IBHE A Public Agenda Power Point Presentation by qye36108

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									                         ILLINOIS STATE BOARD OF EDUCATION
                                    May 21-22, 2008



TO:                  Illinois State Board of Education

FROM:                Christopher A. Koch, Ed.D., State Superintendent of Education

Agenda Topic:        IBHE: A Public Agenda for Illinois Higher Education in Illinois:
                     Planning for Career and College Success

Materials:           PowerPoint Presentation
                     Background Paper – The Who, What, When, Why, How
                     Observations and Findings from the National Center for Higher Education
                        Management Systems (NCHEMS)


Purpose of Agenda Item
As stated on the website for the Illinois Board of Higher Education (IBHE), “The Public Agenda
for Illinois Higher Education is a planning blueprint for the State of Illinois to direct state
policies and resources to the higher education and career needs of Illinois residents and to
address the current and future economic needs of the state.”

House Joint Resolution 69 (adopted July 26, 2007) resolves that the Board of Higher Education
undertake a master plan for Illinois higher education through the creation of a Task Force on
Higher Education and the Economy to study the challenges and opportunities facing higher
education, the State's workforce needs, demographic trends, and higher education funding and
student financial aid.

At the request of Board Member Joyce Karon, who also serves as this Board’s liaison to IBHE,
we have invited Judy Erwin, IBHE Executive Director along with the consultants with whom they
are working for this important endeavor, to attend the May Education Policy Planning
Committee meeting to answer questions that our Board members may have about this process.




                                                             Education Policy Planning Committee Packet - Page 47
                        Summary of I iti l Th
                        S                           F
                                   f Initial Themes For
                         Discussion at the Second Task
                                 Force Meeting

                                      May 1, 2008
                                   Roosevelt University




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                                                          Education Policy Planning Committee Packet - Page 48
           Initial Themes Identified in Draft Public
           Needs Report and Subsequent Meetings

     A. Eliminate racial, ethnic, and gender disparities at all
          levels of educational attainment
     B. I           ff d bilit
     B Improve affordability
     C. Reduce geographic disparities
     D Improve degree production and transitions from
     D.
        associate to baccalaureate degrees
     E. Better integrate education and innovation assets with
        regional economic needs
     F. Increase the number of adults completing pre-
        collegiate and certificate and degree programs

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                                                 Education Policy Planning Committee Packet - Page 49
                                      g p
                                  Demographics




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                                                 Education Policy Planning Committee Packet - Page 50
        Projected Change in Illinois Population by Age
         and Race/Ethnicity, 2006-25 (in Thousands)




   Source: Illinois Department of Commerce and Economic Opportunity

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                                                                      Education Policy Planning Committee Packet - Page 51
          Population Projections by Region and Age,
                          2005-25
300,000                                                      656,431


250,000



200,000                                                                                       Age 15-24
                                                                                              Age 25-44
150,000                                                                                       Age 45-64


100,000


   ,
 50,000



     0
             Central        East      North    Northeast   Northern      Northwest   Southeastern    Southern     Southwestern       West
                           Central   Central               Stateline                                                                Central
-50,000


      Source: Illinois Department of Commerce and Economic Opportunity
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                                                                                                    Education Policy Planning Committee Packet - Page 52
     Percent Educational Attainment of Population Age 25-64
                By Race/Ethnicity—Illinois, 2005




   Source: U.S. Census Bureau, 2005 ACS (PUMS)

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                                                 Education Policy Planning Committee Packet - Page 53
                     Initial Theme A: Eliminate racial, ethnic, and
                       g         p
                       gender disparities at all levels of educational
                                        attainment.




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                                                           Education Policy Planning Committee Packet - Page 54
                   Difference in High School Attainment
                                       Minorities,
                   Between Whites and Minorities * 2006
      Vermont
          o




* Minorities include African-American, Hispanic, and Native American
Source: U.S. Census Bureau, 2006 ACS (PUMS)                                                                         8
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                                                                       Education Policy Planning Committee Packet - Page 55
       High School Graduation Rates—Percentage of
 9th Graders Graduating Four Years Later by Race/Ethnicity
                 (Average 2005 and 2006)




     Source: Illinois State Board of Education; NCES, Common Core Data
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                                                                         Education Policy Planning Committee Packet - Page 56
                Difference in College Attainment Between
                                  Minorities,
                      Whites and Minorities * 2006
      Vermont
          o




