Amy Fujimoto Woodinville Montessori_ Washington Conventions Key

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					                               Conventions
                              Key Experience

Materials: white board, overhead projector or large piece of butcher paper

Aim: introduction to the Trait “Conventions” from the Six Traits

   1. Begin with a large or small group.
   2. Start writing, it could be a story or what happened that day. The
      important thing is to use no spacing, capitals or punctuation. Write
      approximately the amount of one paragraph.
   3. Invite a child to read your writing, discuss why it is hard.
   4. Share the idea of “Conventions”: writers use conventions when they
      check for spelling, penmanship, sentence structure, paragraphs and
      punctuation.
   5. Follow up with any of the “Conventions” writing prompts. Any writing
      prompt can focus on the “Conventions” Trait.




Amy Fujimoto                            Woodinville Montessori, Washington
                                  Ideas
                              Key Experience

Materials: classroom

Aim: introduction to the Trait “Ideas” from the Six Traits

   1. Invite the children to guess what it is you are looking at, similar to
      the “I spy” game. Use many details to describe what it is.
   2. Continue the game allowing other children to take a turn.
   3. Ask the group, “How did you know what the objects were that we were
      describing?”
   4. Continue by explaining that good writers practice this all the time.
      Writers are using “Ideas” when they write about one thing clearly and
      with many details.
   5. Show the etymology of the word “Ideas” and the definition.
   6. Follow up with any of the “Ideas” writing prompts. Any writing prompt
      can focus on the “Ideas” Trait.




Amy Fujimoto                            Woodinville Montessori, Washington
Six Trait Definitions             Six Trait Definitions
Ideas                             Sentence Fluency

idea- Greek origin from           sentence – Latin origin
idein, to see                     sententia meaning an
                                  opinion
I am using “ideas” in my          fluency – Latin origin
writing when I use details.       fluere meaning to flow
My writing is about one
thing or story.                   I am using “sentence
                                  fluency” in my writing
                                  when it has rhythm as I
Six Trait Definitions             read out loud.
Word Choice

choice- French origin,
choisir meaning to choose         Six Trait Definitions
                                  Voice
I am using “word choice”
in my writing when I              voice – Latin origin vox
choose words that make a          meaning voice
picture in the reader’s
mind.                             I am using “voice” in my
                                  writing when my writing
                                  sounds like me, my
                                  feelings and ideas.




Amy Fujimoto              Woodinville Montessori School, Washington
Six Trait Definitions
Conventions

conventions – Latin origin
venire meaning to come

I am using “conventions” in
my writing when I have
checked my writing for
spelling, capitalization,
punctuation and complete
sentences.




Six Trait Definitions
Organization

organization– Greek origin
organon meaning an
instrument

I am using “organization”
in my writing when I use
order in my writing, there
is a beginning, middle and
end.




Amy Fujimoto             Woodinville Montessori School, Washington
                                Organization
                               Key Experience

Materials: plate, peanut butter (or another nut butter if there are allergies),
jelly, knife, bread

Aim: introduction to the Trait “Organization” from the Six Traits

   1. Begin with a large or small group.
   2. Share what each of the materials is for your presentation. Give a
      title to the action. “ The Peanut Butter and Jelly Sandwich”.
   3. Silently and dramatically begin to make a peanut butter and jelly
      sandwich.
   4. Dramatize each step: getting out the bread, spreading the peanut
      butter, spreading the jelly, placing them together, slicing it, taking a
      bite. End with an exuberant “delicious”!
   5. Together discuss what happened, what were the beginning, the middle
      and the end.
   6. Share the idea of “Organization”: writers use organization when they
      create order in their writing, there is a beginning, middle and end.
   7. Follow up with any of the “Organization” writing prompts. One prompt
      excellent prompt is to have the children create recipes. Any writing
      prompt can focus on the “Organization” Trait.




Amy Fujimoto                     Woodinville Montessori School, Washington
                             Sentence Fluency
                              Key Experience

Materials: choose one of the books for demonstrating Sentence Fluency:
Song and Dance Man by Karen Ackerman, Stella’s Bull by Frances Arrington,
Raising Dragons by Nolen Jerdine and a passage from an encyclopedia

Aim: introduction to the Trait “Sentence Fluency” from the Six Traits

   1. Singing the song London Bridges (or any song with nice rhythm your
   class is familiar with) clap with the rhythm of the song. Invite the
   children to listen for rhythm in the following readings.
   2. Read from the encyclopedia, using a bland, monotone voice.
   3. Read from one of the stories listed above. Use expression.
   4. Ask the children which story had rhythm?
   5. Describe that writers use a variety of sentences that have rhythm; it
   is called “Sentence Fluency”. You can identify excellent Sentence
   Fluency when you read your stories out loud.
   6. Present the cards to help with sentence fluency; these will be
   available to help you write using this trait.
   7. Follow up with any of the “Sentence Fluency” writing prompts. Any
   writing prompt can focus on the Word Choice Trait.




Amy Fujimoto                    Woodinville Montessori School, Washington
                                     Voice
                                Key Experience

Materials: glasses, tie, scarf, any type of dress up clothing

Aim: introduction to the Trait “Voice” from the Six Traits

   1. Begin with a large or small group. Have you glasses and additional
      dress up clothing on.
   2. Start talking to the group in an accent if you feel comfortable doing
      so. Explain what your favorite foods are, vacations, fears and dreams.
      The important element is to have a different speech pattern than
      what you usually use.
   3. Say good-bye to the class as that “character” and take off the
      clothing.
   4. Ask the class whom they met and discuss what they remember.
   5. Share the idea of “Voice”: writers are using their voice when the
      writing sounds like the person who is writing. It shares a person’s
      feelings, fears and ideas.
   6. Follow up with any of the “Voice” writing prompts. An autobiography is
      a great beginning point for this trait. Any writing prompt can focus on
      the Voice Trait.




Amy Fujimoto                     Woodinville Montessori School, Washington
                                 Word Choice
                                Key Experience

Materials: classroom, white board, black board or overhead projector, two
stories one with little detail, poor word choice and another with vivid details,
excellent word choice, each child has two pieces of paper and colored pencils

Aim: introduction to the Trait “Word Choice” from the Six Traits

   1. Explain that you will be reading parts from two stories. They will use
      each piece of paper for the two stories.
   2. Invite the children to draw what they hear.
   3. Read the first story.
   4. Read the second story.
   5. Ask the children which story has the most pictures.
   6. Discuss how the two stories were different. Introduce “Word Choice”
      and it’s definition, and the importance for writers to use this trait.
   7. Follow up with any of the “word choice” writing prompts. This is a
      great time to introduce poetry. Any writing prompt can focus on the
      Word Choice Trait.




Amy Fujimoto                      Woodinville Montessori School, Washington

				
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