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					                                                              DRAFT UNC Tomorrow Existing Programs Summary List

                                                                          A                                                                        B    C   D   E     F     G
    Program/Activity Title                                                                                                                         GR A PE ETCD       H     E
1                                                                                                                                                   4.1 4.2 4.3 4.4   4.5   4.6
    15-501 Global Health Dinner Club (Office of Global Health, School of Public Health) The 15-501 Global Health Dinner Club is part of a           x                  x
    global health initiative between UNC-Chapel Hill and Duke funded by the GlaxoSmithKline Foundation. It is a new and important
    mechanism for nurturing collaboration and strengthening ties between faculty and students who work in global health at UNC and Duke.
    The Dinner Club is primarily organized by students at both UNC and Duke brings together UNC and Duke faculty and students to discuss
    research collaborations and promote ongoing collaboration.
2
3   4CNC (see Comprehensive Cancer Control Collaborative of North Carolina)
    A Su Salud (Spanish for ―To Your Health") is a Spanish-language program for students and practicing health professionals that uses DVD-             x              x
    based video, DVD- and Web-based interactive exercises, and a comprehensive print workbook to teach intermediate-level Spanish
    language skills and promote cultural awareness. The program, which focuses specifically on health-related tasks and situations and
    intermediate-level students, was developed at UNC after an overwhelming 92 percent of students reported the need and interest for
    instruction to improve their ability to communicate with Spanish-speaking clients. The program was developed with administrative support
    from the Office of the Provost and the Office of Distance Education and E-learning Policy, part of The William and Ida Friday Center for
    Continuing Education. The intermediate course is offered as an elective to residential and distance education students at the UNC School
    of Public Health as well as the other UNC health science schools, the School of Social Work and to undergraduates in the UNC College of
    Arts and Sciences‘ Department of Romance Languages. The office of Continuing Education at UNC‘s School of Public Health and the
    Friday Center also offer the intermediate course via a distance learning format to those outside the university. Overall enrollment through
    the various formats of the course total about 500. Plans are now well under way to offer an introductory version of A Su Salud in the spring
    of 2008; pilots of this version have already been conducted in Chapel Hill and several other locations around the state.

4
    Academic Success Program for Students with LD/ADHD Our mission is to provide accommodations and services for students with                          x
    LD/ADHD. We work collaboratively with students to create innovative ways to overcome barriers caused by their disabilities so they can be
5   successful in college (and in life) without lowering academic standards or goals.
    Ackland Art Museum Open to the public free of charge, the Ackland Art Museum exhibits from a permanent collection of more than                          x   x
    15,000 works of art, particularly rich in Old Master paintings and sculptures by artists including Degas, Rubens and Pisarro; Indian
    miniatures; Japanese paintings; and North Carolina folk art. The Museum is dedicated to education and promotes innovative
    experimentation with instructional strategies. Like a library, the Museum offers a wide array of teaching resources to enrich the classroom
    experience. Collaborations with members of the University and the community take many forms: gallery lessons tailored to specific course
    objectives, approaches for informal learning in the Ackland, student and faculty research projects, and more. Each year, more than 6,000
    visitors to the Ackland are students from 22 departments across campus. Another 4,000 are K-12 teachers and students who come to the
    Museum to enrich primary education in the state of North Carolina and beyond.

6
    Active Living by Design is a national program of the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation and is a part of the North Carolina Institute for                              x
    Public Health at the UNC School of Public Health in Chapel Hill, North Carolina. This program establishes innovative approaches to
    increase physical activity through community design, public policies and communications strategies. Active Living by Design is funding 25
    community partnerships across the country to demonstrate how changing community design will impact physical activity.
7
    Advocates for Grassroots Development in Uganda (AGRADU) is a UNC student initiative aiming to support indigenous grassroots                     x           x
    efforts at community building and economic development in Uganda. AGRADU helps to educate and raise awareness about international
    development from a grassroots standpoint by giving students the opportunity to participate directly in such efforts.
8
                                                                DRAFT UNC Tomorrow Existing Programs Summary List

                                                                            A                                                                          B    C   D   E     F     G
     Program/Activity Title                                                                                                                            GR A PE ETCD       H     E
1                                                                                                                                                       4.1 4.2 4.3 4.4   4.5   4.6
     Advocates for Human Rights (AHR) (Campus Y) is a student initiative that focuses on civil rights issues around the world. We provide               x           x
     opportunities to advocate and promote discussion of global human rights issues and social justice. Through AHR, we aspire to meet local
     and global needs, redress human rights injustices and organize a campuswide Human Rights Week.
9
     African Studies Center provides the University and the people of North Carolina with a campus hub for interdisciplinary inquiry and                x           x      x
     communication on Africa, including the sponsorship of a wide variety of activities that bring together interested faculty and students from a
     large number of academic disciplines, focusing on the interconnected issues of democratization, development, health, and gender.
10
11   AGRADU (see Advocates for Grassroots Development in Uganda)

12   AHEC (see North Carolina Area Health Education Centers)
13   AHR (see Advocates for Human Rights)
14   ALMA (see Amigas Latina Motivando el Alma (ALMA) / Latina Friends Motivating the Soul )
     Alternative energy studies through the Energy and Environmental collaborative program and the Research Triangle Consortium (created                                         x
     by UNC-CH, NCSU, Duke and RTI). Researchers in the Department of Physics and Astronomy in the College of Arts and Sciences are
     engaged in the development of affordable solar cells based on nanoscale hybrid organic/inorganic structures. Their work could open up new
     possibilities for developing highly-efficient and cost-effective systems for the commercial development of solar cell technology as an
     alternative to coal and oil. Researchers in the departments of Chemistry and Physics and Astronomy are exploring solutions to the problem
     of hydrogen storage through hydrogen absorption in carbon-based nanomaterials. They are working with the U.S. Department of Energy to
     remove this major stumbling block for developing vehicles that use hydrogen fuel cells.

15
     Alvin Ailey Arts in Education Program Now in its seventh year, the program is committed to bringing dance into the classrooms,                             x
     communities and lives of people throughout the world. It is designed to promote student learning by engaging analytic and creative thinking
     skills while introducing students to the work and mission of the late Alvin Ailey, dancer, choreographer and company founder.
16
     American Indian Center is one of the only centers on the East Coast to focus solely on American Indian issues and research. The                        x       x
     Center‘s mission is to establish the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill as a leading public university for American Indian scholarship
     and make American Indian issues a permanent part of the intellectual life of the University. North Carolina is home to one of the largest
     American Indian populations in the eastern United States, and the center will serve as the University‘s portal to American Indian
     communities across the state and the nation. The center will enable Carolina to serve the state‘s American Indian population.
17
     American Indian Studies aims to increase understanding of the historical experiences, cultural traditions and innovations, and political               x       x
     status of Indian peoples in the United States. The program offers courses in American Indian subjects, hosts speakers on American Indian
     topics, supports American Indian student organizations with public activities, and works with the N.C. Commission on Indian Affairs and
     others to help meet the needs of Indian communities in the state. An undergraduate minor in American Indian Studies was established in
     2003.
18
                                                               DRAFT UNC Tomorrow Existing Programs Summary List

                                                                           A                                                                         B    C   D   E     F     G
     Program/Activity Title                                                                                                                          GR A PE ETCD       H     E
1                                                                                                                                                     4.1 4.2 4.3 4.4   4.5   4.6
     Amigas Latina Motivando el Alma (ALMA) / Latina Friends Motivating the Soul As immigrating Latinos adapt to the mainstream                                          x
     culture of the United States they face enormous mental and physical stressors, such as (e.g., shifting cultural practices; negative
     encounters with American schools, employers or other institutions; work and housing insecurity; geographic and linguistic isolation;
     unreliable transportation; lack of awareness of services; and loss of family and social support) with limited resources to address them.
     Local health care agencies have noted the increased need for physical and mental health care services, but are not equipped to meet the
     growing demand. Waiting for mental health stress symptoms to progress and multiply debilitates the individual, family, and community.
     Treating depressive and anxiety symptoms using preventative strategies has significant public health implications and provides an
     opportunity to minimize anxiety and depressive health disparities among Latinos. This project focuses on promoting emotional health and
     reducing mental health stressors for Latinas. The intervention is a peer education model using Latinas as lay health advisors to offer
     coping skills for other Latinas in their community. Using this peer-to-peer support mechanism provides a unique, time efficient and cost-
     effective way to promote mental health stress reduction strategies among Latinas. The intervention will be piloted in Durham and Chatham
     Counties in Spring and Summer 2008.


19
     Amnesty International UNC Amnesty International works to free prisoners of conscience; gain fair trials for political prisoners; end torture,    x
     political killings and "disappearances;" abolish the death penalty throughout the world; and promote economic, social and cultural rights.
20
     Annual Minority Health Conference (School of Public Health) The Annual Minority Health Conference was launched by the Minority                                     x
     Student Caucus in 1977 and has been conducted nearly every year since then. Major objectives are to highlight health issues of concern to
     people of color and to attract students interested in minority health to the School. Planning and implementation of the Conference are led by
     the School's Minority Student Caucus, which designates the chair of the Planning Committee each year. The Conference is co-sponsored
     by various organizations in and outside the University, including the North Carolina Department of Health.

21
22   APPLES (see Assisting People in Planning Learning Experiences in Service)
     Asheville Project is a highly regarded preventative health care program. The initiative formed out of desires of pharmacists around the                             x
     state, including then-Dean of the UNC Pharmacy School William Campbell, to use their knowledge and training to counsel patients regularly
     about their health and medicine. This program began as a diabetes management experiment in 1997. Specially trained pharmacists met
     with city employees who were diabetes patients on a regular basis and counseled them on managing the disease. In return for meeting with
     the pharmacists, the employees received their medication free. The city agreed to pay the pharmacists for their time and for the medication
     if the year-long experiment was successful. Within six months, the project had saved the city enough money to prove its worth. The
     Asheville Project now saves the city $2,000 in medical costs per patient each year. Since this initial success, the project has expanded to
     seven area employers and includes asthma, high blood pressure and high cholesterol as well. The program has caught on around the
     country and has recently caught the eye of the national media, including an article in the New York Times and a feature on NBC Nightly
     News.
23
                                                               DRAFT UNC Tomorrow Existing Programs Summary List

                                                                           A                                                                          B    C   D   E     F     G
     Program/Activity Title                                                                                                                           GR A PE ETCD       H     E
1                                                                                                                                                      4.1 4.2 4.3 4.4   4.5   4.6
     Assisting People in Planning Learning Experiences in Service (APPLES) is a student initiated, student-led, student-funded program                 x   x   x   x      x     x
     engaging students, faculty and community agencies in service-learning partnerships. The goal of APPLES is to foster socially aware and
     civically involved students through participation in an enriched curriculum and hands-on experiences that address the needs of North
     Carolina communities. The focus of the program is on the connection made between service in the community and what students learn in
     an academic setting. More than 150 community organizations in the Triangle region partner with the APPLES program each year. APPLES
     provides extensive support for faculty who teach service-learning courses or would like to develop such courses. Support includes
     consultation during course development and implementation; assistance in identifying community partners; provision of trained student
     facilitators; $500 course enhancement grants; a two-day faculty development institute for faculty, staff, students, and community partners;
     discussion series and workshops held in collaboration with the Center for Teaching and Learning; a resource library, a faculty listserv, and a
     faculty Blackboard site. This past year, 69 APPLES service-learning courses were offered in 22 departments, enrolling 1,214 students.
     These students volunteered 46,010 hours in the Triangle community through APPLES service-learning experiences. Examples include
     students enrolled in an intermediate Spanish course who volunteered with the Spanish School Reading Partners program to help Spanish-
     speakers develop English language skills; public relations students who developed public service announcements, fact sheets and
     brochures for the Special Olympics of Orange County; and students in a biomedical engineering course who modified an iPod to respond to
     movement to encourage a blind toddler to crawl. This year, APPLES launched its first Global Alternative Spring Break experience to
     Guanajuato, Mexico. This signature program provided 11 students, their professor and a graduate student with a first-hand experience on
     the global forces that shape migration to North Carolina, as well as its effects on migrant families and sending communities. Students
     returned to UNC eager and well-equipped to serve local Latino communities through individual, sustained projects. This is a collaborative
     effort between APPLES and the Center for Global Initiatives.


24
     Baby Oral Health Program (BOHP) is a statewide program with the mission of educating dental health care providers on the principles of                               x
     infant and toddler oral health. The program helps the dental team with the necessary tools to be comfortable and competent in providing
     preventive oral health services for young children.
25
     Barbers Trimming Cancer Risk Among Black Men (TRIM) (Center for Health Promotion and Disease Prevention) The overall purpose of                                      x
     this study is to assess the feasibility of working in partnership with barbershop owners and barbers to promote health and reduce colorectal
26   and prostate cancer risk among their African American male customers.

27   BASE (see Business Accelerator for Sustainable Entrepreneurship)

28   BEAUTY (see Bringing Education and Understanding to You Health Project)
     Behavioral Healthcare Resource Program is housed at the School of Social Work and provides training, technical assistance and                         x              x
     consultation services statewide to providers of the NC Division MHDDSAS Mental Health and Addiction services. Program typically trains
     over 2500 clinicians throughout the state annually as well as coordinates a Substance Abuse Studies Program for advanced graduate work
     within the School of Social Work.
29
     Best Buddies is a committee of the Campus Y that pairs college students with individuals in the community who have intellectual                       x
     disabilities. Most of the buddies live in group homes and have few opportunities to interact with people outside of their homes. Best Buddies
     helps to expand their social circles and exposes them to new experiences and opportunities through one-to-one friendships with students.
     Best Buddies is a nonprofit organization that has grown into an international organization with more than 77 million college students
     worldwide, affecting the lives of 250 million people with intellectual disabilities.
30
                                                                 DRAFT UNC Tomorrow Existing Programs Summary List

                                                                              A                                                                            B   C   D    E     F     G
     Program/Activity Title                                                                                                                                GR A PE ETCD       H     E
1                                                                                                                                                           4.1 4.2 4.3 4.4   4.5   4.6
     Big Buddy (Campus Y) is a student-run program which pairs UNC students with children in the Chapel Hill-Carrboro area in an attempt to                    x   x
     stimulate educational, social and personal development through mentor relationships. National research has shown that the positive
     relationships between Big Brothers and Sisters and their Littles have a direct, measurable and lasting impact on children's lives.
31
     Body and Soul Program (Center for Health Promotion and Disease Prevention) is an evidence-based program developed to increase the                                  x      x
     consumption of fruits and vegetables to help reduce cancer and chronic disease among African Americans. The project is the first of its kind
     to follow a community-based intervention through the phases of efficacy testing, effectiveness trial, and dissemination research. This study
     assesses the effect of a nationally disseminated program on fruit and vegetable consumption among participating African American church
     members. Sixteen African American churches in various areas of the US have been recruited and randomized to early or delayed
     intervention conditions. Seventy church members are recruited in each church to complete a baseline and, six-month follow-up survey.
     These surveys assess fruit and vegetable intake and mediators of dietary change. Process measures collected at follow-up from
     participants include questions about exposure to Body & Soul messages and activities, and church coordinators also are interviewed for the
     process evaluation.
32
33   BOHP (see Baby Oral Health Program)
     Bringing Education and Understanding to You (BEAUTY) Health Project is a four-year study to assess the effectiveness of using                                             x
     beauty salons in central North Carolina to share information about preventing cancer. Specifically, the UNC Lineberger Center-UNC School
     of Public Health project addresses the importance of physical activity, increasing consumption of fruits and vegetables, reducing calories
     from fat, maintaining or achieving a healthy weight and obtaining recommended cancer screenings. The BEAUTY team has enrolled 62
     salons within 75 miles of Chapel Hill in the program. Salon owners are recruiting at least 55 customers to participate in the program, so that
     nearly 3,000 African-American women are enrolled in the study. Studies have shown that African-American women are at a higher risk for
     cancer mortality than other groups. The program relies on cosmetologists to successfully promote a variety of health issues after attending
     specialized training workshops to get the facts about cancer prevention. Participating salons receive an interactive, colorful display
     containing an array of health information as well as health magazines.

34
     Business Accelerator for Sustainable Entrepreneurship (BASE) (Kenan-Flagler Business School) As an interdisciplinary UNC program,                                  x
     BASE will be the first accelerator designed specifically to support businesses that address the triple bottom line: financial profitability, social
     equity, and environmental sustainability. The program will connect resident and affiliate businesses to a range of resources from
     sustainability expertise to sustainable capital with the goal of accelerating their growth and impact.
35
     C3E (see Carolina Center for Competitive Economies)
36
     CABJ (see Carolina Association of Black Journalists’ Minority Journalism Program for High School Journalism Students)
37
     CAC (see Carolina Asia Center)
38
     Camp Carolina offers three days of on-campus enrichment each year for 40 rising high-school sophomore and juniors from                                    x
     underrepresented or underserved populations.
39
                                                                DRAFT UNC Tomorrow Existing Programs Summary List

                                                                            A                                                                          B    C   D   E     F     G
     Program/Activity Title                                                                                                                            GR A PE ETCD       H     E
1                                                                                                                                                       4.1 4.2 4.3 4.4   4.5   4.6
     Campus Y is the oldest and largest student organization on the UNC-Chapel Hill campus. Since the Y‘s founding more than 150 years ago,             x   x   x   x      x     x
     Campus Y students have led UNC efforts to address social justice issues and encourage volunteerism throughout the community and
     around the world. Seventeen active issue-based program committees and projects span a wide range of issues, including human rights,
     hunger, supporting immigrants and literacy. These committees and programs are completely student driven and student run. The Campus
     Y is also one of four groups that have worked together to create the STRETCH (STudents REaching Toward CHange) conference. This day-
     and-a-half annual leadership and service conference is planned and run by students to promote leadership and community engagement.
     Current special projects include: Student Movement to End Child Soldiering (SMECS), Advocates for Grassroots Development in Uganda
     (AGRADU), Millennium Village Project (MVP), SHOWW with Arts, Project HEAL, Carolina Microfinance Initiative, Free the Slaves, and ESL
     Tutoring.
40
     CARES (see Center for Aging Research and Educational Services)
41
     Carolina Asia Center (CAC) is a core element of UNC-Chapel Hill‘s initiative to strengthen its position as a world-class international             x       x
     university. CAC (pronounced ―see ay see‖) is the hub for three sets of inter-related activities focusing on Asia: Cutting-edge Research;
42   Innovative Teaching; and Strategic Partnerships.
     Carolina Association of Black Journalists’ Minority Journalism Program for High School Journalism Students (CABJ) is an                                x   x
     affiliated student chapter of the National Association of Black Journalists (NABJ). CABJ is based out of the School of Journalism and Mass
     Communication at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. Founded in 1991, CABJ won NABJ‘s coveted ―Student Chapter of the
     Year‖ award in 2001, 2002 and 2007, and was nominated for the award in 2005.
43
     Carolina Business Institute (Friday Center for Continuing Education) is a noncredit professional development program that introduces the               x
44   world of business to non-business majors.
     Carolina Business News Initiative (School of Journalism) trains journalists to understand and explain complicated business topics,                     x       x
     operating under the assumption that people turn to mass communication to help them understand changes in the economic world that
     affect their lives. The initiative includes coaching business editors and reporters at N.C. newspapers to improve the quality of their sections
     by deeper and more-thorough coverage and providing critiques of business coverage in the state.

45
     Carolina Center for Competitive Economies (C3E) (Kenan Institute ) With the loss of multiple traditional industries, North Carolina at             x           x
     every community level is facing the challenge of how to sustain, grow and prosper in the 21st century. Housed in the Kenan Institute of
     Private Enterprise at the Kenan-Flagler Business School, the Center for Competitive Economies works with leaders at the community,
     county and regional level to address the challenges of global competitiveness and create custom solutions that build on the unique assets
     of each region. The Center has worked with Advantage Carolina, AdvantageWest Regional Partnership; Carteret County; Charlotte
     Regional Partnership, City of Salisbury, Kerr-Tar Council of Governments, and multiple state agencies. Funding for this program is
     provided through grants from the entities served.
46
     Carolina Center for Educational Excellence (CCEE) provides workshops, seminars, internet-supported demonstrations, graduate classes                    x   x
     and other opportunities for study to improve learning environments for students in pre-school through 12th grade, university students and
     the professionals who support them. Equipped with state-of-the-art technology, the CCEE facility includes flexible classroom space, ample
     room for seminars and conferences, a NASA-supported science and mathematics teaching laboratory and a school counseling and
     psychology clinic.
47
                                                                DRAFT UNC Tomorrow Existing Programs Summary List

                                                                            A                                                                          B    C   D   E     F     G
     Program/Activity Title                                                                                                                            GR A PE ETCD       H     E
1                                                                                                                                                       4.1 4.2 4.3 4.4   4.5   4.6
     Carolina Center for Jewish Studies at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill unites the general public, students and faculty from                     x
     various academic disciplines who share a common passion for a deeper understanding of Jewish history, culture and thought. With nine
     affiliated faculty members, undergraduate minors in Jewish Studies and Modern Hebrew, more than 1,000 students taking Jewish Studies
     courses each year, and an active outreach program and popular lecture series, the Center is a dynamic resource both on campus and
     beyond.
48
     Carolina Center for Public Service (CCPS) UNC-Chapel Hill‘s public service programs reach every region of North Carolina, helping                  x   x   x   x      x     x
     communities protect public health, improve schools and medical services, stimulate business, plan for growth, understand cultural heritage,
     and enrich the quality of people‘s daily lives. Launched in 1999, the Carolina Center for Public Service coordinates and catalyzes campus
     outreach activities around the state. The Center has also created the Carolina Center for Public Service Database matching its public
     service projects with all 100 North Carolina counties. This Internet resource contains descriptions of 858 projects currently and will continue
     to grow. The website attracts between 400 and 550 unique users each quarter. The Center‘s Public Service Scholars Program provides a
     framework for students to complete service; connects students who care about similar issues with one another; guides participants in
     training that can make their service more effective; links coursework to service; offers unique opportunities to participants; and recognizes
     students for their commitment to service. Since its inception in 2003, the program has rapidly grown from 78 to more than 1,000 students.
     In four years, participants have logged more than 165,000 hours of service in communities throughout North Carolina, the nation and the
     world. In 2007, 96 students graduated as Public Service Scholars, with nearly 40,000 hours of service to their credit.


49
     Carolina Center for the Study of the Middle East and Muslim Civilizations (CCSMEMC) The Carolina Center for the Study of the                       x
     Middle East and Muslim Civilizations represents a fruitful hybrid between traditional area studies approaches and cross-regional Islamic
     studies. The University aims to support a full range of traditional Middle East Studies, including the region's non-Muslim peoples and
     civilizations, while at the same time broadening the focus to include Muslim peoples and civilizations outside of the traditional area studies
     limits.
50
     Carolina College Advising Corps and National College Advising Corps In partnership with a private, independent foundation (Jack                        x   x   x
     Kent Cooke Foundation) established in 2000 to help young people of exceptional promise reach their full potential through education, UNC-
     Chapel Hill has launched the National College Advising Corps and Carolina College Advising Corps. UNC-Chapel Hill is one of 10 colleges
     and universities joining the Jack Kent Cooke Foundation in a $10 million partnership to create advising programs to help low-income
     students enroll in college. The network of programs created through the partnership – to be called the National College Advising Corps –
     will be headquartered at UNC-Chapel Hill. The University will receive $1 million over four years to create the Carolina College Advising
     Corps, which will place recent UNC-Chapel Hill graduates as college advisers in 18 partner high schools across the state. These advisers
     will help students plan their college searches, complete admissions and financial-aid applications, and overcome obstacles that might
     discourage them from continuing their education. UNC-Chapel Hill will contribute nearly $700,000 to the program, which aims to boost the
     number of low-income and first-generation-college students enrolling in two- and four-year colleges and universities.

51
                                                               DRAFT UNC Tomorrow Existing Programs Summary List

                                                                           A                                                                         B    C   D   E     F     G
     Program/Activity Title                                                                                                                          GR A PE ETCD       H     E
1                                                                                                                                                     4.1 4.2 4.3 4.4   4.5   4.6
     Carolina Community Media Project, an outreach initiative of the UNC School of Journalism and Mass Communication, is dedicated to the                 x       x
     proposition that strong community media help strengthen communities, and that communities — be they rural or suburban — with a vital
     civic life and a sense of place are key to high livability in a free democratic society. Through teaching, research and outreach, the project
     supports, enhances and empowers North Carolina‘s community media, beginning with the 192 community newspapers and their online
     editions, as well as local-emphasis community- oriented radio, TV and cable outlets. Launched in January 2001, the project is led by
     founding director Jock Lauterer, who teaches Community Journalism every semester. His students become intimately involved in the
     project by producing ―hometown hero‖ story/photo packages about outstanding UNC students performing public service. Story/photo
     packages are tailored specifically for the community newspapers ―back home.‖ Since 2001, the project has produced hundreds of such
     hometown hero stories for the state‘s local press. Also, each summer since 2001, Lauterer, has taken his ―Community Journalism
     Roadshow‖ to 107 small newspapers literally ―from Murphy to Manteo.‖ These free on-site workshops are extremely popular and well
     received.
52
     Carolina Connects This chancellor-initiated tour of North Carolina is designed to highlight for local citizens the many ways that UNC            x   x   x   x      x     x
     relates directly to their communities and their needs. A special website (http://www.unc.edu/depts/design/connects/) chronicles the visits to
     every region of the state, to more than 50 communities from Manteo and Shallotte in the East to Asheville and Cullowhee in the West and
     points in between. ―Carolina Connects‖ stops focused on the Carolina Covenant program, the Citizen-Soldier initiative and multiple research
     and public service projects. Chancellor Moeser also visits with alumni, legislators and news media outlets to highlight the ways in which the
     University‘s faculty, staff and students serve communities and people. Each stop spotlights the University‘s teaching, research and public
     service work, particularly in the areas of economic development, health care and public education because we know those are issues of
     interest to North Carolinians. Carolina Connects is also an opportunity for Carolina faculty and staff to listen to the people – to ask the
     question, ―What problems do you need the university to work on?‖

53
     Carolina Courses Online (Friday Center for Continuing Education ) are distance education programs which serve a variety of individuals               x
     with special needs, including students who are home-bound, who have families and full-time jobs, who are recovering from health problems,
     who are away from campus to complete an internship, or who are incarcerated.
54
     Carolina Covenant guarantees a debt-free education for qualified low-income students and is widely recognized as a national model for                x   x
     innovation. In fall 2006, the university enrolled its third class of Carolina Covenant Scholars. To date, UNC has awarded more than 900
     scholarships for a debt-free education through the Carolina Covenant. In addition, the university has launched a mentoring component of
     the program. This effort matches students with volunteer faculty to support them in their daily lives and help them further engage with the
     Carolina community. Goals include supporting student success and successful graduation. Last fall, the mentoring expanded to include
     peers offering support to the incoming Covenant Scholars. Carolina was the first major public U.S. university to announce plans for such a
     program in 2003. Since then, more than two dozen financial aid initiatives for low- to moderate-income students have been launched and
     were modeled after the Carolina Covenant. They include Brown, Harvard, MIT and Stanford, as well as Michigan and Virginia. Many of
     these programs, like Carolina‘s, respond to rapidly changing demographics and social needs, such as rising high school dropout and
     poverty rates. The Carolina Covenant enables eligible students from low-income families to attend UNC and graduate debt-free if they work
     on campus 10 to 12 hours weekly in a federal work-study job throughout their four years here and agree to have the University meet the rest
     of the student‘s financial need through a combination of federal, state, university and private grants and scholarships.


