CBT Basics: A Group Approach to Teaching Fundamental Cognitive-Behavioral Skills by ProQuest

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									Journal of Cognitive Psychotherapy: An International Quarterly
                                                                                 Volume 24, Number 2 • 2010




             CBT Basics: A Group Approach
               to Teaching Fundamental
              Cognitive-Behavioral Skills

                              Sophie D. Macrodimitris, PhD
                             Foothills Medical Centre, Alberta Health Services

                                   Kate E. Hamilton, PhD
                              Peter Lougheed Centre, Alberta Health Services

                               Barb J. Backs-Dermott, PhD
                        Sheldon M. Chumir Health Centre, Alberta Health Services

                                  Kerry J. Mothersill, PhD
                        Sheldon M. Chumir Health Centre, Alberta Health Services



      CBT Basics I is a psychoeducational group program originally developed as a pre-individual
      therapy introduction to cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT) skills for clients presenting with
      depression and/or anxiety disorders. We describe the development and content of this six-
      session introductory CBT group and provide data from a 3-year pilot program. The results
      support the potential for symptom improvement and CBT skill acquisition, and provide pre-
      liminary evidence for the group’s potential to enhance accessibility to CBT. Future directions
      for the development of this group are discussed, including expanding to a 10-session group
      model incorporating mindfulness meditation.


Keywords: CBT; group; psychoeducation; depression; anxiety




R
        ecent clinical practice guidelines (CPGs) for depression (National Institute for Clinical
        Excellence [NICE], 2007a; Royal Australian and New Zealand College of Psychiatrists
        Clinical Practice Guidelines Team for Depression, 2004) and anxiety (NICE, 2007b; Royal
Australian and New Zealand College of Psychiatrists Clinical Practice Guidelines Team for Panic
Disorder and Agoraphobia, 2003; Swinson et al., 2006) recommend cognitive behavioral therapy
(CBT) as an equivalent, and in some cases (e.g., specific phobia, panic disorder), more effective
treatment than medication. These guidelines recognize several years of randomized controlled
trials consistently demonstrating the cost-effectiveness (e.g., Antonuccio, Thomas, & Danton,
1997) and efficacy (Chambless & Hollon, 1998; Chambless & Ollendick, 2001; Otto, Pollack,
& Maki, 2000; Otto, Smits, & Reese, 2005; Vos, Corry, Haby, Carter, & Andrews, 2005) of CBT
for depression and anxiety. Recent advances in CBT, such as the incorporation of mindfulness


132                                                         © 2010 Springer Publishing Company
                                                                               DOI: 10.1891/0889-8391.24.2.132
                                                                CBT Basics Group Therapy Program   133

meditation techniques (Segal, Williams, & Teasdale, 2002), also demonstrate reduced relapse rates
(Ree & Craigie, 2007).
     A major limitation to CBT acknowledged in CPGs is accessibility (NICE, 2007a, 2007b).
CBT is typically taught in specialized psychology graduate training programs, and it is difficult
for other mental health care professionals to obtain adequate training (Hamilton & Dobson,
2001; Royal Australian and New Zealand College of Psychiatrists Clinical Practice Guidelines
Team for Panic Disorder and Agoraphobia, 2003). Recen
								
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