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					                  Any book                                                                                                Any book
                      Any                             Print Motivation                                                        Any                             Print Motivation
                     early                                                                                                   early
                                                      Phonological Awareness                                                                                  Phonological Awareness
                                                       Vocabulary                                                                                              Vocabulary
                   literacy                            Narrative Skills
                                                       Print Awareness
                                                                                                                           literacy                            Narrative Skills
                                                                                                                                                               Print Awareness
                      skill                            Letter Knowledge                                                       skill                            Letter Knowledge




    Print Motivation is one of the six early literacy skills                                                  Print Awareness is one of the early literacy skills
    that researchers say are important for children to become                                                 that researchers say is important for children to have
    readers. Print Motivation is a child’s interest in and                                                    in order to learn to read.
    enjoyment of books and reading. Children who enjoy                                                        Print Awareness includes knowing that print has
    books are more likely to want to learn to read, and to keep                                               meaning, knowing how to handle a book, and
    trying even when it is hard.                                                                              noticing print all around.

                                                                                                        Books:
                                                                                                                  Some books have writing as part of the story
Books:                                                                                                    
                                                                                                                  (Bunny Cakes; Click, Clack, Moo).
          Choose books you enjoy.
                                                                                                                 Some books have writing as part of the pictures
          Choose books your child enjoys.
                                                                                                                  (Hi Pizza Man, Martha Speaks).
          Give your child opportunities to choose and look at
                                                                                                                 Any book helps develop print awareness.
           books.
          Follow your child’s interests; use true books and                                            Book Sharing:
           stories.                                                                                              Let your child turn the pages of the book.
                                                                                                                  Point to words of the title as you say them.
Book Sharing:                                                                                             
                                                                                                                 Point to the words in a repeated phrase as you
          Keep the interaction around the book positive and
                                                                                                                  say them. This helps your child see that, in
           enjoyable. Your child picks up on your attitude.
                                                                                                                  English, we read from left to right and from top
          When you are reading a book you particularly enjoy,
                                                                                                                  to bottom of the page.
           tell your child you like this book.
                                                                                                                 Point to a word that interests your child. Show
          Keep your child involved, even if it means not
                                                                                                                  your child that written words have a space on
           reading the book word for word.
                                                                                                                  each side.
          Remember that your child’s age, stage, personality,
                                                                                                                 Play around with the orientation of the book.
           and mood affect how he interacts with books.
                                                                                                                  Start with it upside down and backwards. Tell
          If your child is not interested in reading, start out
                                                                                                                  your child you are turning it around so you can
           reading just a page or two at a time. Keeping the
                                                                                                                  read it. Use the words “front” and “back” of the
           interaction positive will help their interest grow.
                                                                                                                  book. If your child hands you a book upside down
           If they are still not interested, try another time.
                                                                                                                  or backwards, explain that you are turning it to
          Share books throughout the day, not just at
                                                                                                                  start at the beginning.
           specific times like bedtime or naptime.
                                                                                                                 Use the terms author and illustrator each time
          Read with your child every day. Even if the time is
                                                                                                                  you read a book with your child.
           short, if it is positive, it will help develop your
                                                                                                                 Encourage drawing. Your child can draw a picture
           child’s interest in reading.
                                                                                                                  of what is happening in the book.
    Research tells us:                                                                                          Encourage scribbling. Your child can “write”
                                                                                                                  words to the story on a piece of paper.
   When the interaction around the book is negative,
   the child associates books and reading with that                                                        Research tells us:
   negative experience. It is important to keep the                                                       Research shows that pre-readers focus on the
   interaction around the book a positive one.                                                            pictures in a book. 95% of their visual attention is
                                                                                                          directed toward the pictures. With the help of
                                                                                                          adults children can explore print, and help them
                                                                                                          realize that the written word has meaning.
 Based on information from Every Child Ready to Read @ your library®, a program of the Public Library     Based on information from Every Child Ready to Read @ your library®, a program of the Public Library
 Association and the Association for Library Service to Children, divisions of the American Library       Association and the Association for Library Service to Children, divisions of the American Library
 Association. (www.ala.org/everychild)                                                                    Association. (www.ala.org/everychild)
               Any book                                                                                                     Any book
                   Any                             Print Motivation                                                             Any                             Print Motivation
                  early                                                                                                        early
                                                   Phonological Awareness                                                                                       Phonological Awareness
                                                    Vocabulary                                                                                                   Vocabulary
                literacy                            Narrative Skills
                                                    Print Awareness
                                                                                                                             literacy                            Narrative Skills
                                                                                                                                                                 Print Awareness
                   skill                            Letter Knowledge                                                            skill                            Letter Knowledge