* Minorities include African-American, Hispanic, and Native American
Source: U.S. Census Bureau, 2006 ACS (PUMS)                                                                       10
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                                                                       Education Policy Planning Committee Packet - Page 57
         In-State College-Going Rates—Percentage of
   High School Graduates Enrolling in College the Following
   Academic Year by Race/Ethnicity (Average 2005 and 2006)




     Source: Illinois State Board of Education, Illinois Shared Enrollment and Graduation Information
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                                                                                          Education Policy Planning Committee Packet - Page 58
         Graduation Rates Within 150% of Program Time by
            Race/Ethnicity and Sector, 2006 (Percent)*




Four-Year Source: NCES, IPEDS Graduation Rate Survey; Two-Year Source: ICCB Fall Enrollment (E1), Annual Enrollment and Completion (A1),
Illinois Shared Enrollment and Graduation Data and National Student Clearinghouse. *NOTE: Public 2-yr percentages represent number of first-time,
full-time students transferred, graduated, or still enrolled at 150 percent of catalog time.
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                                                                                                             Education Policy Planning Committee Packet - Page 59
                                                                y
                 Initial Theme B: Address issues of affordability.




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                                                        Education Policy Planning Committee Packet - Page 60
                 State and Family Share of Funding for
                  Public Higher Education, 1991-2006




    Source: SHEEO State Higher Education Finance Survey
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                                                          Education Policy Planning Committee Packet - Page 61
   Percent of Income (Average of All Income Groups)
Needed to Pay for College Expenses Minus Financial Aid—
               Public Four-Year Colleges




    Source: NCPPHE, Measuring Up: The State-by-State Report Card for Higher Education
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                                                                                   Education Policy Planning Committee Packet - Page 62
   Percent of Income (Average of All Income Groups)
Needed to Pay for College Expenses Minus Financial Aid—
                Public Two-Year Colleges




    Source: NCPPHE, Measuring Up: The State-by-State Report Card for Higher Education
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                                                                                   Education Policy Planning Committee Packet - Page 63
                                                                                                                                                                                               Education Policy Planning Committee Packet - Page 64
                                                                                                                                                             17




                                                         Hampshire
                                                     New H
                                                             Vermont
                                                           Delaware
Change in College Participation Rates for Students




                                                          rth
                                                       Nor Dakota
                                                          ew
                                                        Ne Jersey
 from Low-Income Families by State, 1999-2006




                                                          ode
                                                       Rho Island
                                                       Pen
                                                         nnsylvania
                                                      Massachusetts
                                                            Montana
                                                              Nevada
                                                           Wyoming
                                                           New York
                                                                Maine
                                                                  Iowa
                                                       South Dakota
                                    ,




                                                              Indiana
                                                          Minnesota
                                                          M
                                                            Maryland
                                                          Wisconsin
                                                          W



                                                                                           Source: Postsecondary Education Opportunity #188, February 2008
                                                               Hawaii
                                                              Kansas
                              y




                                                              Oregon
                                                              Virginia
                                                                Idaho
                                                               Illinois
                                                           California
                                                        Wa ashington
                                                           st
                                                       Wes Virginia
                                                              Arizona
                                                           Nebraska
                                                          ted
                                                       Unit States
                                                        Coonnecticut
                                                                  Utah
                                                          Oklahoma
                                                          O
                                                           Arkansas
                                                         ew
                                                        Ne Mexico
                                                               Alaska
                                                               Florida
                                                           Louisiana
                                                            Michigan
                                                             Missouri




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                                                            Colorado
                                                            Kentucky
                                                          h
                                                      South Carolina
                                                                          Texas
                                                                          Alaba
                                                                              ama
                                                                          Ohio
                                                                          Missiissippi
 f                                                                        Tennnessee
                                                                          Georrgia
                                                                              h
                                                                          North Carolina
                  Initial Theme C: Reduce geographic disparities
                           in ll        ti i ti      d   ti   l
                           i college participation, educational
                                 attainment, and income.




