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LOVE IN THE TIME OF MONEY
                                       starring

                                     Steve Buscemi
                                    Rosario Dawson
                                      Vera Farmiga
                                      Malcolm Gets
                                     Adrian Grenier
                                      Jill Hennessy
                                    Michael Imperioli
                                       Carol Kane
                                  Domenick Lombardozzi




Distributor Contact:                  NY Press Contact:          L.A. Press Contact:

Amanda Sherwin                        Christine Richardson       Syvetril Perryman
THINKFilm                             Jeremy Walker PR           MPRM
451 Greenwich Street, 7th floor       171 West 80th Street, #1   5670 Wilshire Blvd,
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F 646.214.7907                        F 212.595.5875             P 323.933.3399
                                                                 F 323.939.7211
                                                      CAST


Greta ................................................................................................. Vera Farmiga
Eddie Iovine .......................................................................Domenick Lombardozzi
Ellen Walker ....................................................................................... Jill Hennessy
Robert Walker ................................................................................... Malcolm Gets
Martin Kunkle .................................................................................. Steve Buscemi
Anna ............................................................................................. Rosario Dawson
Nick .................................................................................................. Adrian Grenier
Joey ...................................................................................................... Carol Kane
Will ............................................................................................... Michael Imperioli
Marianne Jones ....................................................................... Nahanni Johnstone
Mark Jones ....................................................................................... John Ottavino
Jack ..................................................................................................... Ross Gibby
Elaine ................................................................................................ Alexa Fischer
Susan Kopit .................................................................................. Tamara Jenkins
                                               FILMMAKERS


Written and Directed by ....................................................................... Peter Mattei
Produced by ....................................................................................... Lisa Bellomo
                                                                                               Joana Vicente
                                                                                                    Jason Kliot
                                                                                       Gretchen McGowan
Executive Producers ...................................................................... Robert Redford
                                                                                               Michael Nozik
Co-Producer ................................................................................... Yves Chevalier
Co-executive Producers ............................................................ Charles Rusbasan
                                                                                                John Orlando
Directory of Photography ........................................................ Stephen Kazmierski
Production Designer ........................................................................... Susan Block
Editor .............................................................................................. Myron Kerstein
Costume Designer ..................................................................... Catherine George
Music Supervisor ............................................................................. Susan Jacobs
Music by ..................................................................................... Theodore Shapiro
Casting........................................................................................ Sheila Jaffe, CSA
                                                                               Georgianne Walken, CSA
                                                                                         Katharina Eggman
                                  ABOUT THE STORY

                           LOVE IN THE TIME OF MONEY

On a dark and blustery evening, a prostitute (Vera Farmiga) gets picked up by a “john”
as he drives by her regular location – a secluded waterfront corner with Manhattan‟s
skyline glitteringin the distance. The experience is unsatisfactory for both of them; the
man, a carpenter (Domenick Lombardozzi), can‟t perform properly and the streetwalker
never gets paid. Thus begins LOVE I N THE TIME OF MONEY, a quintessentially
metropolitan roundelay set at the height of the 90‟s Nasdaq boom. In the film, nine New
Yorkers, representing a cross section of society, are linked by sex, romance, and
commerce, and often all three.

In the ensuing series of successive one-on-one encounters, we follow the carpenter as he
is seduced by a bored, wealthy client (Jill Hennessy); she, in turn, is sexually frustrated in
her marriage to a bisexual art collector (Malcolm Gets), who actually is more interested
in his friend, a struggling painter (Steve Buscemi), who also happens to be pursuing an
art gallery receptionist (Rosario Dawson); she confesses her infidelity to her boyfriend
(Adrian Grenier), who seeks solace in the company of an older woman (Carol Kane),
who then has a disturbing attempt at telephone sex with a desperate Wall Street trader
(Michael Imperioli); he ends his night with the same streetwalker who started the tale and
set into motion this variety of rendez-vous that delineates the enormous gulf between
what we want, what we need, and what we get.