55
                                                               DRAFT UNC Tomorrow Existing Programs Summary List

                                                                           A                                                                          B    C   D   E     F     G
     Program/Activity Title                                                                                                                           GR A PE ETCD       H     E
1                                                                                                                                                      4.1 4.2 4.3 4.4   4.5   4.6
     Carolina Dental Home The Carolina Dental Home is a three-year demonstration project. The overall goal of this project is to develop and                              x
     pilot test a comprehensive community-based system that provides access to dental services for preschool-age Medicaid children. It will link
     medical and dental offices by enhancing the ability of medical providers to provide risk-based dental referrals, and by improving the
     availability and adequacy of the dental workforce to meet the dental needs of preschool-age children enrolled in Medicaid.

56
     Carolina Entrepreneurial Initiative (CEI) This initiative was funded with a five-year, $3.5 million grant from the Ewing Marion Kauffman              x       x
     Foundation that is being matched two-to-one by UNC-Chapel Hill. The University is one of seven Kauffman Foundation-designated
     ―Entrepreneurial Universities‖ chosen through a national competition. UNC is developing new programs to create a surge of
     entrepreneurship among students, faculty and staff, including a new minor in entrepreneurship in the College of Arts and Sciences. The
     program is led by a team managed by the Frank Hawkins Kenan Institute of Private Enterprise at the UNC Kenan-Flagler Business School.
     Successful entrepreneurs, many of them alumni, are advisers, lending their real-world expertise.
57
     Carolina Environmental Student Association (CESA) CESA‘s mission is to provide a meeting ground for the campus and community to                                            x
     unite in connecting different disciplines of thought, study and action through the common goal of environmental awareness. CESA is
     sponsored by the Institute for the Environment and is open to all students and community members with an interest in the environment.
     CESA‘s projects in 2006 included working on Carolina‘s section of the Mountain to Sea Trail in Sparta, volunteering at Carolina‘s Battle
     Park in Chapel Hill to do trail work and invasive species removal, and gleaning machine-harvested fields for food donations to local shelters
     and food pantries.
58
     Carolina for Kibera (CFK) (Center for Global Initiatives) is a significant student initiative which amplifies the global work at Carolina. The    x           x
     project aims to fight abject poverty and help prevent violence through community-based development in the Kibera slum of Nairobi, Kenya
     and beyond. CFK envisions a world where the poor have a voice in their futures and opportunities for healthy growth. We are rooted in the
     conviction that solutions to problems involving poverty are possible only if those affected by it drive development. Concerned outsiders can
     help by mobilizing communities, advising, networking, and providing resources. Ultimately, however, the community possesses the
     knowledge and motivation that are necessary to solve its own problems. Run by Kenyans and advised by American and Kenyan
     volunteers, CFK's primary mission is to promote youth leadership and ethnic and gender cooperation in Kibera through sports, young
     women's empowerment, and community development. Additionally, CFK works to improve basic healthcare, sanitation, and education in
     Kibera. Serving as a model for holistic, community-based urban development world-wide, CFK has helped grassroots organizations develop
     youth-based programs in six other nations and dozens of communities in Kenya.

59
     Carolina Global Water Partnership will focus on increasing the availability and usage of water treatment technologies that can be used in         x           x      x     x
     homes in the developing world that do not have clean running water. Phase I of the project will explore several different business models,
     including whether microfinance institutions can make it easier for poor consumers to purchase point-of-use water filters and other treatment
     technologies and whether micro financing, or micro franchising, can successfully provide seed capital for local entrepreneurs to produce,
     market and distribute the filters. During this phase, researchers will also look at ways to reduce costs through improved design, production
     and distribution models. See also Gillings Innovation Laboratory.

60
                                                                DRAFT UNC Tomorrow Existing Programs Summary List

                                                                            A                                                                           B    C   D   E     F     G
     Program/Activity Title                                                                                                                             GR A PE ETCD       H     E
1                                                                                                                                                        4.1 4.2 4.3 4.4   4.5   4.6
     Carolina Hispanic Association (CHispA) was launched in the fall of 1990 by Catherine Lindsay, a Colombian student at UNC.                                       x
     Catherine's hope was to begin an organization that would stimulate the Hispanic culture at UNC. CHispA, which translate from Spanish to
     mean "spark," was initially comprised of a handful of students and now has grown to a membership of more than seventy active members
     (both Hispanic and non-Hispanic). CHispA is open to all students who express an interest and passion for Hispanic culture and want to
     work in the community.
61
     Carolina Indian Circle (CIC) was founded in 1974 to meet the needs of American Indian students on the Chapel Hill campus. At that time,                 x       x
     fewer than 10 American Indians were enrolled at Carolina. Now, there are more than 200 students at the University from different cultural
     and tribal backgrounds. Goals of the CIC include assisting American Indian students academically and socially by providing a positive
     atmosphere and a sense of community, educating the university community to ensure that American Indian heritage is recognized and
     respected, and providing public service. CIC has hosted an annual spring Pow Wow at Carolina for the past 19 years.

62
     Carolina Mammography Registry (CMR) is a collaborative research project begun in 1993 to study the performance of screening                             x       x      x
     mammography in community practice. CMR has a commitment to understanding and improving breast health care for American Indian
     women in North Carolina and has three projects actively focused on this population. A University of North Carolina at Pembroke faculty
     member is working with CMR to build a special mammography registry for American Indian women, an oral history project of American
     Indian women breast cancer survivors and an American Indian Breast Health Survey. Currently there are more than 1.2 million records in
     CMR.
63
     Carolina Microfinance Initiative (CMI) is a student-run organization with the goal of relieving poverty by supporting the expansion of
     microfinance services to the 395+ million families who lack access. CMI provides established microfinance institutions with volunteers and
     capital to expand their services. CMI is also based on the idea that the classroom should serve as a place to learn about and solve global
     problems. Thus CMI operates via a course at the Kenan-Flagler Business School, where students examine issues in microfinance and
     make investment decisions based on this education.
64
     Carolina Navigators (Center for Global Initiatives) is a K-12 Outreach Program which enriches international education in North Carolina             x       x   x
     schools by providing free educational presentations that engage students in learning about other countries, cultures, world regions, global
     issues and international current events. Presentations are designed to supplement classroom instruction and can be tailored for teaching
     needs, regional issues, instructional purpose and appropriate grade level.
65
     Carolina North A planned mixed-use campus to be located on almost 1,000 acres north of the main campus. Conceived in the academic                       x       x            x
     mission of the University, it will help connect the University‘s research programs to the economic well-being of the state. As a flagship public
     research university charged with helping to lead a transformation in the state‘s economy, Carolina must compete with national peers for the
     talent and resources that drive innovation. Today, that competition demands a new kind of setting — one that enables public-private
     partnerships, public engagement and flexible new spaces for research and education. Much more than a technology park or overflow space
     for main campus, Carolina North will be a campus for living and learning, where people can live, work and study in one place.

66
     Carolina Online Lateral Entry Program (COLE) is an on-line lateral entry licensure program, currently in a pilot year, which supports                   x   x
     unlicensed individuals holding a math or science undergraduate degree through their first year of public school teaching while obtaining
     their initial teacher licensure.
67
     Carolina Pathways increases access to higher education and academic success among North Carolina‘s American Indian tribes.                              x
68
                                                               DRAFT UNC Tomorrow Existing Programs Summary List

                                                                           A                                                                          B    C   D   E     F     G
     Program/Activity Title                                                                                                                           GR A PE ETCD       H     E
1                                                                                                                                                      4.1 4.2 4.3 4.4   4.5   4.6
     Carolina Performing Arts Series is meant to serve diverse audiences through multi-disciplinary performing arts programs in presentation,              x   x   x
     creation and education. Carolina Performing Arts commissions new work, sponsors artist residencies and organizes collaborative projects
     with local, national and international partners. In addition to establishing UNC-Chapel Hill as a leader in the performing arts in the
     southeastern United States, the series also invites outstanding professional artists to perform and to teach; to foster a deep appreciation of
     a wide variety of the performing arts in the University, in the local community and throughout the region. Memorial Hall reopened in fall 2005
     after a three-year, $18 million renovation designed to make the famed venue a focal point for the performing arts across the region.
     Memorial Hall hosts the Carolina Performing Arts Series and anchors the planned Arts Common, which will extend southward from Franklin
     Street to Playmakers Theatre, the oldest building on campus dedicated to the arts.

69
     Carolina Population Center is a community of scholars and professionals collaborating on interdisciplinary research and methods that              x   x       x      x
     advance understanding of population issues. Based at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, the center extends its resources to
     path-breaking work across the US and in more than 85 other countries and makes its findings available to a global audience. A nationally
     recognized training program educates the next generation of population scholars.
70
     Carolina Public Health Magazine contains news of faculty research, first-person accounts of the life of a public health professional, and                     x      x
     reports on partnerships with other Schools and with corporations and foundations.
71
     Carolina Student Transfer Excellence Program (C-STEP) is part of a national effort, funded by the Jack Kent Cooke Foundation, to                      x
     encourage more low- to moderate-income community-college students to transfer to highly selective four-year colleges and universities.
     Talented low- and moderate-income high school students are guaranteed eventual admission to Carolina if they enroll at one of three local
     community colleges-Alamance Community College, Durham Technical Community College, or Wake Technical Community College-and
     complete the program successfully. The program aims to help such students prepare for the academic and social challenges they will face
     when they enroll at Carolina, and then to thrive here once they have transferred. C-STEP identifies talented students while they are still in
     high school or early in their community-college careers. Once identified for the program, students work directly with C-STEP leaders at their
     community colleges and participate in monthly events on their campuses and at Carolina. These events introduce students to Carolina; help
     them engage early with the campus, students, staff and faculty and smooth their eventual transition to Chapel Hill.

72
     Carolina Transportation Program (Department of City and Regional Planning) is an interdisciplinary research and education program.                            x            x
     Our program focuses on the study of transportation planning, transit, non-motorized transportation, and land use patterns, and their impacts
     on health, environment, energy and economic development at local, regional, national, and global scale.
73
     Carolina Troop Supporters is a student-led non-profit organization founded at Carolina in March 2004. Carolina Troop Supporters is the                        x
     executive branch of this organization, yet seven university branches exist across the state and the country. All branches have been founded
     for the purpose of showing appreciation, care and support to the United States Armed Forces in this country and especially to military
     personnel serving abroad. Sending weekly letters and care packages to soldiers in countries such as Iraq, Liberia or Korea is among the
     main objectives of the organization. It is also a goal to increase student and community awareness of military experiences in foreign nations
     and in the United States.
74
                                                               DRAFT UNC Tomorrow Existing Programs Summary List

                                                                           A                                                                          B    C   D   E     F     G
     Program/Activity Title                                                                                                                           GR A PE ETCD       H     E
1                                                                                                                                                      4.1 4.2 4.3 4.4   4.5   4.6
     Carolina Union is an organization of students, professional staff, and part-time student staff who provide programs, services, and facilities                 x
     that all members of the campus community need in their daily lives. The Union contributes to the educational mission of the institution
     through the provision of cultural, social, educational, and entertainment programs sponsored by the Carolina Union Activities Board.
     Student volunteers participate in the various Union Activities Board Committees learning the many aspects of leadership and citizenship
     that serve them long after graduation. The many co-curricular programs offered impact the intellectual environment of the campus and
     create opportunities for campus members to engage in debate, conversation, and interaction around the issues of the time. Carolina has
     over 600 student co-curricular organizations that were extended official University recognition. These organizations plan activities,
     programs, and services that address a wide span of interests. From public service projects and recreation tournaments to performances
     and media, there is something for everyone.
75
     Carolina Vaccine Institute (CVI) CVI‘s mission is to change the dynamics of global public health by developing safe, low-cost, effective          x                  x
     vaccines for people in the developing world. We will accomplish our mission by exploring the fundamental aspects of vaccine design and
     the nature of disease-causing pathogens and by applying that knowledge in pre-clinical vaccine projects that are accessible to all people.
     We focus on diseases that disproportionately afflict people in developing-world countries, but are often overlooked by commercial vaccine
     companies. Our mission will be furthered by expanding the number of top-quality vaccine researchers through training graduate students,
     post-doctoral fellows and visiting vaccine researchers.
76
     Carolina Veterans Organization This group organizes fellowship activities for veterans and other members, provides assistance to                      x       x
     students transitioning from military service to the educational experience, advances interests common to the campus veteran community,
     increases awareness of veteran life to interested nonveteran members and offers support for veterans who may be having difficulty coping
     with past traumatic military experiences.
77
     Carolina Working Group on Economic Development is a network of faculty and administrators interested in engaged scholarship and                   x           x
     public service in economic development. The Working Group is a joint project of the Office of Economic and Business Development, the
     Carolina Center for Public Service, the Odum Institute, and the Center for Global Initiatives. Any Carolina faculty member or administrator is
     welcome to join. The Working Group defines economic development broadly as both business and community development. Areas of
     interest include business administration, social science, professional education, technology commercialization, globalization issues,
     information technology, and the physical and health sciences. Working Group topics need not be confined to North Carolina, but a special
     focus will be given to research with implications for the state's economy.
78
     Carolina-Shaw University Comprehensive NCMHD Research Center With the Goal of eliminating health disparities, the UNC-Shaw                                    x      x
     NCMHD Research Center aims to be a research incubator that will conduct innovative minority health research among adult African
     –American populations in North Carolina. This project builds on the previously funded Carolina-Shaw University Partnership for Health
     Disparity Research. The NCMHD Center will be organized into three cores. The Administrative Core enhances the comprehensive research
     center structure developed during the initial Project EXPORT grant period through which the partnership between UNC and Shaw University
     implements research activities, pilot projects, and community engagement efforts. The Research Core leverages the recently enhanced
     research infrastructure at Shaw University and the existing research resources by managing three-component research projects and seven
     pilot projects in an effort to foster research leading to measurable improvements in health disparities. The Community Engagement Core
     supports and conducts innovative research activities involving the DC2 church network established in the initial grant. This core seeks to
     know and understand better the components of black churches organizational readiness to engage in research, in particular the kinds of
     research that are effective for 1) engaging clergy, laity, and faculty in disseminating evidence based interventions and 2) engaging African-
     American communities and individuals as active participants in the research process.

79
                                                               DRAFT UNC Tomorrow Existing Programs Summary List

                                                                           A                                                                         B    C   D   E     F     G
     Program/Activity Title                                                                                                                          GR A PE ETCD       H     E
1                                                                                                                                                     4.1 4.2 4.3 4.4   4.5   4.6
     Catalyst Conference (Campus Y) The annual Catalyst Conference is a student organization that brings a selected group of 80 high school                       x
     students from across North Carolina to UNC-CH for a weekend-long exploration of social issues affecting American youth.
80
81   CCC (see Center for Community Capital)
     CCEE (see Carolina Center for Educational Excellence )
82
     CCPS (see Carolina Center for Public Service)
83
     CCSMEMC (see Carolina Center for the Study of the Middle East and Muslim Civilizations)
84
     CDL (see Clinical Center for the Study of Development and Learning)
85
     CDS (see Center for Developmental Science)
86
     Cecil G. Sheps Center for Health Services Research a unit of Carolina‘s Division of Health Affairs, seeks to improve the health of                   x              x
     individuals, families and populations by understanding the problems, issues and alternatives in the design and delivery of health care
     services. This is accomplished through an interdisciplinary program of research, consultation, technical assistance and training that focuses
     on timely and policy-relevant questions concerning the accessibility, adequacy, organization, cost and effectiveness of health care services
     and the dissemination of this information to policy makers and the general public. Its current research programs include the following areas:
      Aging, Disability and Long-Term Care; Child Health Services; General Health Services Research; Health Care Economics and Finance;
     Health Care Organization; Health Disparities; Health Policy Analysis; Health Professions and Primary Care; Medical Practice and
     Prevention; Medication Error Quality Initiative; Mental Health and Substance Abuse Services and Systems; North Carolina Institute of
     Medicine; Rural Health Research Program; Southeast Regional Center for Health Workforce Studies; and Women‘s Health Services
     Research.
87
88   CEHS (see Center for Environmental Health and Susceptibility)
     CEI (see Carolina Entrepreneurial Initiative)
89
     Center for Aging Research and Educational Services (CARES) (School of Social Work) Founded in 1988, CARES has worked in close                                x      x
     partnership with state agencies, local health and service networks, families and other public and private stakeholders to improve outcomes
     for a growing population of North Carolinians. CARES is currently engaged in a broad array of initiatives to transform the state‘s long-term
     care network in all 100 of North Carolina‘s counties.
90
     Center for AIDS Research (CFAR) The purpose of the UNC CFAR is to provide infrastructure to support investigation of the HIV/AIDS                x                  x
     epidemic using clinical research, behavioral research, research into HIV biology and pathogenesis at the molecular level, and educational
     outreach. The UNC CFAR is a consortium of three complementary institutions: UNC-Chapel Hill, Research Triangle Institute, and Family
91   Health International.
     Center for Air Commerce (Kenan Institute) offers a range of services that help clients anticipate trends and prepare to take strategic                       x
     advantage. It helps communities plan how they will leverage their airports and surrounding commercial areas to attract industry and
     promote economically and environmentally sustainable growth; airport authorities plan and develop airports as retail, entertainment and
     business meeting destinations and vital networks for air commerce; air shippers and service industries anticipate trends and business
     opportunities; companies streamline their supply chains and integrate the latest information technologies to improve performance and
     profits.
92
                                                               DRAFT UNC Tomorrow Existing Programs Summary List

                                                                           A                                                                        B    C   D   E     F     G
     Program/Activity Title                                                                                                                         GR A PE ETCD       H     E
1                                                                                                                                                    4.1 4.2 4.3 4.4   4.5   4.6
     Center for Banking and Finance (School of Law) was created to provide legal expertise to banking lawyers and financial officials. The                       x
     decision to create the Banking Center in Chapel Hill was an obvious one since Charlotte is the nation‘s banking capital. The Center
     annually brings together leading scholars of banking, business, and finance, along with the general counsel and leading executives of major
     banks and investment houses, to hear key federal regulators, scholars, and others address cutting-edge issues in the financial industry.
93
     Center for Child and Family Health, a collaborative effort of the UNC School of Medicine, Duke University and N.C. Central University,                      x      x
     this unique new treatment center for North Carolina‘s abused and neglected draws on the faculty, staff and resources of the three
     universities to provide a full range of medical, mental health, legal and family support services for children from across the state. The
     center, located in Durham, provides conference rooms, space for social workers, psychologists, law students and trauma therapists. It also
     houses the N.C. Central Family Law Clinic, pediatric offices for doctors from UNC-Chapel Hill and Duke who specialize in child abuse,
     interview rooms with video cameras and child-friendly waiting areas filled with toys. With the mental health department housed right down
     the hall from pediatricians and social workers, it is easier for the staff to set up one visit for families that can include interviews with
     pediatricians, therapists, lawyers, and social service specialists.
94
     Center for Civil Rights (School of Law) has been actively engaged in a portfolio of outreach efforts that impact North Carolina and the                 x   x
     South, generally. In four low-income communities in Moore County, in the town of Clayton, in Hoke County and elsewhere, the center has
     represented and assisted minority residents to seek greater municipal services and political participation. It has also assisted efforts to
     stem the tide of resegregation in North Carolina‘s public schools, including intervening in the long-running Leandro case on behalf of non-
     white children in Charlotte. The center was started because of the need to have an institutional presence in the South to protect the civil
     rights of non-white and low-income communities in a time when 50 years of civil rights progress stands at risk.

95
     Center for Community Capital (CCC) (Department of City and Regional Planning) explores ways to increase economic opportunity for                            x
     undercapitalized communities and households, focusing on techniques that are both effective in building wealth and assets and are
     sustainable from a business perspective. The center focuses its research and analysis on the experience and impact of financial capital as
     it flows into, within and out of U.S. households and communities, particularly those that have been left out of the financial mainstream.

96
     Center for Developmental Science (CDS) is a behavioral research center whose purpose is to pursue questions in basic science related                    x   x      x
     to developmental studies. CDS aims to transcend the limitations of institutional and disciplinary divisions. Its faculty represent several
     universities and specialize in many disciplines including anthropology, behavioral genetics, developmental psychology, developmental
     psychobiology, education, epidemiology, experimental psychology, internal medicine, behavioral neurobiology, nursing, pediatrics,
     psychiatry, public health and sociology.
97
     Center for Entrepreneurial Studies (Kenan Institute) Entrepreneurial career opportunities come in many forms, whether you want to start         x           x
     your own company, work for a start-up, find an entrepreneurial opportunity within a larger company, or go into related areas such as venture
     capital or social entrepreneurship. The Center for Entrepreneurial Studies works with each student to develop an individualized plan for
98   career success.
                                                                 DRAFT UNC Tomorrow Existing Programs Summary List

                                                                             A                                                                          B    C   D   E     F     G
      Program/Activity Title                                                                                                                            GR A PE ETCD       H     E
 1                                                                                                                                                       4.1 4.2 4.3 4.4   4.5   4.6
      Center for Environmental Health and Susceptibility (CEHS) The goal of this Center is to bring together a broad group of environmental                          x      x     x
      health researchers to understand the mechanistic basis of chemical toxicity and integrate this knowledge with epidemiology in order to
      reduce the burden of environmentally related disease. The Community Outreach and Education Core (COEC) of the UNC-Chapel Hill
      Center for Environmental Health and Susceptibility translates Center research into knowledge that can be used to improve public health and
      educates the public about how individual and group susceptibilities interact with environmental factors to cause disease. The COEC staff
      has worked with Center scientists and North Carolina citizens to: develop educational and informational materials to share innovative CEHS
      research with diverse audiences, conduct workshops for community-based and professional organizations, educators, and youth on a
      variety of environmental health issues, participate in a variety of working groups, committees, and partnerships with state agencies and non-
      profit organizations to increase awareness of relevant environmental health research, coordinate science seminars at the NC Division of
      Public Health to share the results of CEHS research with the Division‘s Public Health Management Team, utilize multimedia programming
      to reach broad and varied audiences with prevention messages related to environmental health, and publish the CEHS Sentinel newsletter.



99
      Center for European Studies Our mission is to advance understanding of the social, political and economic events that shape                        x   x
      contemporary Europe, in particular the European integration project. This is accomplished by supporting faculty and graduate student
      research through our roles as a National Resource Center funded by the US Department of Education and as a European Union Center of
      Excellence funded by the European Commission. The Center disseminates knowledge about contemporary Europe by enriching our
      university‘s work in graduate and undergraduate education and in outreach programs with public schools, business, and media
      organizations. The CES offers a EURO major, an undergraduate degree program in Contemporary European Studies and the TransAtlantic
      Masters Program, a graduate program of study in European Union politics, policy and society and transatlantic relations.
100
      Center for Global Initiatives The Center for Global Initiatives is a catalyst for the innovative work of faculty and students at the University    x   x   x   x      x     x
      of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. Formerly known as the University Center for International Studies (UCIS), the center is entrepreneurial and
      nimble in its approach to fostering initiatives that deepen knowledge and understanding of our complex world. The center offers an annual
      interdisciplinary conference titled, ―Navigating the Global American South Conference,‖ which explores the changing face of the southern
      United States and its interaction with the rest of the world.
101
      Center for Health Promotion and Disease Prevention (HPDP) seeks to bring public health research findings to the daily lives of                                 x      x     x
      individuals and communities with a special focus on North Carolina and populations vulnerable to disease. The majority of its projects
      include research within North Carolina and all of its research addresses challenges that many state residents face. Most of the center‘s
      faculty researchers have appointments in the School of Public Health or the other four UNC Health Affairs schools. Programs: HOPE
      (Health Opportunities Partnership Empowerment) Works, Kids Eating Smart and Moving More, The North Carolina Way (Worksite Activities
      for You) to Health, Center of Excellence for Training and Research Translation, Nutrition and Physical Activity Self-Assessment for Child
      Care, Wake to Wellness grants, Weight-Wise Pilot Study, Threads of HOPE, Comprehensive Cancer Control Collaborative of NC, Barbers
      Trimming Cancer Risk among Black Men, Body and Soul, NC Tobacco Free Schools and Quitline Marketing, Internet Cigarette Vendors
      Study.
102
                                                                 DRAFT UNC Tomorrow Existing Programs Summary List

                                                                             A                                                                          B    C   D   E     F     G
      Program/Activity Title                                                                                                                            GR A PE ETCD       H     E
 1                                                                                                                                                       4.1 4.2 4.3 4.4   4.5   4.6
      Center for Infant and Young Child Feeding and Care (CIYCFC) (Maternal and Child Health Department of the School of Public Health)                  x                  x
      aims to create an enabling environment, at the community, state, national and global levels, in which every mother is supported to achieve
      optimal infant and young child feeding and care, and every child achieves its full potential through the best start on life. The Center's goals
      include: promoting attention to the mother/child dyad for addressing health and survival, growth and development, advancing breastfeeding,
      complementary feeding, and related maternal health outcomes through development and dissemination of the evidence-base to enhance
      policy, programs and training throughout the world, increasing the recognition of the importance of the mother/child as the unit for study and
      care, and collaborating with academic, advocacy, and action organizations worldwide and training the leaders and practitioners of tomorrow.

103
      Center for Infectious Diseases encompasses a broad range of disciplines including clinical infectious disease, microbiology, epidemiology              x       x      x
      and public health. The program represents a partnership between the faculties in the Schools of Medicine, Public Health, Pharmacy,
      Nursing and Dentistry, and especially the Division of Infectious Disease (School of Medicine), the Departments of Epidemiology and Health
      Education (School of Public Health) and the Departments of Microbiology and Biochemistry (School of Medicine). These faculty participate
      in clinical, teaching, research and training activities.
104
      Center for International Business and Education Research (CIBER) UNC-Chapel Hill is home to one of the U.S. Department of                          x           x
      Education's Centers for International Business and Research (CIBERs). These university-based centers promote education and training
      that will contribute to the ability of United States business to prosper in an international economy. UNC‘s CIBER offers a range of programs
      to help undergraduates, MBAs, University faculty, working professionals, K-12 teachers and policymakers. CIBER seeks to prepare
      students for global business leadership through experiential education, equip educators to better incorporate global business concepts and
      experiences into their teaching and research, and infuse companies and communities with strategies and processes to enhance their global
      competitiveness.
105
      Center for Logistics and Digital Strategy (Kenan Institute) New intelligent technologies, operating in the Web-enabled information                 x           x
      environment, allow virtual integration of the extended global enterprise in a way not feasible before the advent of the electronic age. In the
      Center's Intelligent Systems Laboratory (ISL) we are able to develop customized logistics solutions that meet an organization's distinct
      competitive needs. We are able to assess the benefits of these new technologies and offer a roadmap for implementation.
106
      Center for Mathematics and Science Education (CMSE) (School of Education) applies the resources of UNC-Chapel Hill to improve K-                           x
      12 mathematics and science education in North Carolina. CMSE presents professional development programs for K-12 teachers throughout
      the area and state and houses the North Carolina Mathematics and Science Education Network (NC-MSEN) Pre-College Program which
      enrolls nearly 1,000 middle and high school students each year. Founded in 1981, CMSE is one of 11 centers of the North Carolina
      Mathematics and Science Education Network.
107
      Center for Real Estate Development (CRED) (Kenan Institute) provides thoughtful leadership through global education, research and                  x           x
      outreach to help business leaders create and manage the built environment in ways that ensure positive impact and sustainable results.
      The Center offers the only program in real estate education from a top-ranked business school that is based in the context of real estate
      development. Without these skills, the ability to structure a project's financials is often not enough to support a successful outcome.

