                                from Level 1 but
Level chemistry)
BS 104 Biochemistry                           BS 103    Physical & bioinorganic chemistry                students may progress
BS 105      Practical biochemistry &          BS 109    Practical cell & molecular biology               to Level 2 with 100
chemistry 1                                   BS 115    Mycology
BS 107      Molecular biology & genetics
BS 108      Cell biology
                                                                                                         Certificate    requires
BS 110      Physiology                        One language module provided by the ELTC                   120 Credits at Level 1
BS 112      Microbiology                      Currently French, German, Spanish, Italian, Russian and
                                              Japanese are available.
                                                                                                         or above
BS 117       Nutrition - macronutrients
BS 118       Food science
BS 119       Key Skills 1
BS 120       Practical nutrition skills
BS 121       Applied nutrition



                                                                                                                            57
58
Appendix 3.   PsychD Practice Placement Provision

                            Map 1 Placement location in context to the south of England




                                                                                          59
Map 2 Enlarged map showing Placement locations




                                                 60
Appendix 4.              Dietetics Practice Placement Provision

The following information is extracted from the HPC (Dietitians Board) Course Requirements
and Guidelines for Pre-registration Courses Leading to State Registration in Dietetics, 2000

3 REQUIREMENTS FOR PRACTICAL TRAINING

The training and experience must be such as to enable the students, on completion of their course,
to be competent to practise as dietitians. Students must be informed of their progress during and at
the end of each period of practical training.

3.1 Sequence of Training
The period of practical training must be 28 working weeks, a 4 week placement (Placement A)
followed by two 12 week placements (Placement B and Placement C). These periods may be
extended to take account of sick and other leave. Following each practical placement students
must return to university to consolidate their knowledge. There must be at least 4 weeks between
Placement B and Placement C spent at university. Placement C would normally be completed
within 2 years and a maximum of 3 years after completing Placement B.

3.2 Practical Dietetics
The training must be at a centre approved for the designated placement. The final decision on
placement outcome must rest with the dietitian in charge of the student’s practical training.
Students must work the statutory hours of a full-time dietitian in the National Health Service, of
which a minimum of 2 hours per week on average must be devoted to private study. They must be
given statutory and public holidays or time off in lieu. Significant time lost through sick leave
must be recovered. No action needs to be taken after a loss of up to 5 days if the trainer considers
that there is no detrimental effect on the student’s progress. If this is not the case, the lost time
should be made up. A minimum of 11 weeks must be undertaken for both Placement B and
Placement C and lost time made up to at least 11 weeks.

3.3 Catering
Students must acquire an appreciation of catering management and of the relationship between
dietetic and catering services.




                                                                                                  61
PRE-PLACEMENT GUIDELINES

PLACEMENT A

GENERAL AIMS
Prior to entering Placement A, the student should:
1 Understand the role of the dietitian both as a State Registered practitioner and within the
structure of an NHS dietetic department
2 Understand the importance of good communication skills to the dietitian
3 Be interested in food and health
4 Be familiar with the eating habits of the public at large

SPECIFIC AIMS
Prior to entering Placement A, the student should:

Knowledge
1 Be able to demonstrate a broad knowledge of the eating habits and foods available to the public
at large and be aware of the factors affecting them
2 Have knowledge of how to use a computer nutrition analysis programme
3 Be aware of and be able to use accepted targets for the macronutrient content of dietary intakes
4 Have knowledge of basic cooking skills

Communication
5 Be able to identify factors facilitating effective communication (oral and written)

Professional Practice
6 Be aware of the Dietitians Board Statement of Conduct
7 Be aware of and understand the need for confidentiality
8 Be aware of the different roles of State Registered dietitians
9 Be aware of the need to practise effective time management
10 Appreciate the need to interact with other health professionals
11 Be in possession of a food handling certificate or equivalent

PLACEMENT B
By the time students commence Placement B they should:
• have completed and demonstrated learning from Placement A
• have covered all areas of the curriculum to allow them to plan, deliver, monitor and evaluate
nutritional advice and dietetic treatment for patients and clients seen in Placement B, taking into
consideration all factors that will influence food choice and compliance
• know the other therapeutic interventions e.g. clinical, pharmacological, for patients and clients
seen in Placement B, where these will influence the dietary advice given
• know the food portion sizes of commonly consumed foods and the major food sources of
nutrients, basic recipes and recipe modification
• take some responsibility for their own learning and development and have demonstrated time
management, such as prioritising work load and handing in completed work on time
• have sufficient command of the English language to undertake an oral presentation to a group
and converse with an individual

PLACEMENT C
By the time the student commences Placement C they should:
• have successfully completed Placement B
• have covered all areas of the curriculum to allow them to plan, deliver, monitor and evaluate
nutritional advice and dietetic treatment for patients or clients seen in Placement C taking into
consideration all factors that will influence food choice and compliance



                                                                                                62
• have covered all areas of the curriculum to allow them to contribute to delivering a dietetic
service in acute and community based care settings including management of health care, self
management, research and audit and professional and personal development

LEARNING OUTCOMES
PLACEMENT A AIMS AND TASKS

GENERAL AIMS
During the placement the student should:
1 Be introduced to the work of the dietitian
2 Have the opportunity to practise communication skills with patients and healthcare workers and
demonstrate basic communication skills
3 Be aware of the interaction between the dietitian and other healthcare professionals
4 Gain experience in an institutional food production unit
5 Be aware of the complementary roles of the catering and dietetic services
6 Demonstrate the ability to apply knowledge of portion sizes, basic cooking methods, standard
recipes and recipe modification, and the range of food products available to the general public
including nutrient modified foods

SPECIFIC AIMS
At the conclusion of the placement, the student should:

Knowledge
1 Have a working knowledge of portion sizes of common foods
2 Be familiar with the range of food products available to the general public including major
nutrient-modified foods and ready-prepared meals
3 Be aware of how the use of nutrient-modified foods can influence the diet both quantitatively
and qualitatively
4 Have a working knowledge and practical experience of producing both standard and modified
recipes
5 Be able to demonstrate the ability to record, calculate and analyse individuals’ nutritional intake
both by hand and by computer assisted analysis
6 Appreciate the factors to be considered in all aspects of menu planning
7 Appreciate the process of meal selection, service and delivery within an institutional food
production unit
8 Be aware of the major health and safety issues within the working environment

Communication
9 Have an understanding of the methods by which dietitians communicate with other health
professionals, patients and the general public
10 Have experience of communicating with patients and healthcare professionals
11 Demonstrate an ability to talk with patients and healthcare professionals

Professional Practice
12 Be aware of the need to respect the point of view of patients and why it is important to avoid
discrimination
13 Demonstrate the ability to maintain confidentiality
14 Be able to explain the reason and need for the Statement of Conduct
15 Demonstrate professional appearance and behaviour
16 Be able to identify those health professionals who work closely with a dietitian
17 Be able to identify the key sources of patient information available to plan dietetic care
18 Demonstrate an interest in and a commitment to the work of dietitians




                                                                                                  63
TASKS FOR PLACEMENT A

Knowledge 1
To have working knowledge of portion sizes of common foods.

Evidence
Task: weigh and record portions of a range of foods and meals.

Knowledge 2
To be familiar with the range of food and food products available to the general public including
major nutrient-modified foods and ready-prepared meals.

Evidence
Task 1: visit a supermarket and describe the range and relative costs of ready prepared meals and
fat/sugar modified foods available to the general public.
Task 2: compare the nutritional content of standard products with those above.

