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					  COLLEGE OF EDUCATION

       Master of Education
Early Childhood Special Education

     Program Handbook - 2006




       University of Alaska Anchorage

                College of Education
           Professional Studies Building
               3211 Providence Drive
               Anchorage, AK 99508


         Website: www.uaa.alaska.edu/sped



                   Sheila Sellers
                Assistant Professor
                 Jeanne Thompson
                  Project Manager



                    Off Campus:
                 Susan Ryan, Ph.D.
 USDOE, Office of Special Education Project Director
  Alaska Low Incidence Early Intervention Program
                    IN MEMORY OF BURTON BLATT



IN THE FOREWORD, ENTITLED THE POWER OF DREAMS AND WORDS,
STANLEY S. HERR, PRESIDENT, AMERICAN ASSOCIATION ON MENTAL
RETARDATION (1998-1999) WROTE: "BURTON BLATT--PROLIFIC WRITER,
DISTINGUISHED EDUCATOR, AND EXPOSER OF HUMAN ABUSES--WAS ONE OF
THE PIONEERING FIGURES IN THE DISABILITY RIGHTS MOVEMENT" (XI).
BURTON BLATT LEAD THE FIELD OF SPECIAL EDUCATION AND
DEVELOPMENTAL DISABILITIES INTO THE DEINSTITUTIONALIZATION
MOVEMENT IN THE SEVENTIES. FEW PROFESSIONALS HAD THE COURAGE
AND STRENGTH TO SHINE A LIGHT ON THE INCARCERATION OF PEOPLE
WITH DISABILITIES IN INSTITUTIONS ACROSS THE UNITED STATES.

IT IS MY HOPE FOR YOU THAT AS YOU ENTER INTO THE CAREER OF EARLY
INTERVENTION AND EARLY CHILDHOOD SPECIAL EDUCATION THAT YOU
"STAND IN THE DEBT OF, AND IN A DIRECT LINE WITH, ALL TRUTH TELLERS
WHO HAVE GONE BEFORE US." (XII). I HOPE YOU GAIN THE KNOWLEDGE,
SKILLS, AND COURAGE TO STRIVE TO IMPROVE THE LIVES OF THE
CHILDREN WHO EXPERIENCE DISABILITIES WITH WHOM YOU WORK AND
THEIR FAMILIES.

Susan Ryan, Ph.D.




HERR, S. (1999). FORWARD: THE POWER OF DREAMS AND WORDS (PXI-XV). IN,
 S. TAYLOR AND S. BLATT, THE COLLECTED PAPERS OF BURTON BLATT: IN
        SEARCH OF THE PROMISED LAND. AAMR: WASHINGTON, DC.




                                ii
                   FACULTY, STAFF AND SUPPORT SERVICES



Faculty Members                     Phone                  E-Mail

Staff Members
Sheila Sellers, M.Ed. ECSE          907.786.6442           afsrs1@uaa.alaska.edu
Assistant Professor                 907.786.4474fax
Jeanett Meier, M.Ed., Recruitment   907.344.3559           meier_jeanett@asdk12.org
Coordinator                         907.742.2660fax

Jeanne Thompson, B.A., Program      907.786.4424           ayecse@uaa.alaska.edu
Manager                             907.786.4474fax

Support Services

College of Education:               907.786.4401 or 4402   www.uaa.alaska.edu/ed
                                    FAX 907.786.4444

Special Education Homepages                                www.uaa.alaska.edu/sped

UAA Academic Technology             907.786.4646           www.uaaonline.alaska.edu
Services

UAA Enrollment Services Office      907.786.1480           www.uaa.alaska.edu/enroll

UAA Bookstore                       907.786.1151           www.uaa.alaska.edu/bookstore
Off Campus:

Susan Ryan, Ph.D.




                                            iii
                                                         TABLE OF CONTENTS
                                           IN MEMORY OF BURTON BLATT                                                        II

                            FACULTY, STAFF AND SUPPORT SERVICES                                                                          III

                                                        TABLE OF CONTENTS                                     IV

                                                                INTRODUCTION                             6

                                     PROGRAM CONCEPTUAL FRAMEWORK                                                                   6

   OVERVIEW OF THE EARLY CHILDHOOD SPECIAL EDUCATION PROGRAM
                                 10

                                             MASTER'S DEGREE PROGRAM
    College of Education Guidelines for Working with Children Throughout the Duration of
the Master's Program                                                                11

  EARLY C HILDHOOD SPECIAL EDUCATION ADVANCED INTERNSHIPS ....................................................................... 13
US Department of Education, Office of Special Education Programs Grant Funding Student
Responsibilities
 Documentation of Work with Young Children with ASD, FASD, and Severe Disabilities

                             MASTER’S DEGREE POLICIES & PROCEDURES                                                                       17
  MASTER'S DEGREE ADMISSION PROCESS ................................................................................................................ 17
                                          MASTER’S DEGREES - ADVISEMENT 18
  GRADUATE STUDIES COMMITTEE ............................................................................................................................ 19
  OFFICIAL GRADUATE STUDIES PLAN ....................................................................................................................... 19
  ACCESSING B LACKBOARD ....................................................................................................................................... 20
  ACCESSING YOUR UNIVERSITY E-MAIL .................................................................................................................... 20
  EDFN 627 EDUCATIONAL R ESEARCH ..................................................................................................................... 21
  EDSE 698/699 OPTION ............................................................................................................................................ 21
  PRAXIS: PRESCHOOL SPECIAL EDUCATION .............................................................................................................. 21
  COMPREHENSIVE E XAMINATION ............................................................................................................................. 21
  ECSE MASTER‟S E XIT REQUIREMENT - THE PORTFOLIO ........................................................................................ 22
  THE EXIT PORTFOLIO‟S CONTENTS.......................................................................................................................... 23
  EVALUATION OF EXIT PORTFOLIO ........................................................................................................................... 24
                                                 REGISTERING FOR COURSES 25

                                          GENERAL GRADUATE POLICIES                                                         26
  LEAVE OF ABSENCE/INACTIVE STATUS ................................................................................................................... 26
  EXTENDED REGISTRATION ....................................................................................................................................... 26
  TRANSFER CREDITS ................................................................................................................................................. 27
  FULL-TIME/PART-TIME STATUS .............................................................................................................................. 27
  GRADING ................................................................................................................................................................. 27
  INCOMPLETE GRADE ................................................................................................................................................ 28
  RETENTION REQUIREMENTS .................................................................................................................................... 28
  ACADEMIC PROBATION ............................................................................................................................................ 29
  REMOVAL FROM GRADUATE DEGREE-SEEKING STATUS ......................................................................................... 29
  DEPARTMENT PLAGIARISM POLICY ......................................................................................................................... 29
  GENERAL UNIVERSITY REQUIREMENTS ................................................................................................................... 29
  TIME EXTENSIONS BEYOND SEVEN YEARS.............................................................................................................. 29

                                                                                iv
ACADEMIC APPEALS ................................................................................................................................................ 30
                                             CANDIDACY & GRADUATION 30
ADVANCEMENT TO CANDIDACY .............................................................................................................................. 30
GRADUATION POLICY AND PROCEDURES ................................................................................................................ 31
                                                          FINANCIAL AID                          31




ALASKA STATE TRAINING REQUIREMENTS – EARLY CHILDHOOD SPECIAL
                      EDUCATION      31

                                                                HOUSING                   32

                                                          ACCREDITATION 32

                   THE COUNCIL FOR EXCEPTIONAL CHILDREN (CEC)                                                                           32
CODE OF ETHICS AND STANDARDS FOR PROFESSIONAL P RACTICE .......................................................................... 33
                                                          APPENDICES                             34
APPENDIX A SERVICES AND RESOURCES ................................................................................................................. 35
APPENDIX B STEPS INTO AND THROUGH THE MASTERS OF EDUCATION IN SPECIAL EDUCATION ........................... 36
APPENDIX C CALENDAR OF E VENTS ........................................................................................................................ 37
APPENDIX D OFFICIAL GRADUATE STUDIES PLAN .................................................................................................. 39
APPENDIX E M.ED. EARLY CHILDHOOD SPECIAL EDUCATION COURSE DESCRIPTIONS .......................................... 40
APPENDIX F SPECIAL EDUCATION APPLICATION FOR ADMISSION ........................................................................... 42
APPENDIX G APPLICATION RECOMMENDATION FORM ............................................................................................ 44
APPENDIX I APPLICATION FOR ADMISSION TO CANDIDACY..................................................................................... 46
APPENDIX H E XIT PORTFOLIO R UBRIC ................................................................................................................... 47
APPENDIX J CEC STANDARDS FOR SPECIAL EDUCATION ........................................................................................ 62
APPENDIX K CEC CODE OF ETHICS AND STANDARDS FOR PROFESSIONAL PRACTICE ............................................. 72
APPENDIX L STUDENT DISPUTE/COMPLAINT RESOLUTION PROCESS ...................................................................... 78




                                                                           v
                                       INTRODUCTION

        Welcome to the Master of Education in Early Childhood Special Education (ECSE)
Program at the University of Alaska Anchorage. The program is housed within the College of
Education. This handbook has been developed to familiarize you with the goals, programs, and
policies of the ECSE program at the University of Alaska Anchorage (UAA). By studying it
carefully, you will be able to complete your program in an efficient manner. While this
handbook discusses much of the information related to the program, it does not replace the need
for a UAA Catalog. Therefore, students are advised to consult the UAA Catalog for additional
information related to graduate policies and procedures not covered in this handbook; it can be
purchased at the UAA Bookstore (Phone: 907.786.1151) or downloaded from the UAA
Homepage - http://www.uaa.alaska.edu/enroll/catalog.html. Appendix A contains a partial list of
services and resources for UAA students and Appendix B contains the list of steps into and
through the Master’s Program. Appendix C contains a calendar of events with important dates
including admission application deadlines, internship application deadlines, etc., which students
are advised to review periodically in order to complete the various requirements in a timely
manner.
        The UAA Master of Education in Early Childhood Special Education Program is
delivered statewide throughout Alaska. This program requires extensive use of the Internet.
Students who desire to pursue this program must be computer literate and able to interface
effectively via the Internet.

PROGRAM CONCEPTUAL FRAMEWORK
        The course objectives, competencies, and outcome indicators clearly delineate the correlation
of this Master‟s course of study to the College of Education, Conceptual Framework. All instruction
is focused on the LEARNER developing COMPETENCE in the ability to internalize and apply the
CONTENT and MILIEU of the course material. The ECSE program in general is grounded in a
model in which academic content provides the foundation for competence through knowledge of the
learner, application of committed professionalism, and collaboration. Course activities, assignments,
and readings reflect this theme by providing opportunities for students to engage in the application of
the components of this model as it relates to young children from birth to age six who experience
disabilities and their families.
        Principle 1: Intellectual Vitality: Graduates think broadly yet systematically about their
practice, use research and technology, and contribute to the knowledge base in the field of early
childhood special education/early intervention. The graduate will team with other professionals to
develop collaborative contributions to the knowledge base in early childhood special education/early
intervention. Students enrolled in the Master of Education in Early Childhood Special Education
ECSE Handbook 2006                                                                                   6
(ECSE) Program will demonstrate the highest level of skill and knowledge in the area of young
children who experience disabilities.
        Principle 2: Partnerships: Graduates are members of learning communities. The graduate
will use his or her knowledge base to establish and maintain relationships with professional
colleagues, families, and agencies. The graduate will model and promote ethical, legal and moral
behavior. Students will demonstrate the ability to work collaboratively with others to improve the
lives of young children who experience disabilities.
        Principle 3: Diversity: Graduates are capable of excellence in their professional practices.
The graduate will develop, and demonstrate interactions and intervention opportunities that celebrate
diversity in students, ideas, opportunities, language and expression. As a result the master‟s program
students will demonstrate skill and knowledge in the area of low and high incidence disabilities.
        Principle 4: Professionalism and Leadership: Graduates are committed to their roles as
professionals and leaders. The graduate in the ECSE Master‟s program will understand how to create
environments that encourage positive social interactions, and active engagement in learning. The
graduate will reflect the knowledge of best practices in the field of early intervention/early childhood
special education as delineated by the Division of Early Childhood, Council of Exceptional Children.
The graduate will furthermore be familiar with best practices in the field of early childhood as
outlined by the National Association for the Education of Young Children. Graduates will actively
seek to improve the lives of young children who experience disabilities and their families.
        The Master of Education in Early Childhood Special Education has been approved by the
National Accreditation for Teacher Education, Specialized Professional Organization (Council on
Exceptional Children) in 2002. The College of Education received NCATE accreditation in 2005.
        The following table provides information on the major standards of the National Council for
Accreditation of Teacher Education, Council for Exceptional Children, State of Alaska and the
College of Education outcomes. The Master of Education in Early Childhood Special Education
aligns all the coursework and internship with these standards.




ECSE Handbook 2006                                                                                         7
                              Interstate New
 National Council for                                    National Board of      Council for
                           Teacher Assessment                                                                                       College of Education
  Accreditation of                                            Teacher           Exceptional Children State of Alaska
                               and Support                                                                                          Outcomes
 Teacher Education                                         Certification
                                Consortium

 Standard 1: Candidate    Principle #1: The teacher     2. Teachers know the      1. Foundation                                     Intellectual Vitality
                                                                                                        4. A teacher knows the
 Knowledge, Skills, and   understands the central       subjects they teach
                                                                                                        teachers content area          1. Graduates think
 Dispositions             concepts, tools of inquiry,   and how to teach
                                                                                                        and how to teach it.           broadly yet systematically
                          and structures of the         those subjects to
                                                                                                                                       about their practice, use
                          discipline(s) he or she       students.
                                                                                                                                       research and technology,
                          teaches and can create
                                                                                                                                       and contribute to the
                          learning experiences that
                                                                                                                                       knowledge base in their
                          make these aspects of                                                                                        fields.
                          subject matter
                          meaningful for students.
                                                                                                                                      2. Graduates work with
                          Principle #2: The teacher                                                     2. A teacher                  other professionals to
                                                        1. Teachers are           2. Development and                                  critically examine and
                          understands how children                                                      understands how
                                                        committed to students     Characteristics of                                  engage with diverse
                          learn and develop, and                                                        students learn and
                                                        and their learning.       Learners                                            perspectives in order to
                          can provide learning                                                          develop, and applies
                          opportunities that support                                                    that knowledge in the         advance their knowledge
                          their intellectual, social                                                    teacher's practice.           and practice in their
                          and personal                                                                                                fields.
                          development.


 Standard 4: Diversity    Principle #3: The teacher                                                     3. A teacher teaches        Diversity
                                                                                  3. Individual
                          understands how                                         Learning              students with respect
                                                                                                                                      4. Graduates develop and
                          students differ in their                                                      for their individual and
                                                                                  Differences                                         support the diversity of
                          approaches to learning                                                        cultural characteristics.
                                                                                                                                      people, ideas, language,
                          and creates instructional                                                                                   and expression through
                          opportunities that are                                  9. Professional and                                 appropriate learning
                          adapted to diverse                                      Ethical Practice                                    opportunities and
                          learners.                                                                                                   experiences.


 Standard 3: Field        Principle #4: The teacher                                                                                 Professionalism
                                                                                  4. Instructional
 Experiences and          understands and uses a
                                                                                  Strategies                                          5. Graduates are
 Clinical Practice        variety of instructional
                                                                                                                                      committed to the highest
                          strategies to encourage                                                                                     standards of ethical
                          students' development of                                                                                    behavior in their
                          critical thinking, problem                                                                                  professional roles.
                          solving, and performance
                          skills.
                                                                                                                                      6. Graduates will use their
                          Principle #5: The teacher                                                     5. A teacher facilitates,     professional expertise
                                                        3. Teachers are           5. Learning                                         and leadership to improve
                          uses an understanding of                                                      monitors, and assesses
                                                        responsible for           Environments and                                    the community in which
                          individual and group                                                          student learning.
                                                        managing and              Social Interactions                                 they work.
                          motivation and behavior
                                                        monitoring student
                          to create a learning
                                                        learning.
                          environment that
                          encourages positive                                                                                         7. Graduates
                          social interaction, active                                                                                  demonstrate that they are
                          engagement in learning,                                                                                     able to translate the
                          and self-motivation.                                                                                        theories and principles of
                                                                                                                                      their field into effective
                                                                                                                                      practice.
                          Principle #6: The teacher                               6. Communication      6. A teacher creates
                          uses knowledge of                                                             and maintains a
                          effective verbal,                                                             learning environment in
                          nonverbal, and media                                                          which all students are
                          communication                                                                 actively engaged and
                          techniques to foster                                                          contributing members.
                          active inquiry,
                          collaboration, and
                          supportive interaction in
                          the classroom.




ECSE Handbook 2006                                                                                                                                   8
                            Interstate New
 National Council for                                   National Board of       Council for
                         Teacher Assessment                                                                                      College of Education
  Accreditation of                                           Teacher            Exceptional Children State of Alaska
                             and Support                                                                                         Outcomes
 Teacher Education                                        Certification
                              Consortium

                        Principle #7: The teacher
                                                                                  7. Instructional
                        plans instruction based
                                                                                  Planning
                        upon knowledge of
                        subject matter, students,
                        the community, and
                        curriculum goals.


 Standard 2:            Principle #8: The teacher
                                                                                  8. Assessment
 Assessment System      understands and uses
 and Unit Evaluation    formal and informal
                        assessment strategies to
                        evaluate and ensure the
                        continuous intellectual,
                        social and physical
                        development of the
                        learner.

                        Principle #9: The teacher      4. Teachers think                               1. A teacher can
                        is a reflective practitioner   systematically about                            describe the teacher's
                        who continually evaluates      their practice and                              philosophy of education
                        the effects of his/her         learn from experience.                          and demonstrate its
                        choices and actions on
                                                                                                       relationship to the
                        others (students, parents,
                                                                                                       teacher's practice.
                        and other professionals
                        in the learning
                        community) and who                                                             8. A teacher
                        actively seeks out                                                             participates in and
                        opportunities to grow                                                          contributes to the
                        professionally.                                                                teaching profession.

                        Principle #10: The             5. Teachers are           10. Collaboration     7. A teacher works as     Partnerships
                        teacher fosters                members of learning                             a partner with parents,     3. Graduates are active
                        relationships with school      communities.                                    families, and with the      and contributing members
                        colleagues, parents, and
                                                                                                       community.                  of learning communities
                        agencies in the larger
                                                                                                                                   that may include
                        community to support
                                                                                                                                   colleagues, families, and
                        students' learning and                                                                                     organizations.
                        well-being.