108
                                                                DRAFT UNC Tomorrow Existing Programs Summary List

                                                                            A                                                                         B    C   D   E     F     G
      Program/Activity Title                                                                                                                          GR A PE ETCD       H     E
 1                                                                                                                                                     4.1 4.2 4.3 4.4   4.5   4.6
      Center for Research on Chronic Illness (School of Nursing) has been funded by the National Institute of Nursing Research (NINR) since                               x
      1994 to promote excellence in nursing research. The center includes 24 federally funded research projects, a pilot study program and a
      range of services to advance research on preventing and managing chronic illness in vulnerable people. The center does research on
      evidence-based interventions that are effective in improving health and function in people with a chronic condition and in preventing chronic
      illness in vulnerable people. To be compelling, the evidence must include documentation of physiological and behavioral benefits as well as
      psycho-social domains. The center‘s four cores (administrative, intervention, outcomes and dissemination) are designed to address these
      needs.
109
      Center for Slavic, Eurasian, and East European Studies (CSEEES) is a multi-disciplinary collaboration committed to enhancing                     x   x   x                x
      knowledge about and experience of Eastern Europe and Eurasia in the university, state, and nation. The CSEEES contributes to the
      preparing of students for successful professional careers through its Curriculum in Russian and East European Studies, which offers BA
      and MA degrees and a Graduate Certificate; outreach activities aimed at increasing awareness among K-12 and Community College
      students and educators about regional culture, history, and issues; and support for faculty and student activities on and off campus,
      including fellowships targeted at graduate study of Foreign Language and Area Studies (FLAS). The Center also promotes partnerships in
      North Carolina and beyond by engaging in collaborative programs; supporting conference, workshop and seminar activities; and actively
      promoting scholarly and student exchanges, research, and study abroad. One of the key CSEEES outreach activities is developing
      capacity of NC teachers to meet the challenges of public education. We partner with other organizations and local schools to increase
      international awareness of teachers and students. The Center is also committed to enhancing expertise and increasing community
      awareness of energy and environmental issues through public programs and support for faculty, students, and scholarly exchanges.


110
      Center for Sustainable Community Design (Institute for the Environment) As population increases in the United States and worldwide,                          x            x
      development pressures also increase. Development is critical to meet legitimate human needs - housing, transportation, jobs - but it can
      degrade air quality, water quality and other environmental and quality-of-life assets. We need a new way to develop our communities - by
      creating designs that serve the same human needs, better support landscape conservation and greatly reduce material and energy use.
      The Center for Sustainable Community Design and its many campus and external collaborators seeks to advance this "sustainable
      community design" movement by developing strategies to improve environmental quality through better planning of regions, cities,
      neighborhoods, buildings and utility and transportation systems.
111
      Center for Sustainable Energy, Environment and Economic Development collaborates with the Institute for Advanced Materials,                                               x
      Nanoscience and Technology in coordinating campus activities related to Energy and Environment. These collaborations are built around
      four primary areas of education, research and outreach: Energy Sciences, Environment and Health, Policy, Planning and Economic
      Development and Greening the Campus. The Center for Sustainable Energy, Environment and Economic Development takes the lead on
      activities related to Environment and Health; Policy, Planning and Economic Development; and Greening the Campus.

112
      Center for Sustainable Enterprise (Kenan-Flagler) helps executives and future business leaders understand how social and                                     x            x
      environmental considerations are changing the competitive landscape of business. The CSE provides education, research and outreach to
      business students, executives and organizations to help them benefit from the opportunities inherent in sustainable enterprise. Sustainable
      enterprise employs strategies that approach social and environmental challenges as profitable business opportunities, while simultaneously
      minimizing any harmful effects. The new CSE Knowledge Bank is a free searchable database that contains scholarly research from the
      University on a broad range of sustainability topics.
113
                                                                   DRAFT UNC Tomorrow Existing Programs Summary List

                                                                               A                                                                           B    C   D   E     F     G
      Program/Activity Title                                                                                                                               GR A PE ETCD       H     E
 1                                                                                                                                                          4.1 4.2 4.3 4.4   4.5   4.6
      Center for Urban and Regional Studies conducts and supports research on urban and regional affairs—research that helps to build                       x           x            x
      healthy, sustainable communities across the country and around the world. The Center's Faculty Fellows—all leading scholars in their
      respective fields—participate in both multidisciplinary research and more narrowly focused projects to generate new knowledge about urban
      and regional processes, problems and solutions. By supporting this network of scholars and connecting them to government agencies and
      foundations that commission research, the Center plays a vital role in linking the University community to ongoing efforts to address
      contemporary social problems. Created in 1957, the Center for Urban and Regional Studies is one of the oldest university-based research
      centers of its kind. The Center's mission is to promote and support within UNC-Chapel Hill, high-quality basic and applied research on
      urban, regional and rural planning and policy issues. The Center seeks to generate new knowledge of urban and regional processes and
      problems and ultimately to improve living conditions in our communities. This is done by involving the University's faculty and graduate
      students in large, multidisciplinary research projects and smaller, more narrowly focused projects. The Center's mission also includes
      promoting the use of the research it facilitates. Many public and non-profit organizations have research needs such as collecting and
      analyzing basic data on urban and regional conditions; surveying clients and prospective clients and interpreting their needs; defining and
      assessing problems; evaluating the impacts of programs; and forecasting urban and regional trends. The Center matches these needs with
      the interests and expertise of its Faculty Fellows -- an interdisciplinary group of UNC scholars who are leaders in their respective fields.
      Examples of projects include: Development Patterns Study of the Charlotte Metropolitan area, Evaluation of Durham Housing
      Authority's Hope VI Community Supportive Services Grant, Transitioning to the New Economy, Disaster Preparedness
      Demonstration Project, Reducing the Risk of Foreclosure among others.


114
      Center for Women's Health Research conducts research and clinical trials targeting under-funded and neglected areas of women's                        x           x      x
      health, Coordinates interdisciplinary teams of researchers for innovative studies, Provides grant writing, study design and implementation
      services to research teams, Teaches and guides the next generation of women's health researchers, Increases awareness of women's
      health issues through community outreach efforts, Sponsors and coordinate the annual Women's Health Research Day, Produces the
      renowned North Carolina Women's Health Report Card every 2 years.
115
      Center of Excellence for Training and Research Translation (Center TRT) (Center for Health Promotion and Disease Prevention) The                                  x      x
      mission of the Center of Excellence for Training and Research Translation is to enhance the public health impact of the WISEWOMAN
      program and the Nutrition and Physical Activity Program to Prevent Obesity and Other Chronic Diseases (Obesity Prevention program)
      through training and intervention translation initiatives that extend their reach, improve their effectiveness, strengthen their adoption in real-
      world settings, improve the quality of their operations, and sustain their efforts over time.

116
      Center on Coastal Law (School of Law) has worked with the Sea Grant Program and its N.C. State University office to bring                                         x            x
      environmental, land use and legal expertise to emerging issues of coastal development along the North Carolina coast. For example, a one-
      day seminar held on these issues in Wilmington drew an overflow audience of more than 90 attorneys, governmental officials and coastal
      community advocates. The center seeks to bring much- needed expertise to the area of coastal development law.
117
      Center on Poverty, Work and Opportunity (School of Law) is a forum for the best minds in the state and the nation to work on issues of                            x
      poverty, work and opportunity. The center has four goals: to address the pressing needs of people currently living at or below the poverty
      level; to provide a non-partisan interdisciplinary forum to examine innovative and practical ideas to move more Americans out of poverty; to
      raise public awareness of issues related to work and poverty; and to train a new generation to combat the causes and effects of poverty and
      improve the circumstances of working people.
118
119 Center TRT (see Center of Excellence for Training and Research Translation)
                                                                  DRAFT UNC Tomorrow Existing Programs Summary List

                                                                              A                                                                          B   C   D    E     F     G
      Program/Activity Title                                                                                                                             GR A PE ETCD       H     E
 1                                                                                                                                                        4.1 4.2 4.3 4.4   4.5   4.6
120 CEP (see Correctional Education Program)
      Certificate in Technology and Communication (School of Journalism) The graduate-level Certificate in Technology and Communication                               x            x
      has admitted 159 students since its inception in 2003. Thirty-two students have completed the program. Approximately 80 percent of
      participants are working professionals from North Carolina who are using e-learning as a way to continue their educations without disrupting
      their careers or family life. The School‘s Executive Education program offers seminars and workshops to nearly 500 professionals in the
      fields of journalism and mass communication. Participants come primarily from North Carolina and the Southeast.
121
122 CESA (see Carolina Environmental Student Association)
123 CFAR (see Center for Aids Research)
124 CFK (see Carolina for Kibera)
125 CHispA (see Carolina Hispanic Association)
      Chuck Stone Program for Diversity in Education and Media brings 20 minority and disadvantaged high school seniors to campus for an                     x   x
126 intensive one-week summer workshop.
127 CIBER (see Center for International Business and Education Research)
128 CIC (see Carolina Indian Circle)
129 CIYCFC (see Center for Infant and Young Child Feeding and Care)
130 CJAA (see Criminal Justice Awareness and Action)
      Clinical Center for the Study of Development and Learning (CDL) A program of the School of Medicine, CDL has provided 40 years of                      x   x    x      x
      innovative, high-quality clinical, research, training and technical assistance to support children and adults with developmental disabilities in
      North Carolina. As the state‘s University Center for Excellence in Developmental Disabilities, Education, Research and Service, the CDL
      pushes the scope of research and services to include a unique focus on how people with developmental disabilities learn and how their
      learning skills can be improved. CDL‘s faculty is made up of professionals in the disciplines of pediatrics, psychology, education, nutrition,
      social work, physical therapy, occupational therapy, audiology, speech and language pathology, and pediatric dentistry.
131
      Clinical Nutrition Research Center (UNC CNRC) bridges nutrition science at the interface between medicine and public health. We are                                    x
      specifically designed to provide expertise and core services that increase and enhance: conduct of nutrition-related basic science,
      epidemiologic, and intervention (including classical clinical nutrition) research; translation from basic to epidemiologic to intervention
      nutrition research and vice versa; and recruitment of investigators from non-nutrition disciplines so that they include nutrition-relevant
      measures and questions in their research.
132
133 CMI (see Carolina Microfinance Initiative)
134 CMR (see Carolina Mammography Registry)
135 CMSE (see Center for Mathematics and Science Education)
136 COLE (see Carolina Online Lateral Entry Program)
                                                                DRAFT UNC Tomorrow Existing Programs Summary List

                                                                            A                                                                         B   C   D    E     F     G
      Program/Activity Title                                                                                                                          GR A PE ETCD       H     E
 1                                                                                                                                                     4.1 4.2 4.3 4.4   4.5   4.6
      College Tobacco Use Prevention and Cessation Initiative Funded by the Health and Wellness Trust, this grant provides technical                                      x
      assistance and training for the N.C. College Tobacco Use Prevention and Cessation Initiative. The initiative provides funding to help prevent
      initiation of tobacco use among young adults ages 18-24, eliminate exposure to secondhand tobacco smoke on college campuses, promote
      tobacco-use cessation among young adults, and eliminate tobacco-related health disparities among young adults.

137
      Community Carbon Reduction Program (CRed) The CRed program in the Institute for the Environment is working on two related                                                 x
      projects: bringing the principles of carbon reduction to the Town of Chapel Hill and to our own university campus. In September of 2005, the
      Town Council voted to become the first U.S. town to make the CRed pledge! Our faculty and student teams have been working with the
      Council and Town staff to develop an initial pledge and determine how the reductions in carbon emissions can be made in the most cost-
      effective manner. In Spring semester, 2005, a second team of Institute students and faculty will develop a suite of short, medium and long-
      term strategies for these reductions, slotting the changes into the budgeting cycle for the Town.

138
      Community Development Academy (School of Government) provides training for local governments in community development and                                    x
      delivers one six-day program annually. The mission of the academy is to help develop scholarship on community economic development.
      The training provides knowledge about the law of community development and helps local government officials get certification to
      administer federal grants and participate in community development programs.
139
      Community Economic Development Program (School of Government) provides public officials with training, research and assistance                               x
      that support local efforts to create jobs and wealth, expand the tax base and maintain vibrant communities. It currently has a partnership
      with the North Carolina Rural Economic Development Center to help small rural communities in the creation and implementation of
      strategies for community and economic development in the 21st century. Faculty & staff at the School of Government are providing training
      to town civic leaders and conducing applied research on identifying case studies that exemplify how small communities have been
      successful in development activities.
140
      Community Outreach Partnership Centers Program In partnership with the city of Durham, Duke, Carolina‘s Center for Urban and                                 x
      Regional Studies established a Community Outreach Partnership Center in Durham. The center served nearly 4,000 residents in six
      Durham neighborhoods and involved 20 faculty and staff members and more than 100 students from the two universities. Nine separate
      projects ranging from crime prevention to housing to job skills/job training were conducted. A computer lab was established and regular
      computer training courses were offered to neighborhood residents. The facility also hosted GED, Adult Basic Education and English as a
      Second Language (ESL) classes and served as home to several youth programs, including a writing/photography/oral history project titled
      ―Community Stories,‖ which received an award for its innovativeness.

141
      Community Workshop Series (through the University Library system) is a partnership program between the University Library and four                  x        x      x
      local public libraries. The free series provides computer and information literacy programming delivered by the University Library for
      community residents onsite at the Chapel Hill Public Library, the Carrboro Cybrary, the Carrboro Branch Library and the Durham Public
      Library. Offerings include introductory computer and information literacy classes, as well as advanced topics such as evaluating health
      information, job searching on the Internet and writing a resume. Some classes are taught in Spanish, providing special benefit in a region
      with a growing Latino population. The series extends the instructional and subject expertise of the university to learners beyond the
      academy. In its first two years (March 2005-Feb. 2007), the series offered a total of 270 classes (22 in Spanish), reaching 1,622
      participants. In February, the series won the Innovation Award from the Association of College and Research Libraries‘ Instruction Section,
      which cited it as ―a programming innovator [and] a model of creativity and quality.‖

142
                                                                DRAFT UNC Tomorrow Existing Programs Summary List

                                                                            A                                                                       B    C   D   E     F     G
      Program/Activity Title                                                                                                                        GR A PE ETCD       H     E
 1                                                                                                                                                   4.1 4.2 4.3 4.4   4.5   4.6
      Comprehensive Cancer Control Collaborative of North Carolina (4CNC) (Center for Health Promotion and Disease Prevention) strives                                  x
      to reduce the impact of cancer in our state by supporting collaboration between North Carolina communities and researchers. 4CNC
      promotes and enhances partnerships that support efforts to implement evidence-based cancer prevention and control strategies and
      conducts research on ways to improve cancer prevention and control. Funded by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's Cancer
      Control Program and the National Cancer Institute as part of the CDC‘s Prevention Research Center Program, 4CNC is one of eight
      nationwide centers that comprise the Cancer Prevention and Control Research Network. Research builds on the knowledge base created
      by the systematic reviews and evidence-based recommendations in the Guide to Community Preventive Services. The 4CNC includes an
      extensive network of partners throughout North Carolina and includes faculty from the UNC Lineberger Comprehensive Cancer Center, the
      UNC School of Medicine, the Sheps Center for Health Services Research, and the UNC School of Public Health.

143
      Consortium for Teaching about Asia (Center for Global Initiatives) With funding from the Freeman Foundation, Center for Global                 x       x
      Initiatives hosts the North Carolina Consortium for Teaching about Asia. The purpose of the Consortium is to work with school districts to
      enhance instruction on Asia in the curriculum, especially in required world history, social studies, and geography courses. It is part of a
144   nation-wide effort led by the National Consortium for Teaching about Asia.
      Continuing Education Through its academic departments and other administrative units, Carolina offers a wide variety of continuing             x   x       x      x
      education courses and events. These noncredit offerings do not carry academic credit but provide opportunities for learners to experience
      personal enrichment, achieve professional advancement and meet other important educational goals. Conducted in a range of formats,
      both on campus and at numerous other locations throughout North Carolina and beyond, these activities reflect the depth of the university‘s
      missions in teaching and public service. In 2005-2006, continuing education programs offered by university departments reached more
      than 109,000 participants in North Carolina and beyond, an increase of more than 11,000 in comparison with the previous year. The 2,284
      courses and events for which data was provided were offered by 27 schools and departments of the university in a variety of formats,
      primarily on site but also by means of distance education. Learning events were held in 58 North Carolina counties, 19 states outside North
      Carolina and several foreign countries. In addition, many of Carolina‘s professional schools have online programs that offer academic
      credentials to off-campus students, such as certificates in programs through the Allied Health Sciences department (molecular diagnostic
      science) and the School of Public Health (community preparedness and disaster management and field epidemiology). Students may earn
      master‘s degrees from the School of Nursing and School of Public Health, and doctorates in physical therapy or health leadership through
      online courses. In 2005-2006, these online and hybrid courses for credit had more than 1,200 participants in five schools or departments at
      Carolina.

145
      Correctional Education Program (CEP) (Friday Center for Continuing Education) which provides academic credit courses and                           x       x
      educational services to qualified inmates through the North Carolina correctional system.
146
      Cost Effectiveness of Supportive Housing This project is exploring the cost-effectiveness of supportive housing developments for                           x      x
      chronically homeless individuals in four counties across North Carolina. As part of this effort, researchers from the School of Social Work
      assist staff from county Housing Support Teams in tracking the costs of providing services to chronically homeless individuals before and
      after entering permanent supportive housing.
147
                                                                  DRAFT UNC Tomorrow Existing Programs Summary List

                                                                              A                                                                           B   C   D    E     F     G
      Program/Activity Title                                                                                                                              GR A PE ETCD       H     E
 1                                                                                                                                                         4.1 4.2 4.3 4.4   4.5   4.6
      Creating Indicators and Improving Outcomes: Analytic Assistance for Child Welfare, Work First, and the Food Stamp Program in                                     x
      North Carolina This project tracks the experiences of all children who enter the child welfare system, as well as the experiences of all
      families who receive Work First or households who receive food stamps. This information is provided to all county departments of social
      services and stakeholders across the state so they can observe and track outcomes for children and families they serve. Longitudinal
      information is provided on the number of children reported as victims of maltreatment, the proportion that enter foster care, the length of
      time they remain in care, and their rate of reentry to care. Information is also provided on the length of time families receive Work First or
      food stamps, the rate at which they leave the program, the proportion that obtain jobs, their earnings, and stability of employment.

148
      Creative Campus, Carolina Performing Arts In 2007-2008 Carolina Performing Arts is facilitating a campus-wide year long conversation,                   x        x
      Criminal/Justice: The Death Penalty Examined, on issues of the death penalty and the criminal justice system, using the arts to engage in
      dialogue. Through collaborations with faculty, students and staff in departments and centers across campus, the project will feature
      performances, photography, art exhibits, historical exhibits, films, student activities, lectures and discussions. We will be exploring issues of
      power, justice, society, the individual and the state, equality, and how our actions as individuals and as a society contribute to the path that
      leads to the cycle of crime and punishment. The arts will provide the foundation to explore stories, engage in perspectives, and hold a
      balanced dialogue examining questions and our own impact on the events that result in state sanctioned executions.

149
150 CRED (see Center for Real Estate Development)
151 CRed (see Community Carbon Reduction Program)
      Criminal Justice Awareness and Action (CJAA) (Campus Y) Through direct volunteer projects and activist efforts both on campus and in                             x
      the community, Criminal Justice Awareness and Action (CJAA) works to enhance student awareness of the problems plaguing the criminal
      justice system. Recognizing that criminal justice is not simply limited to the confines of the prison system, CJAA focuses on issues of race,
      politics and economic status that affect juvenile justice, the death penalty and sentencing policies.
152
153 CSEEES (see Center for Slavic, Eurasian, and East European Studies)
154 C-STEP (see Carolina Student Transfer Excellence Program)
      CVI (see Carolina Vaccine Institute)
155
      DCRP Economic Development Workshop Practicum (Department of City and Regional Planning) Application workshops in the area of                                     x
      economic development, community development, real estate, transportation, land use and the environment enable students to hone skills
      attained in other coursework and to generate useful analyses, plans and recommendations to public and non-profit clients, thereby
      providing community engagement and valuable service to the state.
156
157 DDTI (see Developmental Disabilities Training Institute)
                                                                  DRAFT UNC Tomorrow Existing Programs Summary List

                                                                               A                                                                         B    C   D   E     F     G
      Program/Activity Title                                                                                                                             GR A PE ETCD       H     E
 1                                                                                                                                                        4.1 4.2 4.3 4.4   4.5   4.6
      Delivering Edge-Cutting Science Technology and Internet Across North Carolina for Years to Come (DESTINY) The DESTINY                               x       x
      program at the Morehead Planetarium and Science Center is UNC-Chapel Hill‘s traveling science laboratory, taking the latest technology
      and teaching tools to N.C. schools using two custom-built buses. The program develops and delivers a standards-based, hands-on
      curriculum and teacher professional development with a team of educators and a fleet of vehicles that travel throughout the state. The two
      40-foot, 33,000-pound buses, called Destiny and Discovery, bring the latest science and technology equipment to students who otherwise
      would not see a high-tech laboratory or what a career in science can offer. Since the program‘s inception, 250,000 students have been
      impacted by DESTINY‘s traveling science laboratories and innovative curriculum modules. In 2005-2006 alone, DESTINY served 8,363
      students through wet-lab instruction provided by DESTINY educators on the traveling labs or in classrooms at 158 schools across North
      Carolina, trained 455 teachers in DESTINY professional development workshops, and awarded 701 certificates.

158
      Dentistry in Service to Communities (DISC) The UNC School of Dentistry has substantially increased its community education over the                     x              x
      past two decades. Today, it provides high-quality comprehensive oral health care to all socioeconomic and cultural groups in the state and
      region. The School‘s Dentistry in Service to Communities (DISC) program currently places all senior dental students in community-based,
      non-private practice sites for 50 days of clinical education. These clinical externships occur in a variety of public, not-for-profit sites that
      include county health departments, American Indian reservations, community health centers, VA clinics, correctional institutions, institutions
      for those with mental illness or developmental disabilities, and geriatric dental facilities. Project Accomplishments include:

159
      Department of Disability Services assures that all programs and facilities of the University are accessible to all persons in the University            x
      community and develops programs and services that permit students to, as independently as possible, meet the demands of University life.
160
      Department of English and Comparative Literature Faculty members of the creative writing program in this department bring the art of                    x   x
      literature and creative writing to many people across the state each year, speaking to community groups and reading from their works at
      libraries. Creative writing professors also regularly are involved with public awareness and fundraising efforts for literacy (particularly with
      Orange County Literacy Council). Students in the creative writing program participate in CoachWrite, serving as writing coaches and
      mentors in elementary and middle school classrooms in the Chapel Hill-Carrboro City Schools.

161
162 DESTINY (see Delivering Edge-Cutting Science Technology and Internet Across North Carolina for Years to Come)
      Developmental Disabilities Training Institute (DDTI) Located within the Jordan Institute for Families in the School of Social Work, DDTI                x              x
      fosters improvements in services and support to people with developmental disabilities by developing the knowledge, attitudes and skills of
      staff involved in their lives. This includes identifying best practices as well as providing in-service training activities, targeted program
      evaluation and technical assistance to agencies and organizations managing, coordinating or providing services to individuals and their
      families. DDTI programs include training on crisis planning and management, person-centered thinking when working with people who have
      developmental disabilities, and facilitating support networks for people with developmental disabilities.

163
164 DISC (see Dentistry in Service to Communities)
                                                                   DRAFT UNC Tomorrow Existing Programs Summary List

                                                                               A                                                                            B   C   D    E     F     G
      Program/Activity Title                                                                                                                                GR A PE ETCD       H     E
 1                                                                                                                                                           4.1 4.2 4.3 4.4   4.5   4.6
      Dissemination Core (Lineberger Comprehensive Cancer Center) Our goals are to improve the quality of dissemination research and to                                  x      x
      identify and apply the most effective strategies to increase adoption and implementation of evidence-based innovations. By building the field
      of dissemination research and enhancing dissemination infrastructure, we aim to: eliminate roadblocks to research translation and increase
      our understanding and ability to propel effective interventions into practice. A key strategy to close the gap between research and practice
      is developing communication systems and useful partnerships that span research, practice and policy settings. We work with researchers
      and research teams to design, implement and evaluate dissemination strategies. We are working to help researchers do a better job of
      propelling their proven effective interventions from the academic setting into real world practice. We also provide services to people in
      organizations, communities, and industries that are dedicated to disease prevention and health promotion. We work with program planners,
      public health and medical practitioners, and evaluation teams to learn about evidence-based approaches and to select and adapt the best
      evidence-based strategy for achieving target outcomes. We can also help organizations and communities increase their capacity by
      providing technical assistance to implement, monitor and evaluate evidence-based approaches.

165
      Distance Education: Connecting Carolina to Your Hometown While continuing to live and work in their hometown, adult learners can                          x   x           x
      enroll in individual courses, certificates or degrees at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. Through online education, video-
      conferencing and face-to-face instruction in or near their homes, distance education students experience the same high quality instruction,
      demanding workload and spirited class discussion as students on the main campus. Distance Educations offers many options for
      undergraduate education through the William and Ida Friday Center for Continuing Education; graduate and professional education through
      a wide range of nationally ranked graduate and professional certificates through the Schools of Education, Information and Library Science,
      Journalism, Nursing, Pharmacy, Public Health, Social Work and the Department of Allied Health Sciences in the School of Medicine; as
      well as a Trans-Atlantic Masters. The quality instruction, the program content and the support services engage students as they enroll and
      complete their academic work. The process links students not only to their particular program, but to the whole university.

166
      Doctor of Pharmacy Partnership Program Launched in fall 2005, the Doctor of Pharmacy program through the UNC School of Pharmacy                           x        x      x
      enrolls 10 to 15 students per year at Elizabeth City State University. This partnership enables the Doctor of Pharmacy program to increase
      the number of graduates each year and to promote increased numbers of pharmacists working in underserved populations, especially in
      northeastern North Carolina. Students are co-enrolled in a BS in the Pharmaceutical Sciences program at ECSU and the Doctor of
      Pharmacy program at UNC-Chapel Hill. They remain on the ECSU campus for the first three years of instruction through video-
      teleconferencing, Web-based teaching, and classes taught by ECSU faculty. Graduates of this program will receive a doctor of pharmacy
      degree from UNC-Chapel Hill with acknowledgment of the partnership with ECSU.