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                                                      Education Policy Planning Committee Packet - Page 65
             High School Graduation Rates—Percentage of
          9th Graders Graduating Four Years Later by Region
                               g                   y g
                       (Average 2005 and 2006)




     Source: Illinois State Board of Education; NCES, Common Core Data
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                                                                         Education Policy Planning Committee Packet - Page 66
 Percent of Population Age 25-64 with No High School
      Diploma,
      Diploma 2006 (Public Use Microdata Areas)




                                     13.5    to   54.9
                                     10.6    to   13.5
    Illinois = 833,706                6.8    to   10.6
                                      2.1    to    6.8




 Source: 2006 ACS (PUMS)
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                                            Education Policy Planning Committee Packet - Page 67
   Percent of Population Age 25-64 with an Associate
              Higher
   Degree or Higher, 2006 (P bli Use Microdata Areas)
                           (Public U Mi d t A       )




                                      47.1    to   83.4
                                      35.0    to   47.1
                                      28.1    to   35.0
                                      10.9    to   28.1




 Source: 2006 ACS (PUMS)
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                                             Education Policy Planning Committee Packet - Page 68
                   Personal Income per Capita, 2006
                                  (Public Use Microdata Areas)
                                  (P bli U Mi d t A          )




                                                          29,363   to   61,748
                                                          23,910   to   29,363
                                                          19,953   to   23,910
                                                          10,742   to   19,953




 Source: 2006 ACS (PUMS)
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                                                             Education Policy Planning Committee Packet - Page 69
                        Initial Theme D: Increase production of
                        postsecondary certificates, associate, and
                              baccalaureate degrees. Increase
                      opportunities for baccalaureate completion and
                      improve transitions between the associate and
                                                      levels
                                 baccalaureate degree levels.




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                                                         Education Policy Planning Committee Packet - Page 70
                                    Student Pipeline, 2004




Of 100
9th Graders,
How Many…


Source: NCES Common Core Data 2004; Tom Mortenson, Postsecondary Education Opportunity; NCES, IPEDS Fall 2004
        Retention Rate File and Fall 2003 Enrollments, 2004 Graduation Rates; U.S. Census Bureau, 2005 ACS

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                                                                                  Education Policy Planning Committee Packet - Page 71
 First-Time Undergraduate Enrollment by Region and
             Sector,
             Sector Fall 2006 (Percent)




Source: NCES, IPEDS Fall Enrollment Survey
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                                             Education Policy Planning Committee Packet - Page 72
                                       Transfer Rates by Region
                Fall 2001 Entering Community College Cohort with No Prior College Experience Who
              Completed 12 or More Semester Credits and Transferred to Senior Institutions by Fall 2005
                                                   (FY 2007)

    Southwestern                                                                23.4%                                                   41.2%


    North Central                                                                             28.6%                                    40.8%


        Northeast                                                       20.9%                                                        39.9%


           Central                                                                 24.8%                                         39.1%


       Northwest                                                                        26.4%                                   38.7%


 STATEWIDE                                                               21.5%                                                 38.4%


         Southern                                               18.5%                                                          38.2%


Northern Stateline                                                          23.1%                                             37.9%


     West Central                                                                   25.5%                                    37.1%


     East Central                                                         21.9%                                      34.5%


    Southeastern                                            16.9%                                            32.2%


                     0%          5%          10%          15%            20%            25%           30%         35%           40%             45%
                                 Comprehensive Transfer Rate                       Transfer Rate to Public In-State Universities
   SOURCE OF DATA: ICCB Fall Enrollment (E1), Annual Enrollment and Completion (A1), Illinois Shared Enrollment and Graduation Data, and
   National Student Clearinghouse. National Transfer Assembly/UCLA/Cohen Methodology. Rock Valley prior year data used in detail.
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                                                                                                            Education Policy Planning Committee Packet - Page 73
Bachelor’s Degrees Awarded per 100 High School Graduates
                           Earlier
                 Six Years Earlier, 2004




  Source: NCES-IPEDS Completions Survey, WICHE
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                                                 Education Policy Planning Committee Packet - Page 74
                     Initial Theme E: Better integrate the State’s
                      education and innovation assets with regional
                                    economic needs.