 Standard 5: Faculty
 Qualifications,
 Performance, and
 Development


 Standard 6: Unit
 Governance and
 Resources




ECSE Handbook 2006                                                                                                                               9
         OVERVIEW OF THE MASTER OF EDUCATION IN EARLY
                CHILDHOOD SPECIAL EDUCATION
        The program focuses on the preparation of professionals in the area of early intervention
/early childhood special education for young children with disabilities birth through age five and
their families. The ECSE program is a 36 credit graduate level degree which results in a Master of
Education in Early Childhood Special Education. This program also results in a teaching certificate
in birth to five special education from the AK Department of Education and Early Development.
Appendices B and C provide the Graduate Studies Plan worksheet (program plan) and a list of
courses and internships for students seeking an M.Ed.
        Background: Young children, who have or are at risk for developing delays in one or more
developmental domains, and their families, may receive services through a variety of public and
private agencies. In Alaska, services for infants and toddlers who experience disabilities and their
families are provided primarily through Infant Learning Programs, Alaska Department of Health and
Social Services. Teachers in early childhood education and special education, child development
specialists, speech/language therapists, occupational therapists, physical therapists, nurses, and other
certified or licensed professionals provide coordinated, multidisciplinary early intervention services
to these children in the family's home.
        Preschool age children who experience delays in cognitive, physical, social, emotional, or
communication development primarily receive services in local Head Start Programs or through
preschool special education programs offered by local school districts. Certified Special Educators
or Early Childhood Special Educators with the assistance of related services personnel provide
multidisciplinary services for children ages three to six which are both home- and center-based.
        The Master of Education in Early Childhood Special Education Program is designed to
prepare professionals to provide services to young children between birth and age five. This master‟s
degree is a 36 credit graduate program delivered distance and on campus.
        Distance Delivery Model: The ECSE program is delivered across the state of Alaska in
conjunction with Instructional Technology Services at the University of Alaska Anchorage. In
addition to distanced delivered electives, five of the seven required courses are delivered via distance
delivery: EDSE 474, 674, 681, 622Y, and 685. Currently, the distance aspects of these courses
include: bimonthly audio-conferences; use of the Blackboard courseware system; email; telephone;
field experiences, Elluminate and the Internet. (Students must have access to the Internet because
Blackboard is where coursework is announced, class discussions occur and weekly activities and
assignments are posted and examined.) Please note also that field experiences are a major component
of the students‟ ECSE program and require considerable time.


ECSE Handbook 2006                                                                                       10
        Anchorage and other local area students enrolled in this master‟s course will have access to
the Internet distance delivery model also. Anchorage students, however, may attend the bimonthly
audio-conferences on site in Anchorage.
        On Campus Courses: The course EDSE 610Y (Assessment ECSE) is usually offered every
year, in Anchorage, during the summer. This course is typically 5-6 weeks in length. It is offered in
conjunction with the Anchorage School District (ASD), preschool summer assessment program.
During the first half of the course students participate in the assessment process with the ASD
assessment team. During the second half of the course students are in University classes with course
instructors.
        Confidentiality: It is important that any identifiable information regarding the family, the
children, the home, the internships site, or other adults be used in a professional manner and remains
confidential.
        Coursework and Internships: Courses offered by the College of Education in Early
Childhood Special Education prepare teachers, therapists, and other professionals to provide early
intervention services to infants, toddlers, and preschoolers who experience developmental delays
(e.g., mentally retarded, emotionally disturbed, hearing impaired, visually impaired, speech/language
impaired, physically disabled, health impaired, or experience multiple disabilities). All courses meet
the Alaska Department of Education Early Development personnel preparation mandate for six
credits in Early Childhood Special Education. Students seeking the M.Ed. ECSE from UAA may be
experienced teachers or specialists in related services (e.g., speech/language, occupational or physical
therapy, social work, psychology, nursing, etc.). All students will exit the M.Ed. ECSE program with
a certificate in birth to five special education.
        In addition to the required coursework and internships for the M.Ed. ECSE program,
individuals must complete a written comprehensive examination, Praxis II Preschool Special
Education examination, and a professional exit portfolio. A research project is not required but is
encouraged as an elective option. The M.Ed. ECSE program requires two years of part-time or one
full year enrollment for completion. The program plan appears in Appendix D and description of
coursework is listed in Appendix E, as previously mentioned.

  College of Education Guidelines for Working with Children Throughout the Duration of the
Master’s Program:

   FIELD EXPERIENCES WITHIN A COURSE: Candidates, who are not currently certificated in
    Alaska and who enroll in a course with a fieldwork component (excluding the internship courses),
    must have ASPIN clearance prior to the first day of fieldwork. This requirement also applies to
    independent or directed studies with a fieldwork component.
   CERTIFIED TEACHERS: Candidates who are certificated teachers must submit a copy of a current
    Alaska Teacher Certificate prior to admission to the internship.
   STUDENT TEACHING AUTHORIZATION: Candidates who are not currently certificated in
    Alaska must receive authorization from EED to participate in an internship that is school-based.
    Internship applicants must apply for EED “student teacher” authorization as part of the internship
ECSE Handbook 2006                                                                                       11
    application process. Note: This application process requires fingerprinting/criminal history
    background check, which must be initiated about 5 months prior to the first day of fieldwork. If the
    background check is not initiated in time for the processing to occur before the first day of fieldwork,
    the Office of Clinical Services and Teacher Certification may deny the request for the internship.
   AGENCY BASED INTERNSHIP: Candidates who are not currently certificated in Alaska and are
    planning to take an internship that is agency-based must submit the results of fingerprinting/criminal
    history background check to the COE Office of Clinical Services and Certification the semester prior
    to enrolling in the internship. Applicants do not have to apply for EED “student teacher”
    authorization, but they must initiate the criminal history background check through a local
    fingerprinting agency as part of the internship application process. See note above regarding timeline
    for initiating the check and receiving clearance.
   FAILURE TO COMPLY: Failure to comply with the criminal history background requirements,
    falsification of information, or evidence of a criminal conviction that would preclude State
    certification will result in denial of access to or removal from field placement settings and programs
    that lead to State certification. In addition, conviction of a crime involving moral turpitude may result
    in denial of access to or removal from field placement settings and programs that lead to State
    certification. Refer to the UAA College of Education Student Criminal History Background Check
    Policies and Procedures.

Other requirements:

Liability Insurance
Professional liability insurance is required. Students may use their own professional liability insurance,
or may purchase new insurance. CEC members may contact Forrest T. Jones and Company at 1-800--
265-9366 for purchase information. In 2001, the cost was $12 for $1,000,000 policy. Prices may
change. The company which provides insurance may change.

Accident (Medical) Insurance
Interns must have proof of current Medical Insurance in case of accidents. Interns may submit proof of
their own Medical Insurance by providing a copy of their Insurance card or policy. If personal medical
insurance is not available, interns may purchase this through Megalife by contacting: 1-800-767-0700.
Interns need to be enrolled in at least six credits of study at UAA continually to be eligible for this
insurance through Megalife.

TB
A current TB test is required. It must be dated within the past year. If it expires during the internship or
prior to the internship, a new one is required. [check with College of Education Student Support Services
at 786-4402 to confirm this is still a requirement.]




ECSE Handbook 2006                                                                                           12
Early Childhood Special Education Advanced Internships: EDSE 620Y

        Students are required to complete two three-credit internships (EDSE 620Y Advanced
Internship) or one extended full time internship (six credits) as part of the graduate degree. These
experiences may be completed in a variety of settings including the school districts, located
statewide, and in other community agencies in Anchorage or other communities. Some additional
information regarding the internship is delineated below. Other specific details can be obtained from
the early childhood special education internship handbook and course syllabus for each course.
        EDSE 620Y Advanced Internship is the capstone experience for students attaining an early
childhood special certificate. It offers the future early interventionist or early childhood special
educator support and guidance in practicing skills that are needed on the job. Occasionally,
alternative experiences to this Advanced Internship may be established for students. Individuals who
wish to pursue this option must submit a letter or petition and plan the alternative experience with the
program advisor at least one semester prior to their intended enrollment in EDSE 620Y. Several
restrictions apply to alternative experiences. Approval is contingent upon numerous factors
including previous performance, type of experience requested, perceived professionalism and
collaborative skills of the applicant, and availability of faculty to supervise placements.
        Based on the Council for Exceptional Children‟s (CEC) guidelines, all students must
complete a six-credit semester long, full-time supervised internships (e.g., 400 hours) or two three-
credit internships (e.g., 200 hours each). Three program alternatives are available to fulfill this
requirement.
        1)     One full-time 400 hours, 6 credit advanced internship: The intern may participate in a
               setting in his or her geographical area in an EI/ECSE setting for 6 credit hours (e.g.,
               400 hours) during either the fall or spring semester.
        2)     Two part-time 200 hour, 3 credit advanced internships: The graduate student typically
               completes internship experiences at both the infant/toddler and preschool levels (e.g.,
               two 3-credit internships of 200 hours each) or one internship in EI/ECSE for two
               semesters in the same setting.
        3)     Internships may done “on the job” with the approval of the Internship Supervisor and
               the employer.
National Council for Accreditation of Teacher Education (NCATE)/Council for Exceptional
Children (CEC) guidelines for the advanced internship requires that students must have a cooperating
professional/host teacher who has training and a degree in the area in which they seek an
endorsement/credential (e.g., preschool special education or early intervention). Furthermore, the
intern must be supervised by the university supervisor at least once for every credit of internship for a
total of 6 observations (e.g., 3 observations for 3 credits; 6 observations for 6 credits).

ECSE Handbook 2006                                                                                       13
        Students must complete the DEC recommended practices outlined in Internship Handbook.
Other requirements for placements will be established by the stakeholders in the experiences. For
specific details regarding Internships in Early Childhood Special Education, EDSE 620Y students are
encouraged to consult program faculty and the M.Ed. ECSE Internship Handbook. Academic year
internships are available for students enrolled in the M.Ed. ECSE program. Placements may be in
local infant learning programs, and preschool special education classrooms. Each ECSE internship is
individualized to meet the goals, expertise and needs of the graduate student. The outcomes for each
experience are established by the graduate student, the agency host, the student‟s advisor, and the
instructor of EDSE 620Y. Graduate students are encouraged to refer to the M.Ed. ECSE Internship
Handbook for details.
        Applications for EDSE 620Y are reviewed and approved by special education faculty.
Application timelines are included in the Internship Handbook. No internship placements will be
made prior to receipt of the written application and supplemental documents. (See Internship
Handbook, “Applying for Internship”)
        Students who enter the program without a teaching certificate must in addition to the above
criterion meet the following:
*complete at least 2 weeks full time internship in preschool special education
*meet the state of Alaska requirements in the Praxis I
*6 credits in Alaska native studies/multicultural studies from approved list


US Department of Education, Office of Special Education Programs Grant Funding Student
Responsibilities:

In addition to the regular requirements of the Master‟s in ECSE, there are several additional
requirements for students accepting funding from the US. DOE, Office of Special Education
Programs grant. The following highlights these extra requirements:

    1. Service Obligation & Contract. You are required to familiarize yourself with the
       service obligation contract that you sign when you accepted funding from the USDOE,
       OSEP grant. You will be given a copy of your signed contract as well as a copy of the
       federal register that outlines your responsibilities. You are responsible for complying
       with all the stipulations of this grant award and specifications on the contract.
    2. ECSE Advisement Session. Attendance at the monthly ECSE advisement session is
       mandatory.
    3. Autism, FASD, Severe Disabilities Coursework. Elective courses in the area of autism,
       fetal alcohol spectrum disorders and/or severe disabilities must be part of your program
       plan. The USDOE grant offers 3 specialty electives every year. Students funded under the
       grant are expected to register for these courses. In other words, the electives on your
       program plan must be in the specialty areas offered by the grant (e.g., 690 courses offered
       each semester).
    4. Assessment & Intervention with Young Children with ASD, FASD, and Severe
       Disabilities. Experience with young children birth to three and three to five.
       Documented Experience in Birth-Three and Three to Five is required. Experience with
ECSE Handbook 2006                                                                                    14
        young children who experience FASD, ASD and severe disabilities is required. Students
        must take responsibility for obtaining experience in the following areas throughout their
        coursework, fieldwork and internships. (The following page contains a data sheet that
        students may use to document their activities/hours with students who experience ASD,
        FASD, and severe disabilities.)
   a)   Experience in working with both the Birth to three and the 3-5 populations. Specifically,
        plan on completing assessments on both populations as well as IEP/IFSP and
        interventions on both populations;
   b)   Experience working with children with autism (e.g., document ability to conduct
        assessments and intervention plans)
   c)   Experience working with children with FASD (e.g., document ability to conduct
        assessments and intervention plans)
   d)   Experience working with children with severe disabilities (e.g., document ability to
        conduct assessments and intervention plans)

   5. Leadership and other Requirements. Students must demonstrate skills in the following
        areas: (a) Home Based Intervention Requirement; (b) In-service Training; (c) Professional
        Membership; and (d) Care Coordination (refer to the exit portfolio for more information).




ECSE Handbook 2006                                                                                  15
        Documentation of Work with Young Children with ASD, FASD, and Severe Disabilities
Throughout the course of your Master‟s program grant funded students are responsible for documenting
work with young children with ASD, FASD, and Severe Disabilities. Grant funded students are required
to demonstrate experiences in the area of assessment, and intervention. These experiences may be
obtained in coursework, internship or volunteer experiences. Indicate the date/age of child, type of
assessment or intervention conducted. Submit this table with written products (e.g., IEP/IFSP, assessment
& intervention plans).

Date    Age of                Autism                   FASD                     Severe Disabilities
        Child
                 Assessment     Intervention   Assessment   Intervent   Assessment    Intervention
                                                            ion




Total
Each
Colu
mn




ECSE Handbook 2006                                                                                     16
                MASTER’S DEGREE POLICIES & PROCEDURES

Master's Degree Admission Process
       Students must formally apply for admission into the Master of Education in Early Childhood
Special Education Program. Students are encouraged to apply for admission at least one semester
prior to enrollment in coursework. This allows ample time to submit all necessary documentation for
each program as defined in the following sections. All applications require the submission of
documentation to both UAA and to the College of Education (COE) ECSE Program. Each requires a
separate form and is a separate process. Complete information regarding the admission process can
be obtained from the UAA Catalog that is available at the UAA Homepage at
http://www.uaa.alaska.edu/enroll/catalog.html.
   Graduate Application to the University. The first step in the admission process includes
submission of an application form and appropriate documentation defined in the following
paragraphs.
   1. Graduate Application Form. Obtain the form from the Office of Admissions or download it
       from the UAA Homepage at http://www.uaa.alaska.edu/enroll/catalog.app1.html. and return
       it along with the appropriate fee. This form must specify the program(s) to which the
       applicant is applying (e.g., M. Ed. in Early Childhood Special Education).
   2. Graduate Record Exam or Miller Analogies Test Scores. The GRE General Test scores
       (combined verbal, quantitative) must be at least 450 and the Analytical Writing score must be
       a 4.5 or better. Students taking the MAT must score at or above the 40th percentile. Forward
       your test scores to the UAA Office of Admissions. It takes approximately six weeks after the
       testing date for the test scores to be received.
   3. Copies of transcripts from all institutions of higher education previously attended.
       Applicants must have a Bachelor's Degree and a grade point average of 3.0 (on a 4.0 scale).
       These original transcripts must be submitted to the Office of Admissions.
       College of Education Application for Master of Education in Early Childhood Special
Education Program. The second and simultaneous step in the admission process includes submission
of a COE application and other documentation defined in the following paragraphs.

      The special education application for admission form. A copy of this form is provided in
   Appendix F or may be downloaded from the Special Education Homepage at
   http://www.uaa.alaska.edu/sped/.

      Two application recommendations. A minimum of two application recommendations
   describing recent pertinent professional experience must be submitted. Students are encouraged
   to use the recommendation forms, (Appendix G) provided in the COE-EDSE Application. At
   least one recommendation must be from a supervisor who can document a minimum of one year

ECSE Handbook 2006                                                                                   17
    of successful professional experience and/or an academic advisor. Letters from peers, friends or
    relatives are not considered. All documents must be originals and address admission to the
    Master of Education in Early Childhood Special Education Program. Applicants must
    demonstrate through the completed application packet, a level of social and emotional maturity
    that is consistent with professional standards of teaching.
        The application will be reviewed by the Master of Education in Early Childhood Special
Education Program faculty when all information has been compiled. Students may be granted
different types of admission: unconditional admission or conditional admission. Admission does not
establish candidacy in a graduate program. Additional information regarding candidacy is defined in
the Graduate Policies and Procedures section of the UAA Catalog.
        Unconditional Admission. Applicants who meet the above criteria will be considered for
program admission on a competitive basis taking into account that higher scores are preferable to
lower scores; good recommendations are preferable to marginal ones; and a match on personal and
institutional goals is preferred. All things being equal, the special education faculty will attempt to
select the best candidates for the available openings.
        Conditional Admission. Students who meet all the requirements above but fail to (1) score at
or above the minimum score on the GRE or MAT or (2) have a GPA of 3.0 or higher in the last 30
credits. The progress of students will be monitored closely and input from faculty will be solicited.
This information, plus acceptable grades of "B" or better in a minimum of 12 hours of special
education coursework, may permit students to gain unconditional admission for the subsequent
semester.
        Application materials will be reviewed by the Master of Education in Early Childhood
Special Education faculty. It is the responsibility of the student to determine that the COE
Advisement Office and UAA Enrollment Services receive all appropriate documentation prior to
the admission reviews. Students may contact the Special Education Office at 786-6317 to
confirm receipt of all documents. Verification of the committee's decision will be forwarded to
the UAA Registrar's Office who will in turn send applicants formal notification of acceptance
status. Students will also be notified by letter from the COE of their temporary program advisor
and will be advised to contact this advisor for information.

                         MASTER’S DEGREE-- ADVISEMENT
        Soon after an application has been received by the COE Admission Office, students are
assigned an Interim Advisor. That faculty member helps students to select appropriate classes,
guides them through the initial stages of the program in an efficient manner, and assists them in
identifying other professional issues and concerns. Typically, during the fall and spring semesters,
admission decisions are made within one month of the application deadline. Only limited, periodic
advisement is available during the summer so students are encouraged to seek advisement during the

ECSE Handbook 2006                                                                                        18
fall and spring semesters. The initial meeting with an advisor may be held on campus or via the
telephone. A current list of all faculty and their telephone numbers is at the front of this Handbook.
        Students should initiate a meeting with their assigned advisor within one month of receiving
notification of acceptance, if they intend to complete the program coursework in a timely manner.
Even students who have established a relationship with other faculty members must meet with their
assigned advisor initially. All attempts will be made to accommodate the student‟s preference for an
academic advisor following this initial meeting. Students admitted to Master's Degree programs
must select a “Graduate Studies Committee.” Members of the Graduate Studies Committee include
the academic advisor and two additional committee members. The academic advisor does not
automatically become the graduate committee chairperson. Committee Chairpersons for Master's
degree programs are selected by students. Students need to initiate contact with faculty and request
that they serve as Graduate Study Committee members. This procedure is outlined in the graduate
policies and procedures section of the UAA Catalog.
        Advisors/Committee members will develop a graduate studies plan, which is an official
contract between the University and the student. This formal document should be developed as soon
as possible after admission to the Master's program.
Graduate Studies Committee
        The committee must consist of at least three (3) UAA faculty including the chair, who shall
normally be a full-time faculty member in the area of specialization. Additional members who are
not UAA faculty, but have appropriate professional credentials, may be included with the approval of
both the dean, or designee, and the student. The student is responsible for recruiting members of the
committee. The committee members and chair must agree to serve and must be approved by the
dean. The committee chair will assume supervisory functions formerly performed by the advisor.
Changes of the committee require the approval of the new committee member, the committee chair,
the student, and the dean, or designee.