In his assured and elegant feature debut, Peter Mattei cleverly updates Arthur Schnitzler‟s
classic play “Reigen,” retaining its innovative “daisy chain” structure and its enduring
theme of sex as the great equalizer, while creating a time-capsule worthy portrait of
contemporary New York at its most beautiful and most reckless.
                             ABOUT THE PRODUCTION

                          LOVE IN THE TIME OF MONEY


In his debut feature, LOVE IN THE TIME OF MONEY, writer/director Peter Mattei has
painted a moody and evocative mural of millennial New York, a city on the brink of
momentous change. And, like the city, its inhabitants are also depicted as teetering,
whether between love and loneliness, hunger and satisfaction, wealth and poverty, or
happiness and despair. Set at the height of the go-for-broke nineties Nasdaq boom, the
film focuses on nine stories that are structurally and thematically linked. Together, they
create a haunting picture of a reckless, rapacious era that is at once very recent and very
far from where we are today.

Mattei, an experienced playwright and stage director, who had also studied and taught
film at Yale, had long wanted to make a movie. He found his inspiration in a tour of duty
done at a hot internet company. As he recalls it, “I started working on the script after I
left my job as an executive producer at Razorfish. A big impetus for my writing was my
experience in the dot.com world at the peak of the market -- a world that no longer
exists, really.”

What Mattei remembered was “a version of the city in which everyone was very manic,
very kinetic and obsessed with making more and more money. People were consuming
like mad, but their desire was non-stop and no one had any time to enjoy what they were
consuming. It seemed to me that New York had become a little bit crazy, and people
were having a hard time seeing each other as people, and that it was a very, very tough
time for relationships. Money had something to do with what everyone was doing on
some level.”

Mattei‟s viewpoint was phenomenological. He wanted to portray a time, a place, and an
entire moral climate and he searched for a structure that would encompass every stratum
of society, from its heights to its depths. His search led him to Arthur Schnitzler‟s classic
play, “Reigen,” which he then freely adapted and updated. Written in 1896, “Reigen”
was, appropriately, also an expression of fin de siecle malaise. With its divinely decadent
Viennese setting and depiction of the Austro-Hungarian Empire as it hurtled toward the
cataclysm of World War I, it suited Mattei‟s needs perfectly. Beginning and ending with
a prostitute, and climbing up and down the social ladder, the play‟s characters were
clearly dancing on the edge of a precipice, just as New Yorkers were in the 1990s.

“Reigen” also boasted a dazzling and innovative structure consisting of overlapping
vignettes in which character A encounters character B, followed by character B meeting
character C, C meeting D, and so on. Each vignette is built around a sexual quest,
usually transactional and devoid of romance. And, while the characters are all linked by
their common desires and needs, there is no sense of community. Each of them is
restricted to two unrelated liaisons and the wider the circle grows, the greater the sense of
loneliness and isolation.

Schnitzler‟s play had already proven its cinematic viability. It had been filmed several
times previously, most notably by the legendary Max Ophuls in 1950‟s LA RONDE and
again by Roger Vadim in the 1964 CIRCLE OF LOVE. These versions transposed
Vienna to France, but retained the original period. Modernizations were also attempted,
the most famous being David Hare‟s 1999 stage play “The Blue Room.” The success of
that project was a testament to Schnitzler‟s enduring topicality, and it is hardly
coincidental that at the very same time Stanley Kubrick was also transferring a Schnitzler
work (the book TRAUMNOVEL) to contemporary New York in EYES WIDE SHUT.
Like “Reigen,” that too was about the sexual odysseys of characters who seemed to have
it all but who never seemed to have enough.

The very week Mattei finished his script, he got a call from a friend who was scouting
projects for the Sundance Filmmakers Lab. He sent in the script. “They liked what I‟d
done and they made a spot for me. At the lab I met Robert Redford and Lisa Bellomo
and they optioned the movie and sent me to Jason Kliot and Joanna Vicente, who liked
the project for their digital division, Blow Up Pictures. We spent about a year working
on the script and then went into pre-production in September 2000.”

Mattei attributes his luck in getting his project off the ground to his collaborators. “I‟ve
been very lucky and blessed by being able to attract great actors. Much of this was due to
having great producers and part was having the great casting director Sheila Jaffe on our
team.” But once again he was indebted to Schnitzler, whose daisy chain structure proved
quite practical from a casting point of view. “No actor is required for more than two
sequences. It was only a five or six day commitment for most people and many found
that attractive and liberating. Also, many of these people were from the theatre, and the
film is very dialogue heavy and actors generally react very well when they have a lot to
say. I like to say that I write and direct for actors and they tend to appreciate that.”