167
      Documenting the American South (DocSouth) (UNC Libraries) is a digital publishing initiative that provides Internet access to texts,                      x   x    x
      images, and audio files related to southern history, literature, and culture. Currently DocSouth includes ten thematic collections of books,
      diaries, posters, artifacts, letters, oral history interviews, and songs. The University Library of the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill
      sponsors Documenting the American South, and the texts and materials come primarily from its southern holdings. The UNC University
      Library is committed to the long-term availability of these collections and their online records. An editorial board guides development of this
      digital library.
168
                                                                DRAFT UNC Tomorrow Existing Programs Summary List

                                                                            A                                                                          B    C   D   E     F     G
      Program/Activity Title                                                                                                                           GR A PE ETCD       H     E
 1                                                                                                                                                      4.1 4.2 4.3 4.4   4.5   4.6
      Drinking Water Research Center (School of Public Health) focuses on the chemical, physical, and microbiological quality of drinking                                  x     x
      water; water purification technology; health effects associated with the consumption of drinking water; and economic and planning aspects
      related to the supply of safe drinking water. Ongoing research activities within the DWRC include health effects of disinfection by-products,
      evaluation of disinfection performance, modeling distribution system networks, appropriate technologies for developing countries, and
      planning, decision-making, and risk assessment modeling.
169
      Durham Scholars Program is directed by James Johnson, William Rand Kenan Jr., Distinguished Professor of Management, Kenan-                           x   x   x
      Flagler Business School, and director of the Urban Investment Strategies Center at the Frank Hawkins Kenan Institute of Private Enterprise
      at the UNC Kenan-Flagler Business School. Established in 1993, the foundation of this program is an after-school college preparatory
      academy where students work on improving both academic and social skills. Durham Scholars Program comprises two key components: 1)
      The College Outreach and Retention Program, designed to have an immediate impact on college attendance and matriculation rates of
      children in Northeast-Central Durham. Up to eight need-based scholarships of up to $10,000 are awarded annually to students who
      graduate from high school and qualify for admission to college. Students receive a wide range of academic and social supports during their
      junior and senior years to improve their academic performance and foster college attendance. 2) The College Preparatory Academy for
      Sixth Graders, a long-term strategy for promoting college attendance and matriculation among Northeast Central Durham youth. The
      program seeks to build bridges for these students to the social, educational and occupational mainstream of the new digital economy.
      Beginning in sixth grade and continuing through high school graduation, the young scholars are required to take a set of college preparatory
      classes to hone their communication skills (reading, writing and public speaking), their personal skills (problem solving, note taking, time
      management, decision making and critical thinking), and technical skills (math, science and computer usage). They are linked with a cadre
      of college-level tutors, who help them with their normal school work and college preparatory courses. They also participate in a range of
      extracurricular activities and field trips to broaden their intellectual and socio-cultural horizons. Students who remain in the program until
      high school graduation and are accepted to college receive scholarships of up to $10,000 over four years.



170
171 ECHO (see Ethnicity, Culture and Health Outcomes)
      Educational Renaissance (School of Pharmacy) The Educational Renaissance is the School of Pharmacy's plan to address the needs of                 x   x       x     X
      the next generation of students and prepare them to be the most qualified pharmacists to serve the health-care needs of North Carolina.
      The Educational Renaissance will move the knowledge transfer aspect of education—such as a traditional lecture—out of the classroom
      and put it online. Students would come to class fully prepared to learn to apply that knowledge, which is the key to developing the critical
      thinking skills so important to a pharmacist.
172
      EFC (see Environmental Finance Center)
173
      Ella Baker Women’s Center for Leadership and Community Activism has plans to establish a center near two low-income housing                           x       x
      communities in Chapel Hill and to replicate the model nationwide. A pilot of the Center‘s flagship program was launched in June 2007, with
      10 young women activists (ages 13-18) from the Trinity Court and Pritchard Park public housing communities in Chapel Hill. Phase I of the
      pilot involved the youth in eight weeks of community organization training using curriculum guides and technical assistance from the
      Innovation Center for Community and Youth Development, a Kellogg funded nonprofit organization based in Takoma Park, MD. Training
      focuses on personal leadership (identity, history, vision, ethics), organizational leadership (critical thinking, decision making, accessing
      resources), and community leadership (civic awareness, networking, organizing). Phase II, launched in August 2007, is a year-long
      community change project led by the youth and adult partners (UNC faculty, students and community volunteers). Opportunities for youth to
      identify and construct solutions to problems in their own communities underscore all activities.

174
                                                                 DRAFT UNC Tomorrow Existing Programs Summary List

                                                                             A                                                                          B    C   D   E     F     G
      Program/Activity Title                                                                                                                            GR A PE ETCD       H     E
 1                                                                                                                                                       4.1 4.2 4.3 4.4   4.5   4.6
      Emerging Leaders in Public Health is designed to prepare the next generation of public health leaders by identifying and training those                x              x
      individuals with the talent to serve in significant leadership capabilities in the next decade. The program's topics include balancing
      communications needs, financial resources and human resources during times of crises, analyzing crisis scenarios and assessing their
      potential impact on one's organization and community, creating sustainable organizations in public health and managing an increasingly
      diverse workforce.
175
      Engineers Without Borders (EWB) at UNC-CH is a student organization that has been founded for the purpose of facilitating UNC student              x           x
      involvement in international engineering and health projects organized or approved by Engineers Without Borders-USA. Our chapter is
      involved with construction and design work, consulting, teaching, surveying, or other tasks as determined by project needs. We raise funds
      to support projects, facilitate collaboration between student groups and local engineers and other universities on development projects, and
      host speakers and seminars relevant to the role of the engineer in development work abroad.

176
      ENNEAD Society of Dental Volunteers was created in 2003 by four dental students and with the mentoring of Dr. Eugene Sandler, a                    x   x              x
      School of Dentistry faculty member. The initiative focuses on helping meet oral health needs in the community, heightening awareness of
      health disparities and giving students the skills and dedication necessary to become future community leaders and volunteers. Nine student
      leaders, who serve as board members, are responsible for taking requests from the community, designing projects to meet the needs
      outlined in those requests, and then organizing a group of student volunteers to carry out those projects. ENNEAD provides doctor of dental
      surgery, dental hygiene and dental assisting students with opportunities to volunteer at community health fairs, elementary schools and
      mobile dental clinics. Almost 200 students in these fields are on the volunteer listserv. ENNEAD initiatives include mouth guard fabrication
      for local student-athletes, in concert with the N.C. Dental Society‘s statewide initiative; presentations to schools and other organizations on
      the importance of good oral heath habits; and participation at free clinics, working with the Open Door Dental Clinic of Alamance executive
      director and N.C. Missions of Mercy president, Dr. Steven Slott of Burlington. In October 2005, 45 ENNEAD volunteers along with 22
      community dentists and 10 hygienists provided almost $70,000 worth of care to 267 patients at a two-day Missions of Mercy clinic in
      Burlington. The clinic received nationwide recognition as a winner of USA Weekend Magazine‘s ―Make a Difference Day‖ Competition.


177
      Entrepreneurial Public Serve Fellowships (EPS) (Carolina Center for Public Service) awards five summer fellowships of up to $3,000                 x           x
      each to develop and implement social entrepreneurship projects that employ innovative, sustainable approaches to complex social needs
      anywhere in the world. Any returning, full-time undergraduate or graduate student at UNC-Chapel Hill is eligible to apply. Fellows work with
      community partners and faculty mentors who are familiar with their topics or geographic areas, and the students are responsible for the
      major planning and implementation of their projects. Faculty mentors receive $500 stipends for their involvement. The fellowships are made
      possible through the support of the Donald P. Kanak family.
178
      Environmental Field Site Program advances the Institute for the Environment‘s missions in undergraduate education, environmental                               x            x
      research and community outreach, the institute has established a network of field sites with locations in the U.S. and abroad, including
      three North Carolina sites—Manteo, Highlands and Morehead City. Each site focuses on themes specific to that community or region and
      provides a semester-long opportunity for students to explore real-world issues through a combination of course work, field trips, group
      research projects and internships with local organizations. Challenges facing host communities help shape the curriculum at each site, and
      the results of research by Carolina faculty and students are shared with community partners.

179
                                                                 DRAFT UNC Tomorrow Existing Programs Summary List

                                                                            A                                                                          B    C   D   E     F     G
      Program/Activity Title                                                                                                                           GR A PE ETCD       H     E
 1                                                                                                                                                      4.1 4.2 4.3 4.4   4.5   4.6
      Environmental Finance Center (EFC) The School of Government houses one of nine university based EFCs funded by the Environmental                              x            x
      Protection Agency. The Carolina EFC is dedicated to enhancing the ability of governments to provide environmental programs and
      services in fair, effective and financially sustainable ways. It provides a bridge between students and faculty in the University who work
      principally on environmental financing, management and planning tools, and government workers who use these tools for the public
      interest. Carolina's EFC reaches local communities through the delivery of interactive applied-training programs and technical assistance,
      increasing the capacity of other organizations to address the financial aspects of environmental protection.
180
      Environmental Resource Program (ERP) (Institute for the Environment) is the outreach and public service unit of the Institute for the                     x   x            x
      Environment. It links Carolina‘s environmental resources with the citizens of North Carolina and is one of only a handful of university-
      supported programs of its kind in the nation. ERP‘s mission is to promote environmental stewardship and public health through education,
      research and community service. Based on the belief that one of the best ways to protect the environment and promote public health is
      through an informed citizenry, ERP provides technical assistance to community groups, offers K-12 teacher professional development,
      conducts policy research for nonprofits and government agencies, and sponsors undergraduate environmental internships.

181
      EPS (see Entrepreneurial Public Service Fellowships)
182
183 ERP (see Environmental Resource Program)
      Ethnicity, Culture and Health Outcomes (ECHO) The mission of ECHO is to eliminate health status and health outcomes disparities                       x       x      x
      through translatable, evidence-based research, multidisciplinary training and education, and culturally sensitive service to North Carolina
      communities. The program‘s objectives include: educate faculty, students, health professionals, and communities about the relationship
      between culture, ethnicity and health; educate faculty, students, health professionals, and communities about the relationship between
      culture, ethnicity and health; promote a culturally competent health workforce; encourage greater representation of racial diversity in the
      health workforce; and act as a public policy advisor by providing academic guidance on the formation of effective policy. One of the few
      programs of its type in the nation, ECHO works to connect the various institutes and research agendas throughout the state concerned
      about health disparities, especially through partnerships with the state‘s historically black colleges and universities.

184
      European Exchange Program, (Institute for Economic Development, Department of City and Regional Planning) The economic                            x           x
      development faculty and students have participated in an exchange program with the Vienna University of Economics and Business in
      Austria since the mid-1980s. Students who elect to take advantage of spending a semester at the Vienna University of Economics and
      Business are able to observe at close hand the fascinating process of regional economic restructuring in Eastern Europe and to consider
      their implications for regions in Western Europe and in the United States.
185
      European Study Center, Winston House, King's College, London Carolina‘s newly acquired Winston House—the European Study                           x   x
      Center in London-- serves as a hub linking the College of Arts and Sciences‘ study abroad and research initiatives across the European
      continent. The Center also presents exciting new opportunities for students, faculty, and alumni from units across the Carolina campus,
      from sister institutions across the university system, and from partner institutions elsewhere, to implement programs that take full advantage
      of London‘s cultural riches. Winston House is available for use by administrators, researchers, staff, faculty, students—anyone who
      believes that he or she can enrich and enliven his or her program by meeting and working in London.

186
                                                                   DRAFT UNC Tomorrow Existing Programs Summary List

                                                                               A                                                                            B    C   D   E     F     G
      Program/Activity Title                                                                                                                                GR A PE ETCD       H     E
 1                                                                                                                                                           4.1 4.2 4.3 4.4   4.5   4.6
      Evaluation, Assessment and Policy Connections (EvAP) (School of Education) EvAP is an evaluation unit that conducts evaluations and                            x   x
      provides training and technical assistance in evaluation, assessment and strategic planning to educational, community and service
      organizations across the United States. The mission of EvAP is to build the evaluation capacity and effectiveness of public, nonprofit and
      private organizations in order to meet the challenges of developing and sustaining successful programs. EvAP specializes in training
      evaluators and conducting program evaluations and is committed to sharing evaluation expertise, instruments and processes while serving
      as an evaluation training center for School of Education students and the broader education and service communities.

187
      EvAP (see Evaluation, Assessment and Policy Connections)
188
189 EWB (see Engineers Without Borders)
      Examining Mental Illnesses in the Jails of NC The School of Social Work was invited to engage in this research by the Protection and                               x      x
      Advocacy for Individuals with Mental Illnesses (PAIMI) group of the Governor‘s Advocacy Council for Persons with Disabilities (GACPD).
      The researchers found that jails do a poor job of screening for individuals with mental illnesses; jail staff are often poorly trained in issues of
      mental illness; access to psychotropic medication for individuals in jails is difficult and can take up to two weeks; access to mental health
      care for individuals in jails is also difficult and collaboration between jails and local mental health agencies is often weak. The results of the
      study have been widely disseminated, to groups as disparate as the N.C. Psychiatric Association, the N.C. Commission for Mental Health,
      N.C. jail administrators, and local consumer advocacy groups. The report came to the attention of the N.C. Association of County
      Commissioners, who requested a presentation on the findings and have made this one of their top priority issues. Presentations have been
      planned for Dorothea Dix Hospital and Wake Human Services staff. The report also came to the attention of Representative Verla Insko,
      co-chair of the Legislative Oversight Committee for Mental Health. She has incorporated the recommendations from this report into House
      Bill 691 for the 2007 Legislative Session. Finally, upon recommendation of the report and with participation from the investigators, N.C.
      mental health advocates are planning an ongoing task force to examine and address the issues of jails and the mentally ill.

190
      Executive Doctoral Program in Health Leadership (School of Public Health, Department of Health Policy and Administration) prepares                     x   x              x
      mid-career professionals for senior-level positions in organizations working to improve the public‘s health. The three-year, cohort-based
      distance program confers a DrPH in Health Administration. The Program targets individuals working full-time with substantial leadership
      responsibilities in communities, organizations and institutions. Students may include domestic or international health directors, mid-career
      managers in government agencies, leaders within nonprofit and non-governmental organizations, program officers and other mid-level or
      senior managers working for foundations, and others working within the health field, including entrepreneurs and individuals working in
      nontraditional settings affecting the health of the public.
191
      Executive Education Program (Kenan-Flagler) The graduate-level Certificate in Technology and Communication has admitted 159                            x   x       x
      students since its inception in 2003. Thirty-two students have completed the program. Approximately 80 percent of participants are
      working professionals from North Carolina who are using e-learning as a way to continue their educations without disrupting their careers or
      family life. The School‘s Executive Education program offers seminars and workshops to nearly 500 professionals in the fields of journalism
      and mass communication. Participants come primarily from North Carolina and the Southeast.
192
                                                                DRAFT UNC Tomorrow Existing Programs Summary List

                                                                            A                                                                        B   C   D    E     F     G
      Program/Activity Title                                                                                                                         GR A PE ETCD       H     E
 1                                                                                                                                                    4.1 4.2 4.3 4.4   4.5   4.6
      Faculty Engaged Scholars Program (FESP) is an important new initiative of the Carolina Center for Public Service and the Office of Vice            x        x
      Chancellor for Public Service and Engagement. It is designed to advance faculty involvement in the scholarship of engagement by guiding
      and supporting them to apply their expertise in addressing important community issues. The two-year program incorporates
      interdisciplinary research, education, mentoring, and public service. Faculty scholars interact with their peers from a variety of different
      disciplines, and they also receive support and mentoring from a diverse group of experienced faculty and community partners. In addition
      they receive modest funding to support a project. The program is co-directed by a senior faculty member and a community leader who has
      experience working with faculty members on community-based research projects. The diverse pilot class of eight Faculty Engaged
      Scholars was selected from a very competitive pool and started January 2008. The program is designed to add another eight new Faculty
      Engaged Scholars at the start of each calendar year. The early feedback on the pilot class has been very positive, and we have
      implemented an evaluation system to assess the effectiveness in meeting the stated goals for both individual scholars and the program as
      a whole. We intend to develop a growing and supportive cohort of faculty engaged scholars at Carolina. The program already has received
      national attention as a model for developing scholarly work that touches our communities, and it might be expanded to other interested
      UNC campuses.

193
194 FADD (see Fighting Against the Digital Divide)
      Family and Children’s Resource Program (School of Social Work) is a multifaceted resource for all who seek to improve the lives of the                 x    x      x
      families and children served by North Carolina‘s child welfare system. Since it was founded in 1993, it has worked in close partnership with
      state agencies, local professionals, families, and other stakeholders to enhance both the process and the outcomes associated with child
      protective services, foster care and adoption in our state. The program‘s collaborative efforts within North Carolina have contributed to a
      reduction in the amount of time children spend in foster care and spawned a continuing series of ongoing reforms involving local, state,
      federal, and foundation-based partnerships. FCRP is actively involved in serving all 100 North Carolina counties.
195
      Family Life Project (Frank Porter Graham Child Development Institute) Established at the School of Education in 2002 and funded with a                 x           x
      $16.5 million grant from the National Institute for Child Health and Human Development (NICHD), this study of nearly 1,300 children in rural
      communities is examining the biological, individual, family and community processes that lead to good or poor outcomes for rural children.
      The project was recently renewed with an additional $12 million NICHD grant to continue research on the 1,300 rural children, now turning
      3, who have been studied since birth.
196
      Family Support Network of North Carolina (FSN) (School of Medicine) promotes and provides support for families with children who have              x               x
      special needs. Parent-to-parent support is available through local, affiliated FSN programs across the state and through the Central
      Directory of Resources (CDR).The CDR is a free resource for family members and service providers. Callers can obtain verbal or printed
      information about specific disabilities and the resources and organizations that serve children and families, and they can speak with a
      resource specialist about a family‘s particular issues. A Spanish-speaking resource specialist is available as well as some printed
      information in Spanish.
197
      FESP (see Faculty Engaged Scholars Program)
198
199 FGNC (see First Nation Graduate Circle)
                                                                   DRAFT UNC Tomorrow Existing Programs Summary List

                                                                               A                                                                             B    C   D   E     F     G
      Program/Activity Title                                                                                                                                 GR A PE ETCD       H     E
 1                                                                                                                                                            4.1 4.2 4.3 4.4   4.5   4.6
      FHI-UNC Fellowship Program (Office of Global Health, School of Public Health) Family Health International (FHI) is a nonprofit                          x   x              x
      organization with a mission to improve lives worldwide by addressing complex public health issues through research, education and
      services. FHI, in partnership with the Office of Global Health in the UNC School of Public Health is offering a fellowship program for
      doctoral students and second year masters students in the UNC SPH. This exciting fellowship program provides students with the
      opportunity to work with FHI‘s world-renowned researchers in global health topics such as, HIV/AIDS, infectious diseases, reproductive,
      maternal and adolescent health.
200
      Fighting Against the Digital Divide (FADD) (Campus Y) is a student-run program whose purpose is to provide University employees with                                x
      the necessary technology skills to succeed in the workplace and in the future.
201
      Financial Indicators for Local Public Health Systems The UNC Public Health Leadership Program in conjunction with various partners                                  x      x
      are working with Local Public Health Agencies (LPHA) in northeast North Carolina to implement a set of indicators to measure, monitor and
      improve their financial operations and strategic planning.
202
      First Nation Graduate Circle (FGNC) is an organization of American Indian graduate and professional students at the University of North                     x              x
      Carolina at Chapel Hill. One of FNGC‘s important concerns is ensuring that American Indian cultural heritage is recognized and respected
      at Carolina through appropriate curriculum, research and administrative support. The circle educates members of the North Carolina
      community about the unique cultural heritage of American Indian people in North Carolina and American Indian people throughout the
      United States, Canada and Mexico. Some of its goals are to provide mentoring and support to American Indian undergraduates and to
      sponsor lectures and other events related to the academic and professional accomplishments of American Indians.

203
      First School (Frank Porter Graham Child Development Institute) This initiative involves working with two schools in the state to implement                      x
      a new vision for the education and care of young children from pre-kindergarten through third grade that unites the best of early childhood,
204   elementary, and special education.
      Fogarty AIDS International Research & Training Program UNC-CH participates n the AIDS International Training and Research                               x                  x
      Program (AITRP) which began in 1988 as one of the first of a new generation of research training programs sponsored by the Fogarty
      International Center (FIC) at the National Institutes of Health (NIH). These programs provide training for scientists from institutions in low-
      and middle-income countries to strengthen HIV-related research and public health capacities at their institutions. Grants for full research
      training programs are awarded to U.S. institutions with strong HIV- related research training experience and with HIV-related research
      collaborations with institutions in low- and middle- income countries. The grantees, in partnership with their foreign collaborating institutions,
      identify foreign health scientists, clinicians, and allied health workers from the foreign countries to participate in their joint research training
      programs. The primary goal of this program is to build multi-disciplinary biomedical, behavioral and social science research capacity for the
      prevention, care and treatment of HIV/AIDS and HIV-related conditions for those adults and children affected by HIV/AIDS in the
      collaborating country.
205
      Fort Bragg Base Realignment and Closure Baseline Assessment A community impact assessment was completed in 2006 to predict                                      x   x
      the impact of personnel changes on the public schools. The Center for Urban and Regional Studies project focused on Fort Bragg and 11
      surrounding counties (Bladen, Cumberland, Harnett, Hoke, Lee, Montgomery, Moore, Richmond, Robeson, Sampson and Scotland).
      Projections will help local governments and school systems prepare for an influx of soldiers and their families.

206
207 FPG (see Frank Porter Graham Child Development Institute)
                                                                DRAFT UNC Tomorrow Existing Programs Summary List

                                                                            A                                                                         B    C   D   E     F     G
      Program/Activity Title                                                                                                                          GR A PE ETCD       H     E
 1                                                                                                                                                     4.1 4.2 4.3 4.4   4.5   4.6
      Frank Porter Graham Child Development Institute (FPG) For the past 40 years, FPG research and outreach has shaped how the nation                 x   x   x   x      x     x
      cares for and educates young children. FPG has a proud history of serving as an objective, knowledgeable force for social change to
      enhance the lives of children and families. Researchers focus on parent and family support; early care and education; child health and
      development; early identification and intervention; equity, access and inclusion; and early childhood policy. FPG is one of the oldest
      multidisciplinary centers devoted to the study of children and families. Most of the institute‘s work addresses young children ages birth
      through 8 years. FPG has a special focus on children who experience biological or environmental factors that challenge early development
      and learning. FPG Child Development Institute currently supports 45 projects working across the nation and around the world. Research
      and outreach projects address parent and family support; early care and education; child health and development; early identification and
      early intervention; equity, access and inclusion; and early childhood policy.

208
      Frank Porter Graham Disability Initiative The FPG Disability Initiative is central to FPG's mission and organization. Since its inception in         x
      1966, FPG investigators have demonstrated a strong interest in advancing knowledge about the most effective ways of serving children with
      disabilities and their families. This work has had a particular emphasis on, but is not limited to, the importance of prevention and early
      intervention for children birth through five years of age. The goal of the FPG Disability Initiative is to identify linkages across various
      disability activities and to explore ways to coordinate these efforts and respond to emerging problems.

209
210 FSP (see Family Support Network of North Carolina)
      Get Real and HEEL Breast Cancer Program (Get Recreation, Get Exercise, Get Active, Get Living) The purpose of the program is to                                     x
      provide post-diagnosed breast cancer patients with individualized prescriptive exercise and recreational therapy as a way to help alleviate
      the symptoms of cancer treatment, improve quality of life, and survivorship. Patients come from the 13-county region under the N.C.
      Triangle Affiliate of the Susan Komen Breast Cancer Foundation service area (Caswell, Chatham, Durham, Edgecombe, Franklin, Granville,
      Harnett, Johnston, Nash, Orange, Person, Vance and Wake). Each patient is assigned to a personal trainer (a student trained by the
      Department of Exercise and Sport Science-EXSS) and a licensed recreation therapist, working out three times a week over a six-month
      period, free of charge. Professors from the UNC Departments of Exercise and Sport Science, Allied Health Sciences and Biostatics, along
      with clinicians from UNC, are leading the way. Housed at the Department of Exercise and Sport Science, the program‘s facility at the
      Women‘s Gym is designated for use of cancer patients only. Parking is provided to all patients free of charge in a very convenient location a
      few yards from the program facility. Since opening six months ago, the program has been contacted by more that 200 patients and
      physicians requesting more information on how to participate in the program. So far, 25 women have either completed six months of
      participation in the program or are currently participating in the program.


211
      Gillings Innovation Labs (GILS) Competitively selected Gillings Innovations Laboratories will focus concentrated efforts on solving big          x           x      x
      public health problems, such as obesity, lack of access to clean water and health care, and epidemics around the world. Solutions to these
      problems can make a large difference in the public's health. The GILS are committed to accelerate delivery of best practices to improve
      people's lives and anticipate new public health challenges. Some examples of GILS are the UNC Center for Innovative Clinical Trials and
      the Carolina Global Water Partnership.
212
      GILS (see Gillings Innovation Labs)
213
                                                                    DRAFT UNC Tomorrow Existing Programs Summary List

                                                                                A                                                                         B    C   D   E     F     G
      Program/Activity Title                                                                                                                              GR A PE ETCD       H     E
 1                                                                                                                                                         4.1 4.2 4.3 4.4   4.5   4.6
      GlaxoSmithKline UNC Duke Global Health Project The GlaxoSmithKline Foundation has awarded the University of North Carolina at                        x                  x
      Chapel Hill and Duke University a grant to bring the two institutions together to share resources and ideas in the area of global health. Both
      Duke and UNC are committed to the development of global health research, curricula, and capacity building both at home and in
      international training programs in Tanzania and Malawi, respectively. This grant is designed to foster the development of multidisciplinary
      research projects and partnerships in global health between the two universities. Funds have been designated to support student research
      in the form of seed grants. The grants will be awarded based on the soundness of the research proposal and how well it demonstrates the
      principles of the larger grant.
214
      Global Health Faculty Partnership Grants Program Designed to foster the development of multidisciplinary research projects and                       x   x   x   x      x
      partnerships in global health, grants will be made to UNC-Chapel Hill faculty for international travel to establish or maintain research
      relationships with colleagues in other countries (e.g., clarifying joint research interests, planning, organizing institutional linkages, jointly
      developing or writing research proposals to funding agencies). GHP grant funds cannot be used to support data collection, other actual
215   research activity, or attendance at meetings and conferences.
      Global Leadership Circle The Chancellor‘s Global Leadership Circle is a task force of visionary alumni and friends formed to help Carolina           x   x       x
      develop a strategic vision for global engagement over the next 12 to 18 months. Through this leadership, Carolina will make the state of
      North Carolina more competitive in the world economy and achieve Carolina's vision of becoming a truly world-class university. Leading the
      team is Peter Coclanis, associate provost for international affairs, who has engaged faculty from across the University in an evaluation of
      Carolina‘s comparative strengths, gaps, and potential opportunities.
216
      Global Music In collaboration with WXYC 89.3 FM, UNC's student-run radio station, the Area Studies Centers have launched a new                       x   x       x
      monthly radio program. The program focuses on a particular world region each month, integrating both music from this part of the world and
      relevant expertise of guests scholars from UNC Chapel Hill. Each broadcast is a live "lesson" interspersing music with dialogue.