Official Graduate Studies Plan
        The Official Graduate Studies Plan, called the program plan, lists all required courses, which
will, upon satisfactory completion, entitle the student to receive the graduate degree. The program
plan is based upon the catalog requirements for the graduate degree program to which the student has
been accepted. The plan becomes official once approved by the dean, director and/or Graduate
Studies Committee and filed with the Student Records office. Should changes become necessary
after the plan has been filed, a revised plan must be prepared and sent to the Student Records Office.




ECSE Handbook 2006                                                                                       19
Accessing Blackboard
        When you enrolled as a student at UAA or signed up for a class you were given a “user
name” in this format: “asjas5”. If you do not know your user name, please call 786.4646. They
will be able to tell you what it is.

       You were also automatically set up to access the courses you are taking on Blackboard with
your user name and using your social security number as your password.

    To locate your course(s) on Blackboard, follow these steps:

    1. In your web browser (Netscape Navigator, Internet Explorer or whatever you use to access
       the web) enter the following address:

                                http://uaaonline.alaska.edu

        This takes you to the UAA online Home Page.

    2. Go to Blackboard Resources and pull down the menu.

    3. Click on “Login to Blackboard”.

    4. Enter your user name [e.g. asjas5 and password (UAA ID number)] and click the Login
       button.

        This takes you to a page where all the classes you are taking are listed. You can use this
page to send e-mail, etc.

    5. Access any course by clicking on its name.

    6. ECSE Advisement Workshop is not a class but it listed with your courses. You will find
       much Program information published there and I highly recommend you get into the habit
       of checking Blackboard frequently.


Accessing your University e-mail

    Your university e-mail can be accessed by:

    1. In your web browser enter the following address:

                                http://webmail.uaa.alaska.edu

    2. Enter your user name and password and click on Login. Your messages will appear.

    Remember the help center is as 907.786.4646




ECSE Handbook 2006                                                                                  20
EDFN 627 Educational Research
           All students must complete EDFN 627 Educational Research. This three-credit course
introduces students to the process, methods, and procedures of educational research. Emphasis is
placed on the selection of a research topic and site, progression from topic to researchable question,
development of the theoretical rationale, human subjects‟ research approval, collection procedures,
data analysis, and final document preparation. Students are expected to build upon the knowledge
gained from undergraduate research courses as they design their research project in this course.
           Your advisor will expect that you exit the EDFN 627 class with the skills to design,
implement and write research papers assigned as class projects. If you do not demonstrate the above,
your advisor may require you to take an additional research or statistics course.


EDSE 698/699 Option

           Students may select either EDSE 698 Individual Research Project or EDSE 699 Thesis on
their program of study as one of their electives. EDSE 698 Individual Research requires a minimum
of 3 credits or one semester of work. The written report must follow American Psychology
Association (APA) guidelines. When pursuing this option, the student works only with one advisor.
EDSE 699 Thesis requires a minimum of 6 credits over two semesters. All work must meet specific
graduate publishing guidelines delineated by the UAA Library. In addition, the student must work
jointly with the thesis chair and all committee members on the thesis and must defend the thesis.
Additional details regarding specific requirements for these courses can be obtained from the course
syllabi.

Praxis II: Preschool Special Education
           All students must take the Praxis II: Preschool Special Education examination and score
above a 600. Students are advised to take this examination in the second to last semester of their
graduate program. All students are required to (a) have the scores officially sent to the College of
Education; and (b) include a copy of the scores in their exit portfolio. Both sides of the scores
(including the total score and the subtest scores) must be submitted. The Praxis booklet is available at
www.teachingandlearning.org. Questions about registration: 1.800.772.9476.

Comprehensive Examination
           All Master's degree candidates must pass a comprehensive examination covering information
typically taught in special education courses. The four-hour, written examination usually contains
six essay questions of which only three or four must be answered. The exam is taken using a
computer unless previous arrangements have been made with the COE to take the exam using paper
and pencil. Individuals who are unable to travel to Anchorage for the on-campus exam may request
an opportunity to complete the exam in their respective communities. A written request must be
ECSE Handbook 2006                                                                                       21
submitted with the application. After the request is approved, students must work with COE
administrative staff in identifying an acceptable exam proctor. Typical proctors include principals,
supervisors, or community college test personnel.
        The comprehensive examination is normally taken after the student has completed all but six
hours of coursework. Students must be enrolled in coursework or extended enrollment in order to be
eligible to take the exam. The application form must be completed and submitted. The
Comprehensive Exam Application Form may be downloaded from the Special Education Homepage
at http://www.uaa.alaska.edu/sped/ or picked up from the College of Education Special Education
Office in PSB, Room 225 (907.786.6317). Students should also contact their advisor at least one
semester prior to the scheduled exam so that study questions can be developed. Upon receipt of the
application form, additional information will be forwarded to the applicant. Application deadlines
are as follows:
        November Exam application deadline, second Friday in October
        March Exam application deadline, second Friday in February
        July Exam application deadline, second Friday in June
        Grading of the exams administered during November and March is normally completed
within four to six weeks; grading for the July exams is delayed until August or September. Students
receive official notification from the COE of their results as soon as the exams are graded. Students
who do not pass the exam may request a second opportunity to demonstrate mastery of the
knowledge base by retaking the exam during the subsequent testing period. Failure to pass the
second exam may result in removal from the Master's degree program. The request to re-take the
exam must be sent to the advisor within 30 days after receiving the COE notice of failure to pass.

ECSE Master’s Exit Requirement - The Portfolio

        All students who want to obtain the Master of Education in Early Childhood Special
Education, must successfully complete all courses defined on the signed program of study. All
courses contain professional competencies and dispositions for early childhood special education
professionals defined by the Council for Exceptional Children (CEC). Students must develop an exit
portfolio that documents their competencies and dispositions and submit it for review and approval.
The portfolio will be reviewed after successful completion of advanced internship (EDSE 620Y). It
must be submitted two months prior to the end of the semester during which the student desires to (a)
obtain the Institutional Recommendation for the Birth to Five Special Education Endorsement; and
(b) graduate. The Institutional Endorsement and advancement to candidacy will only be granted to
students who submit portfolios that are approved. If the portfolio is not approved, students may be
required (1) to submit additional documentation, (2) to meet with faculty members to document
specific knowledge or skills, or (3) to complete additional courses to gain specific knowledge and/or
skills. Copies of the exit portfolio rubrics are found in Appendix I. Both documents need to be

ECSE Handbook 2006                                                                                     22
included in the exit portfolio. Students should carefully review and complete the first document, Exit
Portfolio Standards Rubric. All documents listed on the form should be included in the exit portfolio
along with grades or points obtained on the various assignments. The list of documents is
summarized in the following section that addresses the exit portfolio's contents. The second
document, Exit Portfolio Summary, will be completed by your advisor or other Early Childhood
Special Education faculty member as that person reviews your exit portfolio.

The Exit Portfolio’s Contents
       The Exit Portfolio is a reflection of one's professional expertise. Brief descriptions regarding
each evaluation section including contents appear below:

I.     Physical Format (15 points)

       The physical format is the structural representation of the portfolio. Evidence provided is
gathered and categorized into meaningful sections. A three-ring binder with labeled dividers is
recommended. Two components regarding the physical format will be evaluated: table of contents
and required components.
       Table of Contents (list all of the following components and their location)
               A.      Table of Contents
               B.      Conceptual Framework

               C.      A curriculum vita/resume which presents the student‟s degrees, positions
                       held, volunteer experiences, references, and memberships and participation in
                       professional organizations
               D.      A copy of the candidate‟s current Alaska Teaching certificate
               E.      A copy of the signed Master of Education in Early Childhood Special
                       Education Program Plan Worksheet with the most recent grades and
                       anticipated dates for completion
               F.      Copy of PRAXIS II Scores and Subtest Scores
               G.      Conceptual Framework including personal philosophy statement of purpose
                       of portfolio (see Exit Portfolio Summary Rubric)
               H.      Early Childhood Special Education Exit Portfolio Standards
               I.      Competency documentation (refer to rubric)
               J.      Additional documentation
                       1. Home Based Intervention Requirement
                       2. Autism, Fetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorders, or other Severe Disabilities
                           Assessment
                       3. In-service Training
                       4. Professional Membership
ECSE Handbook 2006                                                                                   23
                            5. Care Coordination

        Required Components (all items listed above plus any additional reflections or optional
        documentation)

II.     Conceptual Framework (10 points)
        The conceptual framework portion of the portfolio includes the philosophy statement and the
statement of purpose. The philosophy statement presents the core values that guide the student‟s work
with infants and young children and their families. The philosophy should be evident throughout the
portfolio.
        The statement of purpose introduces the reader to the portfolio. It should include a statement that
highlights the student‟s efforts, progress and achievements. It should delineate and briefly explain each
section of the portfolio.
III.    Evidence of Competence (75 Points)
        This portion of the portfolio demonstrates mastery in each standard. The Portfolio should
demonstrate that the student has integrated theory and practice and actively monitored and reflected on
his or her development. Students must provide evidence that documents the mastery of early childhood
special education program and CEC standards.
        This section contains 10 pages labeled Early Childhood Special Education Standards. Each
standard is listed on a separate page along with a list of items that must be included in the portfolio to
document competencies and dispositions associated with each standard. Under standard one, two items
are listed: PRAXIS II Score and EDSE 681 Personal Philosophy. Both of these items need to be included
in the portfolio. In addition, the scores obtained on both should be entered on the form. If the PRAXIS
score is 600, list the score “600” in the “Assessment Score” column. Also list the grade obtained on the
EDSE 681 Personal Philosophy assignment in the same column.             If you have any additional class
assignments that address this standard that you want reviewed, include them in your portfolio and list
them under “Other documentation” along with the grades. The portfolio reviewer will validate all grades
with items included in the portfolio. All original faculty-grading rubrics/forms should be attached to the
submitted assignments.
        Grant funded students must document elements explained on pages 14, 15, and 16 of this
handbook.




Evaluation of Exit Portfolio
        Each standard will be judged separately. A standard is Met if a scale score of 4 or 5 is
achieved. This occurs only if 95% of the items included in the portfolio document entry-level

ECSE Handbook 2006                                                                                       24
competence even if some additional professional development may be recommended. No more than
one grade of “C” or score of “3” can be listed in any one standard.

        Student are encouraged to have two evaluators [(1) Peer, and (2) Cooperating Teacher or
Selected Professional in the field] review their work before submitting the exit portfolio for final
review. These outside evaluations must be completed by the time you present your portfolio to your
advisor one month before your graduation. Evaluations can be in the form of a letter. These
evaluations may be used as evidence in the portfolio. The student‟s major program advisor will be
responsible for reviewing and grading the portfolio. Grades will be awarded on a
satisfactory/unsatisfactory basis. An unsatisfactory grade means the student will be directed to redo
the portfolio to meet the standards requirements before applying for an institutional recommendation
or advancement to candidacy.
Review of Exit Portfolio
        The professional portfolio must be completed at the end of the last semester of the student‟s
Master‟s program. The portfolio must be submitted to the student’s major advisor one month
prior to anticipated graduation. Upon submission, the program advisor, will review the portfolio
for evidence of attainment of the program competencies and dispositions. This, then completes the
exit portfolio requirement. Appendix H contains the Exit Portfolio Rubric.
   (Note: Master Students in the ECSE Program must also complete a portfolio for each advanced
   internship completed. Further description of the internship competencies, contract, requirements
   and portfolio are contained in the ECSE Internship Handbook. Students who are in the same
   assignment site for consecutive 3 credit internships or on a 6 credit internship will complete one
   internship folio.

                              REGISTERING FOR COURSES
        Students may register for courses during a "priority registration" period or during "walk -in"
registration. Priority registration is done several months before the start of each semester. Typically,
priority registration for the summer and fall terms is during the previous April and priority
registration for the spring term is during the previous November. Only students enrolled at the
University of Alaska Anchorage the prior semester or those who file an Intent to Register Form may
use the early registration process. This may be obtained from:

                The: Division of Enrollment Services University Center
                                  3901 Old Seward Highway
                                    Anchorage, AK 99503
                     Phone:(Information Specialists, M-F, 8 a.m.-5 p.m.)
                               907.786.1480 or FAX 786.1097
                           http://www.uaa.alaska.edu/enroll/catalog.html.


ECSE Handbook 2006                                                                                      25
        Specific dates for priority registration are published in the fall, spring, and summer directory
of classes. The advantages of priority registration are numerous, but the major advantage is that most
students using this process are able to get the classes they need in a most efficient manner.
         A copy of the Semester Schedule Book can be obtained from the UAA Enrollment Services
or a downloaded as a PDF document from the UAA Homepage located at
http://www.uaa.alaska.edu/enroll/catalog.html.
                            GENERAL GRADUATE POLICIES

Leave of Absence/Inactive Status

        Graduate students are expected to make “continuous satisfactory progress toward completing
their graduate program.” Students who need to temporarily suspend their studies for more than one
semester (excluding summer), must apply for a leave of absence through their advisor or committee,
which, if approved, places the student on “inactive status.” Inactive status does not negate the policy
which requires all credits counted toward the degree or certificate, including transfer credits, to be
earned within a consecutive seven-year period prior to graduation. Faculty conduct periodic reviews,
and students who fail to (a) register in a course, (b) extend their registration, or c) obtain a leave of
absence may be removed from the graduate program if they fail to initiate any action toward
completing their programs. Students on leave or inactive status wishing to be “Re-instated to
graduate Degree-Seeking Status” merely write a letter requesting reinstatement to active status.
Additional details regarding the policies and procedures related to leave of absence/inactive status
can be reviewed in the UAA Catalog that is available through the UAA Bookstore or at the UAA
Homepage at http://www.uaa.alaska.edu/enroll/catalog.html.

Extended Registration
        Graduate students not registered for a course, but whose only remaining requirement(s) for
graduation is (are) completion of a thesis or project, and/or removal of a deferred grade, must initiate
an extended registration. This requires a fee and can be done during each semester's registration
period or at Enrollment Services by the end of week twelve (12) of the semester. With completion of
extended registration, a graduate student is considered active for the current semester. Students who
fail to register in a course, extend their registration, or obtain a leave of absence (see Leave of
Absence) may be removed from the graduate program. Note: Please remember that EDSE graduate
students must enroll in one-credit of EDSE 698 or 699 during each semester they intend to actively
work on their project or thesis. Additional details regarding the policies and procedures related to
extended registration can be reviewed in the UAA Catalog that is available through the UAA
Bookstore or at the UAA Homepage at http://www.uaa.alaska.edu/enroll/catalog.html.




ECSE Handbook 2006                                                                                          26
Transfer Credits
        Up to nine (9) semester credits, not used toward any other degree or certificate may be
transferred to UAA from a regionally accredited institution and counted toward the special education
program if the courses are completed within the consecutive seven-year period prior to graduation.
Correspondence courses and independent study courses cannot be used toward any degree
requirement. Individuals who want to transfer credits should schedule a meeting with an advisor to
discuss the matter. Needed documentation includes a written request specifying action desired, a
copy of the transcript, a copy of the course description from the university catalog and possibly a
copy of the course syllabus. This information is reviewed by program faculty or the graduate
committee to determine if the course content is equivalent to those required courses at UAA.
Approval is required for all transfer credits. Additional details regarding the policies and procedures
related to transfer credits can be reviewed in the UAA Catalog that is available through the UAA
Bookstore or at the UAA Homepage at http://www.uaa.alaska.edu/enroll/catalog.html.

Full-Time/Part-Time Status
        A graduate student who is enrolled at UAA for nine (9) or more 600-level credits is classified
as "full-time.” The 300- or 400-level courses will count toward full-time status only if they are
applicable toward a degree program. A graduate student enrolled at UAA for less than nine (9)
credits is classified as "part-time.” Audited courses, Continuing Education Units (CEUs), and
graduate extended registration are not included in the computation. Additional details regarding the
policies and procedures related to full-time/part-time status can be reviewed in the UAA Catalog or
at the UAA Homepage at http://www.uaa.alaska.edu/enroll/catalog.html

Grading
        The Master of Education in Early Childhood Special Education Program at UAA is designed
as a rigorous professional course of study. Grading guidelines and assignment timelines are outlined
in each course syllabus to enable students to plan their time commitments accordingly. Students are
expected to read assigned materials thoroughly, attend and participate actively in class, complete all
assignments in a professional and timely manner, and accept evaluative feedback from faculty.
Students who demonstrate difficulty with these professional expectations will be counseled by their
advisors (with input from other Program faculty involved) to either improve in deficit areas or exit
the program.
        The Master of Education in Early Childhood Special Education Program teaches students
critical skills needed to become effective special educators and collaborators. These skills, or
standards, are taught as part of a developmental sequence over the student's course of study. Each
course syllabus also lists these standards so students can see the relationship between course content
and the standards they are expected to master.


ECSE Handbook 2006                                                                                       27
        While courses provide opportunities for students to develop competence, the Special
Education faculty realizes the diverse nature of their graduate population and that skill levels and
expertise vary. Therefore, those students enrolled in the Master‟s Program must demonstrate
competence to receive an Institutional Recommendation (form available from the UAA COE
website: www.uaa.alaska.edu/ed) for any additional endorsement. This program is based upon the
standards defined by CEC; copies of these standards are included in Appendix J. Successful course
completion does not result in an institutional recommendation.

Incomplete Grade

        An “I” (Incomplete) is a temporary grade. It is used to indicate that a student has made
satisfactory progress in the majority of the work in a course, but for unavoidable absences or other
conditions beyond the control of the student, has not been able to complete the course. The
Incomplete Grade Contract, a signed contract form between the student and the faculty member that
stipulates the assignment(s) required to finish the course, is required and must be completed and filed
with the department or dean‟s office before an “I” grade is assigned. Course work must be
completed by a date specified in the contract, not to exceed one year. Upon completion of the
required course work, the faculty member must submit a change of grade form accompanied by a
copy of the incomplete grade contract to the department or dean‟s office. If course work is not
completed within one year or if the terms specified on the Incomplete Grade Contract are not met,
the student may be assigned a failing grade (F or NP, depending on the grading basis of the course).
If course work is not completed within one year and the faculty member does not submit a change of
grade at that time, the “I” will become a permanent grade and it will be necessary for the student to
re-register to obtain credit for the course.
Retention Requirements
        The College of Education is a professional school, and all programs under its jurisdiction are
controlled by special admission and retention standards. If student progress is unsatisfactory, the
faculty may, under certain circumstances, recommend to the student that (s)he seek additional
assistance in a variety of areas including (a) personal attributes (e.g., initiative, enthusiasm,
reliability, cooperation, physical appearance and personal hygiene, commitment to teaching, personal
or social attributes), (b) classroom performance (e.g., lack of participation in class, poor quality of
assignments, study skills, organization, interpersonal skills, inability to complete assignments on
time, poor performance on examinations, poor performance on skill assignments), (c)
professionalism, and (d) basic skills (e.g., writing skills, spelling, grammar). Students who lack these
skills may be counseled out of special education by their advisors, and they will be denied admission
to Advanced Internship.
ECSE Handbook 2006                                                                                        28
Academic Probation

        Students must maintain a cumulative 3.0 grade point average while pursuing their
professional studies and earn grades of "B" or better in all EDSE coursework. A graduate student
whose GPA falls below 3.0 (B) in courses applicable to his/her graduate program, or a graduate
student who, for reasons specified in writing by the student's advisor/committee and/or dean or
designee, is not making “continuous satisfactory progress toward completing the program
requirements”, will be placed on academic probation. If the requirements to remove academic
probation are not satisfied within one semester (excluding summer), the student may be removed
from graduate degree-seeking status.