Mattei‟s eclectic cast, comprised of independent film stalwarts like Steve Buscemi and
Rosario Dawson as well as television stars such as Jill Hennessy, Carol Kane, and
Michael Imperioli, delivered uniformly strong performances, with each registering
powerfully despite the comparative brevity of screen time. “I learned a lot by listening to
the actors. There‟s a scene where Adrian Grenier is walking down a Coney Island street
with Carol Kane and he starts doing these sort of hip-hop beats, and another scene with
Rosario where he does sort of a boy-band thing. I had seen Adrian do these routines over
drinks the night before, and asked him to do it in the movie. I‟ve found that if you listen
to what people bring to you, sometimes you can put it in just the right place.”

For his maiden directorial effort Mattei also benefited enormously from using digital
video, something his producers Kliot and Vicente have mastered with their digital
division Blow Up. Having successfully used the format with excellent results in such
acclaimed films as SERIES 7, CHUCK AND BUCK, and LOVELY AND AMAZING,
they helped Mattei deliver a film with all the elegance and polish its glamorous
metropolitan setting required. Of the process, he observes, “To me, DV is just another
film stock. We shot DV because it was the right thing to do, and it gave me the
flexibility to shoot a lot and focus on performance without having to worry as much
about how many dollars were flowing through the camera. I did not set out to do a
“dogma” film. It had to be about the acting and not about things like natural light and 40
cameras rolling at once. Because I had a vision of New York as a gleaming city full of
wealth and style, we didn‟t want to shoot it in a gritty, handheld way. I did a lot of
research on DV technology so that I could try to shoot it in a more stylized way, and I
had a great DP, Steve Kazmierski, who really made it work.”

Mattei goes on to say, ”Digital Video also surprised me after we‟d finished shooting. I
was thinking about how to make transitions between the segments of the film and what to
do about an opening credit sequence and I planned a bunch of things. I got one of those
tiny hand-help consumer-grade DV cameras and went out around New York and on the
subway and just sort of experimented. I really liked the grainy, pixilated nature of those
portraits of real people in the streets and subways of New York and I sort of became
obsessed with this idea and we ended up using exactly what I shot.”

Using these “captured” moments as connective tissue, Mattei emphasizes the randomness
with which we connect to one another. “The movie is about the fact that there are
millions of stories in the city and we bring nine of them into focus. What links them all is
that the characters seem to blindly, or myopically, pursue their desires to the exclusion of
all else. As a result, they run the risk of missing out on love. But, I really believe what
Carol Kane‟s character says; „We‟re all connected by love.‟ So, in that way, I guess the
movie is a cautionary tale.”
                                  ABOUT THE CAST

                          LOVE IN THE TIME OF MONEY


STEVE BUSCEMI
Martin Kunkle

Steve Buscemi has become the actor of choice for many of the best directors in the
business. Last year his film “Ghost World” earned him honors for Best Supporting Actor
from the New York Film Critics Circle and the L.A. Film Critics Circle, as well as a
Golden Globe nomination. His resume also includes: Jim Jarmusch's “Mystery Train,”
for which he received an IFP Spirit Award nomination; Alexandre Rockwell's 1992
Sundance Film Festival Jury Award-winner “In the Soup”; Martin Scorsese's “New York
Stories”; the Coen Brothers' “Millers Crossing,” “Barton Fink,” the Academy Award-
winning “Fargo,” and “The Big Lebowski”; Tom DiCillo's Sundance Film Festival
award-winning “Living in Oblivion”; “28 Days”; “Twenty Bucks”; John Carpenter's
“Escape From L.A.”; Stanley Tucci‟s “The Imposters”; Robert Rodriguez‟s “Desperado”;
Gary Fleder‟s “Things to Do in Denver When You're Dead”; Rockwell's “Somebody to
Love”; an IFP Spirit Award-winning performance as Mr. Pink in Quentin Tarantino's
“Reservoir Dogs”; Robert Altman's “Kansas City,” as well as numerous supporting
appearances in films such as “Rising Sun,” “The Hudsucker Proxy,” “Pulp Fiction,” and
“Con Air.”