217
      GlobeMed is a national non-profit organization that connects student-led chapters at universities across the United States directly to health        x           x      x
      organizations around the world. In forming partnerships and designing innovative health projects, we allow ourselves and members of the
      community to engage, educate, and enable. Enabling students to construct change will allow them to deepen their own education.
      Educating our students and community will provide a greater capacity to improve global health. This will be done through workshops,
      course curriculum designs, and distance learning. Engaging students will make them more aware of global health challenges through the
      various service projects that our organization will offer. While a common vision and mission unites members at each of our campuses, the
      strength of the GlobeMed network rests in each chapter‘s unique projects and efforts.

218
      Good Schools – Good Neighborhoods This project, a collaboration of the Center for Urban and Regional Studies and the N.C. Smart                              x   x
      Growth Alliance, identified trends in school construction in North Carolina and key factors affecting the location and design of schools. The
      study suggested ways local governments, school boards and the N.C. Department of Public Instruction could overcome obstacles to
      building and maintaining walk able, neighborhood-scale schools. Focus groups were conducted in Cabarrus, Wake, Pitt, Henderson and
      Buncombe counties.
219
                                                                DRAFT UNC Tomorrow Existing Programs Summary List

                                                                            A                                                                        B    C   D   E     F     G
      Program/Activity Title                                                                                                                         GR A PE ETCD       H     E
 1                                                                                                                                                    4.1 4.2 4.3 4.4   4.5   4.6
      Graduate Certificate in Global Health prepares residential SPH students to work in changing environments and with diverse populations,          x                  x
      and to respond competently to the challenges presented by permeable geographic and cultural boundaries. The Certificate complements
      currently enrolled graduate students' departmental requirements by offering courses, seminars, and fieldwork or internships that provide for
      a comprehensive understanding of global health conditions, needs, and solutions that cross borders in both developing and industrialized
      countries and regions. Students will gain competence in identifying and analyzing factors that generate disparities in health status, health
      resources, and access to health information and health services, particularly for ethnic minorities and other marginalized and vulnerable
      population groups. The Graduate Certificate in Global Health is open to students currently enrolled in a graduate degree program of the
      University of North Carolina School of Public Health.

220
      Graduate Student Fellowship in Greene County Christopher Sherman, a master‘s in public administration student, received a 2006                              x
      Robert E. Bryan Fellowship to document the needs of tobacco farmers and landowners in Greene County and link the farmers with
      available resources from the government and nonprofit organizations. Greene County, a rural county in eastern North Carolina, is the most
      tobacco-dependent county in the state and the second most tobacco-dependent county in the United States. Sherman‘s project helped
      address transition issues as farmers are no longer subsidized for their tobacco crops and must compete on the open world market. He
      plans to develop a website that expands on these issues to help farmers beyond Greene County.

221
      Great Decisions at UNC-Chapel Hill is an outreach program of the Foreign Policy Association (FPA). There are over two thousand Great            x       x   x
      Decisions programs across the U.S. The mission of each program is to facilitate national awareness and critical analysis of the current
      events that roil foreign affairs. Approximately 400 undergraduates and community participants enroll in Great Decisions (INTS 393), and all
      lectures are free and open to the public. We take UNC to the communities that surround us. The committee runs an outreach program to
      local retirement communities and secondary schools. Continuing Education Credit is available to secondary school teachers who enroll.

222
      Hardaway Project With funding from the Alcoa Foundation, the Research Laboratories of Archaeology have helped create a traveling                        x   x
      exhibit called ―Ancient Carolinians‖ which will open this week at Morehead Planetarium then travel to science museums throughout the
      state; we provided content for two archaeological episodes of UNC-TV‘s Exploring North Carolina series; we initiated and co-organized the
      Archaeology Days program at NC Museum of Natural Sciences which attracted over 8,000 visitors in two days; and we are currently
      creating an online workshop and a digital resource library for teachers (in collaboration with Learn NC). This project is named after the
      Hardaway site, the oldest excavated human settlement in North Carolina.

223
      Helping Families Build Assets Researchers at the Center for Urban and Regional Studies worked with several groups, including the                            x
      Corporation for Enterprise Development, the N.C. Department of Labor and the N.C. Division of Community Assistance, as well as
      members of the Individual Development Account (IDA) and Asset-Building Collaborative of North Carolina and 11 local IDA programs
      across the state. This project included both a process and impact evaluation of the two IDA demonstration programs in North Carolina.
      Results and recommendations were provided to state policy makers and local program managers in order to improve the implementation
      and expansion of IDA programs statewide. (IDAs are matched savings accounts that enable low-income American families to save, build
      assets and enter the financial mainstream.)
224
      Helping Paws (Campus Y) is a student program committed to raising awareness on animal rights issue, increasing member and                                   x
      community involvement, teaching about proper animal care and continuing volunteer and fundraising efforts for animal shelters, wildlife
225   centers and animal rights organizations.
                                                                 DRAFT UNC Tomorrow Existing Programs Summary List

                                                                             A                                                                         B    C   D   E     F     G
      Program/Activity Title                                                                                                                           GR A PE ETCD       H     E
 1                                                                                                                                                      4.1 4.2 4.3 4.4   4.5   4.6
      Helping Youth by Providing Enrichment (HYPE) (Campus Y) is a student program which provides social, cultural and educational                              x   x
      experiences for children living in Chapel Hill-Carrboro low-income, public housing communities. In addition to serving as tutors, playmates,
      and mentors, members engage in education advocacy.
226
      Hickory Metropolitan Higher Education Center The Hickory-Morganton metropolitan area is the largest in the state without a university.            x       x   x      x
      In fact, there is not a public university closer than about an hour‘s drive of Hickory. In 2002, the leadership of Hickory created the Hickory
      Metropolitan Higher Education Center — a virtual institution of higher education. The HMHEC is an educational consortium among several
      N.C. universities and colleges that assists students who have completed their initial two years of college courses in earning degrees by
      enrolling them in part-time classes. Graduate degree programs are also available. In 2005, UNC-Chapel Hill‘s Office of Economic and
      Business Development announced a partnership with the HMHEC to offer undergraduate, graduate and nondegree programs at the center
      and to promote the university‘s distance-learning programs and online courses there. Since that time the following activities, among others,
      have occurred in HMHEC: training of nearly 40 local officials at HMHEC in the essentials of economic development by School of
      Government faculty and staff; strong enrollments in training provided by the Northwest AHEC; training in the A Su Salud program; two
      college fairs; and publicity in the seven-county Hickory service area for several Carolina online certificate and masters programs — a
      graduate certificate in technology and communication by the School of Journalism, a certificate program in Community Preparedness and
      Disaster Management through the School of Public Health and also an Executive MPH and MHA degrees.

227
      High School Resource Allocation Project (HSRA) was begun in September 2006 as a collaboration between the State Board of                                  x
      Education, the NC Department of Public Instruction and a visiting professor to the School of Education, now in the Department of Public
      Policy. This ongoing statewide effort conducted audits of high schools in all 115 NC school districts. By examining student achievement,
      researchers identified high schools that have succeeded with struggling students. Then, in data on teacher backgrounds and spending
      patterns were examined to determine the links between specific types of expenditures and resources and student outcomes. The effort
      provides an unparalleled database for focusing resources in the most efficient ways to affect student achievement.

228
      High-Speed Internet Connectivity in Distressed Urban Areas This Center for Urban and Regional Studies project evaluated the factors                           x
      that deny significant portions of the urban population in four North Carolina cities (Charlotte, Durham, Asheville and Wilmington) from
      participating fully in the ―knowledge economy.‖ By developing a better understanding of these factors, this project enabled local and state
      policymakers to be better equipped to develop programs and target resources to improve high-speed internet access among these urban
      populations, in particular those living and running small businesses in economically distressed neighborhoods.

229
                                                                DRAFT UNC Tomorrow Existing Programs Summary List

                                                                            A                                                                          B    C   D   E     F     G
      Program/Activity Title                                                                                                                           GR A PE ETCD       H     E
 1                                                                                                                                                      4.1 4.2 4.3 4.4   4.5   4.6
      Highway Safety Research Center For more than 40 years, the UNC Highway Safety Research Center has conducted interdisciplinary                                 x      x
      research aimed at reducing deaths, injuries and related societal costs of roadway crashes. The center has been a leading research institute
      that has helped shape the field of transportation safety. In terms of miles driven, motor-vehicle related deaths in the United States are only
      one-third as likely as they were 30 years ago. Despite such progress, between 40,000 and 43,000 deaths still occur on U.S. highways every
      year. The Highway Safety Research driver licensing system reduces hospitalizations and medical costs for young drivers. The state‘s
      graduated driver licensing (GDL) system has reduced hospitalizations and resulting hospital costs by about one-third for 16-year-old drivers.
      In the 46 months after North Carolina started GDL, hospitalizations of 16-year-old drivers declined by 36.5 percent and, consequently,
      hospital costs for these young drivers dropped by 31.2 percent, or $650,000 per year. The GDL system places restrictions on young drivers
      that limit their exposure to high-risk driving situations, such as driving during nighttime hours and driving with multiple passengers, while
      they are still adjusting to the complexities involved in driving. GDL programs have been implemented in 40 states and the District of
      Columbia. North Carolina‘s program was adopted on Dec. 1, 1997, making the state the second to implement the system. A Highway
      Safety Research Center study published in 2001, based on motor vehicle crash data, showed that young drivers have been involved in
      fewer crashes since GDL was implemented in the state. This previous study, published in the Journal of the American Medical Association,
      also showed a 57 percent drop in fatal accidents involving 16-year-old drivers.

230
      Honduran Health Alliance The Honduran Health Alliance is an international alliance of organizations working together in the areas of              x           x      x
      education, capacity building, health and development. Member groups are dedicated to common ideals of cooperation and partnership
      coupled with self-determination to facilitate our on-going work. The current focus of our work is promoting women's health and community
      development.
231
      HOPE (Health, Opportunities, Partnerships, Empowerment) Works (Center for Health Promotion and Disease Prevention) The concept                                x      x
      of hope from the field of positive psychology offers a framework for health behavior change that highlights the importance of enhancing
      participants‘ ability to envision, act on, and achieve goals that will lead to the desired health and life changes. HOPE Works seeks to
      increase hope among participants by addressing obesity within the context of social and economic determinants of health (education,
      poverty, employment) among low-income and minority women in two rural counties in NC. HOPE Works uses a community based
      participatory research approach designed with the HPDP Community Advisory Committee, and is implemented by Community Coordinators
      who work closely with HPDP HOPE Works staff. Local community members serve as HOPE Circle Leaders and receive training to lead bi-
      monthly HOPE Circles of 10 to 12 low-income, overweight women. HOPE circle sessions provide social support, teach strategies for weight
      management, and help women set goals for reaching health and economic/educational objectives. Participants receive monthly newsletters
      that provide individualized health information and strategies to achieve targeted behavior changes as well as the goals women set for health
      and life improvement. Community-wide events and interventions, organized and implemented by the Community Advisory Committee
      (CAC) and the Community Coordinators in conjunction with county Healthy Carolinians groups, foster community support. A rigorous
      evaluation will assess the program‘s effects on HOPE Works participants followed over one year as well as overall change in community
      health indicators over the 5-year project period. Evaluation methods include focus groups, interviews, pre and post written surveys and pre
      and post random community surveys. Two HOPE Works spin-off projects, Seeds of HOPE and Threads of HOPE, address economic
      empowerment through community-led strategic planning and the development of a micro-enterprise business.



232
      HOPE (see Hunger and Homelessness Outreach Program)
233
                                                                 DRAFT UNC Tomorrow Existing Programs Summary List

                                                                             A                                                                           B    C   D   E     F     G
      Program/Activity Title                                                                                                                             GR A PE ETCD       H     E
 1                                                                                                                                                        4.1 4.2 4.3 4.4   4.5   4.6
      Housing and Community Economic and Real Estate Development Workshop (Department of City and Regional Planning) Application                                      x
      workshops in the area of economic development, community development, real estate, transportation, land use and the environment enable
      students to hone skills attained in other coursework and to generate useful analyses, plans and recommendations to public and non-profit
      clients, thereby providing community engagement and valuable service to the state.
234
      HPDP (see Center for Health Promotion and Disease Prevention)
235
      HPYE (see Helping Youth by Providing Enrichment)
236
      HSRA (see High School Resource Allocation Project)
237
      Hubbard Program The Program on Aging in the School of Medicine offers the Hubbard Program as a training opportunity for students from                           x      x
      multiple disciplines to practice collaboratively in the care of its older patients. Through weekly home visits with patients and case conference
      meetings, advanced trainees in family medicine, pharmacy, occupational therapy, social workers and nurses gain knowledge and skills in
      collaborative interdisciplinary practice while providing care to frail, older patients. The Hubbard team provides a team assessment and then
      formulates a set of prioritized recommendations that are implemented by the primary-care providers and others involved in the ongoing care
      of the patient.
238
      Hubert H. Humphrey Fellowship Program The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill participates in the Hubert H. Humphrey                        x   x              x
      program, a U.S. Department of State funded program geared towards developing leaders for a global society. The Hubert H. Humphrey
      Fellowship Program provides a year of professional enrichment in the United States for experienced professionals from designated
      countries around the world. Fellows are selected based on their potential for leadership and their commitment to public service in either the
      public or private sector. At UNC the Fellows take graduate classes in the College of Arts and Sciences, the Kenan-Flagler Business
      School, and schools of Government, Law, and Public Health to learn about effective polices in their respective fields. The Fellows also
      receive leadership development training, participate in professional internships that respond to their long-term career goals, and consult with
      leaders from businesses, government agencies and nonprofit organizations. By providing these professionals with a shared experience of
      society, culture, and current approaches to the fields in which they work, the program provides a basis for establishing long-lasting
      productive partnerships and relationships between U.S. professionals and their colleagues from other countries.

239
      Hunger and Homelessness Outreach Program (HOPE) (Campus Y) is a social activist, volunteer organization that allows students to                                 x
      confront homelessness issues facing both the campus and the larger community.
240
      iBiblio is one of the world's first Web sites and largest digital libraries. As a way to share and support free software, Ibibio has grown to           x       x
      host more than 2,000 non-software related projects. From Project Gutenberg (the famous free book archive) to etree.org (where fans of
      tape-friendly bands share concert music); from charities and non-profits both in North Carolina and worldwide (notably those of the Tibetan
      government) to video documentaries of folk practice; and from educational sites to those of odd amusements, ibiblio.org typically serves
      more than 16 million requests for information per day. In addition to its Web-based services, ibiblio.org is involved in Internet2 projects, 3-D
      environments and video archiving and supports NASA educational videos and the streaming of seven not-for-profit radio stations. ibiblio.org
      is also involved in free software development directly with several local projects as well as leadership in the Linux Documentation Project.

241
242 ICV Study (see Internet Cigarette Vendors Study)
      IDOC (see InterDisciplinary Obesity Center)
243
244 IE (see Institute for the Environment)
                                                                   DRAFT UNC Tomorrow Existing Programs Summary List

                                                                               A                                                                             B   C   D    E     F     G
      Program/Activity Title                                                                                                                                 GR A PE ETCD       H     E
 1                                                                                                                                                            4.1 4.2 4.3 4.4   4.5   4.6
      IHCC (see Interdisciplinary Health Communication Center)
245
246 ILAS (see Institute for Latin American Studies)
      Impact Awards for Graduate Students These awards recognize and encourage graduate students whose research is making a difference                           x        x      x
      to our state. Impact Award winners, selected by a faculty review committee, present their research, receive a cash award and are
      recognized at the Annual Graduate Student Recognition Event. The research can have a direct impact on the citizens of North Carolina
      (and beyond) or a more indirect impact through new knowledge or insights gained, educational, economic, health, social and cultural or
      environmental effects that will be derived from the research endeavor. Projects have included research on issues related to education,
      economic development, environmental issues, health and social services. One graduate student worked with the North Carolina Rural
      Center for Economic Development to research and develop a new economic disaster response program called R2R or Resources to
      Recover. This program is aimed at connecting nonprofit, faith-based organizations to the state‘s workforce development system in an effort
      to respond to economic disasters, such as the closure of the Pillowtex plant in Cabarrus County in 2003.

247
      Improving the Care of Acutely Ill Elders works to improve the health of North Carolina‘s elderly population by bringing education and                                      x
      training in geriatric care to nurses in rural or underserved areas is the goal of a new partnership between the School of Nursing and the N.C.
      Area Health Education Centers (AHEC) program. In August 2006, the program launched simultaneously in two rural/underserved regions of
      North Carolina, including a five-county area where, according to U.S. census data, the poverty rate is 20.4 percent for persons aged 65
      years and older. The state average for this age group is 13.7 percent. School of Nursing faculty will teach two AHEC nurses from each area
      how to conduct the program workshops and the geriatric clinical simulations. The AHEC nurses will then lead continuing education
      programs in their area. AHEC will provide the nurses with access to state-of-the-art computerized mannequins for the clinical simulations.

248
      Information Services To The Public UNC‘s libraries most recently ranked 17th among North America‘s 113 leading academic research                           x   x    x
      libraries. The University Library uses its collections, services, and expertise to support inquiry and learning for all North Carolinians. During
      fiscal year 2005-2006, 19 percent of library loans were to individuals not affiliated with the university. Of the 32,000 interlibrary loans that the
      University Library (excluding Health Sciences and Law libraries) filled last year, 50 percent were for readers elsewhere in North Carolina,
      with an additional 16 percent to other readers in the southeast region. Reference librarians provide services to students and faculty at other
      universities; K-12 students, educators, and home-schoolers; journalists; businesses and small business owners; state agencies; and
      others. The library‘s North Carolina Collection (NCC) is the country‘s largest collection of materials about the Tar Heel state and serves as
      the state‘s primary historical collection.

249
      Injury Prevention Research Center (UNC IPRC) Founded in 1987, the University of North Carolina Injury Prevention Research Center                           x        x      x
      (UNC IPRC) is one of 12 "Centers of Excellence" funded by the National Center for Injury Prevention and Control, Centers for Disease
      Control and Prevention. The Center's mission is to build the field of injury prevention and control through a combination of interdisciplinary
      scholarly approaches to research, intervention, and evaluation as well as through the training of the next generation of researchers and
      practitioners. Now in its 20th year of operation, the UNC IPRC is proud of it's accomplishments as a mature and highly productive Center
      and strives to continue affecting change at the state, national, and international level.

250
                                                                  DRAFT UNC Tomorrow Existing Programs Summary List

                                                                              A                                                                         B   C   D    E     F     G
      Program/Activity Title                                                                                                                            GR A PE ETCD       H     E
 1                                                                                                                                                       4.1 4.2 4.3 4.4   4.5   4.6
      INSPIRE is a science outreach student organization that was founded in 2002 and has been organized and run by UNC undergraduates                          x
      every spring and fall semester since, with a current faculty adviser in the College of Arts and Sciences. The mission of the program is to
      provide K-12 teachers with enthusiastic undergraduate volunteers to help teach science in their classrooms. In addition to providing this
      service to the community, the program also exposes undergraduates to the current state of science education in North Carolina public
      schools, and encourages their consideration of science teaching careers. Each semester, 30 to 40 undergraduates are partnered with
      participating K-12 teachers in the community (primarily Chapel Hill, Orange County and Durham public schools), and each spends two to
      three hours per week in the classroom for 10 weeks. Each paired teacher and INSPIRE volunteer negotiate the nature of this partnership to
      best serve the teacher‘s needs. Each student keeps a log of weekly activities on the INSPIRE blackboard site and teacher evaluations are
      collected at the end each semester. The response from teachers has been overwhelmingly positive. To date, more than 250 students have
      participated in the program, logging more than 5,000 hours in the classroom.

251
      Institute for Aging The North Carolina General Assembly created the Institute on Aging in August 1996, placed it under the general                                    x
      umbrella of the 16-campus University of North Carolina System and based it at the UNC-Chapel Hill campus. The Institute's mission is to
      enhance the well-being of older people in North Carolina by fostering state-wide collaboration in research, education, and service. Its
      mandate is to promote collaborative applied and basic gerontological research, develop innovative programs of interdisciplinary
      gerontological education and practice and provide state-of-the-art information to policy makers, program managers, service providers,
      clinicians, and the general public.
252
      Institute for Defense and Business, incubated at the Kenan Institute, brings U.S. military and private sector leaders together to pursue                       x
      applied research and educational programs that improve the military‘s ability to manage today‘s complex war and peace-keeping demands.
      The Institute focuses on the imperative need to increase and sustain the interchange of information between the U.S. military and the
      private sector. It is dedicated to furthering its goals through a unique approach combining scholarly and applied research and education.
      While military and business leaders have vastly different operating constraints and objectives, they can often meet their respective
      objectives through similar business practices and technologies. Bringing them together is valuable to both - the military learns of the most
      recent and dynamic business practices, and the private sector gains a better understanding of the military's needs, which are evolving and
      are more likely to make use of commercial products, services, and solutions.

253
      Institute for Economic Development (Department of City and Regional Planning) The primary objective of the economic development                                x
      focus area is to provide students with the knowledge and know-how needed to perform at the cutting edge of economic development
      practice in this rapidly changing field. We also emphasize providing a solid conceptual and methodological foundation of how and why the
      economies of communities and regions change. With this foundation the economic development professional can continue to grow and
      learn over a lifelong career. The Institute sponsors in-service training and technical assistance activities on urban, rural, and international
      economic development. Graduate students are involved in these activities and receive support through research assistantships and
      internships.
254
                                                                  DRAFT UNC Tomorrow Existing Programs Summary List

                                                                              A                                                                           B    C   D   E     F     G
      Program/Activity Title                                                                                                                              GR A PE ETCD       H     E
 1                                                                                                                                                         4.1 4.2 4.3 4.4   4.5   4.6
      Institute for Global Health and Infectious Diseases UNC-Chapel Hill is among a small minority of public and private universities with                x                  x
      extensive and long-standing strength in global health, including broad and important areas, such as nutrition, water, and infectious
      diseases. The new Institute is seen as a way to catalyze this amazing depth and breadth of global health research, education and service
      being done across UNC and around the world, making the work even stronger and deeper. The Office of Global Health in the UNC School
      of Public Health (OGH) has been playing a central coordinating role for global health across campus, particularly through funding from the
      Fogarty International Center and the Framework Program in Global Health grant that the OGH received. The new Institute will expand on
      these efforts and provide strong institutional support for sustainability.

255
      Institute for Latin American Studies (ILAS) is dedicated to the pursuit of knowledge of the Latin American experience in the Western                 x
      Hemisphere. It builds on a long-standing and distinguished tradition of scholarly interest in Latin America, an interest that embraces the
      diverse regions that make up Latin America, including Mexico and Central America, South America, and the Caribbean.
256
      Institute for Outdoor Drama (IOD) Established in 1963, The Institute of Outdoor Drama is a public service agency in the College of Arts                          x
      and Sciences of The University of North Carolina in Chapel Hill. It is the only organization in the U.S. providing national leadership in
      fostering artistic and managerial excellence and expansion of the outdoor drama movement through training, research and advisory
      programs, and it serves as a national clearinghouse for more than 120 constituent theatre companies across the nation. The outdoor
      historical dramas are original plays, often with music and dance, based on significant events and performed in amphitheatres located where
      the events actually occurred. Born in North Carolina, uniquely American and epic in scope, they focus on the people who shaped the
      heritage of the country, preserving and bearing witness to the great things we've accomplished as a state and nation. They are part of the
      travel and tourism industry, designed to attract families on vacation.

257
      Institute for Pharmacogenomics and Individualized Therapy (IPIT) By translating genetic discoveries into new ways to diagnose and                    x   x              x
      treat disease, a new research institute launched at UNC will make drugs safer and more effective and speed laboratory discoveries to
      physicians and patients. The Institute for Pharmacogenomics and Individualized Therapy (IPIT), based at the UNC School of Pharmacy,
      brings together researchers and clinicians across Carolina to create therapies and treatments for patients suffering from a wide variety of
      conditions. The institute initially will partner with the UNC Lineberger Comprehensive Cancer Center to focus on cancer therapy, with
      planned expansion into cardiovascular disease, psychiatric disorders and global health. The results will have both economic and health
      benefits. Pharmacogenomics is a new field exploring how information in our genes influences our response to drugs. It involves integrating
      pharmacology with modern advances in genome analysis. The institute‘s goal is to fully integrate personalized medicine into medical
      practice by providing tools and tests for physicians to identify patients at risk for adverse reactions or those who are likely to benefit from a
      particular treatment. Institute researchers will also identify drug targets, such as genetic markers in tumor cells, to guide development of
      new drugs. IPIT will house one of 10 research centers that form the National Institutes of Health‘s Pharmacogenomics Research Network.
      The institute‘s researchers also lead the Pharmacogenomics for Every Nation Initiative, a global effort to help countries make better
      informed public health decisions using genetic information.


258
                                                                 DRAFT UNC Tomorrow Existing Programs Summary List

                                                                             A                                                                         B    C   D   E     F     G
      Program/Activity Title                                                                                                                           GR A PE ETCD       H     E
 1                                                                                                                                                      4.1 4.2 4.3 4.4   4.5   4.6
      Institute for Sustainable Development (Center for Global Initiatives) is a partnership of several local entities interested in sustainability,    x           x            x
      including the Center for Global Initiatives, the Chapel Hill-Carrboro Chamber of Commerce, the Duke Center for International Development,
      the Fenwick Foundation, the Foundation for a Sustainable Community, North Carolina Central University Chancellor‘s Office and the UNC
      School of Social Work. Through networking events, seminars, workshops and the development of a sustainability metric, the Institute
      connects students and faculty to local and global community development organizations and to businesses in the greater Triangle
      community who are engaged in sustainable development work both locally and globally.

259
      Institute for the Environment (IE) The UNC Institute for the Environment is leading UNC‘s world-renowned environmental community in                           x            x
      developing solutions to critical challenges. The Institute carries out its public service mission in several ways, including through its
      Environmental Resource Program, which promotes environmental stewardship and public health through education, research and
      community service, and through various field sites, at which students and faculty work with communities to examine environmental issues
      of local concern. The One North Carolina Naturally program provides a state-wide database and decision support tool for conservation and
      planning. An upcoming project is the report ―Energy and Environment in North Carolina.‖ The report, to be released this summer, would
      assess all known UNC system energy and environment programs and would provide thoughts, from faculty leaders' perspectives, about
      how the Carolina and the system could assist all sectors of the state with this critical issue.