Removal from Graduate Degree-Seeking Status
        A graduate student's academic status will be changed to "Non-Degree-Seeking" if the
requirements to remove academic probation are not satisfied or if minimum academic standards are
not met. In some cases, students may be removed from graduate degree-seeking status without
having first been placed on academic probation. Students who have been removed from graduate
degree-seeking status will be allowed to register as non-degree-seeking students. Such students who
wish to register for graduate credits must have the signatures of the appropriate dean(s) or
designee(s) and faculty member(s). See Non-Degree-Seeking Students in the UAA Catalog or at the
UAA Homepage at http://www.uaa.alaska.edu/enroll/catalog.html.
Department Plagiarism Policy

        Plagiarism will not be tolerated. Submission of work completed by someone else or
work/assignments used in another class is prohibited. A grade of “F” may be assigned in such
instances. Further, plagiarism may result in action to drop the student from the class. For a full
definition of plagiarism: see UAA course catalog.


General University Requirements
        Additional details regarding the policies and procedures related to general university
requirements can be reviewed in the UAA Catalog that is available through the UAA Bookstore or at
the UAA Homepage at http://www.uaa.alaska.edu/enroll/catalog.html. You are required to have a
copy of the UAA Catalog for the year you enrolled in the program.



Time Extensions Beyond Seven Years
        Normally, all coursework toward a graduate or endorsement program should be completed
within a seven-year period of time. If an emergency occurs; e.g., being injured in a car accident and
being unable to complete the coursework, a student may request a time extension. A written letter or
petition directed to the student's advisor should include the following items: (1) the chronology of
ECSE Handbook 2006                                                                                     29
events should be explained and the time extension should be justified; (2) all remaining requirements
for the program should be listed; and (3) deadlines for completion of the requirements should be
listed along with a graduation date specified. The advisor will review the letter and student file and
forward it to the Department Chair along with a recommendation (supporting or denying the request).
The Department Chair will review the documents and attach a recommendation (supporting or
denying the request), which will be forwarded to the Dean's Office. The Dean will review the
documents also and attach a recommendation, which will be forwarded to the Dean of the Graduate
College. Additional details regarding the policies and procedures related to time extensions beyond
seven years can be reviewed in the UAA Catalog that is available through the UAA Bookstore or at
the UAA Homepage at http://www.uaa.alaska.edu/enroll/catalog.html.

Academic Appeals
        Students have the right to appeal academic actions. A written request for appeal must be
made to the Dean of the College not later than fifteen (15) working days following notification of the
action under review. The request shall set forth clearly and concisely the action to be reviewed, the
reason the student believes the action to be inappropriate, and the corrective action the student seeks.
Additional information regarding appeals is delineated in the UAA Catalog that is available through
the UAA Bookstore or at the UAA Homepage at http://www.uaa.alaska.edu/enroll/catalog.html.

                              CANDIDACY & GRADUATION

Advancement to Candidacy
        After a graduate student has demonstrated an ability to succeed in graduate study as defined
below (s)he may apply for Advancement to Candidacy (Appendix I) status through his/her program.
A student may apply if (s)he is in satisfactory academic standing as defined in the “Satisfactory
Academic Standing” section and has:
        1.      Satisfied specific program requirements for candidacy (comprehensive exam, exit
                portfolio, Praxis II Preschool Special Education, etc.).
        2.      Demonstrated competence, e.g., use of research tools or passing EDFN 627, as
                required by the individual student‟s program committee.
        4.      Satisfied all prerequisites and removed all deficiencies in his/her academic
                background.
        5.      Satisfied all terms of a conditional admission.
        6.      Submitted an approved Official Graduate Studies Plan.


        Advancement to Candidacy status, which is a prerequisite to graduation, is determined by the
faculty of the program. If more than seven years have elapsed since advancement to candidacy, the
student may need to re-apply for candidacy under the catalog requirements which are in effect at the
time.
ECSE Handbook 2006                                                                                       30
Graduation Policy and Procedures
        Students must submit an Application for Graduation to the Enrollment Services Office along
with the appropriate fee no later than September 15 for May graduation, March 1 for August and
May 1 for December graduation. Application forms can be obtained from the COE Advisement
Office or the Enrollment Services Office. Applications received after the deadline will be processed
for the following semester. Students who apply for graduation but do not complete degree or
certificate requirements by the end of the semester must re-apply for graduation. The fee is required
with each Application for Graduation. Additional details regarding the graduation policies and
procedures can be reviewed in the UAA Catalog that is available through the UAA Bookstore or at
the UAA Homepage at http://www.uaa.alaska.edu/enroll/catalog.html.
        To be eligible for graduation students must have successfully completed the following:
        1. All coursework on the Graduate Studies Plan.
        2. The written and/or oral comprehensive examination.
        3. An Individual Research Project or Thesis if it is required by the program.
        See page two of Appendix B, “Getting „The Degree‟”.

                                        FINANCIAL AID
        Numerous types of financial aid can be obtained while enrolled at the University. Students,
however, are encouraged to apply for those various programs prior to their arrival on campus. It is
critical to apply to the Special Education program at least one semester prior to enrollment in courses
for which financial aid is desired. In the past, some students have waited until they arrived on
campus to apply for financial assistance for their graduate program; in many cases, these students
have not received any money until the last week of the semester because it took a semester to
complete the admission process. Additional information regarding financial aid can be obtained from
the Financial Aid Office (907.786.1586) or from the UAA Homepage at
http://www.uaa.alaska.edu/enroll/catalog.html.




 ALASKA STATE TRAINING REQUIREMENTS – EARLY CHILDHOOD
                   SPECIAL EDUCATION
        In 1993, Alaska‟s Department of Education and Early Development instituted a training
requirement for all special education personnel working with preschool-age students, (3-5 years) who
experience disabilities. All teachers providing services to either preschoolers who are disabled or are
at risk for developing disabilities must have six credits of coursework in early childhood special
education. This is a State training requirement; completion of the six credits does not result in
another area of endorsement or certification. Individuals who are planning to teach in small rural
schools are advised to complete this coursework prior to accepting a job in a rural district.
ECSE Handbook 2006                                                                                    31
        NOTE: Individuals, who lack this coursework and accept a job that includes responsibilities
in this area (preschool special education), will be required to complete the additional 6 hours during
the first year of employment.

                                            HOUSING
        Housing is available at UAA for single students who are enrolled in a minimum of 12 credits
during the regular academic year and 3 credits during a summer session. For specific qualification
requirements, students may request a Housing application and brochure from:

                                        UAA Residence Life
                                      3700 Sharon Gagnon Lane
                                       Anchorage, AK 99508
                                        Phone: 907.751-7444
        Off campus housing is available but is sometimes difficult to locate and more expensive than
on-campus housing. Students are encouraged to locate suitable housing during the semester prior to
their intended enrollment.

                                      ACCREDITATION

        The University of Alaska Anchorage teacher education programs, including the special
education program, have been examined and measured against standards, which are approved and
adopted by the several professional organizations including the Alaska Department of Education and
National Association of State Directors of Teachers‟ Education and Certification (NASDTEC). In
2002 Council for Exceptional Children approved the Special Education Program including both the
Early Childhood Special Education Program and the Mild Disabilities Program. The College of
Education received NCATE accreditation in 2005.
        The Early Childhood Special Education program was developed using the CEC standards. A
copy of the standards appears in Appendix J.


            THE COUNCIL FOR EXCEPTIONAL CHILDREN (CEC)
        The CEC is the largest professional organization in special education. This international
organization has seventeen divisions including:
        Division on the Physically Handicapped (DPH)
        Council of Administrators of Special Education (CASE)
        Council for Children with Behavioral Disorders (CCBD)
        Division on Mental Retardation (CEC-MR)
        Division for Children with Communication Disorders (DCCD)
        Division for Learning Disabilities (DLD)
        Division on Visual Handicaps (DVH)
ECSE Handbook 2006                                                                                       32
       The Association for the Gifted (TAG)
       Teacher Education Division (TED) *Typically this division recruits university faculty
       Division for Early Childhood (DEC)
       Council for Educational Diagnostic Services (CEDS)
       Technology and Media Division (TAM)
       Division on Career Development (DCD)
       Division for Research (CEC-DR)
       CEC Pioneers Division (CEC-PD)
       Division for Culturally and Linguistically Diverse Exceptional Learners (DDEL)
       Division of International Special Education and Services (DISES)
       Numerous local CEC chapters exist throughout Alaska, other states and countries. UAA
special education faculty members participate actively in CEC at the state and national levels, and we
encourage all students join the organization and participate actively in it. Benefits of CEC
membership include subscriptions to various journals (Exceptional Children and Teaching
Exceptional Children), reduced costs of attending regional, state, and national conventions,
professional liability insurance, and other benefits. CEC meetings are scheduled periodically.
Announcements concerning the meetings are made in classes and posted on bulletin boards in the
COE. Students may participate in CEC sponsored activities without being paid members. The
Alaska Federation of CEC holds a statewide spring conference during February, and the International
CEC Convention is held during April. Students are encouraged to attend these professional
meetings. CEC Divisions (e.g., DEC, CASE) have annual conferences held throughout the year. The
CEC mailing and Internet address appears below along with their phone number.
       Council for Exceptional Children
       1110 N. Glebe Rd.
       Arlington, VA 22201-5704
       http://www.cec.sped.org 1.800.224.6830

Code of Ethics and Standards for Professional Practice


       The Council for Exceptional Children adopted a Code of Ethics and Standards for Professional
Practice in 1983. The Code and Standards are consistent with the philosophy of the special education
program at the University of Alaska Anchorage. Please review this information carefully. It is included in
Appendix K




ECSE Handbook 2006                                                                                  33
                     APPENDICES




ECSE Handbook 2006                34
                                Appendix A Services and Resources

The following is a partial list of available services and resources for UAA students.

         Service                Location     Phone            Web Address
          eMedia/Distance       GHH101       786.6177         http://uaaonline.alaska.edu/
         Distance Learning/
         Blackboard help.

         Financial Aid          U Center     786.1586         http://www.uaa.alaska.edu/finaid/
         Campus Bookstore        BKST        786.1151         http://www.uaa.alaska.edu/bookstore/

         College of             PSB209       786.4401         http://www.uaa.alaska.edu/ed/
         Education
         Computer Lab –         SMH111       786.6830         http://technology.uaa.alaska.edu/computer/Labs/
         Learning Resource                                    mainCampus/LRCLearningLab.cfm
         Center

         Disability Support     RH105        786.4530         http://www.uaa.alaska.edu/dss/Student_Links.ht
         Services                                             m

         Enrollment             U Center     786.1480         http://www.uaa.alaska.edu/enroll/enrol.html
         Services

         Help desk              ITS Call     786.4646         http://technology.uaa.alaska.edu/kb/Telephone/
         Answers to UAA         Center       1.877.633.38     PhoneTroubleQuestions.cfm
         computer/email                      88
         and Blackboard
         questions.
         U Center               UC126        786.6996         http://technology.uaa.alaska.edu/computer/Labs/
         Computer Lab

         Learning Resource      SMH          786.6828         http://www.uaa.alaska.edu/lrc/contact.html
         Center                 LCR

         Library                LIB          786.1871         http://www.lib.uaa.alaska.edu/




ECSE Handbook 2006                                                                                   35
Appendix B Steps into and through the:

                     Master of Education in Early Childhood Special Education

                                               University of Alaska
                                               College of Education
                                          3211 Providence Drive, PSB225
                                              Anchorage, AK 99508


Getting into the Program

       Admission to the Program


              Secure UAA Graduate Application and the Early Childhood Special Education
           (ECSE) application package from the ECSE staff by calling 907.786.4424 or emailing
           Jeanne Thompson at: ayecse@uaa.alaska.edu

             Complete and return (directions for returning are included on each item) all necessary
           questions and forms to include:
           b. Graduate Application for Admission (3.0 GPA in last 30 credits necessary). Return to
              Enrollment Services.
           c. Special Education Application (2 years professional experience preferred before
              consideration into program). Return to COE.
           d. Letters of Recommendation (2). Return to COE.
           e. Official Transcripts from all institutions of higher education previously attended.
              Return to Enrollment Services.


       Application for Financial Assistance if you are requesting such.


            Complete and return the Tuition Assistance Application to Special Ed Office
            at COE

            Submit each of the following to Special Ed Office at COE
                              Paper on your philosophy of services for young children including
                        young children who experience difficulties

                               Statement of why you are interested in the area of early childhood in
                        general and young children who experience disabilities specifically

                               Statement of your goals in terms of the field of Early
                        Intervention/Early Childhood Special Education




ECSE Handbook 2006                                                                                      36
Getting Through the Program


                   Read the Early Childhood Special Education Handbook downloaded from the
               UAA Special Education web site: http://www.uaa.alaska.edu/sped/ or Blackboard.

                       Download the Internship Handbook from the same sources.

                      Develop a graduate studies plan (program plan copy attached) with your
               faculty advisor (see page 25 in ECSE Handbook)

                       Successfully complete course work (B or better in each course)

                       Complete and submit professional Disposition Standards Survey (3 times)

                       Apply for, and interview for, internship

                       Prepare for comprehensive examination -

                       Schedule exam date through the Special Ed office (907.786.6317)

                       Mail application by due date to COE (see page 24 in ECSE Handbook)

                        Prepare and submit two potential comprehension exam questions and forward
                     to Sheila Sellers by agreed upon date

                       Pass comprehensive exam. Distance learning students may be required to
                     provide your own proctor.

Getting "The Degree"


             Complete the portfolio (directions for successful completion are on pages 32-35 in
       the ECSE Handbook)

             Take Praxis II Special Education examination; administered in Anchorage,
   procedures for registration see www.ets.org/praxis.org

              Apply for Advancement to Candidacy

              Apply for Graduation; forms available on UAA website or on Blackboard.

           Apply for Institute Recommendation; (available from the State Website:
   www.educ.state.ak.us/TeacherCertification/)

              Complete the Exit Interview

       1.      Complete the service obligation if grant monies were awarded to you



                                Appendix C Calendar of Events
ECSE Handbook 2006                                                                                 37
March 1                            M.Ed. Graduation application deadline for Summer (August)
                                   graduation. There is a $25 fee required.
May 1                              M. Ed. Graduation application deadline for Fall (December)
                                   graduation. There is a $25 fee required.
June (2nd Friday)                  M.Ed. Comprehensive exam application deadline for July
July 1                             Exit Portfolio and Praxis scores due for summer graduation
July (2nd week - date varies)      M.Ed. Comprehensive exams

July 1                             Program admission application deadline for fall semester

August (4th week - date varies)    Classes start

September 15                       M.Ed. graduation application deadline for Spring (May) graduation.
                                   There is a $25 fee required.
October 1                          EDSE 620 Internship application deadline for spring semester

October (2nd Friday)               M.Ed. Comprehensive exam application deadline for November
                                   exam

November 1                         Program admission application deadline for spring semester

November 1                         Exit portfolio and Praxis scores due for December graduation
November (2nd week - date          M.Ed. Comprehensive exam
varies)

December (2nd or 3rd week)         Notification of EDSE 620 Internship placements

January (2nd week - date varies)   Classes resume
February (2nd Friday)              M.Ed. Comprehensive exam application deadline for March exam

March 1                            EDSE 620Y Internship in Early Childhood Special Education
                                   application deadline for fall and summer session (limited
                                   placements-discuss with supervisor prior to submitting application.)
March 1                            M.Ed. Graduation application deadline for Summer (August)
                                   graduation. There is a $25 fee required.
March (3rd week - date varies)     M.Ed. Comprehensive exam

April 1                            Exit portfolio and Praxis scores due for May graduation




ECSE Handbook 2006                                                                                 38
                                     Appendix D Official Graduate Studies Plan
                              Master of Education in Early Childhood Special Education

 Name:                                                                   UAA ID#:                                               Date:
                   Print
 E-Mail Address:
 Degree:                                                                                          Major:
      This plan formally establishes the specific program requirements, which will, upon satisfactory completion, entitle you to
 receive your graduate degree. You are expected to complete all requirements listed on this program plan, and are subject to all
 Graduate General University Requirements and University Requirements for Graduate Degrees as published in the catalog.
 Any changes to this plan must be submitted on a “revised” graduate studies plan to Enrollment Services through your
 graduate committee.

                    Graduate General University Requirements                            A minimum of 24 credits must consist of courses
(Individual graduate programs may have more stringent requirements)                      other than a research project.
 In 400 level courses, a minimum grade of “B” is required.                             Catalog year and courses must be completed within
 Cumulative GPA of 3.00 in the courses on this program is required.                     a consecutive 7-year period.
 UAA 100, 200, 300 and 500 level courses are not applicable.                           A written comprehensive exam, exit portfolio, and
 A minimum of 21 credits must be completed at the graduate (600)                        the Praxis Preschool
      level.                                                                             Special Education Exam.
 A minimum of 9 credits must be taken at UAA
Courses To Be Transferred:                                                           (Excluding UAS/UAF)
 (A maximum of 9 semester credits from a regionally accredited institution, not used toward any other degree or certificate, may be transferred.)


 Institution     Prefix       Course      Title                                                                     Credits       Grade       Sem/YR
                              No.



                                                      UAA/UAF/UAS Courses:

 Campus                    Prefix             Course No.            Title                                        Credits Grade
 Sem/YR
 Campus        Prefix         Course     Title                                                                      Credits       Grade       Sem/YR
                              No.
 UAA           EDFN           A627       Educational Research                                                       3
 UAA           EDSE           A474       Special Children from Birth to Five                                        3
 UAA           EDSE           A681       Issues in ECSE                                                             3
 UAA           EDSE           A674       Families: Devel. Parent Prof. Partnerships                                 3
 UAA           EDSE           A610Y      Assessment: ECSE                                                           3
 UAA           EDSE           A622Y      Strategies: ECSE                                                           3
 UAA           EDSE           A620Y      Advanced Internship: ECSE                                                  6
 UAA           EDSE           A685       Young Children with Complex Needs                                          3
 Electives by advisement (9 credits)
 Campus        Prefix         Course     Title                                                                      Credits       Grade       Sem/YR
                              No.
 UAA           EDSE           A690                                                                                  3
 UAA           EDSE           A690                                                                                  3
 UAA           EDSE           A690                                                                                  3
     Total Credits in Program: _____________ (36 credits minimum required to graduate)

 Comps __________Praxis II                   __________Exit Folio ____ Graduation __________
 ______________________                       ________            ______________________                                            ________
 (Committee Chair)                            (Date)              (Committee Member)                                               (Date)
 ______________________                      ________
  (Committee Member)                          (Date)




 ECSE Handbook 2006                                                                                                                                 39
            Appendix E M.Ed. Early Childhood Special Education Course Descriptions

EDFN 627 - Education Research (3 credits) - Techniques of education research; selection of topics
and problems; data gathering; interpretation and preparation of reports.