Knowledge 3
To be aware of how the use of nutrient modified foods can influence the diet both quantitatively
and qualitatively.

Evidence
Task: using a standard diet record, substitute fat and sugar modified food products and describe
how it affects the diet quantitatively and qualitatively using current recommendations on eating
for health. Cost both diets.
* Students may wish to adapt their own diet and describe the effect on its palatability, satiety and
appearance.

Knowledge 4
To have a working knowledge and practical experience of producing standard and modified
recipes.

Evidence
Task: state the ingredient content of five standard recipes and how their fat and sugar content can
be modified (both decreased and increased). Prepare both the standard and modified dishes.
Describe the effect of the modification on texture, appearance and taste.

Knowledge 5
To be able to demonstrate the ability to record, calculate and analyse individuals’ nutritional
intake both by hand and by computer assisted analysis.

Evidence
Task 1: using a food intake record chart, record what a patient/resident eats and drinks over a 24
hour period. Collate the information and analyse both by hand, using a table of food composition,
and by computer assisted analysis.
Task 2: identify the main sources of 3 vitamins or minerals likely to be deficient in an institutional
diet.

Knowledge 6
To appreciate the factors to be considered in all aspects of menu planning.




                                                                                                   64
Evidence
Task 1: list six factors to be considered when menu planning. Task 2: select an example of a day’s
menu stating standard portion sizes. Find out the budget allocation for meals and beverages to
feed a patient for one week. Compare this with an estimate of your expenditure (excluding
alcohol).

Knowledge 7
To appreciate the process of meal selection, service and delivery of meals.
Evidence
Task: describe the process of patient/resident meal selection, service and delivery.

Knowledge 8
To be aware of the major health and safety issues within working environment.

Evidence
Task: list six major health and safety issues relevant to the working practices of the dietitian.
Explain why they need to be addressed.

Communication 9
To have an understanding of the methods by which dietitians communicate with other health
professionals, patients and the general public.

Evidence
Task 1: list three methods of communication with other healthcare professionals and the general
public.
Task 2: describe one successful communication between you and another individual. Consider
why you think it was successful.
Task 3: observe an interaction between a dietitian and a colleague. Describe the key points of the
interaction.

Communication 10
To have experience of communicating with patients and healthcare professionals.

Evidence
Task: detail any difficulties you have experienced when communicating with patients and
colleagues. Outline how you could overcome these in the future.

Communication 11
To demonstrate an ability to converse with patients and health care professionals.

Evidence
Task 1: initiate conversations.
Task 2: collect information from patients/residents e.g. how many patients on a ward say they eat
a cooked breakfast/cereal at home.
Task 3: through discussion, collect information from healthcare professionals e.g. what is their
role and how they work with dietitians.

Practice 12
To be aware of the need to respect the point of view of patients and why it is important to avoid
discrimination.

Evidence
Task: list six ways in which individuals can be discriminated against.




                                                                                               65
Practice 13
Demonstrate the ability to maintain confidentiality.

Evidence
Task: state the potential consequences of breaking confidentiality.

Practice 14
To be able to explain the reason and need for the Statement of Conduct.

Evidence
Task: state the first two points from the Statement of Conduct and describe anexample of how you
have applied these in practice.

Practice 15
Demonstrate professional appearance and behaviour.
Task 1: explain the need for a department dress code.
Task 2: list four personal qualities required by the professional dietitian.

Practice 16
To be able to identify those health professionals who work closely with a dietitian.

Evidence
Task: list four health professionals who provide information to facilitate dietetic treatment.
Provide a relevant example of an interaction you have seen which facilitated treatment.

Practice 17
To be able to identify the key sources of patient information available to plan dietetic care.

Evidence
Task 1: list six sources of patient-specific information available to plan dietetic care. Provide one
example you saw of how and why this information was used.
Task 2: collect both social and medical information about one patient from
medical notes.

Practice 18
To demonstrate an interest in and commitment to the work of dietitians.
Task 1: ask appropriate questions when with dietitians and other health professionals.
Task 2: be punctual and manage workload within timescale allocated.


PLACEMENT B AIMS AND LEARNING OUTCOMES
THE PLACEMENT
There are several levels of description here:
1 General Aims
2 Outcomes
3 Examples of evidence which might be used to demonstrate the outcome

GENERAL AIMS
1 To enable the student to translate theory into practice for patients seen in Placement B
2 To develop confidence in obtaining information and advising clients
3 To develop interpersonal and social skills to facilitate communication with clients
4 To develop the skills of self and time management with respect to their own learning and
management of given workload
5 To gain insight into health promotion and public health strategies
6 To facilitate the development of a professional approach to dietetic practice


                                                                                                  66
LEARNING OUTCOMES
The learning outcomes are in bold. Each one is followed by range statements (in italics) where
appropriate and performance criteria.

Knowledge
1 Demonstrate a working knowledge of all disciplines required to support practice with
patients seen in Placement B
® Is able to justify dietetic treatment on the basis of current knowledge and evidence based
practice in all relevant areas e.g. nutrition, medicine, biochemistry,
pharmacology, sociology and psychology

Communication
1 Is able to communicate effectively using appropriate aids and skills with individuals seen
in Placement B
In at least two different settings e.g. in-patients and out-patients and with at least 2 different client
groups e.g. young adults and elderly
® Communicates at a level appropriate to the patient
® Listens attentively
® Recognises and responds to non verbal cues of the patient
® Provides information and responds to patient concerns
® Is able to conduct and complete a patient/client interview demonstrating appropriate content
and communication skills including the use of suitable visual aids

2 Is able to communicate effectively using appropriate aids and skills to groups seen in
Placement B
® Is able to give an oral presentation
- of a case study to a group of dietitians
- a talk to a patient group demonstrating appropriate content and
presentational skills including the use of suitable visual aids, and time
management

3 Is able to report accurately to dietetic supervisors on action taken
® Informs dietetic supervisor of action taken; writes concise, legible notes in
appropriate documents

Professional Practice
1 Is able to collect and record relevant medical, nutritional, social, cultural, financial and
personal information and food intake details in line with established standards and
procedures
In at least 2 different settings e.g. GP practice premises and acute unit with at least 3 different
client groups e.g. elderly, young adults and children
® Demonstrates the above using for example a case study or patient record cards
® Uses appropriate questioning style to elicit relevant information

2 Is able to assess client information qualitatively and quantitatively
With at least 3 different patient types e.g. individual with diabetes, individual requiring
nutritional support, individual requiring advice on eating for health
® Analyses the gathered data before making a decision
® Demonstrates the above using, for example, dietetic record cards, dietary assessments, care
plans or case study




                                                                                                      67
3 Is able to plan and justify dietary advice to patients seen in Placement B
® Using the patients identified in Professional Practice 2, demonstrates the above using, for
example, care plans, case study and record cards

4 Is able to review, monitor and evaluate dietetic practice with patients or clients
In at least 2 different settings e.g. in-patients and out-patients and with at least 3 different patients
types e.g. individual with diabetes, individual requiring nutritional support and individual
requiring advice on eating for health
® Demonstrates the above using, for example, care plans, case study and other documented
evidence

5 Demonstrate an understanding of the strategies which can be used to influence nutritional
intake
® Taking 3 patients seen, list the factors which affect the individual’s compliance with dietary
advice and outline strategies used to overcome these in both disease states and health promotion
® Is able to contribute to the planning and delivery of a health promotion project