Buscemi's recent films include: the voice of Randall Boggs in “Monsters, Inc.,”
“Domestic Disturbance,” “Final Fantasy,” “Double Whammy,” “13 Moons,” “Mr.
Deeds,” and “Spy Kids 2: The Island of Lost Dreams.”


JILL HENNESSY
Ellen Walker

Hailing from Edmonton, Canada, Hennessy began her film career appearing in David
Cronenberg‟s “Dead Ringers.” She studied improvisational comedy with the famed
Second City and also worked with a Toronto-based improv comedy troupe before landing
a role in the Broadway-bound production of “The Buddy Holly Story.”

Once in New York, Hennessy starred in Ron Howard‟s “The Paper.” Her additional film
credits include: “I Shot Andy Warhol,” “Chutney Popcorn,” “Most Wanted,” “A Smile
Like Yours,” “Dead Broke,” “Row Your Boat,” “The Florentine,” “Two Ninas,”
“Molly,” “Komodo,” “Autumn in New York” and “Exit Wounds.” She also performed in
“The Acting Class,” on which she also served as writer and co-director.

Television audiences know Hennessy best for her three years as assistant district attorney
Claire Kincaid on the Emmy-winning NBC drama series “Law & Order.” She returned to
NBC starring as First Lady Jacqueline Kennedy in the miniseries “Jackie, Ethel, Joan:
Women of Camelot” and in the series “Crossing Jordan.”


ROSARIO DAWSON
Anna

With numerous films already to her credit, Rosario Dawson is emerging as one of
Hollywood‟s hottest young actresses. She recently starred opposite Eddie Murphy in the
futuristic action/comedy “The Adventures of Pluto Nash” and opposite Will Smith and
Tommy Lee Jones in “Men In Black 2.” She also was seen in “Sidewalks of New York,”
the romantic comedy written, directed by and starring Ed Burns and plays the female lead
in Burns‟ next film, “Ash Wednesday.”

Other recent roles include “Chelsea Walls” for director Ethan Hawke, and “The First $20
Million is Always The Hardest,” written by Jon Favreau and directed by Mick Jackson.

Dawson made her film debut in the highly acclaimed and controversial hit “Kids”
directed by Larry Clark, and went on to appear in Spike Lee‟s “He Got Game” opposite
Denzel Washington, “Light It Up,” opposite Forrest Whitaker and Vanessa Williams,
“Down To You,” with Freddie Prinze Jr., and “Josie and the Pussycats,” with Rachael
Lee Cook and Tara Reid.


MICHAEL IMPERIOLI
Will

Michael Imperioli is currently on HBO‟s hit show “The Sopranos,” for which he earned a
nomination for the 2001 Emmy Award for outstanding supporting actor in a drama series
for his role as Christopher Moltisanti.

He has appeared in over thirty films, including Martin Scorsese's “Goodfellas,” five films
with Spike Lee (“Jungle Fever,” “Malcolm X,” “Clockers,” “Girl 6” and “Summer Of
Sam”), “Dead Presidents,” “The Addiction,” “Household Saints,” “Bad Boys,”
“Basketball Diaries,” “I Shot Andy Warhol,” “Girls Town,” “Last Man Standing,”
“Sweet Nothing,” and “Office Killer.” Additionally, Imperioli co-wrote and was
executive producer of “Summer Of Sam.” Television appearances include guest leads on
“Law and Order,” “NYPD Blue” and “Under Suspicion,” as well as more recent roles in
“Hamlet” and “Disappearing Act.”

Imperioli has produced, directed and acted on the New York stage for over a decade.
Some of his work includes his critically acclaimed performances in “Avenue Boys”
directed by Frederick Zollo, “Displaced Persons” (opposite Martha Plimpton), “Half
Deserted Street,” Seth Zvi Rosenfeld's “The Writing On The Wall,” and “Little Blood
Brother.” As producer and director, he co-founded Machine Full, an experimental
downtown theater company, creating over twenty new works with writer Tom Gilroy and
actor Lili Taylor.