EDSE 474 - Special Children From Birth Through Five (3 credits) - Distance
Legislative, historical, and philosophical perspectives of early childhood special education Includes
principles and procedures for developing infant learning and preschool programs for young children
with special needs.
Students are expected to participate in experiences outside regular class periods. This cour se is
acceptable for meeting the State requirement to instruct preschool handicapped children. EDSE 474
and EDSE 674 may be taken concurrently or in any order.


EDSE 674 - Families: Building Parent Professional Partnerships (3 credits) - Distance
Concepts and practices related to providing family centered services to families who have a member
who experiences a disability. Professionals will be provided with an in-depth understanding of
concepts and strategies required to develop effective parent/professional partnerships.


EDSE 474 and EDSE 674 may be taken concurrently or in any order.


EDSE 681 - Issues in Early Childhood Special Education (3 credits) - Distance
A critical study of theoretical and practical issues related to personal curricular, cultural, political,
coordination, and service delivery needs of young children who experience disabilities and their
families.


This course is acceptable for meeting the State requirement to instruct preschool handicapped
children. EDSE 474 and EDSE 674 may be taken concurrently or in any order.


EDSE 610Y - Assessment: Early Childhood Special Education (3 credits) - Summer- On Campus
Techniques and methods for assessing young children with special needs and their families.
Historical development, basic purposes and assumptions of assessment, testing terminology and
statistics; and the administration and interpretation of formal and informal assessment procedures.
Prerequisite for EDSE 620Y Internship.


Special Education students are required to spend time outside of class testing children and their
families.



ECSE Handbook 2006                                                                                     40
EDSE 622Y - Strategies: Early Childhood Special Education (3 credits) - Distance
Provides in-depth understanding of best-practice strategies in the field of early intervention. Presents
concepts necessary to prepare students to work with infants, toddlers and preschoolers with
disabilities and their families.


SPECIAL NOTE:          Assignments outside of class will be required to practice strategies and
demonstrate competence. This course is acceptable for meeting the State requirement to instruct
preschool handicapped children Prerequisite for EDSE 620Y Internship


EDSE 685         - Young Children with Complex Needs (3 credits) - Distance
Professionals working with young children, who experience severe medical-complex needs, will
acquire basic knowledge and awareness of medical, educational and health issues.


This course is acceptable for meeting the State requirement to instruct preschool handicapped
children.


EDSE 620Y- Advanced Internship: Early Childhood (6 credits) Fall, Spring - On campus-Off
Campus
Supervised field experience with exceptional children in Anchorage area facilities. Assignments
vary across areas of specialization.




ECSE Handbook 2006                                                                                    41
APPENDIX F                            UNIVERSITY OF ALASKA ANCHORAGE


                   3211 Providence Drive, PSB Suite 225, Anchorage, Alaska 99508-4614
                907.786.6317 888.822.8973 fax: 907.786.4474 e-mail: case@uaa.alaska.edu

                                   APPLICATION FOR ADMISSION
                                     Special Education Programs
                                                                                School Year _________ - _________
                Students must also apply to the University (and pay the fees) using the Graduate
                 Application form found in the UAA catalogue or at http://uaonline.alaska.edu/.

Special Education Application Deadlines : May 1, November 1, and July 1    (Application must be complete)
           Return application and supporting materials to UAA College of Education at above address


Name:                                                                    Student ID #:

Address:
                        Street

                                                                                      Fax:
 City                                                     State           Zip

Home Phone:                                   Work Phone:                             Cell Phone:

Email address:


Program Goal:
           
           Graduate Certificate in Special Education (endorsement only)
           
           Master of Education - General Special Education (can include Endorsement)
           Master of Education Early Childhood Special Education
        (The M.Ed. in Early Childhood Special Education can lead to a preschool teaching certificate. The M.Ed. in General
        Special Education does NOT lead to a teaching certificate.)
Admission Requirements:
        Graduate Certificate                                       M.Ed. General Special Education
         Teaching certificate                                          All Graduate Certificate requirements
         (3) current professional                                      GRE Test scores
          recommendation/teaching evaluations
         Elementary math methods                                  Early Childhood Special Education
         Elementary reading methods                                    (2) current professional
         Child Development                                              recommendations/teaching evaluations
         Classroom Management                                          Miller‟s Analogy or GRE Test scores


Currently held teaching credential:
Attach a copy of your current teaching credential to this application
            Elementary
                                 emphasis                                                    expires
            Secondary
                                 emphasis                                                    expires
            Other
                                 Emphasis                                                    expires


ECSE Handbook 2006                                                                                                     42
ECSE Handbook 2006
Teaching Experience or Related Professional Experience:
        Note: Record experiences for past 5 years minimum and attach additional sheets if necessary. "Applicant
        Recommendation Forms" must document most recent contract experience(s).

Position #1* (Most Recent First)
Role/Subjects
District Name/Location
Supervisor‟s Name                                                                  Phone
Date of Employment
Position #2
Role/Subjects _________________________________________________________________________________
District Name/Location _________________________________________________________________________
Supervisor‟s Name                                                                  Phone                               _
Date of Employment ____________________________________________________________________________

Position #3
Role/Subjects _________________________________________________________________________________
District Name/Location _________________________________________________________________________
Supervisor‟s Name                                                                  Phone                               _
Date of Employment ____________________________________________________________________________
Experiences with Individuals who have a Disability:
        Please describe your experiences with persons with disabilities. Use an additional sheet if necessary.
____________________________________________________________________________________________
____________________________________________________________________________________________
____________________________________________________________________________________________
____________________________________________________________________________________________
____________________________________________________________________________________________
____________________________________________________________________________________________

Goal Statement:
        Please write a brief statement about why you are applying to the program and what you intend to do when
        you finish. Use an additional sheet if necessary.
____________________________________________________________________________________________
____________________________________________________________________________________________
____________________________________________________________________________________________
____________________________________________________________________________________________
____________________________________________________________________________________________
____________________________________________________________________________________________
____________________________________________________________________________________________


Applicant‟s Signature                                                               Date:


ECSE Handbook 2006                                                                                                43
ECSE Handbook 2006
                                  Appendix G Application Recommendation Form
                                          University of Alaska
                                      Special Education Program
                                          College of Education

The applicant named below is applying for admission to a professional preparation program in
Special Education. Please complete this non-confidential form and send it to our office as soon as
possible to facilitate the processing of this applicant‟s request for admissions. Our address is on the
last page of this form. Thank you for your assistance.

Applicant:                                                             Date

Applicant address:

Applicant Social Security Number:

Position Held:

Dates of Employment:

Rate the applicant regarding his/her potential to relate to other teachers with whom you know
and have worked.

Ratings:
         NK = No Knowledge of applicant's performance
         1 = This individual performs in the weak range with the bottom 0% - 15% of teachers.
         2 = This individual performs in the marginal range with 15% - 40% of teachers.
         3 = This individual performs in the average range with 40% - 75% of teachers.
         4 = This individual performs in the above average with the top 5% - 25% of teachers.
         5 = This individual performs in the superior range with the top 5% of teachers.

____   1.        Skill as a teacher
____   2.        Knowledge of relevant curriculum
____   3.        Discipline and control
____   4.        Ability to work with students with disabilities
____   5.        Desirable attitude toward persons with disabilities
____   6.        Verbal communication using Standard English
____   7.        Written communication using Standard English
____   8.        Self-confidence & assertiveness
____   9.        Judgment & tact
____   10.       Initiative & motivation
____   11.       Emotional stability
____   12.       Attention to detail & organization
____   13.       School/community involvement
____   14.       Instructional methods and planning
____   15.       Motivation of students
____   16.       Evaluation of students & outcomes
____   17.       Interpersonal relationships with students
____   18.       Interpersonal relationships with parents
____   19.       Interpersonal relations with other faculty/staff
____   20.       Responsiveness to supervision




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Graduate Program Characteristics (Use same rating scale)
Ratings:
       NK = No Knowledge of applicant's performance
       1 = This individual performs in the weak range with the bottom 0% - 15% of teachers.
       2 = This individual performs in the marginal range with 15% - 40% of teachers.
       3 = This individual performs in the average range with 40% - 75% of teachers.
       4 = This individual performs in the above average with the top 5% - 25% of teachers.
       5 = This individual performs in the superior range with the top 5% of teachers.

____ 21.       Ability to successfully complete an endorsement program in Special Education
               (if applicable)
____ 22.       Ability to successfully complete a Master's degree program that requires
               comprehensive written exams and a yearlong research project

How long have you known this applicant and in what capacity?


Have you directly observed this person interacting with children/students in an instructional
situation? YES      NO
If "Yes", please describe the situation, role, etc. and include your comments in this evaluation
based upon your observations.

General Comments: (Use additional sheets if needed)

Name:                _______________________________          Position/Title:

Signature:           _______________________________          Date:

School/District:     _______________________________          Work Number:

Mailing Address        ______________________________________________________________


                                        Return this form to:
                                       University of Alaska
                                       College of Education
                                      3211 Providence Drive
                                     Anchorage, Alaska 99508
                             Attention: Special Education Admissions




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                     Appendix H Application for Admission to Candidacy

                                       (Please type or print)


 All terms of conditional admission must be satisfied, all prerequisites
 satisfied, and all academic deficiencies removed prior to Advancement to
                                 Candidacy

                                       .
Name:__________________________________________________________________
      (Last)                   (First)                  (MI)

SSN:__________________________ Day Phone:_______________________________


E-Mail Address:__________________________________________________________


Degree:________________________ Major:___________________________________


Emphasis:______________________ Track: _______________Option:_____________


Date of admission to graduate program:_______________ Catalog Year:_____________


Graduate Comprehensive Examination: _______________________________________


Graduate Exit Folio: ______________________________________


Other requirements: Praxis II: Preschool Special Education _____________________


__________________________________________ ________________________
      (Student Signature)                       (Date)
……………………………………………………………………………………………
Admission to Candidacy Approved:

__________________________________         _______________________________
      (Committee Chair)      (Date)          (Department Chair) (Date)

__________________________________         _______________________________
      (Committee Member)     (Date)          (Dean/Director) (Date)
__________________________________
      (Committee Member) ……(Date)


ECSE Handbook 2006                                                                 46
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                     Appendix I Exit Portfolio Rubric




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                             The University Alaska Anchorage
                                    Master of Education
                                             in
                             Early Childhood Special Education




                               EXIT PORTFOLIO SUMMARY




Name:




The purpose of this rubric is to evaluate the quality of the contents of the portfolio as well as
the quality of the portfolio defense. The rubric is divided into three sections: physical format,
conceptual framework, and evidence of competence. Students must achieve a total score of
85 or better with no more than one score of “3” or one grade of “C” in the evidence of
competence section to receive a passing grade.

Comments:




Portfolio due to the faculty by:

Portfolio returned to student by:


Total Score:
Reviewer:




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                                                                                                          Points
                                                                                                                           Total
                                                                                                          Times
       Physical Format (15 points)                                                                        Weight
                                                                                                                           Points

       Organization
       Table of Contents lists all major components of portfolio and location including
       resume/vita, PRAXIS II Scores, philosophy statement, statement of purpose,                           X1
       ECSE (CEC) standards, reflections, additional optional documentation. A three-
       ring binder with labeled dividers is recommended.
       (5 points maximum)
       Required Components
       Resume; PRAXIS II Scores, philosophy statement; statement of purpose; ECSE
       (CEC) standards documentation including a variety of activity/lesson plans,                          X2
       instructional and assessment activities and materials, academic/course
       assignments, observation assignments, interactions with families; reflections,
       additional optional documentation)
       Conceptual Framework (10 points)                                                                     X1
       Philosophy Statement
       The statement of core values, which is reflective of program/national values, is                     X1
       reflected in documentation throughout portfolio
       (5 points maximum)
       Statement of Purpose
       The statement of purpose introduces the portfolio: highlights the student‟s efforts,
       progress, and achievements; and delineates and briefly explains each section of                      X1
       the portfolio.
       (5 points maximum)
        Scoring Guidelines

   5 – At least 90 % of listed items are included and professional presented with a clear writing style
   4 – At least 80% of listed items are included and professional presented with a clear writing style, but some details/documents
        may be omitted
   3 – At least 70% of listed items are included, but some documents may lack professional appearance
   2 – At least 50% of listed items are included, but many documents lack professional appearance
   1 – Less than 50%of listed items are included

      Evidence of Competence (75 points)                                         Points Times Weight                Total Points

       EC1: Foundations                                                                   X 1.5
       EC2: Development and Characteristics of Learners                                   X 1.5
       EC3: Individual Learning Differences                                               X 1.5
       EC4:Instructional Strategies                                                       X 1.5
       EC5: Learning Environments and Social Interactions                                 X 1.5
       EC6: Language                                                                      X 1.5
       EC7: Instructional Planning                                                        X 1.5
       EC8: Assessment                                                                    X 1.5
       EC9: Professional and Ethical Practice                                             X 1.5
       EC10: Collaboration                                                                X 1.5

               Scoring Guidelines
    5 - 95% of documentation/information with supporting details is included, which documents entry-level competence
    4 - 95% of documentation/information with supporting details is included but some documentation may indicate a need for
           continuing professional development
    3 - 80% of documentation/information with supporting details is included, which document professional skills that require
           additional assistance prior to entry-level competence
    2 - 50% of documentation/information with supporting details is included, which document professional skills that require
           additional assistance prior to entry-level competence
    1 - Fewer than 50% of documentation/information with supporting details is included

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                                                   Name_______________________________________________
                                                                Date: Fall_______ Spring______ Summer _____
                           Exit Portfolio Standards (Evidence of Competence) Rubric
                                       Early Childhood Special Education
                                         University of Alaska Anchorage

1. Foundations                                                                                      Assessment
                                                                                                    Scores
Special educators understand the field as an evolving and changing discipline based on
philosophies, evidence-based principles and theories, relevant laws and policies, diverse and
historical points of view, and human issues that have historically influenced and continue to




                                                                                                           Scale scores must be equal to or greater than “4”
influence the field of special education and the education and treatment of individuals with
exceptional needs both in school and society. Special educators understand how these influence
professional practice, including assessment, instructional planning, implementation, and
program evaluation. Special educators understand how issues of human diversity can impact




                                                                                                    Passing Scores for Assessment Items Below

                                                                                                           Letter grades must be “B” or higher
families, cultures, and schools, and how these complex human issues can interact with issues in
the delivery of special education services. They understand the relationships of organizations
of special education to the organizations and functions of schools, school systems, and other
agencies. Special educators use this knowledge as a ground upon which to construct their own
personal understandings and philosophies of special education.
Historical points of view and human issues (models, theories and philosophies in development,
special education, and ECSE)
Trends and issues in ECSE (evidence-based principals and theories in behavior management
planning and implementation)
Issues of human diversity (family systems, dominate culture, impact of differences in values,
languages & customs)
Relationships of organizations (organizations and functions of agencies)
Issues in definition (rights and responsibilities, identification of individuals with Exceptional
Learning Needs (ELN), due process rights)
Laws and policies (educational young children, families & service providers)
PRAXIS II Total Score (include a copy of your PRAXIS II total score)
Total Score ________
Enter the scale score (600-719 = 4; 720+ = 5) in the “Assessment Scores” column
EDSE 681 Personal Philosophy
Paper Grade/points earned ____________ Total points possible_______
DO NOT enter the score in the “Assessment Scores” column
Student Entries



Evaluator‟s Comments


Standard is Met if score is equal to or greater than “4”                                            1 2 3 4 5
*No more than one grade of “C” or scale score of “3” can be listed to receive a Met




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Standard Scoring Guidelines

            5 - 95% of documentation/information with supporting details is included, which documents entry-level
                 competence
            4 - 95% of documentation/information with supporting details is included but some documentation may indicate a
                 need for continuing professional development
            3 - 80% of documentation/information with supporting details is included, which document professional skills
                 that require additional assistance prior to entry-level competence
            2 - 50% of documentation/information with supporting details is included, which document professional skills
                 that require additional assistance prior to entry-level competence
            1 - Fewer than 50% of documentation/information with supporting details is included




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2. Development and Characteristics of Learners                                                      Assessment
                                                                                                    Scores
Special educators know and demonstrate respect for their students first as unique human




                                                                                                           Scale scores must be equal to or greater than
beings. Special educators understand the similarities and differences in human development
and the characteristics between and among individuals with and without exceptional learning
needs (ELN). Moreover, special educators understand how exceptional conditions can interact




                                                                                                    Passing Scores for Assessment Items Below


                                                                                                           Letter grades must be “B” or higher
with the domains of human development and they use this knowledge to respond to the
varying abilities and behaviors of individuals with ELN. Special educators understand how the
experiences of individuals with ELN can impact families, as well as the individual‟s ability to
learn, interact socially, and live as fulfilled contributing members of the community.
Human development (typical and atypical growth and development in young children,
educational implications of various exceptionalities, similarities and differences across labels,
different theories of development)
Understand and respect children as unique human beings (characteristics and effects of cultural
and environmental milieu, significance of socio-cultural and political context for development
and learning)
Biological and medical issues (effects of various medications, childhood illnesses and




                                                                                                           “4”
communicable diseases, biological and environmental factors that affect development, families,
resources and priorities)
Family systems and support (role of family in supporting development, influence of stress and
trauma, supportive relationships)
PRAXIS II Special Education Preschool/Early Childhood (Test Code 0690) Test Category:
Human Growth and Development (include a copy of your PRAXIS subtest scores)
Subtest Score ________
Enter the scale score (<10 = 2; 10 - 12 = 3; >12 = 4) in the “Assessment Scores” column
Student selected documentation




Evaluator‟s Comments




Standard is Met if score is equal to or greater than “4”                                            1 2 3 4 5
*No more than one grade of “C” or scale score of “3” can be listed to receive a Met




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3. Individual Learning Differences                                                                   Assessment
                                                                                                     Scores
Special educators understand the effects that an exceptional condition can have on an
individual’s learning in school and throughout life. Special educators understand that the




                                                                                                     Passing Scores for Assessment Items Below


                                                                                                            Letter grades must be “B” or higher
beliefs, traditions, and values across and within cultures can affect relationships among and




                                                                                                            Scale scores must be equal to or
between students, their families, and the school community. Moreover, special educators are
active and resourceful in seeking to understand how primary language, culture, and
familial backgrounds interact with the individual’s exceptional condition to impact the
individual‟s academic and social abilities, attitudes, values, interests, and career options. The
understanding of these learning differences and their possible interactions provide the foundation
upon which special educators individualize instruction to provide meaningful and challenging