6 Demonstrate an ability to contribute to both dietetic and multi-disciplinary teamwork
® Is able to explain the relationship between the dietitian and other teamworkers
® Involves and informs appropriate personnel about their activities

7 Practises within the Statement of Conduct
® Using care plans demonstrate the collection and use of information from a variety of sources in
order to prepare the care plan, observing confidentiality, relevant legislation e.g. Data Protection
Act, and national and local standards

8 Practises in line with anti-discriminatory policies such as discrimination on grounds of
race, gender, religion physical disability, learning disability, sexual orientation
® Spoken or written communication is consistent with the promotion of equality and diversity

9 Manages available time and resources in completing tasks allocated
® Works to specific time scales e.g. is punctual, produces work such as case studies, patient
reports on time
® Manages a given workload e.g. on a ward, in an out-patient clinic or group session

10 Reflects on experience and evaluates their own practice
® Reflects on practice at defined intervals and is able to describe how their practice has changed
and what led to that change
® Uses initiative but is aware of limitations of knowledge and experience and knows when and
how to obtain advice and guidance

11 Demonstrates an enquiring attitude and shares knowledge and experience with others
® Seeks opportunities for additional involvement
® Seeks out others and current journals to expand self knowledge
® Takes part in journal clubs and case discussions

12 Begins to take responsibility for personal and professional development and shows
commitment to excellence of practice
® Is able to identify with dietetic supervisor own strengths and weaknesses and develops plans to
build on strengths and overcome weaknesses




                                                                                                      68
13 Demonstrates responsibility for own learning by seeking out answers to questions
® Demonstrates a professional attitude
® Listens to and respects others
® Asks relevant questions at appropriate times
® Is able to list five personal attributes that could affect interactions with individuals and groups
® Recognises sources of discrimination


PLACEMENT C AIMS AND LEARNING OUTCOMES

THE PLACEMENT
There are several levels of description here:
1 General aims
2 Outcomes
3 Examples of evidence which might be used to demonstrate the outcome

GENERAL AIMS
1 To enable the student to become competent in transferring theory to practice
2 To enable the student to become competent in obtaining information and advising clients
3 To ensure that the student is able to communicate with all clients using all appropriate
interpersonal, social and counselling skills
4 To ensure that the student is competent in handling a full workload in line with given standards
5 To enable the student to become competent in the delivery of health promotion and public
health strategies
6 To enable the student to show a commitment to the delivery of an explicit quality of service

Knowledge
1 Demonstrate a working knowledge of all disciplines required to support practice
with patients seen in Placement C
® Is able to justify dietetic treatment on the basis of current knowledge and evidence based
practice in all relevant areas e.g. nutrition, medicine, biochemistry, pharmacology, sociology and
psychology

Communication
1 Is able to communicate effectively using appropriate aids and skills with individuals seen
in placement C
In at least 2 different settings e.g. in-patients and primary care setting with at least 3 different
individuals e.g. an individual with learning disability, a child and another health professional
® Communicates at an appropriate level
® Listens attentively
® Recognises and responds to non verbal cues of the patient
® Provides information and responds to patient concerns
® Maintains the direction of the interview
® Summarises meeting/interview and closes meeting/interview
® is able to conduct a patient/client interview demonstrating appropriate content, communication
skills including the use of visual aids, within a given timescale

2 Is able to communicate effectively with colleagues, other health professionals and
clients at an appropriate level and pace
® Is able to plan, deliver and evaluate a talk
- to a group of health professionals
- to the general public demonstrating relevant content and presentation skills including the use of
suitable visual aids, and time management



                                                                                                    69
3 Is able to report accurately to relevant people on action taken
® Informs dietetic supervisor of action taken; writes concise, legible notes in appropriate
documents

Professional Practice
1 Continues to be able to collect and record and use relevant medical, nutritional, social,
cultural, financial and personal information and food intake details in line with established
standards and procedures
In at least two different settings e.g. patient’s home and acute unit with at least 3 different client
groups e.g. children, learning difficulties and people from different cultural backgrounds
® Demonstrate the use of all above information to support practice documented in, for example,
record cards or case study
® Uses appropriate questioning style to elicit relevant information

2 Is able to assess and use information qualitatively and quantitatively to support dietetic
practice
With at least 3 different types e.g. individual requiring enteral feeding, renal patients, patients
with insulin dependant diabetes
® Analyses the gathered data before making a decision
® Demonstrate the above using, for example, dietetic record cards, dietary assessments, care
plans, management statistics, and performance indicators

3 Is able to plan and justify dietary advice to patients seen in Placement C
® Using the patients identified in Professional Practice 2, demonstrates the above, using for
example, care plans, case study and record cards

4 Continues to review, monitor and evaluate dietetic practice with patients or clients
In at least 2 different settings e.g. in primary care and patient’s home and with at least 3 different
patient types e.g. renal patient, individual requiring enteral feeding, individual with insulin
dependent diabetes
® Demonstrates the above using, for example, care plans, health promotion projects,
group work

5 Demonstrates an understanding and ability to implement the strategies which can be used
to influence nutritional intakes and nutritional standards
Using at least 3 different strategies such as behavioural modification, negotiation, and multi-
agency working
® Taking 3 patients seen, list the factors which affect the individual’s compliance with dietary
advice and outline strategies used to overcome these in both disease states and health promotion
® Is able to plan, deliver and evaluate a health promotion project e.g. taking
responsibility for a display or poster

6 Demonstrates an ability to contribute to the effectiveness of both dietetic and
multidisciplinary
teamwork
® Is able to explain the difference between working as part of a dietetic or multidisciplinary team
or working alone in a general ward/primary care setting and a specialist area
® Using patients seen in both primary care and specialist areas, explain the impact that they have
had as part of a team and how this was different from working alone

7 Continues to practise within the Statement of Conduct
® Using care plans, demonstrate the collection and use of information from a variety of sources in
order to prepare the care plan, observing confidentiality, relevant legislation e.g. Data Protection
Act, and national and local standards


                                                                                                   70
8 Continues to practise in line with anti-discriminatory policies such as discrimination on
grounds of race, gender, religion, physical disability, learning disability, sexual orientation
® Spoken or written communication is consistent with the promotion of equality and diversity
® Challenges and reports sources of discrimination

9 Prioritises and manages a given workload
® Manages a given workload e.g. allocated wards and outpatient clinics
® Adheres to Trust standards on outpatients waiting times

10 Reflects on experience and demonstrates reflection in action
® Reflects on practice at defined intervals and is able to describe how his/her practice has
changed
® Give examples of how they have modified their approach and advice at the time of the
intervention by acting on information obtained during the exercise

11 Evaluates practice
® Give an example of how the process of audit or research has resulted in changes to dietetic
practice

12 Continues to demonstrate an enquiring attitude and shares knowledge and experience
with others
® Seeks opportunities for additional involvement
® Takes lead role part in journal clubs and case discussions, to expand self and others knowledge

13 Takes responsibility for personal and professional development and shows commitment
to excellence of practice
® Is able to identify with dietetic supervisor own strengths and weaknesses and develops plans to
build on strengths and overcome weaknesses
® Demonstrates responsibility for own learning by seeking out answers to questions

14 Continues to demonstrate a professional attitude
® Listens to and respects others
® Recognises the individual’s right to make their own decisions
® Is able to reflect on how their own behaviour and appearance may influence interactions with
both individuals and groups