   Letter Knowledge is one of the early literacy skills                                                        Vocabulary is one of the early literacy skills that
   that researchers say is important for children to have in                                                   researchers say is important for children to have in order
   order to learn to read.                                                                                     to learn to read. The more vocabulary children have the
   Letter Knowledge is knowing that the same letter                                                            easier it will be for them to understand what they are
   can look different, that letters have names and are                                                         reading.
   related to sounds.                                                                                          Vocabulary is knowing the names of things, feelings,
                                                                                                               concepts, and ideas.

Books:
          Books with shapes                                                                             Books:
          Books where you have to find things                                                                    Books with words not used in daily conversation.
           (like I Spy books).                                                                                    True books use different words than those used
          Alphabet books                                                                                          in stories.
          Any book!                                                                                              Any book!

Book Sharing:                                                                                            Book Sharing:
          With any book, not necessarily an alphabet book,                                                       Explain an unfamiliar word; do not replace it with
           you can point out a letter.                                                                             a familiar one.
          Trace a letter from the title with your finger                                                         When a word has more than one meaning, talk
           and let your child do it, too.                                                                          about the different meanings.
          Alphabet books do not necessarily need to be                                                           Pick out a word from a book, rhyme or song. For
           read from cover to cover. Let your child choose                                                         an unfamiliar word, explain it. For a familiar word,
           what letters to talk about.                                                                             think of a new word that has a similar meaning.
          When reading an alphabet book your child may                                                           Add descriptive words or more information than
           talk about the picture. Listen, and then also talk                                                      is in the book.
           about the letter and its sound.                                                                        Encourage your child to talk about the pictures.
          Show your child the first letter in his name.                                                           Add information and ideas to what he says.
           Look for that letter in the book.                                                                      Use words to describe what characters in the
          Talk about some of the letters in the book. Can                                                         book might be feeling, even if those words are not
           you find an upper case and a lower case of the                                                          used in the book.
           same letter?                                                                                           Use words to describe ideas in the story even if
          Talk about some of the letters in the book.                                                             those words are not used in the book.
           Choose two letters: How do they look alike? How                                                        Use specific words instead of words like it, here,
           do they look different? What shapes do they                                                             there.
           have in them?                                                                                          Your child learns and remembers by having words
          Encourage scribbling, drawing, and writing.                                                             and books repeated. Be patient as you re-read the
                                                                                                                   same story over and over or answer the same
    Research tells us:                                                                                            questions over and over.
   When you talk about letters, say the name of the
   letter as well as the sound it makes. Young                                                              Research tells us:
   children can hear the sound of the letter most                                                          Children’s books have three times more rare words
   easily when it is at the beginning of the word.                                                         than we use in conversation.