                                                                                                            greater than “4”
learning for individuals with ELN.
Effects of exceptional condition on learning
Interactions that impact learning (primary language, culture, familial backgrounds, beliefs,
traditions, values, social abilities, attitudes, and interests)
Cultural perspectives (differences across culturally diverse groups and differing ways of
learning)
Intervention strategies for young children and families that address exceptional condition and
cultural perspective)
PRAXIS II Special Education Preschool/Early Childhood (Test Code 0690) Test Category:
Knowledge of Disabling Conditions (include a copy of your PRAXIS subtest scores)
Subtest Score ________
Enter the scale score (<6 = 2; 6 - 9 = 3; >9 = 4) in the “Assessment Scores” column
Student selected documentation




Evaluator‟s Comments




Standard is Met if score is equal to or greater than “4”                                             1 2 3 4 5
*No more than one grade of “C” or scale score of “3” can be listed to receive a Met




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4. Instructional Strategies                                                                          Assessment
                                                                                                     Scores
Special educators posses a repertoire of evidence-based instructional strategies to individualize




                                                                                                            Scale scores must be equal to or
instruction for individuals with ELN. Special educators select, adapt, and use these instructional




                                                                                                     Passing Scores for Assessment Items



                                                                                                            Letter grades must be “B” or
strategies to promote challenging learning results in general and special curricula3/ and to
appropriately modify learning environments for individuals with ELN. They enhance the
learning of critical thinking, problem solving, and performance skills of individuals with
ELN, and increase their self-awareness, self-management, self-control, self-reliance, and self-
esteem. Moreover, special educators emphasize the development, maintenance, and




                                                                                                            greater than “4”
generalization of knowledge and skills across environments, settings, and the lifespan.
Select, adapt, and use evidence-based strategies to individualize instructions across various
settings (based on child, family, community, and curriculum)




                                                                                                            higher
Use strategies that promote learning of critical thinking and performance skills (self-awareness,
self-management, self-control, self-reliance, self-esteem, maintenance and generalization across
learning environment)




                                                                                                     Below
Use strategies that will promote future, successful transitions (self-assessment, problem solving,
etc.)
PRAXIS II Special Education Preschool/Early Childhood (Test Code 0690) Test Category:
Planning and Service Delivery (include a copy of your PRAXIS subtest scores)
Subtest Score ________
Enter the scale score (<8 = 2; 8 - 11 = 3; >11 = 4) in the “Assessment Scores” column
EDSE 620Y Intervention plans (include the best 4 plans)
Birth to three_____

Three to five____
DO NOT enter a grade in the “Assessment Scores” column
EDSE 622Y Intervention Project (include report, sample intervention plans, and grading
rubric)

Birth to three_____

Three to five____

DO NOT enter a grade in the “Assessment Scores” column
EDSE 685 Implementation plan and videotape (include the plan but not the video tape)
Plan Grade/points earned ______________ Total points possible_______
DO NOT enter a grade in the “Assessment Scores” column
Evaluator‟s Comments




Standard is Met if score is equal to or greater than “4”                                             1 2 3 4 5
*No more than one grade of “C” or scale score of “3” can be listed to receive a Met




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5. Learning Environments and Social Interactions                                                      Assessment
                                                                                                      Scores
Special educators actively create learning environments for individuals with ELN that foster
cultural understanding, safety and emotional well-being, positive social interactions, and active
engagement of individuals with ELN. In addition, special educators foster environments in
which diversity is valued and individuals are taught to live harmoniously and productively in a
culturally diverse world. Special educators shape environments to encourage the
independence, self-motivation, self-direction, personal empowerment, and self-advocacy of
individuals with ELN. Special educators help their general education colleagues integrate
individuals with ELN in regular environments and engage them in meaningful learning activities
and interactions. Special educators use direct motivational and instructional interventions
with individuals with ELN to teach them to respond effectively to current expectations. When




                                                                                                             Scale scores must be equal to or greater than “4”
necessary, special educators can safely intervene with individuals with ELN in crisis. Special
educators coordinate all these efforts and provide guidance and direction to paraeducators
and others, such as classroom volunteers and tutors.
Integrate learning, medical care, and teaching pedagogy to plan optimal learning environments in




                                                                                                      Passing Scores for Assessment Items Below

                                                                                                             Letter grades must be “B” or higher
which diversity is valued (basic management theories and strategies, teacher attitudes and
behavior that influence behavior, social skills, crisis prevention and intervention, medical care
considerations for fragile children)
Foster environments in which diversity is valued (ways specific cultures are negatively
stereotyped, strategies to cope with a legacy of former and continuing racism)
Create safe learning environments (foster cultural understanding, emotional well-being, positive
social interactions, realistic expectations for personal and social behavior, appropriate supports,
active participation)
Modify the learning environment (use performance data to manage behaviors, use effective and
varied strategies, use least intensive behavior management strategy based on needs)
Manage the learning environment (establish and maintain rapport with all students; design and
manage daily routines; structure, direct and support activities of parents and other volunteers)
Design and implement appropriate interventions (nutrition and health plans and feeding
strategies, developmentally and functionally appropriate; stimuli-rich materials, media, and
technology including adaptive and assistive technology)
PRAXIS II Special Education Preschool/Early Childhood (Test Code 0690) Test Category:
Planning and Service Delivery (include a copy of your PRAXIS subtest scores)
Subtest Score ________
Enter the scale score (<8 = 2; 8 - 11 = 3; >11 = 4) in the “Assessment Scores” column
Student selected documentation




Evaluator‟s Comments




Standard is Met if score is equal to or greater than “4”                                              1 2 3 4 5
*No more than one grade of “C” or scale score of “3” can be listed to receive a Met




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6. Language                                                                                        Assessment
                                                                                                   Scores
Special educators understand typical and atypical language development and the ways in
which exceptional conditions can interact with an individual‟s experience with and use of




                                                                                                   Passing Scores for Assessment Items Below


                                                                                                          Letter grades must be “B” or higher
language. Special educators use individualized strategies to enhance language development




                                                                                                          Scale scores must be equal to or
and teach communication skills to individuals with ELN. Special educators are familiar with
augmentative, alternative, and assistive technologies to support and enhance communication
of individuals with exceptional needs. Special educators match their communication methods to
an individual‟s language proficiency and cultural and linguistic differences. Special educators
provide effective language models and they use communication strategies and resources to
facilitate understanding of subject matter for individuals with ELN whose primary




                                                                                                          greater than “4”
language is not English.
Understand typical and atypical language development (cultural and linguistic differences;
characteristics of one‟s own culture and use of language and differences with other groups; ways
of behaving and communicating across cultures)
Augmentative and assistive communication strategies
Facilitate understanding for individuals whose primary language is not English
Use strategies to support and enhance communication skills (support and facilitate family and
child interactions)
PRAXIS II Special Education Preschool/Early Childhood (Test Code 0690) Test Category:
Human Growth and Development (include a copy of your PRAXIS subtest scores)
Subtest Score ________
Enter the scale score (<10 = 2; 10 - 12 = 3; >12 = 4) in the “Assessment Scores” column
EDSE 622Y or EDSE 620Y (include best intervention plans in the area of language)
Birth to three_____

Three to five____

DO NOT enter a grade in the “Assessment Scores” column
Evaluator‟s Comments




Standard is Met if score is equal to or greater than “4”                                           1 2 3 4 5
*No more than one grade of “C” or scale score of “3” can be listed to receive a Met




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7. Instructional Planning                                                                                        Assessment
                                                                                                                 Scores
Individualized decision-making and instruction is at the center of special education practice. Special
educators develop long-range individualized instructional plans anchored in both general and special
curricula. In addition, special educators systematically translate these individualized plans into carefully
selected shorter-range goals and objectives taking into consideration an individual‟s abilities and needs,
the learning environment, and a myriad of cultural and linguistic factors. Individualized instructional plans
emphasize explicit modeling and efficient guided practice to assure acquisition and fluency through
maintenance and generalization. Understanding of these factors as well as the implications of an
individual‟s exceptional condition, guides the special educator‟s selection, adaptation, and creation of




                                                                                                                        Scale scores must be equal to or greater than “4”
materials, and the use of powerful instructional variables. Instructional plans are modified based on
ongoing analysis of the individual’s learning progress. Moreover, special educators facilitate this
instructional planning in a collaborative context including the individuals with exceptionalities, families,
professional colleagues, and personnel from other agencies as appropriate. Special educators also develop a
variety of individualized transition plans, such as transitions from preschool to elementary school and




                                                                                                                 Passing Scores for Assessment Items Below

                                                                                                                        Letter grades must be “B” or higher
from secondary settings to a variety of postsecondary work and learning contexts. Special educators are
comfortable using appropriate technologies to support instructional planning and individualized
instruction.
Develop long-range individualized instructional plans (based on theories and research of curriculum
development and instructional practice; uses scope and sequences of established curriculums; integrates
appropriate local, state, and national standards; incorporates appropriate technology; all roles
(paraprofessionals), intervention and direct services defined)
Develop and implement programs in collaboration with team members (involve family in goals and
monitoring progress; use functional and task analysis; sequence objectives appropriately; integrate affective,
developmentally and functionally appropriate curriculum; social and life skills with academic curricula
when appropriate; incorporate information from multiple disciplines)
Develop and implement daily instructional plans (prepare lesson plans; prepare and organize lesson
materials; select instructional content, resources, and strategies that respond to cultural, linguistic, and
gender differences; use appropriate assistive technology; use instructional time effectively; adjust
instruction based on continual observations).
Prepare individuals and families for transitions (teach exhibit self-enhancing behaviors; transition planning
to preschool and elementary school)
PRAXIS II Special Education Preschool/Early Childhood (Test Code 0690) Test Category:
Planning and Service Delivery (include a copy of your PRAXIS subtest scores)
Subtest Score ________
Enter the scale score (<8 = 2; 8 - 11 = 3; >11 = 4) in the “Assessment Scores” column
EDSE 620Y Intervention plans (include the best 2 plans and a copy of your Internship Portfolio
Evaluation form)
Birth to three_____

Three to five____

Enter your “Intervention Plans” grade (1,2,3,4,5) from your EDSE 620Y Internship Portfolio
Evaluation in the “Assessment Scores” column
EDSE 622Y Intervention Project
Include best intervention plans, report, and grading matrix from project
Birth to three_____

Three to five____


DO NOT enter a grade in the “Assessment Scores” column
Other documentation
Home based intervention requirement:
    Document home-based intervention totaling 20 hours. Students must include documentation
    of hours. This requirement may be achieved via: internship, volunteering, special course
    projects, or field experience associated with: EDSE 685, 474, 622Y, or other electives taken
    throughout the students‟ program.

Evaluator‟s Comments
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7. Instructional Planning                                                             Assessment
                                                                                      Scores


Standard is Met if score is equal to or greater than “4”                              1 2 3 4 5
*No more than one grade of “C” or scale score of “3” can be listed to receive a Met




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8. Assessment                                                                                                    Assessment
                                                                                                                 Scores
Assessment is integral to the decision-making and teaching of special educators and special educators use
multiple types of assessment information for a variety of educational decisions. Special educators use the
results of assessments to help identify exceptional learning needs and to develop and implement
individualized instructional programs, as well as to adjust instruction in response to ongoing learning
progress. Special educators understand the legal policies and ethical principles of measurement and
assessment related to referral, eligibility, program planning, instruction, and placement for individuals with
ELN, including those from culturally and linguistically diverse backgrounds. Special educators understand




                                                                                                                        Scale scores must be equal to or greater than “4”
measurement theory and practices for addressing issues of validity, reliability, norms, bias, and
interpretation of assessment results. In addition, special educators understand the appropriate use and
limitations of various types of assessments. Special educators collaborate with families and other
colleagues to assure non-biased, meaningful assessments and decision-making. Special educators
conduct formal and informal assessments of behavior, learning, achievement, and environments to design




                                                                                                                 Passing Scores for Assessment Items Below

                                                                                                                        Letter grades must be “B” or higher
learning experiences that support the growth and development of individuals with ELN. Special educators
use assessment information to identify supports and adaptations required for individuals with ELN to
access the general curriculum and to participate in school, system, and statewide assessment programs.
Special educators regularly monitor the progress of individuals with ELN in general and special
curricula. Special educators use appropriate technologies to support their assessments.
Understand legal policies and ethnical principles of measurement and assessment (basic assessment
terminology; measurement theory; screening, pre-referral and classification procedures; use and limitations
of assessment instruments)
Use assessment instruments effectively (gather relevant background data; administer nonbiased formal and
informal assessments; develop and modify assessment tools and strategies; interpret information)
Use assessment information in making eligibility, program and placement decisions (considering cultural
diversity, collaborate with team members; use effective communication skills)
Regularly monitor progress of individuals with ELN (create and maintain records; monitor development
and instruction using appropriate formal and informal assessments)
Work collaboratively with families and other professionals (integrate assessment results into individualized
family service plans and individualized educational plans; assist families in identifying their concerns,
resources, and priorities; evaluate services with families)
PRAXIS II Special Education Preschool/Early Childhood (Test Code 0690) Test Category:
Evaluation, Assessment, and Eligibility Criteria (include a copy of your PRAXIS subtest scores)
Subtest Score ________
Enter the scale score (<8 = 2; 8 – 11 = 3; >11 = 4)in the “Assessment Scores” column
Assessment

Birth to three_____

Three to five____
   Documentation must include: the protocol, assessment write up and findings.

Autism, Fetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorders, or other Severe Disabilities Assessment
   I. Demonstrate the ability to conduct an eligibility and program assessment on a child with:
   a)autism
   b) FAS/FAE
   c) severe disabilities
   Documentation must include: the protocol, assessment write up and findings.

     II. Document attendance at team meetings for a child with autism, FAS/FAE, or severe
            disabilities.


Evaluator‟s Comments


Standard is Met if score is equal to or greater than “4”                                                         1 2 3 4 5
*No more than one grade of “C” or scale score of “3” can be listed to receive a Met


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9. Professional and Ethical Practice                                                                                Assessment
                                                                                                                    Scores
Special educators are guided by the profession‟s ethical and professional practice standards. Special
educators practice in multiple roles and complex situations across wide age and developmental ranges.
Their practice requires ongoing attention to legal matters along with serious professional and ethical
considerations. Special educators engage in professional activities and participate in learning communities
that benefit individuals with ELN, their families, colleagues, and their own professional growth. Special
educators view themselves as lifelong learners and regularly reflect on and adjust their practice. Special
educators are aware of how their own and others attitudes, behaviors, and ways of communicating can
influence their practice. Special educators understand that culture and language can interact with
exceptionalities, and are sensitive to the many aspects of diversity of individuals with ELN and their




                                                                                                                           Scale scores must be equal to or greater than “4”
families. Special educators actively plan and engage in activities that foster their professional growth and
keep them current with evidence-based best practices. Special educators know their own limits of
practice and practice within them.
Knowledgeable about early childhood special education professional organizations and publications,




                                                                                                                    Passing Scores for Assessment Items Below

                                                                                                                           Letter grades must be “B” or higher
research-validated practice, attitudes, behaviors, and ways of communicating (personal cultural biases; role
models for individuals with ELN; lifelong professional development)
Acts ethically (CEC Code of Ethnics, advocating for appropriate services; displays appropriate professional
dispositions; advocate for enhanced professional status and working conditions for early childhood service
providers)
Upholds professional standards of practice (AK State and other professional standards; conducts
professional activities in compliance with applicable laws and policies; limits activities to professional skills
and seeks assistance as needed; recognizes child abuse, etc. and follows reporting procedures; use
appropriate team process models)
Professional development plan and lifelong learning (has a plan that involves early childhood special
education professional development that benefits individuals with ELN, their families, and colleagues;
reflects on own practice to improve; identifies new evidence-based practices and integrates into practice)
Reflects on practice (uses verbal and nonverbal, and written language effectively; accesses information on
exceptionalities; conducts self-evaluation of instruction)
Sensitivity to many aspects of diversity (use family theories and principles to guide practice; respect family
choices and goals; commitment to develop the highest education and quality-of-life potential of individuals
with ELN)
PRAXIS II Special Education Preschool/Early Childhood (Test Code 0690) Test category:
Professional Practice (include a copy of your PRAXIS subtest scores)
Subtest Score ________
Enter the scale score(<15 = 2; 15 – 20 = 3; >20 = 4) in the “Assessment Scores” column
EDSE 681 Position papers – Include best examples of Position Papers
Include grading rubric for each paper submitted.


DO NOT enter a grade in the “Assessment Scores” column
EDSE 674 Family based experience (include the report)
Report Grade/points earned ____________ Total points possible_______
DO NOT enter a grade in the “Assessment Scores” column
EDSE 620Y Recommend Professional Practices (include the Internship final evaluation
conference report)


DO NOT enter a grade in the “Assessment Scores” column
Evaluator‟s Comments


Standard is Met if score is equal to or greater than “4”                                                            1 2 3 4 5
*No more than one grade of “C” or scale score of “3” can be listed to receive a Met




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10. Collaboration                                                                                               Assessment
                                                                                                                Scores
Special educators routinely and effectively collaborate with families, other educators, related service
providers, and personnel from community agencies in culturally responsive ways. This collaboration




                                                                                                                       Scale scores must be equal to or greater than
assures that the needs of individuals with ELN are addressed throughout schooling. Moreover, special
educators embrace their special role as advocate for individuals with ELN. Special educators promote and
advocate the learning and well being of individuals with ELN across a wide range of settings and a range of




                                                                                                                Passing Scores for Assessment Items Below


                                                                                                                       Letter grades must be “B” or higher
different learning experiences. Special educators are viewed as specialists by a myriad of people who
actively seek their collaboration to effectively include and teach individuals with ELN. Special educators
are a resource to their colleagues in understanding the laws and policies relevant to Individuals with ELN.
Special educators use collaboration to facilitate the successful transitions of individuals with ELN across
settings and services.
Knowledgeable about consultation and collaboration models and strategies (roles of various individuals;
concerns of families and strategies to assist them; culturally responsive factors that promote communication
and collaboration; dynamics of team-building, problems-solving, and conflict resolution)
Collaborate with families, other educators, related service providers, and personnel from community
agencies in culturally responsive ways (plan and conduct collaborative conferences; maintain
confidentiality; foster respectful and beneficial relationships between individuals and with families; foster
active participation; use various models of consultation in early childhood settings; use group problem
solving skills; integrate individuals with ELN into various settings; communicate information about the




                                                                                                                       “4”
curriculum and child‟s progress)
Serve as resource for others (assist in planning for transitions; observe, evaluate and provide feedback to
paraeducators; communicate with school personnel about individuals with ELN; model techniques and
coach others in the use of instructional methods and accommodations)
PRAXIS II Special Education Preschool/Early Childhood (Test Code 0690) Test Category:
Family and Community Aspects (include a copy of your PRAXIS subtest scores)
Subtest Score ________
Enter the scale score (<15 = 2; 15 – 18 = 3; >18 = 4)in the “Assessment Scores” column
Professional dispositions
(Leadership Activities):
     Students must include documentation of the Leadership requirements via: internship, volunteering,
     special course projects, or field experience associated with: EDSE 685, 474, 622Y, or other electives
     taken throughout the students‟ program.
     In-service Training: Document developing, implementing, and evaluating an in-service training,
     technical assistance or workshop on a topic related to Early Intervention/Early Childhood Special
     Education. Documentation must include workshop agenda, presentation materials, evaluation of the
     training, and a brief reflection.