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                                                         Education Policy Planning Committee Packet - Page 75
          Per Capita Personal Income as a Percent of U.S.
                   Average—Illinois, 1960-2005




                                                        U.S. Average




 Source: Development Report Card for the States, CFED
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                                                                  Education Policy Planning Committee Packet - Page 76
 Development Report Card for the States—Illinois
                         Employment                              F
                         Earnings and Job Quality                C
C Performance            Equity                                  C
                         Quality of Life                         D
                         Resource Efficiency                     B
       Business          Competitiveness/Existing Businesses     A
A
        Vitality         Entrepreneurial Energy                  C
                                                                            WEAKNESSES (Bottom 10 Rank)
                         Human Resources                         C
                         Financial Resources                     A   Rank              Measure
B Development            Infrastructure Resources                A    41    Sewage Treatment Needs
       Capacity          Amenity Resources and Natural Capital   C    41    Renewable Energy
                         Innovation Assets                       C    43    Change in Average Annual Pay
                                                                      43    Unemployment Rate
                                                                      43    Average Annual Pay Growth
                  STRENGTHS (Top 10 Rank)                             43    Change in New Companies
                                                                      44    Change in Income from Dividends, Interest and
      Rank                   Measure
                                                                            Rent
        2     Initial Public Offerings                                44    New Companies
        3     Change in Homeownership Rate                            47    Employment Growth: Long Term
        4     Change in Energy Costs                                  48    Net Migration
        5     Bridge Deficiency                                       48    Change in Poverty Rate
        5     Industrial Diversity                                    48    Change in Health Professional Shortage Areas
        5     Urban Mass Transit                                      49    Mass Layoffs
        5     Electronic Public Services
        6     Disparity between Rural and Urban Areas
        7     Vehicle Miles Traveled
        8     Strength of Traded Sector
        8     Average Annual Pay
       10     Average Teacher Salary



    Source: 2006 Development Report Card for the States, Corporation for Enterprise Development (CFED)
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                                                                                        Education Policy Planning Committee Packet - Page 77
          Gross License Income Per Worker, 2004
              46.5




   Source: Development Report Card for the States, CFED
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                                                          Education Policy Planning Committee Packet - Page 78
   Employment in High-Technology Establishments as
                                   State,
      Share of Total Employment by State 2004




Source: U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics, Corporation for Enterprise Development (CFED)
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                                                                                         Education Policy Planning Committee Packet - Page 79
                        Initial Theme F: Increase the educational
                                  attainment of adults by:

             a.) Increasing the number of students completing adult basic
             education, GED, and English as a Second Language (ESL)
             programs and continuing into and completing postsecondary
                          certificate and degree programs; and
                  b.)Increasing the number of adults re-entering formal
                  education and completing postsecondary education
                                        credentials.




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                                                           Education Policy Planning Committee Packet - Page 80
                 Adults Age 18-64 Who Speak English
          13.3                         All
                      Poorly or Not at All, 2006




Source: U.S. Census Bureau, ACS
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                                            Education Policy Planning Committee Packet - Page 81
          GEDs Awarded per 1,000 Adults Age 25-44
           ith L th        Hi h School Diploma, 2005
          with Less than a High S h l Di l




Source: GED Testing Service; U.S. Census Bureau, ACS
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                                                       Education Policy Planning Committee Packet - Page 82
              Enrollment in State-Administered ABE Programs
                    1,000            18-64
                Per 1 000 Adults Age 18 64 with Less than a
                        High School Diploma, 2005




Source: U.S. Department of Education; U.S. Census Bureau, ACS
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                                                                Education Policy Planning Committee Packet - Page 83
                      A Public Agenda for Illinois Higher Education:
                         Planning for College and Career Success

                    Background Paper: The Who, What, When, Why, and How

What it is: The Public Agenda for Illinois Higher Education is a planning blueprint for the State of
Illinois to direct state policies and resources to the higher education and career needs of Illinois residents
and to address the current and future economic needs of the state.

What it is not: The Public Agenda is not a plan for higher education institutions or the various sectors
within the higher education system, including community colleges, public universities, and nonprofit and
for-profit private institutions.

Background: The Illinois Board of Higher Education has the statutory responsibility for master
planning, as stated in the IBHE enabling act:

        The Board shall analyze the present and future aims, needs and requirements of higher education
        in the State of Illinois and prepare a master plan for the development, expansion, integration,
        coordination and efficient utilization of the facilities, curricula and standards of higher education
        for public institutions of higher education in the areas of teaching, research and public service.

In its spring 2007 session, the General Assembly approved House Joint Resolution 69, directing the
Board of Higher Education to develop a Public Agenda for higher education through a broad-based task
force “to study the challenges and opportunities facing higher education, the State’s workforce needs,
demographic trends, and higher education funding and student financial aid.”

Purpose: The purpose of the planning initiative is to develop an action agenda, based on quantifiable
evidence, for institutions, state education agencies, and the Governor and General Assembly to address
the education, workforce, social, and economic needs of the State by setting priorities, developing
policies, and allocating resources.