260
      Institute of Marine Sciences Since the 1940s, scientists at UNC‘s Institute of Marine Sciences in Morehead City have served North                                          x
      Carolina by addressing important questions related to the nature, use, development, protection and enhancement of coastal marine
      resources. Its work includes the Neuse River Monitoring and Modeling Project on the Neuse River, which has been designated as one of
      the nation‘s 20 most pollution-endangered rivers. Marine Science researchers are involved in the South East Atlantic Coastal Observing
      System (SEA COOS) and the South Atlantic Bight Synoptic Offshore Observational Network (SABSOON) to collect, manage and
      disseminate critical information about coastal oceanic and atmospheric interactions, which enhances understanding of environmental and
      meteorological impacts on the ocean and coastal resources. In North Carolina, SEACOOS utilizes an instrumentation buoy off of Cape
      Lookout Shoals and a high-frequency radar system along the Outer Banks.
261
      Interdisciplinary Health Communication Center (IHCC) Health communication is a potent tool for improving the public‘s health. To be               x   x              x
      most effective, health communication builds on expertise from many disciplines. UNC has leading programs in journalism and mass
      communication, public health, information and library science, psychology and allied fields that are working together to build a new science
      of health communication. The IHC initiative at UNC fosters synergy among these disciplines that makes this a uniquely interdisciplinary
      place to conduct research and receive graduate training in health communication. The mission of IHCC is to pioneer innovative approaches
      to health communication through graduate education, local and global outreach, and its priority research areas (e-health and health
      informatics, message design and effects, and medical decision making). In 2007 IHCC established a graduate Certificate in Interdisciplinary
      Health Communication, the first health communication certificate in the country specifically focusing on interdisciplinary approaches. Eight
      graduate students from 4 departments are enrolled in the program as it starts its first year and 17 students have enrolled in the core
      theories and methods course.
262
                                                                  DRAFT UNC Tomorrow Existing Programs Summary List

                                                                              A                                                                          B    C   D   E     F     G
      Program/Activity Title                                                                                                                             GR A PE ETCD       H     E
 1                                                                                                                                                        4.1 4.2 4.3 4.4   4.5   4.6
      InterDisciplinary Obesity Center (IDOC) The escalating prevalence of obesity and its consequences is a serious and unresolved                                          x
      challenge. Obesity prevention and treatment have had limited success to date, in part because interventions have focused on isolated
      factors and adopted a "one size fits all" approach. We hypothesize that obesity must be addressed within a complex, individualized system
      of proximate and distal biological and environmental factors using an intensive interdisciplinary approach. To be effective, such an approach
      requires coalescing scientists and practitioners who specialize in obesity from a broad range of perspectives and providing them with a
      fertile environment and infrastructure to synergize their expertise with that of investigators from other key disciplines. The long-term goal of
      this interdisciplinary strategy is to define effective interventions for prevention and treatment of obesity. Our vision is to build on the
      collaborative environment at UNC to involve the participation of departments that cross the Schools of Public Health and Medicine, Allied
      Health Sciences, and Arts and Sciences, and NIH-funded centers that are addressing the obesity epidemic, including the Clinical Nutrition
      Research Center, Carolina Population Center, the Center for Environmental Health Sciences, and the Lineberger Cancer Center.

263
      International Health Forum The School of Medicine has a long and distinguished history of international activity. Throughout the School's           x                  x
      fifty years as four-year institution, faculty members and students have studied the impact of global health and disease upon their own
      interests and those of their current and future patients. They have collaborated with research colleagues in foreign institutions, exchanged
      teaching and learning settings with peers in other countries, and experienced firsthand the difficulties and rewards of providing medical
      care, conducting research and studying medicine under conditions far different from those at home, but conditions which provide valuable
      insight into North Carolina's health care needs. Each year between 30 and 40 School of Medicine students travel abroad for international
      projects and electives. Many of these projects are arranged individually by students with the help of faculty mentors. Other students
      participate in programs that have been designed by School of Medicine faculty and cooperating colleagues abroad.

264
      International Social Studies Project is designed to serve public school teachers and pre-service teachers as well as school districts in            x       x
      their need for up to date information about those areas of the world that change faster than school textbooks. We designed and delivered
      professional development workshops in school districts and at professional conferences for social studies teachers. We also developed
      arts based lessons for delivery in schools that included plays for school groups and provided teaching packets to teachers who brought their
      classes to the plays that were performed by professional actors . We had workshops on Africa, South America, the Middle East, Asia and
      Europe. We delivered workshops across North Carolina in 12 counties. Through our workshops at professional conferences, 37 North
      Carolina counties were served.
265
      Internet Cigarette Vendors (ICV) Study Since 1999, the ICV study has been examining the sales and marketing practices of Internet                                      x
      Cigarette Vendors (ICVs) and their impact on public health and policy issues such as cigarette excise tax evasion and youth access
      prevention, as well as attempting to learn more about how Internet vendors of all illicit materials can be better regulated. Using state of the
      art techniques, the study has identified, catalogued, archived, and analyzed more than 2800 ICV websites since its inception.

266
      IOD (see Institute for Outdoor Drama)
267
      IPIT (see Institute for Pharmacogenomics and Individualized Therapy)
268
                                                                 DRAFT UNC Tomorrow Existing Programs Summary List

                                                                             A                                                                        B    C   D   E     F     G
      Program/Activity Title                                                                                                                          GR A PE ETCD       H     E
 1                                                                                                                                                     4.1 4.2 4.3 4.4   4.5   4.6
      Joint Plan for Dentistry in North Carolina involves a joint initiative between UNC-Chapel Hill and East Carolina University to address the           x              x
      increase and distribution of the dental work force statewide and North Carolina citizens' access to dental care. The plan provides for the
      construction of a new Dental Sciences Building at UNC-Chapel Hill focusing on enhancing opportunities in education, service and patient-
      centered research, and an increase in DDS class size from 81 to up to 100. The plan also provides for the creation of a new dental school
      (DDS class size: 50) at East Carolina University and service-learning centers affiliated with ECU within underserved communities statewide.

269
      Jordan Institute for Families is the research, training and technical assistance arm of the School of Social Work. The Institute is an                       x      x
      example of how a school includes the community voice in institutional planning. Addressing family issues across the lifespan, the Jordan
      Institute brings together experts -- including families themselves -- to develop and test policies and practices that strengthen families and
      engage communities. The School of Social Work provides extensive training and technical assistance through the Jordan Institute.
      Community partners can access a list of programs in their area through an interactive map on the School‘s website. These projects provide
      technical assistance, training, and information to help families become healthy and stable.

270
      Journal of World Health and Population Best practices, policy and innovations in the administration of healthcare in developing                  x                  x
      communities and countries. For administrators, academics, researchers and policy leaders. Includes peer reviewed research papers.
271
      K.I. Asia (see Kenan Institute Asia)
272
      Kellogg Foundation Engaged Institutions Initiative (School of Public Health) The SPH is one of 12 U.S. schools and graduate                                  x      x
      programs of public health (chosen among 26 schools that applied) selected in January 2006 to participate in the Engaged Institutions
      Initiative funded by the W.K. Kellogg Foundation. The initiative seeks to support and promote the sustained efforts of institutions of higher
      education working in partnership with communities to eliminate racial and ethnic health disparities. As part of this initiative, we have
      developed a team that includes school faculty and students, university officials, state and local representatives and community members
      who will be working to develop an action plan for becoming increasingly engaged in community activities and research to eliminate health
      disparities. Consultants will be sent to assist the team throughout the year-long initiative.

273
      Kellogg Health Scholars Program The goal of the Health Scholars Program is to reduce and eliminate health disparities by developing                  x       x      x
      young leaders who participate in community-based participatory research (CBPR). CBPR is a collaborative approach through which
      research endeavors are chosen based on the needs of a community. It aims to combine academic study with social and policy initiatives
      that will improve health outcomes. The University of North Carolina School of Public Health is one of eight national training sites for the
      program. The UNC Center for Health Promotion and Disease Prevention, a research center with expertise in community research,
      administers the UNC grant. Kellogg Health Scholars at UNC become involved in any number of community-based initiatives to promote
      individual wellness, community competence and social change.
274
                                                                  DRAFT UNC Tomorrow Existing Programs Summary List

                                                                              A                                                                          B    C   D   E     F     G
      Program/Activity Title                                                                                                                             GR A PE ETCD       H     E
 1                                                                                                                                                        4.1 4.2 4.3 4.4   4.5   4.6
      Kenan Institute Asia (K.I. Asia) strives to build sustainable competitiveness in Thailand and the Greater Mekong Sub-region. The Institute          x           x            x
      accomplishes this mission of economic, social and environmental sustainability by developing multi-sector partnerships based on true
      development needs and mutual benefit through the cooperation of universities, government agencies, communities and the private sector.
      Key beneficiaries of the Institute include: entrepreneurs and small business managers – raising the management capacity to operate
      responsibly and profitably; corporations – training corporate executives in strategic corporate citizenship and partnering with them to design
      and manage corporate social responsibility programs; communities and youth – assisting communities to develop sustainably and working
      with teachers and young people to develop a new generation of independent thinkers and effective socially responsible leaders.

275
      Kenan Institute for Private Enterprise The Kenan Institute offers knowledge, networks and solutions that help companies, communities                x           x
      and countries manage the competitive challenges they face. The Institute acts as a hub for collaboration among business, government,
      academia and civil society worldwide, helping clients and partners translate the latest knowledge into practical solutions and mutually
      beneficial results. The Institute and its centers work on projects that help: 1) Businesses turn obstacles into opportunity, providing strategic
      help in visioning and business process strategy and management, from logistics systems to new market strategy, trends forecasting to
      executive education 2) Countries and communities identify their competitive strengths and develop innovative strategies and lasting
      partnerships to achieve their goals.
276
      Kenan Institute Youth Initiative provides help to improve the academic performance and overall life chances of disadvantaged public                         x
      school students in Asheville, Kinston, Pembroke and Siler City, NC, through academic and cultural enrichment programs. The initiative, with
      funding from the Z. Smith Reynolds Foundation, expands the Center's Durham Scholars Program, originally funded by the W.R. Kenan Jr.
277   Charitable Trust.
      Kenan-Flagler and Tsinghua University Center for Logistics and Digital Strategy The Kenan Institute's Center for Logistics and Digital              x           x
      Strategy (CLDS) and Tsinghua University have recently established the Kenan-Tsinghua Center For Logistics And Economic Development,
      a joint research center in logistics. Tsinghua University is considered the MIT of China and the partnership positions both organizations as
      leaders in logistics for emerging global markets. The joint Center will focus on logistics and global supply-chain management research that
      enhances trade between the United States and China, supports economic development and addresses issues such as offshore outsourcing.

278
      Kenan-Flagler Leadership/Management Training Program and Urban Investment Strategies Center (UISC) focusing on K-12                                         x   x
      education The Kenan-Flagler Business School and the Kenan Institute‘s Urban Investment Strategies Center (UISC) are delivering a
      leadership/management training program for priority high schools. The first ―class‖ of school leadership has completed the training, and a
      second set of schools has been selected for the next round. The Kenan Institute is working with Edenton/Chowan education, civic and
      business leadership to revitalize K-12 education. UISC is leading the development of a lab school in partnership with Union Baptist Church
      in Durham as an innovative model of 21st century education. In partnership with Golden LEAF Foundation, N.C. New Schools Project,
      NCDPI, NC REAL and others, Kenan-Flagler is developing a model for a pilot K-20 and beyond entrepreneurship education initiative.

279
      KESMM (see Kids Eating Smart and Moving More)
280
      Kids Eating Smart and Moving More (KESMM) (Center for Health Promotion and Disease Prevention) The purpose of this program is to                                       x
      provide brief, evidence-based assessment and counseling tools to help primary care practices identify and treat childhood overweight and
      to evaluate the usefulness of the approach when offered by providers, by case managers / trained health advisors and by both together.
      This program is designed for use in children of all ages, but the study is testing the approaches for families of kids receiving Medicaid or NC
281   Health Choice aged 3-8 years in 24 selected practices in NC.
                                                                DRAFT UNC Tomorrow Existing Programs Summary List

                                                                            A                                                                          B    C   D   E     F     G
      Program/Activity Title                                                                                                                           GR A PE ETCD       H     E
 1                                                                                                                                                      4.1 4.2 4.3 4.4   4.5   4.6
      Kings College Initiatives UNC-Chapel Hill undergraduates have studied abroad at King's College since 2002, and the two universities               x   x
      began a formal exchange program for undergraduates in 2004. In 2005, the collaboration expanded to provide opportunities for graduate
      students and for faculty. Graduate students at both institutions benefit from having access to distinguished faculty advisers in both the
      United States and the United Kingdom. UNC officials plan to expand the exchange further so that students eventually will be able to
      graduate with a joint degree from both institutions.
282
      LAL (see Lifelong Access Libraries)
283
      Latina/o Culture(s) Speakers' Series is sponsored by the UNC-Chapel Hill English Department and the College of Arts and Sciences. The             x           x
      Series, begun in fall 1999, is the first of its kind at UNC-CH. It is dedicated to exploring Latina/o Studies as an interdisciplinary endeavor
      that draws on, among other areas of inquiry, literary and cultural studies, visual culture studies, creative writing and performance studies,
      philosophy and aesthetics, history, sociology, comparative ethnic studies and postcolonial studies, Americas studies, and gender and
      sexuality studies. It has served to create dialogue between ethnic studies areas on campus. The Series has hosted creative writers and
      scholars addressing the intersections between Latina/o and African-American cultural production, between specifically Chicana/o and
      Native American Studies, and common ground (LatinAsia or AsiaLat Studies) between Latina/o Studies and Asian Diaspora Studies.

284
      Latina/o Studies Minor & Program is the first such program in Latina/o Studies in the Southeast of the United States. The Minor &                 x   x       x
      Program provides a unique and valuable set of educational experiences for this part of the country. The state of North Carolina has one of
      the highest percentage increases of Latinas/os or Hispanics in the nation. The program deals with cultural, socio-economic, and political
      issues pertinent to Latinas/os and non-Latinas/os and is both domestic and transnational in its scope. The program provides undergraduate
      and graduate students, faculty, and the greater community with valuable exposure to some of the most salient issues for Latina/o Studies
      as a rapidly expanding area of study and to the impact of these studies on awareness of crucial social and historical developments and on
      approaches to public policy formation, educational practices, governmental practices, law, health care, and the social responsibilities of the
      media and the arts.
285
      LC-MAST (see Leadership Center for Math and Science Teachers)
286
      Leadership Center for Math and Science Teachers (LC-MAST) funded by Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics (STEM),                             x
      is a partnership involving the UNC School of Education and the national Center for Teaching Quality and designed to help science and
      mathematics teachers to become nationally board certified.
287
288 LEAP (see Legal Education Advancement Program)
      LEARN NC (see Learners' and Educators' Assistance and Resource Network of North Carolina)
289
      Learners’ and Educators’ Assistance and Resource Network of North Carolina (LEARN NC) is a collaborative statewide network of                     x   x   x   x
      teachers and partners devoted to improving student performance and enhancing teacher proficiencies by creating and sharing high-quality
      teaching and learning resources via the World Wide Web. Offered free through the UNC School of Education, LEARN NC provides
      curriculum and instructional tools aligned with the state‘s Standard Course of Study and a virtual classroom of online courses for K-12
      students and teachers. LEARN NC has trained 30,000 teachers and others (as of 2000) in all 115 public school systems as well as charter
      schools, N.C.‘s Catholic Diocese and the N.C. Independent School Association. LEARN NC is also are very active in professional
      development courses for teachers.
290
                                                                DRAFT UNC Tomorrow Existing Programs Summary List

                                                                            A                                                                          B    C   D   E     F     G
      Program/Activity Title                                                                                                                           GR A PE ETCD       H     E
 1                                                                                                                                                      4.1 4.2 4.3 4.4   4.5   4.6
      Legal Education Advancement Program (LEAP) provides structured support for non-traditional and other students, including                              x
      underrepresented and first-generation-college students who are making the transition to the study of law, through an intensive three-day
      preorientation program and through structured study groups during the academic year.
291
      Lifelong Access Libraries (LAL) As the baby boom generation moves toward the retirement years, there is a need to create opportunities                x       x
      for these valuable citizens to continue to be active and civically engaged. The School of Information and Library Science (SILS) and the
      UNC Institute on Aging (IOA) are actively involved with a project called Lifelong Access Libraries (LAL) whose aim is to create a model for
      public libraries to support older adults in ways that facilitate learning, social connections, life planning and community engagement. The LAL
      project was created by the Americans for Libraries Council with a grant from Atlantic Philanthropies. In August 2007, SILS and IOA will host
      the second annual LAL Fellows Institute -- a week-long training for public librarians from across the country in how to plan, organize and
      deliver LAL programs in public libraries. The SILS/IOA team is also responsible for the evaluation of five LAL Centers of Excellence that are
      being identified by the Americans for Libraries Council. North Carolina has been identified as one of possible the Centers of Excellence. We
      are currently working with the NC Division of Aging and Adult Services to facilitate LAL initiatives in public libraries across the state.

292
      LINC (see Linking Immigrants to New Communities)
293
      Lineberger Comprehensive Cancer Center As part of the UNC system, the Center is the only public comprehensive cancer center for                       x       x      x
      the State and the people of North Carolina. Our mission is to reduce cancer occurrence and death in North Carolina and the nation through
      research, treatment, training and outreach. Center faculty treat cancer patients, conduct research into the causes of cancer, develop and
      direct statewide programs in cancer prevention and train future physicians, nurses, scientists, and public health professionals.


294
      Linking Immigrants to New Communities (LINC) (Campus Y) helps ease the transition of recent immigrants to the United States through               x           x
295 student interaction and raising awareness in the community.
      Local Elected Leaders Academy The School of Government, in partnership with the NC League of Municipalities and the NC Association                                   x
      of County Commissioners, created the Local Elected Leaders Academy in fall 2007. Through this new educational program, municipal and
      county elected officials will gain the knowledge and skills they need to lead and govern their communities in the 21st century. Three levels
      of programming are offered through the Local Elected Leaders Academy: (1)Offered in alternating years, the Essentials of County
      Government and Essentials of Municipal Government courses, held across the state, provide an introduction to North Carolina government;
      (2) Focused, in-depth courses provide knowledge and tools for elected officials to use in their own communities (e.g., WaterVision summit
      on May 22, 2008, in RTP); (3) Advanced programs will help leaders plan and implement strategies at the regional and statewide level.

296
      Making Choices is a recent project of the School of Social Work and its Jordan Institute, which developed this character education                        x   x
      curriculum for use in elementary schools. Funded by the U.S. Department of Education, the project encouraged school children to use
      language skills to express their feelings and consider alternative solutions, the goal being to help them make friends more easily and reduce
      social aggression and bullying. Designed as a school-based curriculum for students in kindergarten through fifth grade, Making Choices
      brings the latest research on child development into the classroom.
297
                                                               DRAFT UNC Tomorrow Existing Programs Summary List

                                                                           A                                                                       B    C   D   E     F     G
      Program/Activity Title                                                                                                                       GR A PE ETCD       H     E
 1                                                                                                                                                  4.1 4.2 4.3 4.4   4.5   4.6
      Malawi Dental Project (School of Dentistry) provides an experience for four dental students to go for nearly a month to provide much-         x       x          x
      needed dental care and oral health education in Malawi. The program's goals are the following: 1) Provide a cultural exchange between
      UNC students and Malawians. 2) Educate Malawian school-aged children about oral health and hygiene and about the HIV/AIDS epidemic
      and risks associated with the disease (ages 6-18). 3) Provide emergency, preventive and restorative care to those in need in the Lilongwe
      Hospital. The participating dental students are learning while delivering important services and will return better prepared to meet unmet
      health needs in their own communities. Related to this program, the School also sponsors outreach efforts in Mexico and Honduras

298
      Malawi-Carolina Summer Public Health Institute (Office of Global Health, School of Public Health) The third annual Malawi-UNC                 x                  x
      Summer Institute will be held in June 2008 at the University of Malawi College of Medicine in Blantyre. UNC has over 250 employees in
      Malawi conducting research and providing health care on nutrition and infectious diseases such as HIV and malaria.
299
      Management Academy for Public Health prepares teams of health professionals for new management challenges in community health.                            x      x
      Management Academy will build your skills in managing money, people, data and partnerships. Every team writes and presents a public
      health business plan designed to attack a key public health problem in your community.
300
301 MANO (see Mujeres Avanzando hacia Nuevas Oportunidades/Women Working Toward New Opportunities)
      Master’s for Experienced Teachers (MEDX) is a highly popular School of Education program which has a ten-year history of graduating                   x
      teacher leaders who stay in the classroom and serve as teacher leaders within their respective schools. The graduates return to their
      schools with new knowledge and experience, enriched and renewed as education professionals and empowered to work toward improving
      their schools and districts. Just since 2003, 231 career educators have graduated from the program. Most recently, 19 teachers graduated
      from a middle grades mathematics specialization. The teachers were from several counties in NC that were participants in an NSF-Funded
      Middle Math Project, of which the Center for Mathematics and Science Education was a subcontract. As part of their involvement with the
      grant, they were required to submit for their National Boards, so many in that cohort graduated with an M.Ed. in Middle Grades Math and
      their National Boards.
302
      Master’s for School Administrators – Off Campus program (MSA Flex) (School of Education) is designed to accommodate practicing                x   x
      educators who cannot or do not want to stop working to pursue their professional goal of becoming school-site administrators. This off-
      campus program is cohort based and is held in counties that request the program and have sufficient numbers of educators interested in
      becoming school administrators. It also utilizes face-to-face sessions at locations convenient to the students‘ regular work places and a
      variety of distance education activities (using Blackboard) that students access from their homes or from the schools in which they work.
      There are currently three operational off-campus cohorts: in Wake, Orange and Lee counties and in Alamance-Burlington. Past cohorts
      have been based in Alamance and Durham counties. Approximately 75 educators have graduated from the MSA FLEX who work in
      Durham, Orange, Nash-Rocky Mount, Forsyth, Wake, Alamance-Burlington, Chapel Hill-Carrboro, Nash-Rocky Mount, Pamlico, Lee, and
      Guilford counties.
303
      MEASURE Evaluation (Carolina Population Center) As a key component of the United States Agency for International Development's                x           x      x
      (USAID) Monitoring and Evaluation to Assess and Use REsults (MEASURE) framework, MEASURE Evaluation forges international
      partnerships in monitoring and evaluation, builds country capacity to produce and use quality health and population data, and strengthens
      health information systems. MEASURE Evaluation promotes a continuous cycle of data demand, collection, analysis and utilization to
      improve population and health systems.
304
305 MED (Medical Education Development Program)
                                                                  DRAFT UNC Tomorrow Existing Programs Summary List

                                                                              A                                                                            B    C   D   E     F     G
      Program/Activity Title                                                                                                                               GR A PE ETCD       H     E
 1                                                                                                                                                          4.1 4.2 4.3 4.4   4.5   4.6
      Media Law Handbook which was first published in 1992, is widely used by North Carolina journalists for whom it provides a ready                                   x
      reference to information about libel, privacy, access to public records and meetings, the journalist‘s privilege, copyright law, advertising
      regulation, and the North Carolina court system. The handbook‘s contents were researched and written by North Carolina lawyers and
      academicians, each of whom contributed the time and effort to compile a chapter. Together with Cathy Packer, a professor at the School of
      Journalism and Mass Communication, EGHS partners Amanda Martin and Hugh Stevens have edited and produced an updated edition
      (2007), published by the North Carolina Press Foundation and the School of Journalism and Mass Communication.

306
      Medical Education Development Program (MED) increases opportunities in the health professions for minority and disadvantaged                              x              x
      students through a structured summer curriculum at the level of professional education to increase the ability of advanced pre-professional
      candidates, especially those who are disadvantaged, to compete successfully for admission to health professional schools.

307
      Medical Journalism Program at the School of Journalism and Mass Communication communicates with citizens across the state about                           x       x      x     x
      important health and environmental issues through a nine-year collaboration with UNC-TV. Since 1998, student teams under the
      supervision of Dr. Tom Linden have prepared 17 six- to seven-minute reports on health and environmental issues that have been broadcast
      on ―North Carolina Now‖ on UNC-TV. Many of the master‘s projects and theses prepared by graduate students in our Medical Journalism
      Program have focused on health problems around the state. Students have prepared series of articles, radio and video reports on a
      multitude of health-related issues. These reports are all archived in the Park Library in the School of Journalism and Mass Communication.
      In addition, students in the science documentary television class have partnered with independent Chapel Hill producers and UNC-TV to
      produce a half-hour documentary on the Haw River that aired on UNC-TV in April 2001. One goal of the Medical Journalism Program is to
      provide a laboratory for learning for undergraduate and graduate students while communicating to a larger statewide audience.

308
      MEDX (see Master's for Experienced Teachers)
309
      Military History The Department of History in the College of Arts and Sciences offers graduate studies within the major field of military                 x       x
      history. Military history at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill is part of a collaborative program with Duke University. Four core
      courses provide students with a fundamental grounding in the field. Courses include an examination of classic works in military history,
      theory and the study of war and military affairs. Readings encompass several disciplines and genres, including sociology and political
      science, biography, and war and battle narratives.
310
      Millennium Village Project, a partnership of Carolina, Duke and Bennett College, aims to raise $1.5 million by June 2008 in the first                 x           x
      student-led sponsorship of a Millennium Village as a tangible way of demonstrating students‘ commitment to the international effort to
      eradicate extreme poverty. This is a unique opportunity to unite students, faculty, and community members to engage in an academic
      dialogue to critically assess and improve sustainable development strategies such as the Millennium Village model. We hope that the UNC-
      Duke-Bennett Millennium Village Project can set a precedent for the involvement of other universities, and ultimately create a generation of
      students committed to ending extreme poverty.
311
      Mini Medical School (School of Medicine) UNC Mini-Medical School, features renowned researchers from the UNC-CH School of                                 x              x
      Medicine addressing some of the latest developments in medical science. Participants need not have a background in science or medicine
      to enroll – just an interest in medicine and a healthy curiosity about the science behind it. The lecture series is specifically designed for non-
      medical people.
312
                                                                DRAFT UNC Tomorrow Existing Programs Summary List

                                                                            A                                                                          B   C   D    E     F     G
      Program/Activity Title                                                                                                                           GR A PE ETCD       H     E
 1                                                                                                                                                      4.1 4.2 4.3 4.4   4.5   4.6
      Minority Health Project (School of Public Health) The overall purpose of the Minority Health Project (MHP) is to improve the quality of                       x      x
      available data on racial and ethnic populations, to expand the capacity of minority-health researchers to conduct statistical research and
      develop research proposals, and to foster a network of researchers in minority health. Toward these goals, the Minority Health Project, in
      collaboration with other units in the University of North Carolina School of Public Health, the National Center for Health Statistics and the
      Association of Schools of Public Health, conducts educational programs including the Annual Summer Public Health Research Institute and
      Videoconference on Minority Health, provides information on research and sources of data on minority health, and maintains an extensive
      set of links to organizations at UNC-CH and elsewhere.
313
      Moore Undergraduate Research Apprentice Program (MURAP) fosters the entrance of talented students from diverse backgrounds into                      x
      graduate school and faculty positions within the humanities, social sciences, and fine arts in U.S. colleges and universities.