ADRIAN GRENIER
Nick

Adrian Grenier received critical acclaim for his dynamic performance in “The
Adventures of Sebastian Cole.” He also was seen in “Hart‟s War,” “Cecil B. Demented,”
Woody Allen‟s “Celebrity,” “Drive Me Crazy,” “Hurricane Streets” and “A.I.” Most
recently he starred in James Toback‟s “Harvard Man.”

Also a gifted, self-taught musician, Grenier attended Barnard College and Manhattan‟s
prestigious LaGuardia High School for Music & Art and the Performing Arts.



VERA FARMIGA
Greta

Vera Farmiga currently is starring in NBC‟s “UC: Undercover,” on which she plays Alex
Cross, a member of a highly specialized unit within the Justice Department that goes
deep undercover to apprehend powerful criminals.

On film she co-starred opposite Robert De Niro and Edward Burns in the feature film
“Fifteen Minutes,” the romantic comedy “Dummy,” with Adrien Brody, and the
television feature “Snow White,” with Miranda Richardson.

Other film credits include “Autumn in New York,” “The Opportunists,” and “Return to
Paradise.” She is also an accomplished stage actress who has appeared in several
productions as a member of the Barrow Group, a NY theater company, where her credits
include “The Tempest,” “The Seagull,” and “Good.”



MALCOLM GETS
Robert Walker

Since his graduation from the prestigious Yale Drama School, Malcolm Gets has had
steady work on stage, in films and on television, both in the United States and Europe.
Most recently he sang at Carnegie Hall with Barbara Cook and completed work on the
film “Thirteen Conversations About One Thing,” directed by Jill Sprecher.

Gets‟ stage credits include the off-Broadway production of the Marc Blitzstein musical
“Juno,” “Martin Guerre,” directed by Mark Lamos, and the Obie winning “Hello Again,”
written by Michael John LaChiusa at Lincoln Center.
He portrayed the lead in the York Theatre Company‟s revival of Stephen Sondheim‟s
“Merrily We Roll Along,” which brought him a Drama Desk nomination as Best Actor in
a musical as well as an Obie Award. Later he starred in “Two Gentleman of Verona” at
the Delacorte Theatre in New York‟s Central Park, for which he won another Obie. His
most recent stage credit is as the star of Michel Legrand‟s Broadway musical “L‟Amour.”

Gets had a successful four year run starring in the hit NBC series “Caroline in the City.”
His other television credits include: “Law and Order,” “Southbeach,” and “Showboat.”



CAROL KANE
Joey

Carol Kane‟s first starring role in a film, portraying a Jewish bride in “Hester Street,”
brought her an Oscar nomination in 1975. She also played Woody Allen's first wife in
“Annie Hall,” Gene Wilder's Valentino-struck wife in “The World's Greatest Lover”
(both in 1977), and the terrorized baby-sitter in “When a Stranger Calls” (1979).

Best known on TV as Simka on the sitcom “Taxi,” Kane earned two Emmy Awards for
her role playing the wife of Andy Kaufman's character, Latka. Kane‟s additional film
credits include” “Is This Trip Really Necessary?,” “Carnal Knowledge,” “The Last
Detail,” and “Dog Day Afternoon.” She has had supporting roles in such films as “Racing
With the Moon,” “Jumpin' Jack Flash,” “The Princess Bride,” “Ishtar,” and “Scrooged.”
Other credits include playing herself in “Man On The Moon,” “My First Mister,”
“Jawbreakers,” and “Trees Lounge,” written, directed by, and starring Steve Buscemi.


DOMENICK LOMBARDOZZI
Edward Iovine

Lombardozzi‟s film credits include appearances in “Kate & Leopold,” “The Yards,”
“54,” “Kiss Me Guido” and “A Bronx Tale.” His TV credits include guest roles on
HBO‟s hit series “Oz,” “NYPD Blue.” and “Law and Order.”
                             ABOUT THE FILMMAKERS

                          LOVE IN THE TIME OF MONEY



PETER MATTEI
Writer/Director

Peter Mattei is a writer and director who works in both theatre and film. “Love in the
Time of Money" is his first feature. The script was developed at the Sundance
Filmmakers Lab in 1998.