Participants:

        Task Force – The Task Force is chaired by the Board of Higher Education, and includes
        legislators, and representatives of a broad cross-section of business, labor, healthcare, civic, and
        education stakeholders.

        Constituency Advisers – Organizations representing minorities and women, individuals with
        disabilities, business and labor interests, state and national experts in higher education, economic
        development, and statewide planning, civic and foundation leaders will participate in the public
        agenda process in a key advisory role.

        Higher Education Advisers – The planning process also will involve the higher education
        community: Illinois Community College Board, Illinois Student Assistance Commission,
        Presidents/Chancellors of Public Universities, Community College Presidents Council,
        Federation of Independent Illinois Colleges and Universities, Illinois Community College
        Trustees Association, IBHE Proprietary Advisory Committee, Faculty Advisory Council, Student
        Advisory Committee, Disabilities Advisory Committee, and individual colleges and universities.


DRAFT, April 21, 2008

                                                                       Education Policy Planning Committee Packet - Page 84
        National Center for Higher Education Management Systems (NCHEMS) – National,
        nonprofit consultant with vast experience and expertise in assisting in development of state plans.
        Dennis Jones, President and principal research director of Public Agenda. NCHEMS has assisted
        in development of state plans is several states, including Indiana, Texas, and Kentucky where
        public agendas have been successful in producing improved educational outcomes.

Process:
        The Task Force will hold five formal meetings.

        NCHEMS will oversee regional forums to solicit comments from business, labor, political, civic,
        and education leaders on public needs and existing higher education policies.

        NCHEMS and IBHE will hold special briefings for legislative members and staff, higher
        education committees, and the education caucus. NCHEMS also will brief interested
        constituents, including: employers; civic and nonprofit organizations; state associations; faculty
        and student organizations; labor unions; state agency staff; and college and university academic,
        business, and legislative staff throughout the planning process.

Planning Phases:
Phase I: Definition of Public Needs – December 2007-April 2008
NCHEMS collects and analyzes historical, current, and projected data; national and international
comparisons examining social, economic, demographic and educational conditions in Illinois. Data
analysis will permit the state to ground the Public Agenda and its priorities on the needs of state
residents. From this research, NCHEMS prepares a Public Needs Report.

Public Needs Report focuses on:
   o Population and demographics
   o Economic and workforce conditions and needs
   o Education pipeline, postsecondary access and completion, student learning, and education finance

Schedule:
   o March 20, Task Force meeting, 9 a.m.-noon, at DePaul University, Loop Campus.
   o April 1, NCHEMS presentation to Illinois Board of Higher Education

Phase II: Higher Education Policy Audit – December 2007-June 2008
NCHEMS reviews existing policies to determine how Illinois’ higher education system currently operates
and the adequacy of policies to address needs in student preparation, college participation, affordability,
degree completion, research and economic development, and learning.

The Policy Audit Report examines:
   o Availability and allocation of resources
   o Accountability mechanisms
   o Regulations that mandate institutional or agency activities
   o Governance and decision authority

Schedule:
   o April 15, draft Policy Audit Analytic Framework distributed
   o April 26, briefing for public university trustees,10 a.m.-noon, NIU Naperville center
   o May 1, 2008, Task Force meeting, 2-4 p.m., Chicago, Roosevelt College
   o June 20, 2008, Task Force meeting, 2-4 p.m. Chicago, Robert Morris College, Chicago

DRAFT, April 21, 2008

                                                                     Education Policy Planning Committee Packet - Page 85
Phase III: Development of Preliminary Public Agenda – May-August, 2008
NCHEMS will oversee regional forums to solicit input on Public Needs Report and Policy Audit Report
from legislators, business, labor, civic leaders, K-12 and higher education faculty and administrators, and
students. Based on feedback from regional forums, legislative hearings, and constituent and public
briefings, IBHE staff, in conjunction with NCHEMS, will prepare a preliminary Public Agenda
distributed to the Board of Higher Education, the Task Force, key stakeholders, and the public.

Schedule:
   o June 9-June 30, regional forums
   o July 7, NCHEMS report on identified needs and priorities from regional forums
   o August 4, Release of preliminary Public Agenda
   o August 12, Task Force meeting to discuss preliminary Public Agenda, 2-4:00 p.m. Kendall
       College, Chicago

Phase IV: A Public Agenda for Illinois Higher Education: Planning for College and Career Success
– August, 2008-October, 2008
IBHE staff, in conjunction with NCHEMS, will prepare a Public Agenda for consideration by the Task
Force and the Illinois Board of Higher Education. The Board of Higher Education will take final action
on the Public Agenda and transmit it to the Governor and General Assembly.