314
      Morehead Planetarium and Science Center The UNC Morehead Planetarium and Science Center informs and inspires the public about                        x   x    x            x
      the foundations and frontiers of scientific discovery. Through innovative educational experiences, Morehead engages the public and the
      University community in a forum for interpreting contemporary science. The DESTINY program at the Morehead Planetarium and Science
      Center is UNC-Chapel Hill‘s traveling science laboratory, taking the latest technology and teaching tools to N.C. schools using two custom-
      built buses. (See Delivering Edge-Cutting Science Technology and Internet Across North Carolina for Years to Come -- DESTINY).
315
      Morehead-Cain Scholars Program A $100 million gift from the Gordon and Mary Cain Foundation of Houston, Texas -- the largest                         x   x
      donation ever given in support of UNC – has expanded the number of Morehead Scholars as well as the Summer Enrichment Program and
      other enrichment opportunities at UNC-Chapel Hill. For more than half a century, the Morehead Foundation has enhanced the reputation
      and strength of Carolina by providing scholarships to future leaders.
316
      MSA Flex (see Master's for School Administrators)
317
      Mujeres Avanzando hacia Nuevas Oportunidades / Women Working Toward New Opportunities (MANO) MANO is a student                                           x    x
      organization that addresses the ESL and other pressing needs of non-native, primarily Spanish-speaking women in the Chapel Hill/Carrboro
      area. Students offer year-round classes twice a week at Carrboro Elementary School. Their objectives are to teach English skills based on
      the needs of each participant; provide childcare, tutoring and mentoring for children of participants during the classes; and serve as a
      valuable resource for the well-being of these families and their integration into the community. Another student organization, Building
      Opportunities through Language Development (BOLD), is the brother program of MANO and offers ESL classes for Spanish-speaking men.

318
319 MURAP (see Moore Undergraduate Research Apprentice Program)
320 NAP SACC (see Nutrition and Physical Activity Self-Assessment for Child Care)
      National Children’s Study is the largest long-term look at the effects of social, behavioral, biological, community and environmental factors                 x      x
      on human health and development ever conducted in the U.S. Study activities will begin in seven Vanguard Sites, including Duplin County,
      in summer 2008. A team of researchers from CPC/UNC, Duke University, Battelle Memorial Institute and Mount Sinai School of Medicine
      are working together on planning and implementing the study. Ultimately, a national probability sample of 100,000 children will be identified,
      as early as possible in pregnancy. These children will be followed for 21 years to explore the causes of a variety of health problems
      including obesity, injuries, asthma, and developmental delays. This project has been funded in whole or in part with federal funds from the
      National Institutes of Health, Department of Health and Human Services.

321
                                                                 DRAFT UNC Tomorrow Existing Programs Summary List

                                                                             A                                                                          B    C   D   E     F     G
      Program/Activity Title                                                                                                                            GR A PE ETCD       H     E
 1                                                                                                                                                       4.1 4.2 4.3 4.4   4.5   4.6
      National Demonstration Program for Citizen-Soldier Support UNC-Chapel Hill has spearheaded this Citizen-Soldier Support initiative,                            x
      which received $1.8 million in funding in the Department of Defense appropriations bill finalized by Congress in 2004 and another $5 million
      in 2006. The program serves N.C. National Guard and Reserve personnel who are challenged, along with their families, by the demands
      and risks of mobilization, deployment and return from duty. Partners include Duke University, N.C. State, UNC-Charlotte, East Carolina,
      UNC-Greensboro, Virginia Tech, Bryn Mawr College and UNC-TV. Currently, the program serves communities in and around Asheville,
      Charlotte, Greensboro, Rocky Mount and Wilmington.
322
      National Public Health Leadership Institute Public health is as complex, as important, and as challenging now as it ever has been. CDC             x   x              x
      has re-funded the Public Health Leadership Institute to convene the new leaders and new partners who together will confront the new
      challenges in public health. The goal: create new cadres of public health leaders who will help lead change in the public health system.
      The new PHLI is a one-year leadership development program for high-potential leaders with a commitment to leading in their own
323   organizations and communities, but also leading system change on the national scene.
      National Research Center for Rural Education Support (NRCRES) Established in 2004 by a $10 million, five-year award from the U.S.                          x
      Department of Education to the UNC-Chapel Hill School of Education, the National Research Center on Rural Education Support
      (NRCRES) in the School of Education is working to improve teaching, learning and student achievement in rural schools nationwide. Led by
      investigator Lynne Vernon-Feagans, a team of 20 researchers is conducting research studies focused on issues that face children as they
      begin their education, issues that face students during the transition to early adolescence and the role that distance education can play in
      rural schools. Their research is designed to help rural kindergarten and first-grade teachers reach their struggling learners and to use state-
      of-the-art distance education to extend their consultation model to the nation‘s teachers. See Targeted Rural Literacy Initiative and Rural
      Early Adolescent Learning for more information about specific interventions.

324
      National University of Singapore / UNC Joint Undergraduate Degree Programs in Economics, English, Geography, History,                              x   x
      Political Science An innovative joint undergraduate degree program joining the academic strengths of the University and the National
      University of Singapore (NUS). The joint program is believed to be a first at the undergraduate level outside of a professional school setting
      among UNC‘s U.S. peer campuses. Students will apply for the program after being admitted to either university. Eligible UNC
      undergraduates in the College of Arts and Sciences can take two to four semesters of classes at NUS and earn diplomas from both
325   universities. NUS students can study in Chapel Hill and also receive a degree from both campuses.
      Native Health Initiative (NHI) organized by medical student Anthony Fleg, focuses on the health disparities facing American Indians                            x      x
      communities in North Carolina. Now in its fourth year, the project is a collaboration between student volunteers and American Indian
      communities. The principles behind NHI include educating future health care providers on the health issues facing Native communities,
      providing sustainable benefits to the communities involved, supporting meaningful cultural exchange and empowering American Indian
      youth through mentoring and training. Projects began in the summer of 2005 in Waccamaw, Siouan and Lumbee communities, and NHI‘s
      work has since expanded. Each summer, the NHI sends students to work with tribes throughout the state.

326
      NC AHEC (see North Carolina Area Health Education Centers)
327
      NC DETECT (see North Carolina Disease Event Tracking and Epidemiologic Collection Tool)
328
                                                                 DRAFT UNC Tomorrow Existing Programs Summary List

                                                                             A                                                                           B   C   D    E     F     G
      Program/Activity Title                                                                                                                             GR A PE ETCD       H     E
 1                                                                                                                                                        4.1 4.2 4.3 4.4   4.5   4.6
      NC Health Info To assist North Carolinians with their health information needs, the Health Sciences Library developed N.C. Health Info                 x        x      x
      (www.nchealthinfo.org), a website that provides Internet users with quick and easy access to quality health information. This summer, N.C.
      Health Info will be expanded into a health information portal, where North Carolinians of any literacy level may find health information that is
      easy-to-read, or presented visually with audio narration. Users will find information about health insurance, preparedness and public safety,
      mental health, alternative medicine and wellness, drugs and supplements, lab tests and diagnostic procedures, educational tools, and
      news, all with a North Carolina focus. The portal will feature information for citizen-soldiers and their families, seniors and Spanish
      speakers. The portal‘s design and development is being led by the Health Sciences Library and conducted by a multi-institutional group of
      academic health sciences libraries and public and AHEC libraries throughout North Carolina.

329
330 NC YES (see North Carolina Youth Empowerment Study)
      NC-BSP (see North Carolina Breast Screening Program)
331
      NCCRES (see National Research Center for Rural Education Support)
332
      NC-FIRST (RENCI, Institute of Marine Sciences) targets first responders and aims to help them interpret and easily access weather data so                              x     x
      they can make better decisions during weather emergencies. It includes two components: classroom training on interpreting weather data
      and a weather data Web portal. NC-FIRST classroom training helps first responders understand scientific weather data ranging from
      satellite and radar images to text forecasts and new National Weather Service products. The NC-FIRST Weather Data Portal pulls together
      a wide range of weather data into an easy-to-use Web environment. Designed for North Carolina emergency personnel, the weather portal
      tailors its information to the user‘s county, providing an accurate, real-time picture of local weather conditions. The NC-FIRST tropical storm
      training modules were introduced in the summer of 2007. Last December, RENCI unveiled modules designed to help emergency managers
      handle winter weather emergencies. Hundreds of emergency management personnel in counties across North Carolina have been trained
      in using the portal.
333
      NC-HCAP (see North Carolina Health Careers Access Program)
334
      NCIPH (see North Carolina Institute for Public Health)
335
      Ned Brooks Award for Public Service (Carolina Center for Public Service) recognizes a faculty or staff member of the UNC-Chapel Hill                            x
      community who throughout his/her career has, in a collaborative and sustained manner, made a difference in the larger community. The
      award is based on a sustained record of service over a period of years carried out through the individual‘s role(s) in the University rather
      than as a private citizen.
336
      NHI (see Native Health Initiative)
337
                                                                DRAFT UNC Tomorrow Existing Programs Summary List

                                                                            A                                                                          B   C   D    E     F     G
      Program/Activity Title                                                                                                                           GR A PE ETCD       H     E
 1                                                                                                                                                      4.1 4.2 4.3 4.4   4.5   4.6
      North Carolina Area Health Education Centers (AHEC) The mission of the N.C. AHEC Program is to meet the state‘s health and health                    x        x      x
      workforce needs by providing educational programs in partnership with academic institutions, health care agencies and other organizations
      committed to improving the health of the people of North Carolina. AHEC educational programs and information services target improving
      the distribution and retention of health-care providers, with a special emphasis on primary care and prevention; improving the diversity and
      cultural competence of the health care workforce in all health disciplines; enhancing the quality of care and improving health care
      outcomes; and addressing the health care needs of underserved communities and populations. There are nine AHEC regional centers
      throughout the state. In 2004-2005, AHEC offered 7,745 continuing education programs in allied health, dentistry, medicine, mental health,
      nursing, pharmacy, public health and other topics with 184,194 attendees. In addition, health science students in these subject areas
      receive part of their training under AHEC auspices in community hospitals, rural health centers, public health departments and other health-
      related settings. In 2004-2005, these health science students completed 9,707 student months of training through AHEC-supported
      community-based rotations. AHEC also provides support for 326 primary care residency positions. These residency programs, located at
      five of the nine AHEC regional centers, have now graduated nearly 2,000 physicians since 1980. During the past 25 years, 67 percent of
      the AHEC-trained family practice residents have remained in the state to practice.

338
      North Carolina Area Health Education Centers (AHEC) (Pediatric Specialty Services at the Zimmer Cancer Center in Wilmington) The                         x    x      x
      Zimmer Cancer Center, Southeastern North Carolina‘s only community cancer center dedicated solely to the diagnosis, treatment and
      support of people with cancer, is part of the Coastal AHEC, and Pediatric Specialty Services helps parents find care locally that wouldn‘t
      otherwise be available. Specialists, such as those from UNC Lineberger Comprehensive Cancer Center, travel to Wilmington on a regular
      basis to treat children with special medical needs.
339
      North Carolina Area Health Education Centers (AHEC) Digital Library was created by a partnership of the Health Sciences Library, the                                 x
      N.C. AHEC Program, the N.C. AHEC Information and Library System and the Duke Endowment, the ADL virtual library
      (http://library.ncahec.net/) contains the highest quality medical information, with more than 450 full-text medical journals, 10 clinical
      databases and 70 medical textbooks. A major objective of the ADL is to provide community healthcare providers with access to clinical
      information resources equal to those available from academic medical libraries. Currently, the ADL has more than 15,800 members,
      including 33 community hospitals, 1,500 individual health professionals and more than 4,000 healthcare preceptors of students from UNC-
      Chapel Hill (preceptors receive UNC-Chapel Hill library resources through the ADL at no charge.
340
      North Carolina Black and Latino Media Issues Forum Held at the School of Journalism and Mass Communication in spring 2007, this                               x
      forum was co-sponsored by the NC Triangle Chapter of the National Association of Hispanic Journalists and the Triangle Association of
      Black Journalists. The event provided an open forum for discussions about dispelling certain myths and stereotypes that exist between
      ethnic groups, and vocalizing a call to action for better, more ethical and accurate coverage of minority populations by other minority
341   populations.
      North Carolina Botanical Garden Besides its displays of native and unusual plants and its nature trails, the N.C. Botanical Garden offers                x    x            x
      art exhibits, nature walks and courses on topics ranging from home gardening to botanical illustration. The garden is open to the public daily
      for recreation and learning, including certificate programs in botanical illustration and native plant studies and classes and workshops in
      gardening, botany, ecology, and botanical illustration. The Visiting Plants Program provides native plants to elementary schools for
      classroom study, while school children may visit the garden for workshops, classes, guided tours, hikes and programs correlated with the
      N.C. Standard Course of Study. The Botanical Garden is currently building a new sustainable, green Visitor Education Center, which will be
      a center of learning, teaching both the science and the enjoyment of plants and nature.

342
                                                                  DRAFT UNC Tomorrow Existing Programs Summary List

                                                                              A                                                                           B    C   D   E     F     G
      Program/Activity Title                                                                                                                              GR A PE ETCD       H     E
 1                                                                                                                                                         4.1 4.2 4.3 4.4   4.5   4.6
      North Carolina Breast Screening Program (NC-BSP) Based at the UNC Lineberger Comprehensive Cancer Center, the NC-BSP is                                          x      x
      dedicated to reducing late-stage diagnosis of breast and cervical cancer in older African American women living in eastern North Carolina.
      The program‘s efforts to increase mammography and Pap testing rates aim to improve quality and length of life for rural African American
      women and, ultimately, contribute to greater equality in health between black and white women.

343
      North Carolina Cancer Hospital The N.C. General Assembly approved $180 million in funding for a new cancer hospital to be built by the                           x      x
      UNC Health Care System that will replace an aging cancer treatment facility originally built in the 1950s as a tuberculosis sanatorium. The
      new hospital will also serve as the clinical home for the UNC Lineberger Comprehensive Cancer Center, one of only 38 such National
      Cancer Institute-designated centers in the United States. Tentatively scheduled to open in late 2009, the Cancer Hospital will provide North
      Carolinians with complete clinical cancer care and research facilities in one building. The seven-story, 320,000-square-foot hospital is
      being built in front of the N.C. Neurosciences Hospital, just to the east of the building it is to replace, the N.C. Clinical Cancer Center (also
      known as the Gravely Building).
344
      North Carolina Center for Public Health Preparedness is a program of the North Carolina Institute for Public Health, the service and                 x                  x
      outreach arm of the University of North Carolina's School of Public Health. The overall mission of NCCPHP is to improve the capacity of the
      public health workforce to prepare for and respond to terrorism and other emerging public health threats by: assessing the competency of
      the public health workforce in core public health skills and bioterrorism preparedness, facilitating training to meet the assessed needs, and
      carrying out applied research on emerging health issues.
345
      North Carolina Child Welfare Education Collaborative (Jordan Institute for Families) Responding to the staffing crisis in North Carolina                                x
      social services, the Collaborative aims to counter high attrition rates within child welfare by increasing the number of committed and
      knowledgeable BSWs and MSWs in local Departments of Social Services. The Collaborative involves six universities and provides a
      statewide program of educational services, specialized training and field experiences, and financial incentives to students so that students
      receiving professional social work degrees will commit to employment in child welfare.
346
      North Carolina Civic Education Consortium The Civic Education Consortium works with schools, governments and community                                       x   x
      organizations to prepare North Carolina‘s young people to be active, responsible citizens. The consortium has worked alongside Charlotte-
      Mecklenburg Schools and local community partners to create a resource notebook and CD-ROM encouraging discussions of current events
      and controversial issues. It is currently conducting a student civic profile survey in all Duplin County elementary, middle and high schools to
      help principals develop school-improvement plans addressing civic responsibility. The consortium also administers a small grants program
      and provides technical assistance to teachers and community leaders across the state.
347
      North Carolina Clearinghouse on Family and Child Well-being Website was established in 2008 at the University of North Carolina-                             x   x      x
      Chapel Hill School of Social Work with funding from the North Carolina Governor‘s Crime Commission. The website is run by the School's
      Family and Children's Resource Program, housed within the Jordan Institute for Families. The Clearinghouse connects individuals and
      North Carolina agencies, schools, courts and human service providers and is dedicated to providing a central source of information about
      learning opportunities and training resources throughout North Carolina for those working to strengthen families and to prevent and respond
      to child maltreatment and family violence. This website carries forth the vision of the Child Abuse and Neglect Subcommittee of the
      Governor‘s Crime Commission‘s Juvenile Justice Planning Committee which identified the need for North Carolina to have one central
      place to disseminate training information and to facilitate collaboration among professions in training efforts. The Clearinghouse staff
      collaborates with an advisory committee in on-going development of the website.

348
                                                               DRAFT UNC Tomorrow Existing Programs Summary List

                                                                           A                                                                         B    C   D   E     F     G
      Program/Activity Title                                                                                                                         GR A PE ETCD       H     E
 1                                                                                                                                                    4.1 4.2 4.3 4.4   4.5   4.6
      North Carolina Collection Housed in Wilson Library, the North Carolina Collection documents the history, literature and culture of our state        x   x   x
      by actively collecting, organizing and providing access to publications, photographs and artifacts. The North Carolina Collection covers the
      entire range of the state‘s written history, from 16th-century accounts by explorers and early settlers to present-day journals, books and
      newspapers. In addition to statewide histories, the collection is especially robust on local history, holding materials from each of North
      Carolina‘s 100 counties. 

349
      North Carolina College Media Association is a new program of the School of Journalism and Mass Communication which brings together                          x
      college media staff and advises from across the state to explore issues in journalism and build a network among college media staff.
350
      North Carolina Disease Event Tracking and Epidemiologic Collection Tool (NC DETECT) NC DETECT provides statewide early event                                       x
      detection and timely public health surveillance to public health officials and hospital users. NC DETECT was created by the North Carolina
      Division of Public Health (NC DPH) in 2004 in collaboration with the UNC Department of Emergency Medicine to address the need for early
      event detection and timely public health surveillance in North Carolina using a variety of secondary data sources. Authorized users are
      currently able to view data from emergency departments, the Carolinas Poison Center, and the Pre-hospital Medical Information System
      (PreMIS). Data from the Piedmont Wildlife Center, the NCSU College of Veterinary Medicine Laboratories, and select urgent care centers
      are in final testing and will soon be available for user analysis. NC DETECT analyzes these data sources with CUSUM algorithms from the
      Early Aberration Reporting System (EARS), developed by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. NC DETECT is designed,
      developed and maintained by staff at the Department of Emergency Medicine at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill with funding
      by the NC DPH. New functionality is added regularly based on end user feedback.

351
      North Carolina ECHO (Exploring Cultural Heritage Online) is a partnership of the State Library of North Carolina/Department of Cultural             x       x
      Resources and the School of Information and Library Science (SILS) and Academic Affairs Libraries (AAL) at Carolina. NC ECHO aims to
      provide deep, wide, and comprehensive access to the holdings of North Carolina‘s cultural institutions. In particular, SILS and the AAL are
      supporting the development of mechanisms that allow cultural institutions across the state of North Carolina to provide digital access to
      their collections through a single portal. Particular aims are to allow K-12 educators and students to benefit from these resources even
      though they may not be physically nearby, and to showcase the cultural heritage of North Carolina for tourism and economic development
      purposes.
352
      North Carolina Global Learning Lab - Globalization and the Transformation of NC's Economy Global outsourcing and the growing                    x           x
      integration of international markets have altered the structure of regional competition around the globe. North Carolina provides an
      interesting context to study the processes of industrial restructuring, because the state has simultaneously experienced a rapid decline in
      manufacturing sectors and a rapid growth in high technology sectors. This project maps these transformations in key industries and
      explores the role of public-sector intermediaries in the process. The website summarizes student work in an economic development course
      in the Department of City and Regional Planning at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill.

353
      North Carolina Graduated Driver Licensing System Review (School of Public Health) This review was published in the journal, Traffic                         x      x
      Injury Prevention, and focuses on the implementation of North Carolina's Graduated Driver Licensing (GDL) system. The study
      demonstrates the effectiveness of the program in reducing hospitalizations in the NC teenage community. The project demonstrates how
      UNC researchers help to validate NC legislature, programs and community initiatives.
354
                                                                 DRAFT UNC Tomorrow Existing Programs Summary List

                                                                             A                                                                         B    C   D   E     F     G
      Program/Activity Title                                                                                                                           GR A PE ETCD       H     E
 1                                                                                                                                                      4.1 4.2 4.3 4.4   4.5   4.6
      North Carolina Health Careers Access Program (NC-HCAP) Since 1971, NC-HCAP has served thousands of students, administrators,                          x   x   x      x
      practitioners, health professionals, advisors, health professions programs, community health agencies and local Area Health Education
      Centers (AHEC). Today, NC-HCAP continues to develop innovative ways to serve our students and to contribute to the overall health and
      well-being of North Carolina's citizens. Through a variety of programs and activities geared toward disadvantaged students -- from
      elementary to graduate school -- as well as to their parents, mentors and communities, NC-HCAP works to increase the number of these
      students trained and employed in the health professions in our state. When these students pursue their careers in North Carolina's
      underserved communities, they promote a higher quality of life for us all.
355
      North Carolina Innocence Project The School of Journalism and Mass Communication is exploring new ways to contribute to this effort                   x       x
      among top-tier law schools to review and investigate credible claims of innocence by death row inmates. Previously, the school has offered
      coursework in investigative journalism, and faculty and students have worked independently to research cases and pursue leads. This
      project teaches our students critical reporting skills and honors the most important traditions of journalism: advocacy and reform.
356
      North Carolina Institute for Public Health (NCIPH) is the service and outreach arm of the prestigious School of Public Health at the              x   x              x
      University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. Its mission is to bring the public health scholarship and practice communities together for the
      common purpose of improving the public's health and human well-being. As a constituent of UNC, the Institute is committed to the public
      health needs of North Carolina, placing those first. But public health issues go beyond geographic boundaries. The Institute provides
      services to the public health communities of neighboring states, the nation, and the world. NCIPH provides a range of learning and
357   development experiences that constitute the largest, most comprehensive set of public health professional development resources in the
      North Carolina Journalism Hall of Fame (School of Journalism and Mass Communication) recognizes North Carolinians who have                                    x
      contributed to the mass communication profession.
358
      North Carolina Public Health Academy aims to broaden public health professional development opportunities and experiences through                     x              x
      AHEC‘s multi-site educational system. "Schools" for different public health professions will provide public health leaders and clinicians with
      access to knowledge and skills needed to deal with the rapidly changing public health environment by linking them to state-of-the-art
      learning methods. The first schools will be for health directors and medical residents. In the future, schools will be developed for public
      health nurses, environmental health specialists and social workers.
359
      North Carolina Scholastic Media Association is a statewide organization that promotes excellence and responsibility in scholastic                     x   x   x
      journalism and encourages respect for freedom of the press. NCSMA also promotes professional growth of journalism teachers and speaks
      for scholastic media in matters of curriculum and instruction that affect journalism education in North Carolina. Outreach services related to
      high school journalism have been part of the School of Journalism and Mass Communication since 1938. NCSMA currently offers a
      Scholastic Media Institute in Chapel Hill each summer, regional workshops co-hosted with universities and newspapers across the state
      during the fall and spring semesters and a statewide high school publication contest each spring. One recent example of NCSMA services
      involved a coordinated response to the State Board of Education‘s approval of the framework for a new core course of study. The
      framework included provisions for four-course endorsements in several extracurricular areas, with the exception of communication-related
      courses. NCSMA, along with journalism teachers throughout the state, alerted state board members to the need and viability of adding such
      a communications endorsement.

360
      North Carolina WAY (Worksite Activities for You!) to Health (Center for Health Promotion and Disease Prevention) Researchers at the                                  x
      University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill are recruiting more than 1,200 overweight employees at several North Carolina colleges and
      universities for a study of workplace weight-loss programs. The project will test four worksite-based weight-loss programs. Researchers
      hope to uncover cost-effective ways for employers to help employees lose weight and keep it off.

361
                                                                 DRAFT UNC Tomorrow Existing Programs Summary List

                                                                             A                                                                          B    C   D   E     F     G
      Program/Activity Title                                                                                                                            GR A PE ETCD       H     E
 1                                                                                                                                                       4.1 4.2 4.3 4.4   4.5   4.6
      North Carolina Women’s Health Report Card (Center for Women's Health Research) A partnership between the School of Medicine and                                x      x
      the Cecil G. Sheps Center for Health Services Research, the Center for Women‘s Health Research (CWHR) produces this report card
      based on ongoing survey research every two years. The researchers are particularly concerned with health disparities across racial
      subgroups as they exist in the state comparing them to federal guidelines on health related to the Centers for Disease and Prevention
      Control and also the National Institutes of Health‘s ‗Healthy People 2010‘ goals. The report card plays an important role in indicating further
      areas of consideration for researchers and local policymakers in the areas of women‘s health.

362
      North Carolina Youth Empowerment Study (NC YES) NC YES is a participatory research study examining the impact of youth                                                x
      empowerment in preventing tobacco use. Funded by the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation, the three-year study aims to convene an
      Advisory Board of lay youth and adults in a participatory research process, document the characteristics of youth programs for tobacco-use
      prevention and control in North Carolina and track the role of youth involvement in initiating and implementing 100 percent tobacco-free
      policies in North Carolina schools.
363
      Nourish International works to bridge the gap between students and developing communities, between good ideas and the resources they               x                  x
      require. Since 2002, Nourish International has sought innovative and effective ways to make a tangible reduction in poverty around the
      world. From its humble beginnings at one university to its current presence across the U.S., Nourish has achieved its goal by teaching
      students the principles of sustainable enterprise and investing in pioneering development projects.

364
      NRI (see Nutrition Research Institute)
365
      Nuestros Niños Early Language and Literacy Project (Frank Porter Graham Child Development Institute) is developing and testing an                          x
      intervention designed to improve the quality of teaching practices related to literacy and language learning among Latino children enrolled in
      North Carolina‘s More at Four Pre-Kindergarten program for at-risk children.
366
      Nursing Refresher Program (Friday Center for Continuing Education) is an educational program for nurses who wish to return to the                      x              x
367 profession after being inactive.
      Nutrition and Physical Activity Self-Assessment for Child Care (NAP SACC) The NAP SACC program contains a number of                                            x      x
      components including a self-assessment instrument, continuing education workshops, collaborative action planning and technical
      assistance materials, and an extensive resource manual which includes copy ready materials. The NAP SACC intervention was designed
      for implementation through an existing infrastructure of public health professionals, typically registered nurses and health educators, trained
      as NAP SACC Consultants. Key steps in the intervention, which typically takes place over 6 months, include the following:
368
      Nutrition Research Institute (NRI) a part of the School of Public Health at UNC-Chapel Hill, is located on the new N.C. Research Campus                x       x      x
      in Kannapolis. Using cutting edge new methods in nutrigenomics and metabolomics, the researchers seek to understand why people are
      metabolically different and how this affects health and nutrition recommendations. Research by Institute Director Dr. Steven Zeisel includes
      the role of choline in human nutrition and the use of phytochemicals as possible cancer prevention treatments.
369
                                                                   DRAFT UNC Tomorrow Existing Programs Summary List

                                                                               A                                                                          B    C   D   E     F     G
      Program/Activity Title                                                                                                                              GR A PE ETCD       H     E
 1                                                                                                                                                         4.1 4.2 4.3 4.4   4.5   4.6
      OASIS (UNC Department of Psychiatry) Oasis stands for Outreach And Support Intervention Services. The mission of OASIS is to foster                                     x
      successful recovery from early psychosis and to increase public understanding of psychotic disorders. The program aims to: provide early
      identification and treatment , prevent relapse, prevent hospitalization, minimize disruption in people's lives, support people in the workplace,
      school and relationships, educate the community and other providers to recognize early psychosis and the importance of early treatment,
      provide educational opportunities for mental health professionals, and provide access to state of the art clinical research programs.
370
      Odum Institute for Research in the Social Sciences Founded in 1924, the H. W. Odum Institute for Research in Social Science is the                       x       x
      nation's oldest multidisciplinary social science university institute. Indeed, we are the oldest institute or center at the nation's first public
      university, UNC- Chapel Hill.* The mission of the Odum Institute parallels that of the University as a whole -- teaching, research, and
      service -- but the Institute's focus is on the social sciences. The Odum Institute is not part of any one school or department. Rather it
      stretches across virtually the entire university community and beyond, touching students, faculty, and staff from public health, social work,
      business, government, and the arts and sciences. People come from all corners of the university to take advantage of the training and
      courses, consulting services, data, software, and facilities that the Institute offers. The Odum Institute also has served as an incubator for
      other centers. The institute started the Center for Urban and Regional Studies in 1957 and launched it as an independent center in 1969.
      The Center for the Study of the American South began in 1992 as an Odum Institute initiative and is now an independent Center. We
      currently serve as the administrative home for the Citizen Soldier Support Program that was developed in 2005.