Mattei is a founding member of the Obie-winning Cucaracha Theatre in New York,
where he wrote, designed and directed several plays to critical acclaim. The Village
Voice called his work "rare and distinctive" and The New York Times hailed his
directing as "electrifying." His plays have also been produced in Los Angeles, San
Francisco, Seattle, Chicago and many other cities.

He was executive producer at Razorfish Studios, where he created original web-based
content, some of which is in the permanent collection of the San Francisco Museum of
Modern Art.

Mattei studied at Brown University and at the Yale School of Drama, where he also
taught film studies, and has received a residency grant at the Royal Court Theatre in
London. He lives in Brooklyn.


JOANA VICENTE AND JASON KLIOT
Producers

Joana Vicente and Jason Kliot are Co-Founders and Co-Presidents of Open City Films
and its digital production division Blow Up Pictures, both of which are dedicated to the
discovery and advancement of ground-breaking independent visions in film. Together
and separately they have worked on over 30 feature films, shorts and commercials, and
have a proven track record for producing critically acclaimed and commercially
successful films. They produced the Miramax financed “Down to You,” directed by Kris
Isacsson and starring Freddie Prinze Jr. and Julia Stiles. The film opened at the top of the
U.S. box office charts and grossed over $20 million in the first month of its national
release. They also produced Tony Bui‟s “Three Seasons” which was the first film ever to
win both the Grand Jury Prize and the Audience Award at the Sundance Film Festival.

For Blow Up Pictures, they executive produced “Chuck and Buck,” and produced “Series
7,” both of which premiered at Sundance. Both films were critical and commercial
successes, and have been sold to all major territories throughout the world. Their most
recent production was Nicole Holofcener‟s “Lovely and Amazing.”
Other projects include: “Too Much Sleep,” “Welcome to the Dollhouse” (Grand Jury
Prize, 1996 Sundance Film Festival), “All Revved Up,” “A, B, C . . . Manhattan” (official
selection, 50th Cannes Film Festival, 1998 Sundance Film Festival), “Chocolate Babies”
(official selection, Berlin Film Festival), “Childhood‟s End” (official selection, Montreal
Film Festival), “Strawberry Fields,” and “The Incredibly True Adventures of Two Girls
in Love.”

Before founding Open City Films and Blow Up Pictures, Vicente worked as a press
attaché for the European Parliament, as a producer of television political campaigns in
her native Portugal, and as a radio producer at the United Nations.

Kliot previously worked as an assistant director for such notable filmmakers as Sam
Fuller, Wim Wenders and Euzhan Palcy. He is also a co-founder of City Harvest, a food
redistribution program in New York City.


LISA BELLOMO
Producer

Currently, Bellomo serves as Senior Vice President of Production/Development at
Michael Douglas' Furthur Films. Previously, she served as Senior Vice President of
Production/Development for Robert Redford's South Fork Pictures from 1995 to 2000,
where she co-produced “How To Kill Your Neighbor's Dog,” starring Kenneth Branagh
and Robin Wright Penn. Bellomo also served as an executive on South Fork's numerous
features in development and production, where she worked alongside writer/director's Ed
Burns, Tamra Jenkins, Walter Salles and Milcho Manchevski.

Before joining South Fork, Bellomo was Director of Development for Paula
Weinstein's Spring Creek Productions, working on such features as “Fearless,”
“Flesh & Bone” and “Something To Talk About.” Prior to South Fork, Bellomo spent
two years as a story editor for Sydney Pollack and Mark Rosenberg at Mirage
Productions.


GRETCHEN MCGOWAN
Producer

Gretchen McGowan has been producing feature films and documentaries for over eleven
years. As a line producer, her projects include “Buffalo ‟66,” “Two Girls and a Guy,”
“Heavy” and “American Psycho.”

McGowan has been working with Blow Up Pictures and Open City Films as the head of
production since December 1999. Blow Up‟s digitally originated projects for theatrical
distribution have included Miguel Arteta‟s “Chuck & Buck,” Dan Minahan‟s “Series 7,”
Alan Wade‟s “The Pornographer,” and Nicole Holofcener‟s second feature, “Lovely And
Amazing.”