Schedule:
   o August 15-September 15, public comment period
   o September 22-26, Task Force meets to consider final Public Agenda for Illinois Higher
       Education
   o October 7, Public Agenda for Illinois Higher Education presented for action by the Illinois
       Board of Higher Education
   o October 31, Public Agenda for Illinois Higher Education transmitted to Governor and General
       Assembly
   o October 2008-Spring 2009, IBHE develops implementation plan for the Public Agenda for
       Illinois Higher Education




DRAFT, April 21, 2008

                                                                     Education Policy Planning Committee Packet - Page 86
DRAFT, April 21, 2008

                        Education Policy Planning Committee Packet - Page 87
                Tentative Timeline and Work Plan for Development
                  of Public Agenda for Illinois Higher Education


DECEMBER 2007-FEBRUARY 2008:
    NCHEMS research public needs, existing policies.

JANUARY 2008:
    NCHEMS outlines planning process to IBHE Board members

FEBRUARY 2008:
    Appointment of Task Force

MARCH 2008:

20             FIRST TASK FORCE MEETING
               9 a.m.-noon, DePaul University, Loop Campus, Chicago

28      Progress report to IBHE, General Assembly

APRIL 2008:

1       Illinois Board of Higher Education, NCHEMS presentation
        Illinois State University, Bloomington-Normal

        Release of revised Public Needs Report
        Distribution of Draft Policy Audit Analytic Framework


MAY-JUNE 2008:

May 1          SECOND TASK FORCE MEETING
               2-4 p.m., Roosevelt College, Chicago

        Legislative briefings/hearings

JUNE 2008:

9-30    Regional Forums

15      Progress Report to IBHE, General Assembly

20      THIRD TASK FORCE MEETING
        2-4 p.m., Robert Morris College, Chicago

30      NCHEMS Report on Needs and Priorities from Regional Forums

DRAFT, April 21, 2008

                                                            Education Policy Planning Committee Packet - Page 88
JULY 2008:

Drafting of Preliminary Public Agenda

AUGUST 2008:
4   Distribution of Preliminary Public Agenda

August 12     THIRD TASK FORCE MEETING
              2-4 p.m., Kendall College, Chicago

AUGUST -SEPTEMBER 2008:
    Public Comment Period on Preliminary Public Agenda

SEPTEMBER 2008:
15   Quarterly Progress Report to IBHE, General Assembly

Week of 22-26        FINAL TASK FORCE MEETING

OCTOBER 2008:
7   IBHE action on Public Agenda

31     Presentation of Public Agenda to Governor and General Assembly

OCTOBER 2008 – SPRING 2009
Development of Implementation Plan for Public Agenda for Illinois Higher Education




DRAFT, April 21, 2008

                                                           Education Policy Planning Committee Packet - Page 89
                                      IBHE Staff and Consultant
                                         Studies and Reports

Phase I.
Define Public Needs: What does Illinois need from higher education?
(Data collection and analysis; historical, current, and projected; national and international comparisons.)

        A. Social Conditions
                Age
                Race/Ethnicity
                Family Structure
                Family Income
                Regional Differences
                Educational Attainment
                Population Migration
                Health Characteristics

        B. Economic Conditions
               Industry Mix
               Importing/Exporting
               Economic Strengths
               Effects of Globalization
               State GDP
               Tax Collections
               New Business Starts
               Regional Differences
               Personal Income
               Healthcare quality and availability

        C. Educational Conditions
               Governance/Coordination
               Finance
               Achievement Gap
               Pipeline, including healthcare and professional education
               Institutional Focus
               Regional Differences




DRAFT, April 21, 2008

                                                                      Education Policy Planning Committee Packet - Page 90
Phase II.
Review Existing Policies: How Does Illinois’ Higher Education System Currently Operate?