                                                                                              71
72
       Appendix 5.                PsychD Student Progression Data



  PsychD intake and progression 2000 - 2004
                                                               2000/2001   2001/2002        2002/2003       2003/2004     2004/2005
                                                   Transfers
Programme             Intake Year     Intake No.                           Successful Completions [Withdrawals] (Fails)               Still on Course   Awards
                                                      Out



Clinical Psychology   2000/2001          25           0         0[0](0)      0[0](0)         0[0](0)         23[0](0)      2[0](0)          0             25



Clinical Psychology   2001/2002          23                                  0[0](0)         0[0](0)          0[0](0)      22[0](0)         1             22



Clinical Psychology   2002/2003          24                                                  0[0](0)          0[0](0)      0[0](0)          24               0



Clinical Psychology   2003/2004          24                                                                   0[0](0)      0[1](0)          23               0



Clinical Psychology   2004/2005          27                                                                                0[0](0)          27               0




                                                                                                                                                        73
74
Appendix 6.               Dietetics Student Progression Data


                     Level HE1         Level HE2      Level P*   Level HE3
                     (Year 1)          (Year 2)       (Year 3)   (Year 4)
  New
                     60                0              0          0
  Admissions
  Population         65                39              36        34
  Fail               0                 0               0         0
  Withdraw           3                 1               0         0
  Transfer Out       0                 2               0         1
  Temp.
                     2                 0              0          0
  Withdraw
  Repeat             5                 1               0         2
  Proceed to next
                     55                35             36         0
  Level
                                                                 31   total
                                                                 5    1st
  Awards             0                 0               0
                                                                 19   2:1
                                                                 7    2:2

*Placements B and C take place at Level P




                                                                              75
76
Appendix 7.    PsychD Further Study and Employment Statistics

                               Course 28

                     First Destination Information


SARAH ADAMS          Clinical Psychologist
                     South West London and St George’s NHS Trust
                     Child and Family Consultation Centre
                     LEAP
                     Richmond Royal Hospital
                     Kew Foot Road
                     Richmond
                     Surrey TW9 2TE
                     Child and Adolescent
                     Full time
                     0208 3551984

RACHEL BLAKE         Clinical Child Psychologist
                     South London and Maudsley NHS Trust
                     Based at the Bethlem in Beckenham
                     Child
                     Full time

MARY BOND            Clinical Psychologist
                     South London and Maudsley NHS Trust
                     Croydon CAMHS
                     Lennard Lodge
                     West Croydon
                     Child
                     0208 700 8800

SARAH CLARE          Clinical Psychologist (Grade A)
                     West London NHS Health Trust
                     Broadmoor Hospital
                     Crowthorne
                     Berkshire
                     RG45 7EG
                     Forensic
                     01344 773111

TARA DANIELS         Clinical Psychologist
                     South West London and St George’s NHS Trust
                     Department of Psychology
                     Springfield
                     And
                     Tooting and Furzedown CMHT
                     Old Estates Building
                     Springfield Hospital
                     61 Glenburnie Road
                     Tooting SW17 7DJ
                     Adult – half time primary care and half time CMHT



                                                                         77
GEMMA DOLD         Clinical Psychologist
                   West Sussex Health and Social Care NHS Trust
                   Horsham Hospital
                   Hurst Road
                   West Sussex
                   RH12 2DR
                   Child and Adolescent
                   Full time
                   01403 227014

CLAIRE ELPHICK     Clinical Psychologist
                   West Sussex Health and Social Care NHS Trust
                   16 Liverpool Gardens
                   Worthing
                   West Sussex
                   01903 – 843530
                   AMH 8 sessions; Pain management 2 sessions

ANDY GENTIL        Clinical Child Psychologist Grade A
                   Lothian Primary Care NHS Trust
                   South Edinburgh and Mid Lothian CAMHS Service
                   3 Rillbank Terrace
                   Edinburgh
                   Child and Adolescent Mental Health
                   Full time permanent

DAVID GLASMAN      Locum Clinical Psychology for 4 months (from Oct 02)
                   North West Surrey Mental Health Partnership NHS Trust
                   Psychology Outpatient Dept.
                   Abraham Cowley Unit
                   Holloway Hill, Lyne
                   Chertsey
                   Surrey KT16 OAE
                   01932 722196
                   Adult Mental Health
                   Full time

MARK GRIXTI        Clinical Psychologist
                   Eastbourne and County Healthcare NHS Trust
                   Child Health Department
                   The Annexe
                   Avenue HS?
                   Eastbourne
                   East Sussex
                   BN21 3XY
                   01323 440022
                   Child
                   Full time

FIONA MCALLISTER   No information yet




                                                                           78
ANA MENDES           (Will be travelling)
                     West Kent NHS and Social Care Trust
                     Child and Adolescent Mental Health Services
                     Gatland House
                     Gatland Lane
                     Maidstone
                     Kent
                     ME16 8PF
                     01622 723600
                     Child
                     0.6 – community team
                     0.4 – inpatient service

MICHELLE PEOPLES     Extension and so not graduated

ALLISON RIGG         Clinical Psychologist
                     West London NHS Health Trust
                     Broadmoor Hospital
                     Crowthorne
                     Berkshire
                     RG45 7EG
                     Forensic
                     01344 773111
                     WTE 0.8

HELENA STONE PEARN   Clinical Psychologist
                     Surrey Hampshire Borders NHS Trust
                     Bridge Centre
                     Basingstoke
                     0.7 LD and 0.3 Primary care

CATHIE SWAINLAND     Kingston Primary Care Trust
                     22 Hollyfield Road
                     Surbiton
                     Surrey
                     KT6
                     020 855476558
                     Learning Disabilities
                     WTE 0.6
                     Spine point 31

EMMA VEITCH          On maternity leave and will graduate late

JENNY WEALL          East Sussex County NHS Trust
                     Eastbourne District General Hospital and
                     Conquest Hospital Hastings
                     Occupational Health 0.8
                     Neurology 0.2

KATHERINE WIGLEY     Planning to go travelling




                                                                   79
                                   Course 29

                          First Destination Information

INGRID BERGSON                Camden and Islington MH and Social Care Trust
                              National Hospital for Neurology & Neurosurgery
                              Queens Square
                              London
                              Pain Management
                              WTE 0.7

                              Whittington Hospital
                              Archway
                              London
                              General Medicine
                              WTE 0.3

SHAI BETTERIDGE               East Elmbridge and Mid Surrey PCT
                              The Poplars
                              West Park Hospital
                              Horton Lane
                              Epsom
                              Surrey KT19 8PB

                              St George’s Healthcare NHS Trust
                              Department of Clinical Neuropsychology
                              The Wolfson Neurorehabilitation Centre
                              Copse Hill
                              Wimbledon
                              London
                              SW20 0NQ
                              Neuropsychology
                              WTE 1.0?