Since 1987, Gretchen developed, produced, and secured distribution for several
acclaimed documentaries, including “Martha and Ethel,” “Unmade Beds,” and “The
Dancemaker” which was nominated for an Academy Award in 1999.


ROBERT REDFORD
Executive Producer

Executive producer Robert Redford has received international acclaim for his work as a
director, actor and producer, as well as his efforts as a champion of independent film and
the environment.

Redford won an Academy Award, a Golden Globe and a Director‟s Guild of America
Award for his feature film directorial debut on “Ordinary People.” He went on to direct
and produce “The Milagro Beanfield War,” “A River Runs Through It,” “Quiz Show,”
“The Horse Whisperer,” and “The Legend of Bagger Vance.” Also honored for his
acting work, Redford received an Academy Award nomination for Best Actor for his
performance in “The Sting.” Among his numerous acting credits are “Jeremiah Johnson,”
“The Way We Were,” “The Candidate,” “Three Days of the Condor,” “All the Presidents
Men,” “The Natural,” “Out of Africa” and “The Horse Whisperer.” He recently starred
in “Spy Game” opposite Brad Pitt.


MICHAEL NOZIK
Executive Producer

Michael Nozik has been Robert Redford‟s producing partner since 1995 and President of
his film production companies - Wildwood Enterprises and South Fork Pictures. A
veteran of 14 years of producing, he received an Academy Award nomination for his
work as the producer of “Quiz Show,” directed by Redford and starring Ralph Fiennes.

Most recently, he produced the thriller “People I Know” starring Al Pacino, Kim
Basinger, and Tea Leoni, and the Redford directed “The Legend of Bagger Vance,”
starring Matt Damon and Will Smith.

For South Fork, Nozik also produced “How to Kill Your Neighbor‟s Dog,“ starring
Kenneth Branagh and Robin Wright Penn, “Slums of Beverly Hills,” starring Alan Arkin
and Marisa Tomei; “No Looking Back,” starring Edward Burns and Lauren Holly; and
executive produced “She‟s the One,” starring Edward Burns, Cameron Diaz, and Jennifer
Aniston.

Previously, Nozik produced three films for award-winning director Mira Nair: “The
Perez Family,” starring Marisa Tomei and Anjelica Huston; “Mississippi Masala,”
starring Denzel Washington; and the Academy Award nominated “Salaam Bombay!”
His other producing credits include “Thunderheart,” starring Val Kilmer; the HBO movie
“Criminal Justice,” starring Forest Whittaker, “Crossing Delancey,” with Amy Irving,
and Abel Ferrara‟s “China Girl.”


STEPHEN KAZMIERSKI
Director of Photography

Stephen Kazmierski has photographed Kenneth Lonergan‟s Academy Award-nominated
and 2001 Sundance Film Festival Grand Jury Award-winning film “You Can Count on
Me.” In addition, he photographed “The Myth of Fingerprints,” directed by Bart
Freundlich.

Other credits include: “Skins,” “Boys on the Run,” “Tart,” “The Bumblebee Flies Away,”
“The Florentine,” “Murder & Murder,” “Grind,” “Blessing,” and the documentary
“Listen Up, The Lives of Quincy Jones.”


SUSAN BLOCK
Production Designer

Susan Block has worked as a production designer, set decorator and art director on a
variety of projects including “Ash Wednesday,” written, directed and starring Ed Burns,
Brad Anderson‟s “Happy Accidents,” Tom Gilroy‟s “Spring Forward,” Todd Solondz‟
1996 Sundance Film Festival Grand Jury Award-winner “Welcome to the Dollhouse,”
and “Spanking the Monkey,” the Audience Award-winner at the 1994 Sundance Film
Festival.

Music video credits include: “Crash Into Me” for Dave Matthews Band, “K.D. Lang‟s
“Miss Chatelaine,” Bobby Brown‟s “That‟s the Way Love Is,” Sting‟s “Englishman in
New York,” and Cyndi Lauper‟s “Time After Time” and “Girls Just Wanna Have Fun.”

				
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