       A. Preparation
              K-12 Student Development
              Teacher/School Leader Preparation
              Dual Enrollment
              Curriculum Alignment
              Placement Examinations
              HS Graduation Standards/Entrance Requirements
              Remediation
              Adult Education/Adult Literacy
              Feedback Mechanisms -- TDW
              Data Systems, Efficiency, Productivity
              Marketing
              Financial Implications

       B. Participation
               Institutional and Sector Capacity
               Underrepresented Groups
               Distance Education
               Off-Campus Degree Completion Opportunities
               Dual Enrollment
               Counseling, Advising, Other Services
               Adult Education
               Healthcare, Graduate and Professional Training
               Certificate/Workforce Training
               Data Systems, Efficiency, Productivity
               Marketing
               Financial Implications

       C. Affordability
               Campus Funding Adequacy
               Tuition and Fee Policy
               Financial Aid Programs and Policies
                        Need-based Aid
                        Merit-based Aid
                        Institutional Aid
                        Waiver Programs
                        Savings Programs
                        Loan Programs
                        Healthcare, Graduate and Professional Training
                        Relationship Between Public Funding, Tuition and Fees, and Financial
                                 Aid Policies
               Efficiency
               Data Systems, Efficiency, Productivity
               Marketing
               Financial Implications




DRAFT, April 21, 2008

                                                                 Education Policy Planning Committee Packet - Page 91
       D. Completion
             Counseling, Advising, Childcare, and Other Student Services
             Underrepresented Groups
             Off-Campus Degree Completion
             Transfer Agreements
             Illinois Articulation Initiative
             Course Applicability System
             Stop-Out, Drop-Out Intervention
             Student Achievement Goals Less Than a Degree (e.g., certificate programs)
             Data Systems, Efficiency, Productivity

       E. Research and Economic Development
              Critical Workforce Needs
              Workforce Development
              Adult Education/Retraining
              Research and Development
              Applied Research Activities
              Technology Transfer
              Retention of Graduates
              Health Care Provision and Training
              Regional Cultural Resources
              Data Systems, Efficiency, Productivity
              Financial Implications

       F. Learning
               Student Assessment

Phase III.
A Preliminary Higher Education Public Agenda

       A. Goals
              Preparation
              Participation
              Affordability
              Completion
              Research and Economic Development
              Learning

       B. Sector Responsibilities, Institutional Focuses, and Financial Implications

       C. Accountability Measurements

       D. Coordination

       E. Timelines and Responsibilities




DRAFT, April 21, 2008

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This report can be found on the IBHE website at: http://www.ibhe.org/masterPlanning/materials/APublicAgendaforIllinois.pdf




               National Center for Higher Education Management Systems




                                               A Public Agenda for Illinois
         D R A F T                           Higher Education: Planning for
                                               Career and College Success




                                            Summary Observations and Findings
                                                      Regarding Public Needs

                                                                                             March 17, 2008




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                                      INTRODUCTION

This document contains the results of the initial round of analyses performed by the National
Center for Higher Education Management Systems (NCHEMS) as background for identifying
strategic priorities to be addressed by higher education to improve the circumstances of Illinois
and its citizens. Additional analyses will be performed as follow-up.


                               PRIMARY OBSERVATIONS

The following key observations are derived from the analytic findings:

1. The population of Illinois is projected to grow much more slowly than is the case for most
   other states and the country as a whole (page 4). The growth that is projected will be found
   almost exclusively in the Northeast region of the state (page 5). Populations in all other
   regions of the state will be essentially stagnant. The working-age population will be
   comprised increasingly of minorities (page 6). Only among retirees will whites be the fastest
   growing subpopulation. Minority populations are heavily concentrated in the Northeast
   Region of the state.

2. The population of Illinois is reasonably well educated, ranking 17th among the states in the
   proportion of young adults (through ages 25-34) who have an associate or higher degree
   (page 8). It ranks 12th in the proportion of the working-age population with a baccalaureate
   or graduate degree; only 27th in the proportion with an associate degree (page 10). It has a
   lower proportion with high school or less and higher proportion with college educations than
   the U.S. average. While Illinois compares favorably to the U.S. as a whole, it compares less
   favorably to international competitors (page 9).

3. The average education data mask substantial differences between the races, with whites
   being considerably better educated than their minority counterparts (page s 11-14). Education
   attainment also varies considerably from one region of the state to another with the highest
   educational attainment found in the Chicago suburbs and McLean and Champaign counties
   and the lowest on the south side of Chicago and in some of the more rural parts of the state
   (page 15).

4. The economy of Illinois mirrors closely that of the nation as a whole (page 16). However, it
   has been growing much more slowly than the economies of most other states (page 17).