  Based on information from Every Child Ready to Read @ your library®, a program of the Public Library         Based on information from Every Child Ready to Read @ your library®, a program of the Public Library
  Association and the Association for Library Service to Children, divisions of the American Library           Association and the Association for Library Service to Children, divisions of the American Library
  Association. (www.ala.org/everychild)                                                                        Association. (www.ala.org/everychild)
                Any book                                                                                                 Any book
                    Any                             Print Motivation                                                         Any                             Print Motivation
                   early                                                                                                    early
                                                    Phonological Awareness                                                                                   Phonological Awareness
                                                     Vocabulary                                                                                               Vocabulary
                 literacy                            Narrative Skills
                                                     Print Awareness
                                                                                                                          literacy                            Narrative Skills
                                                                                                                                                              Print Awareness
                    skill                            Letter Knowledge                                                        skill                            Letter Knowledge




  Phonological Awarneess is one of the early literacy                                                          Narrative Skills is one of the early literacy skills that
  skills that researchers say is important for children to have                                                researchers say are important for children to have in order to
  in order to learn to read.                                                                                   learn to read. Narrative skills help children understand what
  Phonological Awarenes is the ability to hear and play                                                        they hear and read.
  with the smaller sounds in words.                                                                            Narrative Skills is expressive language, including being
                                                                                                               able to descibe things, to tell events in order, and to retell
                                                                                                               stories.
Books:
           Books with rhyme
   
                                                                                                         Books:
          Books with alliteration
                                                                                                                  Books with a repeated phrase
          Books with sounds of animals and other things
                                                                                                                  Books with repetition as part of the story
          Song in book format
                                                                                                                  Books that tell a cumulative tale
          Books of Mother Goose rhymes
                                                                                                                  Books with a natural sequence
          Poetry books
                                                                                                                  Any book!
          Any book!
                                                                                                         Book Sharing:
Book Sharing:                                                                                                     Encourage participation, saying a repeated phrase
          Whether or not the book rhymes, you and your
                                                                                                                   together.
           child can make up rhyming words for any word in
                                                                                                                  Re-read books so that your child can become
           the book. Remember rhyming words do not have to
                                                                                                                   familiar with the story, making it easier to retell
           make sense. They can be silly words.
                                                                                                                   the story.
          It is easier to recognize a rhyme than to make a
                                                                                                                  Have your child retell the story.
           rhyme. If your child cannot say what word rhymes
                                                                                                                  Encourage your child to tell you something from
           with one you give him ,then see if he can tell you if
                                                                                                                   her own experience related to what happened in
           two words you say rhyme. Then you can move on to
                                                                                                                   the book.
           “Which two of these three words rhyme?
                                                                                                                  Use props to tell the story to help your child
          Choose a long word from the book and clap out the
                                                                                                                   remember it.
           syllables.
                                                                                                                  Have your child use props to help retell the story.
          Choose a word from the book and say the first
                                                                                                                  Encourage your child to talk about the pictures in
           sound very clearly. You and your child can say other
                                                                                                                   the book even if what she says is not in the story.
           words with the same starting sound.
                                                                                                                   Follow your child’s lead as your child talks about
          Play an “I Spy” game using the pictures in the book.
                                                                                                                   what is going on in a picture. Ask open-ended
           “I spy something in this picture. It is red and it
                                                                                                                   questions, ones that cannot be answered with yes
           rhymes with block.” “Sock!” Or “Let’s see how many
                                                                                                                   or no.
           things we can spy in this picture that starts with
                                                                                                                  Talk about the pictures in the book and let your
           the /d/ sound.”
                                                                                                                   child tell you his thoughts and experiences.
                                                                                                                  Have your child draw pictures of the story and
    Research tells us:
                                                                                                                   retell it or make up her own story.
   Many preschoolers are not able to hear the smaller
   sounds in words. Adults who play games that                                                              Research tells us:
   highlight sounds in words with preschoolers help them                                                   While reading books, give additional information and
   develop phonological awareness.                                                                         relate the pictures and story to the child’s
                                                                                                           experiences. This is strongly related to later early
                                                                                                           literacy development.
  Based on information from Every Child Ready to Read @ your library®, a program of the Public Library      Based on information from Every Child Ready to Read @ your library®, a program of the Public Library
  Association and the Association for Library Service to Children, divisions of the American Library        Association and the Association for Library Service to Children, divisions of the American Library
  Association. (www.ala.org/everychild)                                                                     Association. (www.ala.org/everychild)

				
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