IMOGEN CLARKE                 Camden Primary Care Trust
                              Greenland Road Children’s Resource Centre
                              4 Greenland Road
                              London
                              NW1 0AS
                              020 7530 4823
                              Child and Adolescent
                              WTE 1.0

RICHARD COATES                The Royal Hospital for Neuro-Disability
(Starting January 2004)       Department of Clinical Psychology
                              Royal Hospital for Neuro-disability
                              West Hill
                              Putney
                              London
                              SW15 3SW
                              0208 780 4500
                              Neuropsychology
                              WTE 1.0




                                                                               80
SARA DICKSON           Had a job but then went onto maternity leave shortly after

ALEX FARLEY            Central and North West London NHS Trust
                       Vincent Square Clinic
                       1 Osbert Street
                       London
                       SW1P 2QU
                       0208 237 2104
                       Eating Disorders

LUISA FERNANDEZ-FORD   Gloucestershire Partnership NHS Trust
                       Rikenel
                       Montpellier
                       Gloucester
                       GL1 1LY
                       01452 891000
                       Child and Adolescent
                       WTE 1.0

TIM GREEN              South West London and St Georges
                       Department of Forensic Psychiatry
                       Shaftesbury Clinic
                       Springfield Hospital
                       61 Glenburnie Road
                       Tooting
                       SW17 7DJ
                       Forensic
                       1.0

NAOMI HORTON           Oxleas NHS Trust
                       Pinewood House
                       Pinewood Place
                       Dartford
                       Kent
                       DA2 7WG
                       01322 625700
                       Complex Needs – Rehabilitation
                       WTE 1.0

FERGAL JONES           East Sussex County Healthcare NHS Trust
                       Ouse Valley CMHT
                       Greenwich House
                       Meridian Centre
                       Peacehaven
                       East Sussex
                       BN10 8BB
                       01273 585750
                       AMH
                       WTE 1.0




                                                                                81
SHARON KALSY    The Tudor Wing (HIV and Sexual Health Service)
                The Hillingdon Hospital Trust
                Pield Heath Road
                Uxbridge
                Middlesex
                UB8 3NN

JOANNA LILLEY   Bradford District Care Trust
                New Mill
                Victoria Street
                Saltaire
                Shipley
                BD18
                01274 228900
                Learning Disabilities
                WTE 1.0

ANNA MANNERS    Maternity Leave then
                West London Mental Health NHS Trust
                Department of Psychology
                Broadmoor Hospital
                Crowthorne
                Berkshire
                RG45 7EG

MOZ MCQUILLAN   Extension then maternity leave

CHLOE MORLEY    Travelling

JULIAN MORRIS   Surrey Oaklands NHS Trust
                Croydon Community Learning Disability Team
                Rees House
                2 Morland Road
                Croydon
                CR0 6NA
                020 8239 4441
                Learning Disabilities
                WTE 1.0

PHILIP RAY      (Resubmission with further oral)
                Walsall Primary Care Trust
                Psychology Department
                Greybury House
                Walsall
                WS1 1EP
                Child and Adult Neuro
                WTE 1.0
                01922 858450




                                                                 82
CAROLINE RODD         Northamptonshire Healthcare NHS Trust
(Deceased Jan 2005)   St Mary’s Hospital
                      London Road
                      Kettering
                      Northamptonshire
                      NN15 7PW
                      01536 493033
                      WTE 1.0
                      AMH

JESSICA SELMAN        Moved to Canada with Partner

HEATHER TOMLINSON     West London Mental Health NHS Trust
                      Department of Psychology
                      Broadmoor Hospital
                      Crowthorne
                      Berkshire
                      RG45 7EG
                      Forensic
                      WTE 1.0

KATE WAGSTAFF         Oxleas NHS Trust
                      Keswick House
                      207a Anerly Road
                      Penge
                      London
                      0208 676 8250
                      WTE 1.0
                      Complex Needs - Rehabilitation Support Team

SARA WALSH            West Hampshire NHS Trust
                      Waterford House
                      142 Station Road
                      New Milton
                      Hampshire
                      BH25 6LP
                      01425 622922
                      WTE 1.0
                      CMHT
                      Spine point 28

ESTHER WILCOX         West Sussex Health and Social Care NHS Trust
                      Martyn Long Centre
                      Horsham
                      West Sussex
                      Learning Disabilities
                      WTE 1.0




                                                                     83
EVE WILSON                St Georges Healthcare NHS Trust
                          Paediatric Psychology Service
                          Lanesborough Wing
                          St George's Hospital
                          Blackshaw Road
                          London
                          SW17 0QT
                          Locum Paediatric Psychologist



                               Course 30

                      First Destination Information

JOANNE BOULTER              Will look for a post in the new year.

ALISTAIR COOPER             South West London and St George’s NHS Trust
                            Springfield University Hospital
                            61 Glenburnie Road
                            London
                            SW17 7DJ
                            0208 682 6713
                            Looked After Children and CAMHS
                            1.0

DAWN-MARIE CROCKARD         North East London Mental Health Trust
                            Older People Service
                            Petersfield Centre
                            Harrold Hill
                            Essex
                            RM3 9PB
                            01708 796476
                            Older Adults
                            1.0

ALEXA EDGLEY                Maternity leave – plans to go back to work in  Summer
                            05 – has been offered a job at Surrey    Hampshire
                            Borders (Adult) following ML

MELISSA EDMONDS             Four Seasons Healthcare
                            The Huntercombe Roehampton Hospital
                            Holybourne Avenue
                            London
                            SW15 4JL
                            Adult Inpatient Unit (High dependency, low
                            security)
                            Tel. 0208 780 6155
                            Fax. 020 8780 6156
                            melissa.edmonds@fshc.co.uk
                            1.0
                            Starting Jan 2005




                                                                              84
HAZEL FELL-RAYNER      West Sussex Health and Social Care Trust
                       CAMHS for Worthing
                       Children’s Centre
                       Worthing Hospital
                       Lyndhurst Road
                       Worthing
                       Child and Adolescent Mental Health
                       1.0


HOWARD FINE            East London and the City Mental Health Trust
                       The Royal London Hospital
                       Whitechapel Road
                       Whitechapel
                       London E1 1BB
                       0207 377 7779
                       Paediatrics/CAMHS
                       1.0

CHARLOTTE FLACK-HILL   Oxleas NHS Trust
                       Highpoint House
                       Shooters Hill
                       London SE18 3RS
                       0208 836 6418
                       CAMHS
                       1.0

CAROLINE FOSTER        Surrey Hampshire Borders NHS Trust
                       Conifers CMHT
                       Sorrell Close
                       Broadhurst
                       Cove
                       GU14 9XW
                       01483 783555
                       AMH
                       1.0

ELIZABETH FREEMAN      South West London and St George’s NHS Trust
                       Springfield University Hospital
                       61 Glenburnie Road
                       London
                       SW17 7DJ
                       0.5 Older Adults
                       0.5 Primary Care

ANNA-LOUISE GOSLING    Surrey Oaklands NHS Trust
                       Oaklands House
                       Coulsdon Road
                       Caterham
                       Surrey CR3 5YA
                       Primary Care (AMH)
                       1.0




                                                                      85
SHEILA GOULD      West Kent Social Care Trust
                  Baltic Road
                  Tonbridge
                  Kent
                  01732 356522
                  Adults and Children with Learning Disabilities   1.0

SHARON GREEN      St Andrews Group of Hospitals (Independent
                  Charity)
                  Kemsley Division
                  St Andrews Hospital
                  Billing Road
                  Northampton
                  NN1 5DG
                  01604 616000
                  SGreen2@standrew.co.uk
                  Neuro rehab- brain injury and challenging behaviour
                  1.0

JENNIFER HARRIS   South London and Maudsley NHS Trust
                  Addiction Resource Centre
                  Marina House
                  63 – 65 Denmark Hill
                  London
                  SE5
                  0207 520 5720
                  Addictions
                  1.0