     Professional Membership: Documentation that shows she/he belongs to one professional national
     organization related to ECSE.

     Care Coordination: Demonstrate participation in care coordination for at least 2 young children with
     disabilities. Documentation must include a description of the child, the coordination that occurred, and
     an outcome.


Evaluator‟s Comments

Standard is Met if score is equal to or greater than “4”                                                        1 2 3 4 5
*No more than one grade of “C” or scale score of “3” can be listed to receive a Met




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                            Appendix J CEC Standards for Special Education

                        CEC Standards for All Beginning Special Education Teachers of
                                         Early Childhood Students

Special Education Standard #1:                        Foundations

Special educators understand the field as an evolving and changing discipline based on philosophies, evidence-based
principles and theories, relevant laws and policies, diverse and historical points of view, and human issues that have
historically influenced and continue to influence the field of special education and the education and treatment of
individuals with exceptional needs both in school and society. Special educators understand how these influence
professional practice, including assessment, instructional planning, implementation, and program evaluation. Special
educators understand how issues of human diversity can impact families, cultures, and schools, and how these
complex human issues can interact with issues in the delivery of special education services. They understand the
relationships of organizations of special education to the organizations and functions of schools, school systems, and
other agencies. Special educators use this knowledge as a
ground upon which to construct their own personal understandings and philosophies of special education.

Beginning special educators demonstrate their mastery of this standard through the mastery of the CEC Common
Core Knowledge and Skills, as well as through the appropriate CEC Specialty Area(s) Knowledge and Skills for
which the program is preparing candidates.


Common Core

 Knowledge:
 CC1K1                   Models, theories, and philosophies that form the basis for special education practice.
 CC1K2                   Laws, policies, and ethical principles regarding behavior management planning and
                         implementation.
 CC1K3                   Relationship of special education to the organization and function of educational agencies.
 CC1K4                   Rights and responsibilities of students, parents, teachers, and other professionals, and
                         schools related to exceptional learning needs.
 CC1K5                   Issues in definition and identification of individuals with exceptional learning needs,
                         including those from culturally and linguistically diverse backgrounds.
 CC1K6                   Issues, assurances and due process rights related to assessment, eligibility, and placement
                         within a continuum of services.)
 CC1K7                   Family systems and the role of families in the educational process.
 CC1K8                   Historical points of view and contribution of culturally diverse groups.
 CC1K9                   Impact of the dominant culture on shaping schools and the individuals who study and
                         work in them.
 CC1K10                  Potential impact of differences in values, languages, and customs that can exist between
                         the home and school.
 Skill:
 CC1S1                   Articulate personal philosophy of special education.
ECSE Handbook 2006
Early Childhood

 Knowledge:
 EC1K1                Historical and philosophical foundations of services for young children both with and without
                      exceptional learning needs.
 EC1K2                Trends and issues in early childhood education and early childhood special education.
 EC1K3                Law and policies that affect young children, families, and programs for young children.
 Skills:              None in addition to Common Core

Special Education Standard #2: Development and Characteristics of Learners

Special educators know and demonstrate respect for their students first as unique human beings. Special educators
understand the similarities and differences in human development and the characteristics between and among
individuals with and without exceptional learning needs (ELN)1/. Moreover, special educators understand how
exceptional conditions can interact with the domains of human development and they use this knowledge to respond
to the varying abilities and behaviors of individual‟s with ELN. Special educators understand how the experiences
of individuals with ELN can impact families, as well as the individual‟s ability to learn, interact socially, and live as
fulfilled contributing members of the community.

Beginning special educators demonstrate their mastery of this standard through the mastery of the CEC Common
Core Knowledge and Skills, as well as through the appropriate CEC Specialty Area(s) Knowledge and Skills for
which the preparation program is preparing candidates.

Common Core

 Knowledge:
 CC2K1               Typical and atypical human growth and development.
 CC2K2               Educational implications of characteristics of various exceptionalities.
 CC2K3               Characteristics and effects of the cultural and environmental milieu of the individual with
                     exceptional learning needs and the family.
 CC2K4               Family systems and the role of families in supporting development.
 CC2K5               Similarities and differences of individuals with and without exceptional learning needs.
 CC2K6               Similarities and differences among individuals with exceptional learning needs.
 CC2K7               Effects of various medications on individuals with exceptional learning needs.


Early Childhood

 Knowledge:
 EC2K1                Theories of typical and atypical early childhood development.
 EC2K2                Effect of biological and environmental factors on pre-, peri-, and post-natal development.
 EC2K3                Influence of stress and trauma, protective factors and resilience, and supportive relationships
                      on the social and emotional development of young children.
 EC2K4                Significance of sociocultural and political contexts for the development and learning of young
                      children who are culturally and linguistically diverse.
 EC2K5                Impact of medical conditions on family concerns, resources, and priorities.
 EC2K6                Childhood illnesses and communicable diseases
 Skills:              None in addition to Common Core




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Special Education Standard #3: Individual Learning Differences

Special educators understand the effects that an exceptional condition2/ can have on an individual‟s learning in
school and throughout life. Special educators understand that the beliefs, traditions, and values across and within
cultures can affect relationships among and between students, their families, and the school community. Moreover,
special educators are active and resourceful in seeking to understand how primary language, culture, and familial
backgrounds interact with the individual‟s exceptional condition to impact the individual‟s academic and social
abilities, attitudes, values, interests, and career options. The understanding of these learning differences and their
possible interactions provide the foundation upon which special educators individualize instruction to provide
meaningful and challenging learning for individuals with ELN.

Beginning special educators demonstrate their mastery of this standard through the mastery of the CEC Common
Core Knowledge and Skills, as well as through the appropriate CEC Specialty Area(s) Knowledge and Skills for
which the program is preparing candidates.

Common Core


  KNOWLED
    GE:
 CC3K1                Effects an exceptional condition(s) can have on an individual‟s life.
 CC3K2                Impact of learners‟ academic and social abilities, attitudes, interests, and values on instruction
                      and career development.
 CC3K3                Variations in beliefs, traditions, and values across and within cultures and their effects on
                      relationships among individuals with exceptional learning needs. Family, and schooling.
 CC3K4                Cultural perspectives influencing the relationships among families, schools and communities
                      as related to instruction.
 CC3K5                Differing ways of learning of individuals with exceptional learning needs including those from
                      culturally diverse backgrounds and strategies for addressing these differences.


Early Childhood

 Knowledge:           None in addition to Common Core
 Skills:
 EC3S1                Use intervention strategies with young children and their families that affirm and respect
                      family, cultural, and linguistic diversity.

Special Education Standard #4: Instructional Strategies

Special educators posses a repertoire of evidence-based instructional strategies to individualize instruction for
individuals with ELN. Special educators select, adapt, and use these instructional strategies to promote challenging
learning results in general and special curricula3/ and to appropriately modify learning environments for individuals
with ELN. They enhance the learning of critical thinking, problem solving, and performance skills of individuals
with ELN, and increase their self-awareness, self-management, self-control, self-reliance, and self-esteem.
Moreover, special educators emphasize the development, maintenance, and generalization of knowledge and skills
across environments, settings, and the lifespan.

Beginning special educators demonstrate their mastery this standard through the mastery of the CEC Common Core
Knowledge and Skills, as well as through the appropriate CEC Specialty Area(s) Knowledge and Skills for which
the program is preparing candidates.




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Common Core

 Skill:
 CC4S1                Use strategies to facilitate integration into various settings.
 CC4S2                Teach individuals to use self-assessment, problem solving, and other cognitive strategies to
                      meet their needs. (Replaces CC4.S12)
 CC4S3                Select, adapt, and use instructional strategies and materials according to characteristics of the
                      individual with exceptional learning needs.
 CC4S4                Use strategies to facilitate maintenance and generalization of skills across learning
                      environments.
 CC4S5                Use procedures to increase the individual‟s self-awareness, self-management, self-control,
                      self-reliance, and self-esteem.
 CC4S6                Use strategies that promote successful transitions for individuals with exceptional learning
                      needs.

Early Childhood

 Knowledge:           None in addition to Common Core
 Skills:
 EC4S1                Use instructional practices based on knowledge of the child, family, community, and the
                      curriculum.
 EC4S2                Use knowledge of future educational settings to develop learning experiences and select
                      instructional strategies for young children.
 EC4S3                Prepare young children for successful transitions.


Special Education Standard #5: Learning Environments and Social Interactions

Special educators actively create learning environments for individuals with ELN that foster cultural understanding,
safety and emotional well-being, positive social interactions, and active engagement of individuals with ELN. In
addition, special educators foster environments in which diversity is valued and individuals are taught to live
harmoniously and productively in a culturally diverse world. Special educators shape environments to encourage the
independence, self-motivation, self-direction, personal empowerment, and self-advocacy of individuals with ELN.
Special educators help their general education colleagues integrate individuals with ELN in regular environments
and engage them in meaningful learning activities and interactions. Special educators use direct motivational and
instructional interventions with individuals with ELN to teach them to respond effectively to current expectations.
When necessary, special educators can safely intervene with individuals with ELN in crisis. Special educators
coordinate all these efforts and provide guidance and direction to paraeducators and others, such as classroom
volunteers and tutors.

Beginning special educators demonstrate their mastery of this standard through the mastery of the CEC Common
Core Knowledge and Skills, as well as through the appropriate CEC Specialty Area(s) Knowledge and Skills for
which the preparation program is preparing candidates.

Common Core

 Knowledge:
 CC5K1                Demands of learning environments.
 CC5K2                Basic classroom management theories and strategies for individuals with exceptional learning
                      needs.
 CC5K3                Effective management of teaching and learning.
 CC5K4                Teacher attitudes and behaviors that influence behavior of individuals with exceptional
                      learning needs.
 CC5K5                Social skills needed for educational and other environments.
 CC5K6                Strategies for crisis prevention and intervention.
 CC5K7                Strategies for preparing individuals to live harmoniously and productively in a culturally
                      diverse world.
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 CC5K8                Ways to create learning environments that allow individuals to retain and appreciate their
                      own and each others‟ respective language and cultural heritage.
 CC5K9                Ways specific cultures are negatively stereotyped.
                      Strategies used by diverse populations to cope with a legacy of former and continuing racism
 Skills:
 CC5S1                Create a safe, equitable, positive, and supportive learning environment in which diversities
                      are valued.
 CC5S2                Identify realistic expectations for personal and social behavior in various settings.
 CC5S3                Identify supports needed for integration into various program placements.
 CC5S4                Design learning environments that encourage active participation in individual and group
                      activities.
 CC5S5                Modify the learning environment to manage behaviors.
 CC5S6                Use performance data and information from all stakeholders to make or
                      suggest modifications in learning environments.
 CC5S7                Establish and maintain rapport with individuals with and without exceptional learning needs.
 CC5S8                Teach self-advocacy.
 CC5S9                Create an environment that encourages self-advocacy and increased independence.
 CC5S10               Use effective and varied behavior management strategies.
 CC5S11               Use the least intensive behavior management strategy consistent with the needs of the
                      individual with exceptional learning needs.
 CC5S12               Design and manage daily routines.
 CC5S13               Organize, develop, and sustain learning environments that support positive intracultural and
                      intercultural experiences.
 CC5S14               Mediate controversial intercultural issues among students within the learning environment in
                      ways that enhance any culture, group, or person.
 CC5S15               Structure, direct, and support the activities of paraeducators, volunteers, and tutors.
 CC5S16               Use universal precautions.

Early Childhood


 KNOWLEDG
    E:
 EC5K1                Medical care considerations for premature, low-birth-weight, and other young children with
                      medical and health conditions.
 Skills:
 EC5S1                Implement nutrition plans and feeding strategies.
 EC5S2                Use health appraisal procedures and make referrals as needed.
 EC5S3                Design, implement, and evaluate environments to assure developmental and functional
                      appropriateness.
 EC5S4                Provide a stimuli-rich indoor and outdoor environment that employs materials, media, and
                      technology, including adaptive and assistive technology.
 EC5S5                Maximize young children‟s progress in group and home settings through organization of the
                      physical, temporal, and social environments.

Special Education Standard #6:              Language

Special educators understand typical and atypical language development and the ways in which exceptional
conditions can interact with an individual‟s experience with and use of language. Special educators use
individualized strategies to enhance language development and teach communication skills to individuals with ELN.
Special educators are familiar with augmentative, alternative, and assistive technologies to support and enhance
communication of individuals with exceptional needs. Special educators match their communication methods to an
individual‟s language proficiency and cultural and linguistic differences. Special educators provide effective
language models and they use communication strategies and resources to facilitate understanding of subject matter
for individuals with ELN whose primary language is not English.


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Beginning special educators demonstrate their mastery of language for and with individuals with ELN through the
mastery of the CEC Common Core Knowledge and Skills, as well as through the appropriate CEC Specialty Area(s)
Knowledge and Skills for which the preparation program is preparing candidates
Common Core

 Knowledge:
 CC6K1               Effects of cultural and linguistic differences on growth and development.
 CC6K2               Characteristics of one‟s own culture and use of language and the ways in which these can
                     differ from other cultures and uses of languages.
 CC6K3               Ways of behaving and communicating among cultures that can lead to misinterpretation and
                     misunderstanding.
 CC6K4               Augmentative and assistive communication strategies.
 Skills:
 CC6S1               Use strategies to support and enhance communication skills of individuals with exceptional
                     learning needs.
 CC6S2               Use communication strategies and resources to facilitate understanding of subject matter for
                     students whose primary language is not the dominant language.

Early Childhood

 Knowledge:          None in addition to Common Core
 Skills:
 EC6S1               Support and facilitate family and child interactions as primary contexts for learning and
                     development.

Special Education Standard #7: Instructional Planning

Individualized decision-making and instruction is at the center of special education practice. Special educators
develop long-range individualized instructional plans anchored in both general and special curricula. In addition,
special educators systematically translate these individualized plans into carefully selected shorter-range goals and
objectives taking into consideration an individual‟s abilities and needs, the learning environment, and a myriad of
cultural and linguistic factors. Individualized instructional plans emphasize explicit modeling and efficient guided
practice to assure acquisition and fluency through maintenance and generalization. Understanding of these factors as
well as the implications of an individual‟s exceptional condition, guides the special educator‟s selection, adaptation,
and creation of materials, and the use of powerful instructional variables. Instructional plans are modified based on
ongoing analysis of the individual‟s learning progress. Moreover, special educators facilitate this instructional
planning in a collaborative context including the individuals with exceptionalities, families, professional colleagues,
and personnel from other agencies as appropriate. Special educators also develop a variety of individualized
transition plans, such as transitions from preschool to elementary school and from secondary settings to a variety of
postsecondary work and learning contexts. Special educators are comfortable using appropriate technologies to
support instructional planning and individualized instruction.

Beginning special educators demonstrate their mastery of this standard through the mastery of the CEC Common
Core Knowledge and Skills, as well as through the appropriate CEC Specialty Area(s) Knowledge and Skills for
which the preparation program is preparing candidates.

Common Core

 Knowledge:
 CC7K1                 Theories and research that form the basis of curriculum development and instructional practice.
 CC7K2                 Scope and sequences of general and special curricula.
 CC7K3                 National, state or provincial, and local curricula standards.
 CC7K4                 Technology for planning and managing the teaching and learning environment.
 CC7K5                 Roles and responsibilities of the paraeducator related to instruction, intervention, and direct
                       service.
 Skills:
 CC7S1                 Identify and prioritize areas of the general curriculum and accommodations for individuals
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                       with exceptional learning needs.
 CC7S2                 Develop and implement comprehensive, longitudinal individualized programs in collaboration
                       with team members.
 CC7S3                 Involve the individual and family in setting instructional goals and monitoring progress.
 CC7S4                 Use functional assessments to develop intervention plans.
 CC7S5                 Use task analysis.
 CC7S6                 Sequence, implement, and evaluate individualized learning objectives.
 CC7S7                 Integrate affective, social, and life skills with academic curricula.
 CC7S8                 Develop and select instructional content, resources, and strategies that respond to cultural,
                       linguistic, and gender differences.
 CC7S9                 Incorporate and implement instructional and assistive technology into the educational program.
 CC7S10                Prepare lesson plans.
 CC7S11                Prepare and organize materials to implement daily lesson plans.
 CC7S12                Use instructional time effectively.
 CC7S13                Make responsive adjustments to instruction based on continual observations.
 CC7S14                Prepare individuals to exhibit self-enhancing behavior in response to societal attitudes and
                       actions.

Early Childhood

 Knowledge:            None in addition to Common Core
 Skills:
 EC7S1                 Implement, monitor and evaluate individualized family service plans and individualized
                       education plans.
 EC7S2                 Plan and implement developmentally and individually appropriate curriculum.
 EC7S3                 Design intervention strategies incorporating information from multiple disciplines.
 EC7S4                 Implement developmentally and functionally appropriate individual and group activities
                       including play, environmental routines, parent-mediated activities, group projects,
                       cooperative learning, inquiry experiences, and systematic instruction.

Special Education Standard #8:                Assessment

Assessment is integral to the decision-making and teaching of special educators and special educators use multiple
types of assessment information for a variety of educational decisions. Special educators use the results of
assessments to help identify exceptional learning needs and to develop and implement individualized instructional
programs, as well as to adjust instruction in response to ongoing learning progress. Special educators understand the
legal policies and ethical principles of measurement and assessment related to referral, eligibility, program planning,
instruction, and placement for individuals with ELN, including those from culturally and linguistically diverse
backgrounds. Special educators understand measurement theory and practices for addressing issues of validity,
reliability, norms, bias, and interpretation of assessment results. In addition, special educators understand the
appropriate use and limitations of various types of assessments. Special educators collaborate with families and
other colleagues to assure non-biased, meaningful assessments and decision-making. Special educators conduct
formal and informal assessments of behavior, learning, achievement, and environments to design learning
experiences that support the growth and development of individuals with ELN. Special educators use assessment
information to identify supports and adaptations required for individuals with ELN to access the general curriculum
and to participate in school, system, and statewide assessment programs. Special educators regularly monitor the
progress of individuals with ELN in general and special curricula. Special educators use appropriate technologies to
support their assessments.

Beginning special educators demonstrate their mastery of this standard through the mastery of the CEC Common
Core Knowledge and Skills, as well as through the appropriate CEC Specialty Area(s) Knowledge and Skills for
which the preparation program is preparing candidates.




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Common Core

 Knowledge:
 CC8K1                 Basic terminology used in assessment.
 CC8K2                 Legal provisions and ethical principles regarding assessment of individuals.
 CC8K3                 Screening, pre-referral, referral, and classification procedures.
 CC8K4                 Use and limitations of assessment instruments.
 CC8K5                 National, state or provincial, and local accommodations and modifications.
 Skills:
 CC8S1                 Gather relevant background information.
 CC8S2
                       Administer nonbiased formal and informal assessments.
 CC8S3                 Use technology to conduct assessments.
 CC8S4                 Develop or modify individualized assessment strategies.
 CC8S5                 Interpret information from formal and informal assessments.
 CC8S6                 Use assessment information in making eligibility, program, and placement decisions for
                       individuals with exceptional learning needs, including those from culturally and/or
                       linguistically diverse backgrounds.
 CC8S7                 Report assessment results to all stakeholders using effective communication skills.
 CC8S8                 Evaluate instruction and monitor progress of individuals with exceptional learning needs.
 CC8S9                 Create and maintain records.