5. The kinds of jobs typically most desirable and lucrative—those in management and
   professional occupations—are held by residents of very few parts of the state, primarily those
   in the Chicago suburbs and around Champaign-Urbana (page 20). Growth in jobs requiring
   postsecondary training is projected to be lower than in all but seven other states (page 21).
   The occupations in which desirable jobs will be growing are those in:

       •   Nursing and other health professions

       •   Computer specialists


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       •   Teachers

       •   Accountants and auditors

       •   Vehicle repair technicians

       (Pages 22-23)

   Many of these are fields in which demand exceeds in-state supply (page 24).

6. Illinois’ economy has been sufficiently strong to allow its citizens to enjoy a per capita
   income in excess of the national average. While above the national average, the state’s per
   capita income has shown a steady, long-term decline (page 25). Income varies greatly from
   one part of the state to another—highest in the suburban areas of the Northeast Region and
   lowest in the southern and eastern parts of the state (and of the Northeast Region) (page 26).

7. Earnings are higher in Illinois than the national average at every level of educational
   attainment. The economic benefits of postsecondary education vary widely from one region
   of the state (from $0 to nearly $30,000 for an associate degree and from $1,600 to $67,000
   for a bachelor’s degree). The economic benefits are greatest in those areas with the greatest
   concentration of managerial and professional jobs (pages 27-28).

8. Illinois outperforms the nation as a whole at every stage of the education pipeline. However,
   Illinois is substantially below the best-performing states at every stage of the pipeline
   (page 30). Minorities (except for Asian-Americans) are significantly underrepresented at
   each stage of the pipeline (pages 32 and 34). There are similarly substantial variations from
   one region of the state to another—in both high school graduation and postsecondary
   education participation with the Northeast and Central Regions of the state being below the
   state average on both measures (pages 31 and 33).

9. Illinois exports a significant number of college students, primarily to public research
   universities in nearby states (page 37).

10. The students who do enroll in-state overwhelmingly enroll within the region in which they
    reside. This is particularly true of part-time students but applies to full- time students as well
    (page 38). In all regions, the clear majority of students who enroll in public institutions
    enroll in community colleges (page 39). Transfer rates from community colleges to public
    four-year institutions are relatively low in all parts of the state, but especially low in the
    Northeast Region where a higher proportion of students begin their postsecondary educations
    in four-year institutions (page 43).

11. The six- year graduation rates at four- year institutions are higher than the national average
    and three-year rates at community colleges are below the national average. Enrollment
    patterns are such that the numbers of degrees produced relative to numbers of high school
    graduates are well below the national average (pages 41-42). Graduation rates of African-
    Americans and Hispanics are particularly low and contribute to the low statewide
    performance (page 44).



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12. Illinois relies heavily on in- migration of educated individuals to meet the needs of its
    economy. Interestingly, students who have achieved associate degrees tend to leave the state,
    while those with baccalaureate and graduate degrees migrate into the state. When analyzed
    by age, large numbers of young people come to the state (and Chicago in particular), while
    older workers leave the state. Net migration is positive among adults age 30-64 only for
    individuals with less than a high school education (page 47). The state has depended heavily
    on in- migration of computer specialists; this is one of the few areas where there is an
    in- migration of older as well as younger workers (pages 48-49).

13. While the Illinois economy is stronger than those of many upper Midwestern states, it has
    some clear weaknesses. Particularly noticeable is the region-to-region variatio n and the
    dependence on established companies, rather than emerging companies, for its economic
    vitality (page 51). Illinois is very much in the middle of the pack with regard to innovation
    assets (page 52). Illinois universities are in the top 10 states in all major fields with regard to
    research and development expenditures, with particular strength in math and computer
    science (page 54). This has not translated into entrepreneurial activity that is driving a
    revitalized economy (pages 55-57).

14. Although Illinois’ population is above the national average in education attainment, the state
    must improve its position if it is to remain globally competitive. If the state’s institutions
    maintain business as usual, improvement will require additional resources from either the
    state or from students. Relative to the rest of the country, Illinois has a somewhat higher tax
    capacity and lower tax effort (page 59). However, since Illinois, like all other states, has a
    long-term structural deficit in its budget, the likelihood of tapping tax capacity specifically
    for higher education is probably not high (page 60).

   Increasing revenues from students is also problematic. After many years of stability,
   the share of educational costs borne by students has increased markedly (page 62).
   By all measures, higher education is substantially less affordable than it was in 2001
   (pages 63-66).




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