EMMA HARROLD      Birmingham & Solihull Mental Health NHS Trust
                  Chronic Pain Management Service
                  Union Exchange Block
                  Selly Oak Hospital
                  Raddlebarn Road
                  Birmingham
                  B29 6JD
                  Emma.Harrold@uhb.nhs.uk
                  0121 627 1627 x 51125.51176
                  Psychology Services in Health and Neuropsychology
                  1.0

NISHA KARIA       Central and North West London Mental             Health
                  NHS Trust
                  Child, Family and Adolescent Service
                  1 Redford Way
                  Uxbridge
                  UB8 1SZ
                  01895 256521
                  CAMHS
                  1.0




                                                                         86
VICTORIA LAUTÉ     West London Mental Health NHS Trust
                   Uxbridge Road
                   Southall
                   Middlesex UB1 3EU
                   020 8483 2032
                   AMH (inc eating disorders and PTSD services)
                   1.0

FIONA LOWIS        Is applying in Primary Carebut nothing yet

JULIA MACLEOD      Hampshire Partnership NHS Trust
                   Ravenswood House
                   Knowle
                   Fareham
                   Hampshire PO17 5NA
                   01329 836088
                   julia.macleod@wht.nhs.uk
                   Medium Secure Forensic Unit

MARK PERTINI       South London and Maudsley NHS Trust
                   Guys and St Thomas’s Hospital
                   Unsure of address
                   Children with neuropsychological,
                   neurodevelopmental, and/or complex cognitive
                   behavioural difficulties
                   1.0

KATHERINE PREEDY   Travelling for 6 months

JOANNE STEER       South London and Maudsley NHS Trust
                   Lennard Lodge
                   3 Lennard Road
                   West Croydon
                   Surrey CR0 2UL
                   0208 700 8800
                   Child & Adolescent Mental Health Generic Service
                   Child & Adolescent Neurodevelopmental Team
                   0.7 and 0.3

LYDIA STONE        West London Mental Health Trust
                   Uxbridge Road
                   Southall
                   Middlesex
                   UB1 3EU
                   020 8321 6439
                   1.0
                   AMH and Post-traumatic stress service




                                                                      87
RACHEL SWEETINGHAM   West Kent NHS and Social Care Trust
                     Child and Adolescent Mental Health Services
                     Unit 1, Twisleton Court
                     Priory Hill
                     Dartford
                     Kent DA1 2EN
                     01322 299900
                     Child
                     1.0




                                                                   88
Appendix 8.              Dietetics First Destination Data

First Destination 2002 Graduates of the BSc (Hons) Nutrition/Dietetics

Employed as Dietitians in NHS location (unless otherwise stated) at:

Queens Medical Centre Nottingham (2 graduates)
Ealing London
John Radcliffe – Oxford (2 graduates)
Torquay
Newbury and Reading
Redhill
Winchester
Orpington Community NHS Trust
Birmingham
Leicester
Isle of Wight
St Peters and Ashford NHS Trust Surrey
St Marys Paddington
Bedford (2 graduates)
Cambridge
Newbury
Liverpool
Royal Free London
Norwich
Slough
Crawley

Other
Ph D Surrey
Research Officer Surrey
Scientific journalism London

Total 27




                                                                         89
First Destination 2003 Graduates of the BSc (Hons) Nutrition/Dietetics

No     URN    Tutor Degree            NHS employment location (unless otherwise stated)
 1    1921487 JAB    B401                               Norwich
 2    1921681     JAB     B401                        Nottingham - Queens
 3    1934953     JAB     B401                            Frimley Park
 4    1921592     JAB     B401                         St Helier - Epsom
 5    1935119     JAB     B401              Queen Elizabeth Queen Mother - Margate
 6    1921673     JAB     B401                          Middlesborough
 7    1921347     JAB     B401                              Swindon
 8    1921509     LH      B401                       Barts and The London
 9    1921584     LH      B401                            Sunderland
10    1921258     LH      B401                             unknown
11    1921207     LH      B401                      Chelsea and Westminster
12    1934988     LH      B401                              Sheffield
13    1934759    BAG      B401                       Broomfild Chelmsford
14    1934996    BAG      B401                          Masters Degree
15    1821563    JBM      B401                             Worthing
16    1921657    JBM      B401                              Oldham
17    1921746    JBM      B401                              Epping
18    1934848    JBM      B401                         extended training
19    1921452    JBM      B401                            St Thomas'
20    1935054     JAB     B401                       Nottingham - Queens
21    1921711    MRA      B401                              London
22    1934686    MRA      B401                             Newcastle
23    1921223    MRA      B401                            Frimley Park
24    1934813    SAN      B401                 Princess of Wales - Bridgend Wales
25    1934708    SAN      B401                          Kent somewhere!
26    1934856    SAN      B401                               Poole
27    1921444     HT      B401                            PhD - UniS
28    1921363     HT      B401                               Kings
29    1934775     HT      B401                              Ipswich
30    1934724     HT      B401                              unknown
31    1935003    LOR      B401                              unknown




                                                                                          90
First Destination 2004 Graduates of the BSc (Hons) Nutrition/Dietetics

No.     e-mail   Tutor     B401        NHS employment location (unless otherwise stated)
 1      bs01ra   MRA       B401                  Pembury Tunbridge Wells
  2     bs01sa    MRA      B401                          Exeter Cornwall
  3     bs02ra    MRA      B401                              Reading
  4     bs01lb    MRA      B401                             Kingston
  5     bs01ab    MRA      B401                              Swansea
  6     bs01sb    JAB      B401                          Hounslow PCT
  7     bs01le     HT      B401                         Arrowsmith, Wirral
  8     bs01eg     HT      B401                            Basingstoke
  9     bs02eg     HT      B401                                MSc
 10     bs01kg    JAB      B401                             Chichester
 11     bs02sh    JAB      B401                            Frimley Park
 12     bs01fh    JAB      B401                             Travelling
 13     bs01jh    JAB      B401                            Portsmouth
 14     bs01sl    JAB      B401                             Mansfield
 15    bs01vm     JAB      B401                        Masters programme
 16     bs01jr    JAB      B401                              Sheffield
 17     bs01sr    JAB      B401                           Southampton
 18     bs01pr    BAG      B401                             St Georges
 19     bs02ns    BAG      B401                            Warrington
 20     bs02js    BAG      B401                             unknown
 21     bs01ks    BAG      B401                              Norwich
 22     bs02ks    SFP      B401                          Boston, Lincoln
 23     bs01ts    SFP      B401                       Darent Park Dartford
 24     bs02ct    SFP      B401                              Reading
 25     bs02at    SFP      B401                            Masters Prog
 26    bs01hw      LH      B401                                Hull
 27    bs01rw      LH      B401                      Abergavenny NHS Trust
 28    bs01dw      LH      B401                              Leicester
 29    bs01kw     JAB                                       Travelling
 30    bs01cw      LH                                       unknown




                                                                                           91
92
Appendix 9.         Glossary of Terms and Abbreviations

ASC           Academic Standards Committee
AV            Audio-visual
BDA           British Dietetic Association
BPS           British Psychological Society
BS …          Biomedical and Molecular Sciences module codes
CITCP         Committee in Training Clinical Psychologists
CV            Curriculum Vitae
DCP           Division of Clinical Psychology
GTiCP         Group of Trainers in Clinical Psychology
HEI           Higher Education Institute
HOD           Head of Department
HPC           Health Professions Council
HR            Human Resources
IT            Information Technology
NCLWDC        North Central London Workforce Confederation
NHS           National Health Service
NICE          National Institute of Clinical Excellence
OQME          Ongoing Quality Monitoring and Enhancement
PBL           Problem Based Learning
PsychD        Doctoral Clinical Psychology Programme
QAA           Quality Assurance Agency for Higher Education
R and D       Research and Development Committees
RAE           Research Assessment Exercise
SAM form      Student Assessment of Module form
SBMS          School of Biomedical and Molecular Sciences
SED           Self Evaluation Document
StepDiet      StepDiet, teaching software developed at The University of Surrey
SySx SHA      Surrey and Sussex Strategic Health Authority
UDEG          University Dietetic Education Group
ULearn        University of Surrey Managed Learning Environment
UniS          University of Surrey
WDC           Workforce Development Confederation