Early Childhood

 Knowledge:            None in addition to Common Core
 Skills:
 EC8S1                 Assess the development and learning of young children.
 EC8S2                 Select, adapt and use specialized formal and informal assessments for infants, young
                       children and their families.
 EC8S3                 Participate as a team member to integrate assessment results in the development and
                       implementation of individualized family service plans and individualized education plans.
 EC8S4                 Assist families in identifying their concerns, resources, and priorities.
 EC8S5                 Participate and collaborate as a team member with other professionals in conducting family-
                       centered assessments.
 EC8S6                 Evaluate services with families.

Special Education Standard #9: Professional and Ethical Practice

Special educators are guided by the profession‟s ethical and professional practice standards. Special educators
practice in multiple roles and complex situations across wide age and developmental ranges. Their practice requires
ongoing attention to legal matters along with serious professional and ethical considerations. Special educators
engage in professional activities and participate in learning communities that benefit individuals with ELN, their
families, colleagues, and their own professional growth. Special educators view themselves as lifelong learners and
regularly reflect on and adjust their practice. Special educators are aware of how their own and others attitudes,
behaviors, and ways of communicating can influence their practice. Special educators understand that culture and
language can interact with exceptionalities, and are sensitive to the many aspects of diversity of individuals with
ELN and their families. Special educators actively plan and engage in activities that foster their professional growth
and keep them current with evidence-based best practices. Special educators know their own limits of practice and
practice within them.

Beginning special educators demonstrate their mastery of this standard through the mastery of the CEC Common
Core Knowledge and Skills, as well as through the appropriate CEC Specialty Area(s) Knowledge and Skills for
which the preparation program is preparing candidates.

Common Core
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 Knowledge:
 CC9K1                 Personal cultural biases and differences that affect one‟s teaching.
 CC9K2                 Importance of the teacher serving as a model for individuals with exceptional learning needs.
 CC9K3                 Continuum of lifelong professional development.
 CC9K4                 Methods to remain current regarding research-validated practice.
 Skills:
 CC9S1                 Practice within the CEC Code of Ethics and other standards of the profession.
 CC9S2                 Uphold high standards of competence and integrity and exercise sound judgment in the
                       practice of the professional.
 CC9S3                 Act ethically in advocating for appropriate services.
 CC9S4                 Conduct professional activities in compliance with applicable laws and policies.
 CC9S5                 Demonstrate commitment to developing the highest education and quality-of-life potential of
                       individuals with exceptional learning needs.
 CC9S6                 Demonstrate sensitivity for the culture, language, religion, gender, disability, socio-economic
                       status, and sexual orientation of individuals.
 CC9S7                 Practice within one‟s skill limit and obtain assistance as needed.
 CC9S8                 Use verbal, nonverbal, and written language effectively.
 CC9S9                 Conduct self-evaluation of instruction.
 CC9S10                Access information on exceptionalities.
 CC9S11                Reflect on one‟s practice to improve instruction and guide professional growth.
 CC9S12                Engage in professional activities that benefit individuals with exceptional learning needs,
                       their families, and one‟s colleagues.

Early Childhood

 Knowledge:
 EC9.K1                    Organizations and publications relevant to the field of early childhood special education.
 Skills:
 EC9S1                     Recognize signs of child abuse and neglect in young children and follow reporting
                           procedures.
 EC9S2                     Use family theories and principles to guide professional practice.
 EC9S3                     Respect family choices and goals.
 EC9S4                     Apply models of team process in early childhood.
 EC9S5                     Advocate for enhanced professional status and working conditions for early childhood
                           service providers.
 EC9S6                     Participate in activities of professional organizations relevant to the field of early
                           childhood special education.
 EC9S7                     Apply research and effective practices critically in early childhood settings.
 EC9S8                     Develop, implement and evaluate a professional development plan relevant to one‟s
                           work with young children.

Special Education Standard #10:              Collaboration

Special educators routinely and effectively collaborate with families, other educators, related service providers, and
personnel from community agencies in culturally responsive ways. This collaboration assures that the needs of
individuals with ELN are addressed throughout schooling. Moreover, special educators embrace their special role as
advocate for individuals with ELN. Special educators promote and advocate the learning and well being of
individuals with ELN across a wide range of settings and a range of different learning experiences. Special
educators are viewed as specialists by a myriad of people who actively seek their collaboration to effectively include
and teach individuals with ELN. Special educators are a resource to their colleagues in understanding the laws and
policies relevant to Individuals with ELN. Special educators use collaboration to facilitate the successful transitions
of individuals with ELN across settings and services.

Beginning special educators demonstrate their mastery of this standard through the mastery of the CEC Common
Core Knowledge and Skills, as well as through the appropriate CEC Specialty Area(s) Knowledge and Skills for
which the preparation program is preparing candidates.
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Common Core

     Knowledge:
     CC10K1                Models and strategies of consultation and collaboration.
     CC10K2                Roles of individuals with exceptional learning needs, families, and school and community
                           personnel in planning of an individualized program.
     CC10K3                Concerns of families of individuals with exceptional learning needs and strategies to help
                           address these concerns.
     CC10K4                Culturally responsive factors that promote effective communication and collaboration with
                           individuals with exceptional learning needs, families, school personnel, and community
                           members.
     Skills:
     CC10S1                Maintain confidential communication about individuals with exceptional learning needs.
     CC10S2                Collaborate with families and others in assessment of individuals with exceptional learning
                           needs.
 CC10S3                    Foster respectful and beneficial relationships between families and professionals.
 CC10S4                    Assist individuals with exceptional learning needs and their families in becoming active
                           participants in the educational team.
     CC10S5                Plan and conduct collaborative conferences with individuals with exceptional learning needs
                           and their families.
     CC10S6                Collaborate with school personnel and community members in integrating individuals with
                           exceptional learning needs into various settings.
     CC10S7                Use group problem solving skills to develop, implement and evaluate collaborative activities.
     CC10S8                Model techniques and coach others in the use of instructional methods and accommodations.
     CC10S9                Communicate with school personnel about the characteristics and needs of individuals with
                           exceptional learning needs.
     CC10S10               Communicate effectively with families of individuals with exceptional learning needs from
                           diverse backgrounds.
     CC10S11               Observe, evaluate and provide feedback to paraeducators.
Early Childhood

     Knowledge:
     EC10K1                 Dynamics of team-building, problem-solving, and conflict resolution.
     Skills:
     EC10S1                 Assist the family in planning for transitions.
     EC10S2                 Communicate effectively with families about curriculum and their child‟s progress.
     EC10S3                 Apply models of team process in early childhood settings.
     EC10S4                 Apply various models of consultation in early childhood settings.
     EC10S5                 Establish and maintain positive collaborative relationships with families.
     EC10S6                 Provide consultation and instruction specific to services for children and families.

1/
           “Individual with exceptional learning needs” is used throughout to include individuals with disabilities and individuals
           with exceptional gifts and talents.
2/
           “Exceptional Condition” is used throughout to include both single and co-existing conditions. These may be two or
           more disabling conditions or exceptional gifts or talents co-existing with one or more disabling conditions.
3/
           “Special Curricula” is used throughout to denote curricular areas not routinely emphasized or addressed in general
           curricula; e.g., social, communication, motor, independence, self-advocacy.




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              Appendix K CEC Code of Ethics and Standards for Professional Practice
                                            CEC CODE OF ETHICS

         We declare the following principles to be the Code of Ethics for educators of exceptional persons.
Members of the special education profession are responsible for upholding and advancing these principles.
Members of The Council for Exceptional Children agree to judge by them in accordance with the spirit and
provisions of this Code.

        I.       Special education professionals are committed to developing the highest educational and quality
                 of life potential of exceptional individuals.

       II.       Special education professionals promote and maintain a high level of competence and integrity in
                 practicing their profession.

      III.       Special education professionals engage in professional activities which benefit exceptional
                 individuals, their families, other colleagues, students, or research subjects.

      IV.        Special education professionals exercise objective professional judgment in the practice of their
                 profession.

       V.        Special education professionals strive to advance their knowledge and skills regarding the
                 education of exceptional individuals.

      VI.        Special education professionals work within the standards and policies of their profession.

     VII.        Special education professionals seek to uphold and improve where necessary the laws, regulations,
                 and policies governing the delivery of special education and related services and the practice of
                 their profession.

     VIII.       Special education professionals do not condone or participate in unethical or illegal acts, nor
                 violate professional standards adopted by the Delegate Assembly of CEC.

CEC Standards for Professional Practice

I.       PROFESSIONALS IN RELATION TO EXCEPTIONAL PERSONS AND THEIR FAMILIES

         A.      Instructional Responsibilities

                 1.       Special education personnel are committed to the application of professional expertise to
                          ensure the provision of quality education for all exceptional individuals. Professionals
                          strive to:

                          a.       Identify and use instructional methods and curricula that are appropriate to their
                                   area of professional practice and effective in meeting the needs of exceptional
                                   persons.

                          b.       Participate in the selection of and use appropriate instructional materials,
                                   equipment, supplies, and other resources needed in the effective practice of their
                                   profession.

                          c.       Create safe and effective learning environments which contribute to fulfillment
                                   of needs, stimulation of learning and of self-concept.


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                       d.      Maintain class size and caseloads which are conducive to meeting the individual
                               instructional needs of exceptional persons.
                       e.      Use assessment instruments and procedures that do not discriminate against
                               exceptional persons on the basis of race, color, creed, sex, national origin, age,
                               political practices, family or social background, sexual orientation, or
                               exceptionality.

                       f.      Base grading, promotion, graduation, and/or movement out of the program on
                               the individual goals and objectives for the exceptional individual.

                       g.      Provide accurate program data to administrators, colleagues, and parents, based
                               on efficient and objective record-keeping practices, for the purpose of decision-
                               making.

                       h.      Maintain confidentiality of information except where information is released
                               under specific conditions of written consent and statutory confidentiality
                               requirements.

       B.      Management of Behavior

               l.      Special education professionals participate with other
                       professionals and with parents in an interdisciplinary effort in the management of
                       behavior. Professionals:

                       a.      Apply only those disciplinary methods and behavioral procedures which they
                               have been instructed to use and which do not undermine the dignity of the
                               individual or the basic human rights of exceptional persons (such as corporal
                               punishment).

                       b.      Clearly specify the goals and objectives for behavior management practices in
                               the exceptional person's Individualized Education Program.

                       c.      Conform to policies, statutes, and rules established by state/provincial and local
                               agencies relating to judicious application of disciplinary methods and behavioral
                               procedures.

                       d.      Take adequate measures to discourage, prevent, and intervene when a
                               colleague's behavior is perceived as being detrimental to exceptional persons.

                       e.      Refrain from aversive techniques unless repeated trials of other methods have
                               failed and then only after consultation with parents and appropriate agency
                               officials.

       C.      Support Procedures

               l.      Adequate instruction and supervision shall be provided to professionals before they are
                       required to perform support services for which they have not been previously prepared.

               2.      Professionals may administer medication, where state/provincial policies do not preclude
                       such action, if qualified to do so or if written instructions are on file which state the
                       purpose of the medication, the conditions under which it may be administered, possible
                       side effects, the physician's name and phone number, and the professional liability if a
                       mistake is made. The professional will not be required to administer medication.

               3.      Professionals note and report those concerned whenever changes in behavior occur in
                       conjunction with the administration of medication or at any other time.



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       D.      Parent Relationships

               l.      Professionals seek to develop relationships with parents based on mutual respect for their
                       roles in achieving benefits for the exceptional person. Special education professionals:

                       a.       Develop effective communication with parents, avoiding technical terminology,
                                using the primary language of the home, and other modes of communication
                                when appropriate.

                       b.       Seek and use parents' knowledge and expertise in planning, conducting, and
                                evaluating special education and related services for exceptional persons.

                       c.       Maintain communications between parents and professionals with appropriate
                                respect for privacy and confidentiality.

                       d.       Extend opportunities for parent education, utilizing accurate information and
                                professional methods.

                       e.       Inform parents of the educational rights of their children and of any proposed or
                                actual practices which violate those rights.

                       f.       Recognize and respect cultural diversities which exist in some families with
                                exceptional persons.

                       g.       Recognize that the relationship of home and community environmental
                                conditions affects the behavior and outlook of the exceptional person.

       E.      Advocacy

               l.      Special education professionals serve as advocates for exceptional persons by speaking,
                       writing, and acting in a variety of situations on their behalf. Professionals:

                       a.       Continually seek to improve government provisions for the education of
                                exceptional persons while ensuring that public statements by professionals as
                                individuals are not construed to represent official policy statements of the
                                agency by which they are employed.

                       b.       Work cooperatively with and encourage other professionals to improve the
                                provision of special education and related services to exceptional persons.

                       c.       Document and objectively report to their supervisors or administrators
                                inadequacies in resources and promote appropriate corrective action.

                       d.       Monitor for inappropriate placements in special education and intervene at the
                                appropriate level to correct the condition when such inappropriate placements
                                exist.

                       e.       Follow local, state/provincial, and federal laws and regulations which mandate a
                                free appropriate public education to exceptional students and the protection of
                                the rights of exceptional persons to equal opportunities in our society.




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II.    PROFESSIONAL EMPLOYMENT

       A.      Certification and Qualification

               l.       Professionals ensure that only persons deemed qualified by having met state/provincial
                        minimal standards are employed as teachers, administrators, and related-service providers
                        for persons with exceptionalities.

       B.      Employment

               l.       Professionals do not discriminate in hiring on the basis of race, color, creed, sex, national
                        origin, age, political practices, family or social background, sexual orientation, or
                        exceptionality.

               2.       Professionals represent themselves in an ethical and legal manner in regard to their
                        personnel preparation and experience when seeking new employment.

               3.       Professionals give notice consistent with local education agency policies when intending
                        to leave employment.

               4.       Professionals adhere to the conditions of a contract or terms of an appointment in the
                        setting where they practice.

               5.       Professionals released from employment are entitled to a written explanation of the
                        reasons for termination and to fair and impartial due process procedures.

               6.       Special education professionals share equitably the opportunities and benefits.(salary,
                        working conditions, facilities, and other resources) of other professionals in the school
                        system.

               7.       Professionals seek assistance, including the service of other professionals, in instances
                        where personal problems threaten to interfere with their job performance.

               8.       Professionals respond objectively when requested to evaluate applicants seeking
                        employment.

               9.       Professionals have the right and responsibility to resolve professional problems by
                        utilizing established grievance procedures when appropriate.

       C.      Assignment and Role

               l.       Professionals should receive clear written communication of all duties and
                        responsibilities, including those which are prescribed as conditions of employment.

               2.       Professionals promote educational quality and intra-and inter professional cooperation
                        through active participation in the planning, policy development, management, and
                        evaluation of the special education program and the education program at large so that
                        programs remain responsive to the changing needs of exceptional persons.

               3        Professionals practice only in areas of exceptionality, at age levels, and in program
                        models for which they are prepared by reason of personnel preparation and/or experience.

               4.       Adequate supervision of and support for special education professionals is provided by
                        other professionals qualified by reason of personnel preparation and experience in the
                        area of concern.

               5.       The administration and supervision of special education professionals provides for clear
                        lines of accountability.

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               6.      The unavailability of substitute teacher or support personnel, including aides, must not
                       result in the denial of special education services to a greater degree than to that of other
                       educational program.


       D.      Professional Development

               1.      Special education professionals systematically advance their knowledge and skills in
                       order to maintain a high level of competence and response to the changing needs of
                       exceptional persons by pursuing a program of continuing education including but not
                       limited to participation in such activities as in-service personnel preparation, professional
                       conferences/workshops, professional meetings, continuing education courses, and the
                       reading of professional literature.

               2.      Professionals participate in the objective and systematic evaluation of themselves,
                       colleagues, services, and programs for the purpose of continuous improvement of
                       professional performance.

               3.      Professionals in administrative positions support and facilitate professional development.

III.   PROFESSIONALS IN RELATION TO THE PROFESSION AND TO OTHER PROFESSIONALS


       A.      To the Profession

               1.      Special education professionals assume responsibility for participating in professional
                       organizations and adherence to the standards and codes of ethics of those organizations.

               2.      Special education professionals have a responsibility to provide varied and exemplary
                       supervised field experiences for persons in undergraduate and graduate preparation
                       programs.

               3.      Special education professionals refrain from using professional relationships with
                       students and parents for personal advantage.

               4.      Special education professionals take an active position in the regulation of the profession
                       through use of appropriate procedures for bringing about changes.

               5.      Special education professionals initiate support and/or participate in research related to
                       the education of exceptional persons with the aim of improving the quality of educational
                       services, increasing the accountability of programs, and generally benefiting exceptional
                       persons. Professionals:

                       a.          Adopt procedures that protect the rights and welfare of subjects participating in
                                   research.

                       b.          Interpret and publish research results with accuracy and a high quality of
                                   scholarship.

                       c.          Support a cessation of the use of any research procedures which may result in
                                   undesirable consequence for the participant.

                       d.       Exercise all possible precautions to prevent misapplication or misuse of a
                                research effort, by oneself or others.
       B.      To Other Professionals



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               1.    Special education professionals function as members of interdisciplinary teams and the
                     reputation of the profession resides with them. Professionals

                     a.      Recognize and acknowledge the competencies and expertise of members
                             representing other disciplines as well as those of members in their own
                             disciplines.

                     b.      Strive to develop positive attitudes among other professionals toward
                             exceptional persons, representing them with an objective regard for their
                             possibilities and their limitations as persons in a democratic society.

                     c.      Cooperate with other agencies involved in serving exceptional persons through
                             such activities as the planning and coordination of information exchanges,
                             service delivery, and evaluation and personnel preparation, so that no
                             duplication or loss in quality of services may occur.

                     d.      Provide consultation and assistance, where appropriate, to both regular and
                             special education as well as other school personnel serving exceptional persons.

                     e.      Provide consultation and assistance, where appropriate, to professionals in non-
                             school settings serving exceptional persons.

                     f.      Maintain effective interpersonal relations with colleagues and other
                             professionals, helping them to develop and maintain positive and accurate
                             perceptions about the special education profession.




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                     Appendix L Student Dispute/Complaint Resolution Process


       University students have a variety of procedures available to them to process complaints or
disputes about actions or inaction by members of the University community, which adversely affect
them. The process used will depend on the nature of the complaint. Refer to the specific sections in
the UAA Catalog that address the issues in question.
       For disputes about grades and other academic actions, refer to the Academic Dispute
Resolution Procedure; for complaints about the conduct of anther student or disputes regarding
University judicial decisions or resulting disciplinary sanctions, refer to the Student Code of Conduct
and the Student Judicial Review Procedures; for complaints about sexual harassment and sexual
misconduct, refer to the Student Code of Conduct and the Sexual Offenses policy; for challenges to
the content of your student record, refer to the Access to Student Records Procedure. All of these
topics plus other may be found in the student life section of the UAA Catalog.




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