                                                                                  93
94
  APPENDIX 10.                   List of Supporting Documents


  Documentation submitted to the Review Panel with the SED
  Prospectuses for School of Human Sciences and School of Biomedical and Molecular Sciences
  Programme Handbooks for PsychD and Dietetics Programmes
  Most recent external examiners reports for PsychD and Dietetics Programmes
  Most Recent British Psychological Society (PsychD) and Health Professions Council (Dietetics)
  reports
  University of Surrey Campus Map
  Practice Placement Location Maps for PsychD and Dietetics Programmes


   Supporting documents available at Review Panel visit listed by footnote number
 1   University of Surrey Strategic Plan
 2   University of Surrey Senior Management Structure
 3   University of Surrey Committee Structure for the Management of Quality and Standards
 4   University of Surrey University Calendar
 5   http://libweb.surrey.ac.uk/calendar/
 6   Accreditation report from BPS 2005
 7   Report of the Quinquennial Course Approval Visit by the Dietitians Board, 2001
 8   Minutes of the PsychD Programme Stakeholders’ Meetings
 9   Minutes of Dietetics Stakeholders Group meetings
11 Criteria for Accreditation of Postgraduate Training Programmes in PsychD BPS, 2002
12 Department of Health and NICE Guidelines,
13 The National Service Frameworks
14 The Ten Shared Capabilities,
15 The BPS Code of Conduct,
16 The DCP Professional Practice Guidelines and BPS Good Practice Guidelines for the Conduct of
     Psychological Research within the NHS
17 Visiting lecturers, clinical supervisors, markers and examiners, the Strategic Health Authority
     and the Service User Advisory Group
18 Curriculum planning meeting
19 Letters following Placement meetings with supervisors
20 Supervisors working groups
21 Course Handbook & Programme regulations 2004/5
22 Supervisors Handbook 2005
23 Placement Handbooks 2005
24 University of Surrey Academic Standards Committee Report
25 Ongoing Quality Enhancement Report QAA 2005
26 Roll over of the SySx SHA Contract for the Programme with the commissioners
27 Board of Studies Minutes- the last year of minutes demonstrates the Programme Teams
     commitment to providing feedback to the committee on progress on aspects of the Programmes
     development and response to recommendations
28 Team trainee minutes- the 2005 minutes are examples of the two way process of hearing of
     challenges and concerns as well as positive feedback and being able to respond.
30 Curriculum timetables
31 Curriculum modules
32 Accreditation Reports BPS 2005 March 2002
35 Trainee feedback on lectures
36 Lecturer feedback on trainee participation
37 List of Stakeholders




                                                                                             95
38   List of invited speakers
39   List of markers workshops
40   Board of Studies 10th May 2004
41   Criteria for Accreditation of Postgraduate Training Programmes in PsychD BPS, 2002
43   Surrey PsychD Programme changes
45   Minutes of Service User and Carer Advisory Group
46   Minutes of Trainee Forum in relation to Service Users and Carers
47   Induction Block outline
48   Surrey PsychD Curriculum Changes
49   Curriculum timetable
50   Placement outline
51   Assessment schedule
52   Placement Evaluation forms
53   Marking forms for :- essays, Case reports, problem based learning ,research
54   Timetables 2004 and 2005
55   Research Teaching module
56   Research section of the Course Handbook and Programme regulations
57   BPS Code of Conduct
60   Personal and professional Development policy ,Course Handbook and Programme Regulations
61   Case discussion group and Problem Based Learning Rationale
62   Programme specification for PsychD in the appendix
64   Assessment Schedule outline
66   Marking guidelines, marking workshops and moderated marking
67   PBL, case report and essay, SRRP and MRP guidelines
68   Trainee appraisal Form
69   Grading scheme for assessments
70   Board of Studies Minutes from meeting on 25th July 2005
71   See the Course Handbook and Programme regulations page 26, section 9
72   Assessment outline and Programme specification
73   Evaluation of Clinical placement
74   List of External Examiners
76   External Examiners reports
77   Timetable of Supervisor workshops
79   Trainee feedback from first PBL Exercise Relationship to change
80   PsychD Marking sheets presented to Examination Board
81   PsychD placement Evaluation forms
82   Examination Board minutes 2004 and 2005
83   Minutes of Stakeholder meetings, the 2004/5 minutes highlight strengths on the Programme
84   Board of Study Minutes 2004/5 highlight strengths on the Programme
85   External Examiner reports
86   Accreditation visit report of the BPS
87   Report of the Academic Standards Committee 2005
88   OQME Report 2005
89   Selection policy 2005
90   HPC Standards of Proficiency 2003
91   HPC (Dietitians Board) Course Requirements and Guidelines for Pre-registration Courses
     Leading to State Registration in Dietetics, 2000
92   QAA/NHS Subject Benchmark statement: Healthcare Programmes: Dietetics
93   QAA/NHS Framework for Higher Education Qualifications
94   BDA Professional Standards for Dietitians, 2004
95   HPC Standards of Conduct, Performance and Ethics 2003
96   European Academic and Practitioner Standards for Dietetics, 2005
97   Job descriptions and Curriculum Vitae of Dietetic Programme staff
98   The Programme team are highly professionally oriented. Annual Programme Reviews are carried
     out within the wider supportive structure of the School and in accord with the University


                                                                                           96
      framework, see Nutrition Programmes Review minutes, 2002-05
100   External examiners reports
101   A mapping exercise carried out when the Programme was restructured to implement the new
      placement model demonstrates the match between the Dietitians Board requirements and the
      learning outcomes of this Programme (February 2002)
102   Level 1, 2 and 3 Handbooks 2004/05
103   A, B and C Practical Placement Handbooks 2004/05
104   Sample placement assessment tools
106   Higher Education Review forms Pre-placement A, B and C and Review of Placement forms A, B
      and C
108   Final year project topics for recent years
111   Minutes of the SBMS Undergraduate Board of Studies, 2002-05
113   As required by the BDA, HPC and by NHS policy
115   The Programme Director Dr Jacki Bishop was a member of the joint BDA/CPSM working party
      that developed and published the guidelines in a consultative process, see paper: Pre-registration
      education and training for Dietitians. Report and recommendations from the British Dietetic
      Association/CPSM Dietitians Board Joint working Party, February 1996
116   The plans for the restructure are reported, see submission to the then Dietitians Board in 2001.
      Programme development was supported by the School by the ‘super-numerary’ appointment of a
      Dietetic education consultancy during 2001 and 2003-05
117   Feedback from final year students, May 2005
118   Outcome of The University of Surrey Validation Process
119   Report of the Dietitians Board 2002 on the restructuring of the Dietetics Programme
121   The University of Surrey Notes of Guidance for Placement Learning
122   QAA Code of Practice for Placement Learning
123   recent Facilitation of Learning Course programmes and attendance lists
124   Outcomes of Trainers Forum, May 2005
125   QAA Code of Practice for the assurance of academic quality and standards in higher education
      Section 6: Assessment of students, May 2000
126   Board of Examiners, ASC
127   External examiners, HPC (Dietitians Board) accreditation process
128   Table showing application of assessment strategies
129   SBMS Consultation document ‘Feedback: a proposed agenda for change’ May 2005
130   Example of Placement portfolio
131   Examples of assessment tools
132   Membership of National Facilitators Group
133   Sample placement assessment tools
134   Programme Report to SySx SHA, 2004-05
135   Programme Report to HPC, 2002-03 and 2003-04
136   Programme Report to the BDA, 2003-04
137   Correspondence with Dean of Students
138   Teaching and learning Strategy, University of Surrey (October 2003)
139   SHS/PsychD proposal for Statement of Equivalence training
142   Overview of implementation of ULearn in Dietetics
143   Outline of PBL block (Applied Dietetics 2)
144   SBMS Strategic Plan
145   SBMS Strategic Plan 2005-09
148   Curriculum vitae of PsychD teaching staff
149   See Service users and Carers forum minutes and the minutes of the trainees forum on service
      Users and Carers
150   See Severe and enduring mental distress module outline
151   See Selection Policy
152   In line with the Criteria for the accreditation of postgraduate training Programme in PsychD
153   Supervisor workshop Programme timetable
154   Supervisor feedback


                                                                                                   97
155   Minutes of the ULearn Project Steering Group and FSDLT ULearn project bid
157   ULearn evaluation reports
158   Minutes of Nutrition Programmes Review May 2005
159   Preliminary report of PBL block evaluation
160   Herriot AM, Bishop JA, Kelly M, Murphy M and Truby H 2003 Evaluation of a computer
      assisted instruction resource in nursing education. Nurse Education Today 23, 537-545
      Herriot AM, Bishop JA and Truby H 2004 The development and evaluation of Student Training,
      Education and Practice for Dietetics CD-ROM: a computer-assisted instruction programme for
      dietetic students. J Hum Nutr Dietet 17, 35-41
162   In the Dietetics Programme for example, a food skills course has been developed for students
      with English as a second language, specific placement support has been developed for a student
      with dyslexia.
163   Health and Safety Policy 2005. This draws to together the Policies of the University, the Surrey
      Borders Partnership NHS Trust, the employer and Placements
164   Placement contract and supervisor responsibilities
165   Schedule of Dietetic Placements
166   Newsletter for dietetic placement trainers 2002
167   Nutrition and Dietetics Trainers’ forum outcomes
169   Promoting Good Practice in NHS Research, The Psychologist 18, (332) June 2005
170   Post Graduate Certificate in Academic Practice
171   Recognition of teaching practice in Dietetics, H. Truby and others
172   Presentations and publications on developments in the Nutrition/Dietetics teaching programme
173   Clearing House Handbook Surrey PsychD Entry 2006
174   Selection Policy PsychD 2005
175   Selection Policy Dietetics 2005
177   Dr Purves Consultation document on selection
178   Team meeting minutes 6th June 2005
179   PsychD Selection policy and processes
180   Service User and Carer Forum provided questions for the two interview panels
181   survey of first year Dietetic students’ reasons for selecting The University of Surrey Programme
182   PsychD Induction Programme timetable 2005
183   Dietetics Induction Programme 2005
186   Policy for Personal and Professional Development
187   PsychD Trainees mid and end of placement meetings reports
189   University of Surrey Self-Evaluation Document, QAA Institutional Audit 2004, paras 133-149
194   Student Assessment of Module forms from Dietetic Programme
196   Student Feedback on Post ULearn Evaluations, May 2005.
197   University of Surrey Self-Evaluation Document, QAA Institutional Audit 2004, paras150-154.
198   1 Registered Dietitian to 9.8 students (based on the largest year cohort). The Dietitians Board
      traditionally required a ratio of 1:12.
200   In recognition of the significant administrative workload for the head of the Dietetic Programme
      team, a Programme Manager post has been established – see Job Description
201   List of invited lecturers
203   Contract with Portsmouth Hospitals NHS Trust
205   List of Supervisors, their specialties and locations
207   Minutes of the National University Dietetic Education Group
208   Schedule of dietetic placement visits
211   Information leaflet to all lecturers on trainee who is deaf and relies on lip reading
212   University of Surrey Committee Structure for the Management of Quality and Standards
      (previous footnote 3)
213   Academic Standards Committee: Membership and Terms of Reference, Calendar 2004-05, Part
      One, ppC/55-56
214   Validation Board: Membership and Terms of Reference, Calendar 2004-05, Part One, pp C/69-
      71



                                                                                                  98
215   Student Progress and Assessment Board (Taught): Membership and Terms of Reference,
      Calendar 2004-05, Part One, pp C/65-66; Student Progress and Assessment Board (Research):
      Membership and Terms of Reference, Calendar 2004-05, ppC/66-68
216   Senate Awards Committee: Membership and Terms of Reference, Calendar 2004-05, Part One, p
      C/62
217   General Regulations, Calendar 2004-05, Part Two, Section F, pp F/34-48 (First Degrees) and pp
      F/76-88 (Practitioner Doctorate Degrees)
218   UniS Teaching Policy Development Committee
219   SBMS Curriculum Review and Development Committee
220   Membership of PsychD Board of Studies
221   Membership of SBMS Board of Studies
222   Debriefing sessions are scheduled after each dietetic placement
224   Report of a Visit to: The PsychD Programme (School of Human Sciences), QAEO (18 January
      2005)
225   Report of a Visit to: The Nutrition/Dietetics Programme (School of Biomedical and Molecular
      Sciences), QAEO (10 March 2005)
226   Report on action on recommendations of ASC Review for PsychD Programme June 2005
227   Report of action on recommendations for Dietetics Programme following ASC visit March 2005
228   Service Level Agreement PsychD
229   Statement of Equivalence business case
230   Abstracts of two trainee evaluations new innovations in selection
231   Response to 2005 Dietetics Programme OQME process action report
232   Action on recommendations arising from BPS review June 2005
233   Action on recommendations of the Dietitians Board Review 2001.
234   PsychD Programme placement Audit
235   Regional specialist interests groups and the national group of trainer (GTiCP)
      (Workshops arranged as a result of feedback from attendance at these groups)
236   PsychD Programme list of supervisor workshops
237   National Placement Quality Approval Tool
238   Peer review forms for teaching and group facilitation in the PBL block
239   External examiner appointments, BDA appointments and HPC visitor status of members of the
      Dietetic Programme team
240   PsychD Programme staff , external examiner appointments, QAA reviews and roles within other
      local, regional and national professional committees
241   Nutrition/Dietetic Programme staff participate in the National Dietetic Educators Group and the
      annual BDA national forum on


  Additional supporting documents available at Review Panel visit not listed as
  footnotes
  An overview of SBMS
  Submission to the Dietitians Board, 2001
  Examples of student work by module
  Dietetics Programme – Policy and Procedures
  Minutes of SBMS Strategy and Policy Meetings
  Library collection – key listings relevant to the Dietetics Programme

  An overview of School of Human Sciences
  Surrey and Borders Partnership NHS Trust., Employers Policies and Procedures
  Examples of trainee assessments
  Examples of trainees’ completed portfolios
  Submission to the BPS Accreditation Team 2005




                                                                                                99