371
      OEBD (see Office of Economic and Business Development)
372
      Office of Economic and Business Development (OEBD) matches faculty and campus expertise and resources with economic                                              x
      development issues facing North Carolina and its communities and organizations. This office is led by Jesse White Jr., who headed the
      Appalachian Regional Commission and the Southern Growth Policies Board. During its first year of operations, OEBD worked within the
      university to develop a network of faculty interested in economic development work in North Carolina. It also worked on several economic
      development projects in the state, including Carolina‘s response to the state‘s successful bid to have Credit Suisse First Boston locate a
      major facility in the RTP area. At the announcement ceremony, the company stated that the assets of our universities were a deciding
      factor in locating in North Carolina. In addition, OEBD took the leadership role, along with the Friday Center for Continuing Education, in
      having UNC-Chapel Hill become an associate of the Hickory Metropolitan Higher Education Council. Carolina can now offer credit,
      noncredit and special courses and seminars in the Hickory facility. Another successful project was OEBD‘s role in helping the North
      Carolina Rural Economic Development Center secure a Kellogg Foundation grant to create an entrepreneurial support system in rural North
      Carolina. A multiyear, multimillion dollar grant, Carolina‘s School of Government will play a significant role in training local officials. OEBD
      also continued work in Carteret County begun by the Carolina Center for Competitive Economies by analyzing the marine sciences cluster
      there and working with the Economic Development Council of the county.

373
      Office of Experiential Education We have integrated engagement with the newly revised undergraduate curriculum that took effect last                 x   x   x   x
      fall. One objective of the curriculum is to help undergraduates understand that what they learn in a specific course is not knowledge in
      isolation but part of a larger concept. As part of the core curriculum requirements, every student must complete at least one experiential
      requirement. The opening of the Office of Experiential Education has been timed to coincide with the implementation of the ―Making
      Connections‖ General Education curriculum with its new experiential education graduation requirement. The office seeks to create,
      promote, expand and publicize the experiential learning available to undergraduates.
374
                                                                 DRAFT UNC Tomorrow Existing Programs Summary List

                                                                             A                                                                           B    C   D   E     F     G
      Program/Activity Title                                                                                                                             GR A PE ETCD       H     E
 1                                                                                                                                                        4.1 4.2 4.3 4.4   4.5   4.6
      Office of Global Health (School of Public Health) is the organizing unit for global health activities at the School. The Office of Global Health    x                  x
      actively supports the faculty, staff, and students of the UNC School of Public Health in their efforts to improve the health of the world's
      populations. The goals of the OGH include increasing awareness of the great diversity of global health research, teaching, and service
      activities underway in the School; creating more global educational and research opportunities for students and faculty; serving as a
      resource for faculty engaged in global health research by identifying funding opportunities and supporting proposal development; and
      enhancing cooperative partnerships with investigators and institutions from around the university, the state, the nation, and the world.

375
      Office of Technology Development (OTD) works with researchers at the university to facilitate the development of new products, services                         x
      and processes based on Carolina research discoveries by: managing the invention disclosure process, providing commercial opportunity
      assessments, pursuing and managing intellectual property protection, marketing technology and UNC capabilities, navigating laws, policy
      and contractual obligations, negotiating licenses, monitoring licenses for up to 20 years.
376
      Office of the Provost Engaged Scholarship Award (Carolina Center for Public Service) recognizes university units for exemplary                                  x
      engaged scholarship (the application of university expertise to address community needs) in service to the state of North Carolina. This
      award is for a specific (rather than overall) effort, and all university units and organizations are eligible.
377
      Office of Undergraduate Research includes a number of internships and opportunities for students to conduct community engaged                           x       x
      research. These opportunities include fellowships supported by APPLES Service Learning Program and the Carolina Center for Public
      Service, FPG Child Development Center and the Smallwood Foundation.
378
      OHMS (see Outpatient Health Maintenance System)
379
      One Atmosphere Research Program The UNC Ambient Air Research Facility is used to study the chemistry of gaseous air pollutants.                                        x     x
      Framed in wood, the structure is lined with transparent Teflon film walls through which ultraviolet, infra-red and natural light can pass.
      Located three miles east of Pittsboro, N.C., the structure is the nation‘s largest and the world‘s second largest outdoor smog chamber.
      Human lung cells, which are used to represent the lining of the respiratory tract, have been incorporated into the research conducted there
      by connecting the chambers to incubators in the adjacent lab via air carrying glass and Teflon tubes. Findings from this program have
      provided North Carolina as well as global audiences with information regarding the interaction of sunlight with various air pollutants and the
      combined effect on human lung cells. Throughout the last three decades, the School‘s contributions to clean air have been substantial. The
      studies from the One Atmosphere Research Program have helped the EPA demonstrate how control of hydrocarbon gases might affect
      ozone and nitrogen dioxide levels in urban areas. Since 1975, the School‘s researchers have also provided the EPA with data to test
      mathematical computer models that help the EPA regulate ozone levels throughout the country.

380
      One North Carolina Naturally (Institute for the Environment) focuses on coordinating conservation efforts with a web-based database and                         x            x
      decision support framework for regional-scale conservation and development decisions. One North Carolina Naturally is a comprehensive
      statewide conservation plan that involves the public, governmental agencies, private organizations and landowners to maintain functional
      ecosystems, biological diversity and working landscapes through the stewardship of land and water resources. The project is part of a larger
      effort by the state to conserve and restore the state‘s natural heritage and sustain a healthy life for all North Carolinians and visitors.

381
382 OTD (Office of Technology Development)
                                                                  DRAFT UNC Tomorrow Existing Programs Summary List

                                                                              A                                                                           B    C   D   E     F     G
      Program/Activity Title                                                                                                                              GR A PE ETCD       H     E
 1                                                                                                                                                         4.1 4.2 4.3 4.4   4.5   4.6
      Outpatient Health Maintenance System (OHMS) (RENCI) is a device designed to decrease emergency room visits by people with asthma                                        x
      and other acute respiratory diseases. RENCI is working with the UNC School of Medicine to develop a wireless device that measures a
      patient‘s daily respiratory health as well as environmental factors (e.g., airborne particulates, pollution, humidity and temperature). The
      device will encrypt and relay that information daily to the patient‘s physician, giving both doctor and patient a long-range, holistic picture of
      the patient‘s health. As conditions change, doctor and patient will be able to work together, noting how environmental factors correlate with
      respiratory distress and adjusting medications and lifestyle to better manage the patient‘s health. For those in remote areas without easy
      access to medical care, for an aging population with more health issues and reduced mobility, and for those without quality health insurance
      who often depend on emergency rooms, OHMS potentially offers a way for people to take more control of their health without straining the
      budget and without the need for face-to-face doctor visits. A pilot study to test the device will begin this summer. If successful, the device
      could improve the quality of life for asthma patients and those with other chronic conditions, such as diabetes and heart disease. Our
      healthcare system also would benefit from OHMS: emergency room visits are the most costly type of healthcare and roughly 75 percent of
      U.S. healthcare costs are related to chronic diseases.

383
      Parr Center for Ethics serves as the public face of the University's commitment to ethics. Its mission is to bring academic and theoretical                      x
      work in ethics to bear on practical ethical issues, especially as these issues are understood and articulated by experts in various academic
      disciplines, develop the integrity and ethical sophistication of our students, and provide a public forum for discussion and debate on
      important ethical issues affecting the university and the broader community. A recent initiative of the Parr Center is the Freedom House
      Scholars which aims to expand the traditional reach of a liberal arts education and engage the university in service to the community. The
      program provides the unique opportunity for UNC faculty to teach humanities and social science courses at a local halfway house. The
      initiative is modeled closely on the Hope House Scholars program at Stanford University which has been very successful over the past
      seven years.
384
      Partnerships for Inclusion (PFI) (Frank Porter Graham Child Development Institute) is a statewide technical assistance project with                      x   x   x      x
      offices in the western, central and eastern regions of North Carolina. PFI promotes the inclusion of young children with disabilities, from
      birth through five, in all aspects of community life. PFI collaborates with local inter-agency groups to sponsor public forums, specializes in
      staff development activities that meet the needs of mixed audiences from different agencies and provides technical assistance to improve
      the quality of community services to children and families. Other services include the North Carolina Early Intervention Library, which
      contains print and video materials available to parents and professionals.
385
      Pediatric Telemedicine Clinic (School of Medicine) Parents whose children need to see medical specialists are taking advantage of                        x              x
      technology that lets them stay in the Wilmington area while being checked out by doctors located hundreds of miles away. Telemedicine, a
      growing trend using the Internet, video conferencing, telephone and other tools to allow for remote visits by doctors, is increasingly being
      tapped to improve health care access in rural areas. In Southeastern North Carolina, doctors are using the equipment to address the
      statewide shortage in several pediatric subspecialties, including the physicians who treat children with physical disabilities or lung problems.

386
      Period of Purple Crying: Keeping Babies Safe in North Carolina is a statewide educational program involving UNC-CH Injury                                    x   x      x
      Prevention Center, School of Medicine, School of Journalism and Mass Communication, and Duke University Medical Center.

387
388 PFI (see Partnerships for Inclusion)
      Pharmacogenomics for Every Nation Initiative, an initiative of the Institute for Pharmacogenomics and Individualized Therapy, is a global            x                  x
      effort to help countries make better informed public health decisions using genetic information.
389
                                                                 DRAFT UNC Tomorrow Existing Programs Summary List

                                                                             A                                                                           B   C   D    E     F     G
      Program/Activity Title                                                                                                                             GR A PE ETCD       H     E
 1                                                                                                                                                        4.1 4.2 4.3 4.4   4.5   4.6
      PHE (see Project for Historical Education)
390
      Pilot study of mental health among Latino immigrants Through Russell Sage and William T. Grant-funded studies, Krista M. Perreira,                         x    x      x
      an assistant professor in the Department of Public Policy in the College of Arts and Sciences, investigates how acculturation and migration
      processes influence the mental health and academic achievement of Latino youth in North Carolina. She also studies ways to improve the
      well-being of immigrant youth by improving the understanding of their health, education, and labor market experiences. She has become a
      local expert in collecting data from hard-to-reach, Latino immigrant populations. Through this research, she is actively engaged in 10
      schools across five different school systems in the state. In addition, she works with the N.C. Department of Health and Human Services
      and many Latino-serving organizations throughout the state to promote the development of evidence-based health and education
      interventions.
391
      PlayMakers Repertory Company (PRC) Housed in the UNC Department of Dramatic Art PlayMakers Repertory Company is a                                      x        x
      professional theater named in 2003 by the Drama League of New York as ―one of the 50 best regional theatres in the country.‖ As part of its
      educational mission, PlayMakers offers the Educational Matinee Series, sponsored by GlaxoSmithKline. The Educational Matinee Series
      offers weekday performances followed by discussions with the cast members, director, dramaturgs and technical staff and is attended by
      middle and secondary school students from throughout North Carolina. Audience Discussion Wednesdays is a pre-performance discussion
      series offered to audiences following selected Wednesday performances throughout the season. Backstage tours, available to groups at
      no charge by advance reservation, offer an exciting and informative look behind the scenes at PlayMakers. PlayMakers dedicates one
      performance per production dedicated to ensuring that people with disabilities have equal access to the arts by employing: sign language
      interpretation for patrons who are hard of hearing or deaf; assisted listening devices for patrons with partial hearing loss; audio description,
      Braille playbills, large print playbills, and a tactile tour for patrons with impaired vision; and wheelchair access. The theater also offers
      Community Nights discounts on Tuesdays, when general admission tickets are just $10.

392
      PMH-NP (see Psychiatric Mental Health Nurse Practitioners)
393
      Practica/community-based courses in the professional schools Virtually every professional school requires students to complete                         x   x    x      x
      community practica or take community-based courses. For instance, in the School of Public Health, all master‘s students in health behavior
      and health education are required to take ―Action-Oriented Community Diagnosis.‖ Using concepts and methods from anthropology and
      epidemiology, this powerful service-learning course teaches students to conduct community-based research. Over the last 25 years, more
      than 1,000 students have worked with over 262 communities. For example, a recent group of students on one team, ¡Accion Latina!,
      interviewed community members and developed a plan to address identified problems with health, education, employment and
      transportation. Such projects provide valuable information to community members who can then develop informed plans.

394
      PRC (see PlayMakers Repertory Company)
395
      Pre-Med Seminars are a series of seminars offered by a group of physicians from UNC hospital, under the direction of Dr. Marion Couch,                 x               x
      to Carolina Covenant Scholars, with the mission of making medical school more accessible to students from low-income families.
396
      Preserving North Carolina's Archaeological Heritage (N.C. Archaeological Collection) As a service to the state, we maintain the pre-                       x    x
      eminent repository for archaeological collections from North Carolina. This is the archive on which most of our knowledge of the state‘s
      ancient history is based. The collection contains over 7 million artifacts from more than 7,000 sites, which go back some 12,000 years.

397
                                                                  DRAFT UNC Tomorrow Existing Programs Summary List

                                                                               A                                                                            B   C   D    E     F     G
      Program/Activity Title                                                                                                                                GR A PE ETCD       H     E
 1                                                                                                                                                           4.1 4.2 4.3 4.4   4.5   4.6
      Preventing Child Obesity and Diabetes A School of Nursing-based research team began a three-year intervention in January 2007 to                              x           x
      reduce risk for type 2 diabetes among middle school students in rural North Carolina. Researchers will study students at six North Carolina
      middle schools to determine if changes in schools can lower risk factors for type 2 diabetes. The study is part of the nationwide HEALTHY
      study sponsored by the National Institutes of Health. The research team provides intervention schools with new physical activity equipment
      and with lesson plans to increase aerobic activity in physical education classes. School cafeterias offer more nutritious food options along
      with a marketing campaign encouraging students to select healthier choices. Schools also restrict choices made in vending machines. The
      intervention includes health education for families and classroom-based education interventions for students. Given the rising prevalence of
      high weight and high glucose among our children in North Carolina and across the United States, there is a critical need now to intervene
      and change behaviors to prevent young people from developing diabetes or cardiovascular disease.

398
      Primary Health Care Management Support Package for People with Developmental Disabilities This project is a demonstration and                             x               x
      evaluation project in five counties (Duplin, Sampson, Lenoir, Wayne, and Pitt) in eastern North Carolina aimed at improving the quality of
      health care for adults with developmental disabilities. The project intervention consists of three components: (1) collaboration between case
      managers employed by two different public sector entities (i.e., developmental disabilities agencies and community networks that assume
      responsibility for managing medical care for Medicaid recipients) involved in helping adults with developmental disabilities to proactively and
      effectively utilize health care services; (2) assistance from trained family members, residential staff persons, or other caregivers in adults
      with developmental disabilities to proactively and effectively utilize health care services; (3) training of adults with developmental disabilities
      and their direct caregivers in routine preventative oral health care. The knowledge gained during the evaluation of the intervention will be
      transferred to other communities in North Carolina through training, technical assistance, and consultation.


399
      Program in Racial Disparities and Cardiovascular Disease During the past year, physicians and investigators at UNC-Chapel Hill and                                        x
      East Carolina University have joined forces to create this partnership of communities, faculty and programs to enhance and support access
      to the state‘s diverse cardiovascular patient populations and enable scientific collaborations that will bring near-term breakthroughs in the
      understanding and treatment of this most common cause of illness and death in the United States. Through its nationally recognized
      Schools of Medicine and Public Health, UNC-Chapel Hill provides a unique, highly interactive, team approach to solving the problem of
      ethnic disparities in cardiovascular disease. The Carolina Cardiovascular Biology Center, for example, is the fastest-growing cardiology
      program in the region and a national Center of Excellence with over $13 million per year in competitively funded research dedicated to
      bettering detection and treatment of heart disease. The Carolina Center for Genome Sciences is a national platform for health policy,
      patient advocacy and scientific inquiry that take advantage of the explosion of knowledge of the human genome. The UNC Heart Center at
      Meadowmont and the UNC Latino Initiative together provide clinical access to target patient populations crucial to understanding disparities
      in heart disease. And the university-wide Ethnicity, Culture and Health Outcomes (ECHO) Program brings an evidence-based approach to
      culturally sensitive training, education and service that is dedicated to reducing health disparities in communities across the state.


400
      Program in the Humanities and Human Values in the College of Arts and Sciences sponsors continuing education seminars to help                             x   x    x
      business executives, public leaders, humanities scholars and teachers explore and respond to emerging issues and challenges. For
      example, the Warren A. Nord Executive Seminar for Teachers set for July 2007 is designed to enhance teachers‘ understanding of religion
      in history and literature over the past century and to help them in their efforts to present religion and religious themes to students in ways
      that are constitutionally permissible and pedagogically sound. In addition, the Roger and May BellePenn Jones Executive Seminar set for
      May 2007 will encourage executives, public leaders and humanities scholars to explore the nature and meaning of a successful life.

401
                                                                   DRAFT UNC Tomorrow Existing Programs Summary List

                                                                               A                                                                            B   C   D    E     F     G
      Program/Activity Title                                                                                                                                GR A PE ETCD       H     E
 1                                                                                                                                                           4.1 4.2 4.3 4.4   4.5   4.6
      Program on Public Life The Program on Public Life serves the people of the state and region by informing the public agenda and                            x        x
      nurturing leadership. Established in 1997 and now residing in the Center for the Study of the American South, the Program serves as a
      vehicle for the university to exercise its scholarly strength, civic tradition and historic mission of public service in North Carolina and the
      South. Our goals are to provide ―research brokerage‖ so that the work of scholars at UNC-Chapel Hill and other institutions contributes to
      the work of elected officials, journalists and civic leaders; to serve North Carolina and the South by supporting and fostering enlightened
      leadership; and to offer a gathering place for leaders – in political and civic life and in the news media – to engage in substantive debate
      along with periods of study and reflection. Our current projects include an annual Leadership Seminar for Southern Legislators, a once-a-
      semester Journalists Roundtable, a Carolina Seminar on School Improvement, evening discussion sessions for North Carolina legislators,
      and working roundtables on such topics as coastal development and business innovation and entrepreneurship.

402
      Project Archaeology Research Laboratories of Archaeology are the state coordinators for this national program. We have offered teacher                        x    x
      workshops and published a book of 4th through 8th grade lesson plans called Intrigue of the Past: North Carolina‘s First People. We are
      currently working closely with LEARN NC (UNC School of Education) in adapting these lesson plans for their digital history textbook project.
403
      Project CONNECT (the Bridge to Healthy Communities Through Research) The role of Project CONNECT is to build trusting                                              x      x
      relationships with the black community that will lead to meaningful participation in disparities research and from these relationships build a
      stable research population. Project CONNECT accomplishes this by 1) piloting the development of a registry of potential research
      participants 2) networking with Black churches and community organizations to inform about different types of research, what research
      participation may entail and what to expect from research participation and 3) identifying individuals who are interested in being contacted
      about future research participation in health research, particularly cancer prevention and control studies. Serving as a liaison between
      registry participants and investigators, Project CONNECT assists investigators in developing culturally appropriate strategies for recruitment
      and retention of minority participants and disseminate summaries of studies to volunteers to foster awareness of and interest in current
      research. Activities of Project CONNECT enhance knowledge about successful methods of minority recruitment and the effectiveness of a
      volunteer registry for facilitating enrollment of minority participants into research studies. Current geographical focus areas include the
      following regions the Triangle (Orange, Durham, and Wake counties), Area L AHEC (Edgecombe, Halifax, Nash, Northampton, and Wilson
      counties), Greensboro AHEC (Alamance, Caswell, Chatham, Guilford, Montgomery, Orange, Randolph and Rockingham counties), and
      (DC)2 Network Churches (Orange, Durham, Wake, Johnston, Duplin, Sampson, Cumberland, Robeson, Wilson, Vance, Warren, Halifax,
      Hertford, and Bertie).

404
      Project EAST (Education and Access to Services and Testing) Project EAST targets the individual, community and provider factors that                               x      x
      influence participation in HIV/AIDS research by individuals living in rural minority communities, and will test the feasibility of providing
      clinical trials on a mobile unit based in the communities. Project EAST will develop in three phases, the first and second focusing on
      establishing and refining an outreach strategy, and the third phase will be a 12-month pilot. The goals of the research project are to (1)
      define community and individual factors that influence willingness of rural racial and ethnic minorities to participate in HIV/AIDS clinical
      trials; (2) refine a theory-based, culturally responsive outreach strategy to increase enrollment in clinical trials and evaluate the acceptability
      of components of this outreach from the perspective of community members, providers and individuals with HIV/AIDS; and (3) determine
      the feasibility of the individual enrollment session and mobile unit alone and in combination to increase willingness to participate and
      attendance at a follow-up referral appointment. The study will also explore the relationship between constructs from the conceptual model
      (i.e., perceived barriers, perceived benefits, perceived and social resource availability) and willingness to participate in HIV/AIDS trials. The
      geographic focus area includes Johnston, Edgecombe, Nash, Sampson, Harnett, and Wilson counties.

405
                                                                 DRAFT UNC Tomorrow Existing Programs Summary List

                                                                             A                                                                         B    C   D   E     F     G
      Program/Activity Title                                                                                                                           GR A PE ETCD       H     E
 1                                                                                                                                                      4.1 4.2 4.3 4.4   4.5   4.6
      Project EXPORT Building on the existing close relationship between Shaw University and UNC-Chapel Hill, the research expertise at UNC-                        x      x
      Chapel Hill is being combined with Shaw University‘s expertise in strengthening African-American communities and training minority
      leaders. The Partnership is addressing issues such as enhancing the existing research infrastructure at Shaw University by establishing an
      institutional review board and upgrading its grants management office; facilitating the recruitment of black adults into research programs
      focusing on health disparities and minority health; investigating how black churches can function as both sources of health-related
      information to parishioners and access points for gathering research information from community members; expanding the investigator
      base and the research by soliciting, mentoring, and funding new investigators with innovative projects; and developing and disseminating a
      novel health disparities curriculum at UNC-CH and Shaw University.

406
      Project for Historical Education (PHE) Currently in its 10th year, the PHE in the Department of History sponsors regular workshops for                    x   x
      N.C. teachers. The PHE was founded in 1991 by UNC history professors Leon Fink and Lloyd Kramer as part of a conference on ―How We
      Learn History.‖ Funded by the Z. Smith Reynolds Foundation, the Arts and Sciences Foundation and the N.C. Humanities Council, PHE
      sponsors day-long seminars for North Carolina social studies teachers on four Saturdays each academic year. The seminars, typically led
      by UNC faculty members with assistance from teachers, present recent developments in historical research, as well as practical strategies
      for integrating those developments into middle school and high school lesson plans. PHE has also published a book of essays on historical
      education in the United States, ―Learning History in America: Schools, Cultures and Politics,‖ edited by Lloyd Kramer, Donald Reid, and
      William L. Barney (Minneapolis: University of Minnesota Press, 1994).
407
      Project HEAL (Campus Y) is a 501(c)(3) nonprofit organization founded in 2006 by 3 UNC students which is focused in Ghana, West                   x           x      x
      Africa. Project HEAL aims to provide the fundamental knowledge and supplies needed to prevent basic infections and related health
      problems. Our approach is based upon two main facets: providing individual kits containing basic medical supplies that are safe and
      effective for family use, and holding school and community-based educational workshops to provide fundamental information about the use
      of items in the kits and available medical resources in the area. Project HEAL is further dedicated to providing the structure for students to
      experience the inequalities in international health care and community development that are pervasive in Ghanaian society.

408
      Project Literacy (Campus Y) takes a two-pronged approach to addressing literacy issues: volunteerism and advocacy. Project Literacy               x       x
      promotes education and empowerment by helping community members of all ages learn to read and write through programs like Jump
      Time and English as a Second Language. Our Special Projects committee increases awareness of literacy issues on both a local and
      global level through partnerships with initiative programs.
409
      Project Smoking, Education, Lifestyle and Fitness (SELF) Improvement (Department of Health Behavior and Health Education, School                                     x
      of Public Health) The goal of the project is to reduce chronic disease risk factors such as lack of physical activity, poor nutrition and
      tobacco use among residents of low-income African-American communities in Wake County. Tobacco interventions will focus on prevention
      of use among adolescents.
410
      Project U~Stars, Frank Porter Graham Child Development Institute The project works with 49 schools in the state to help kindergarten                      x
      through third grade teachers recognize outstanding potential in their students.
411
      Project Uplift provides two days of on-campus enrichment each year for 1,000 African-American, Native American, Hispanic/Latino, Asian                x
      American, low-income, rural, and other rising high-school seniors from historically underserved populations who are in the top 25% of their
      class.
412
                                                                 DRAFT UNC Tomorrow Existing Programs Summary List

                                                                             A                                                                         B    C   D   E     F     G
      Program/Activity Title                                                                                                                           GR A PE ETCD       H     E
 1                                                                                                                                                      4.1 4.2 4.3 4.4   4.5   4.6
      Protecting NC Water Resources Researchers in various departments of the College of Arts and Sciences are studying ways to protect                                          x
      the state‘s water resources from different threats. Researchers in the departments of Geography and Statistics and Operations Research
      are investigating the impacts of land use and climate change on the expected frequency of drought conditions that could threaten N.C. fresh
      water supply catchments over the next 40 years. Geographers are studying the effects of small-dam removal on the restoration of steam
      and river ecosystems and the delivery of sediment and nutrients to receiving water bodies.
413
      PSS (see Public Service Scholars Program)
414
      Psychiatric Mental Health Nurse Practitioners (PMH-NP) The School of Nursing has opened a master‘s program and post-master‘s                          x              x
      certificate program (the first and only in the state) to prepare psychiatric mental health nurse practitioners. These advanced-practice nurses
      will provide ―one-stop‖ diagnostic assessment, crisis intervention, psychotherapy, community intervention and medication prescription and
      management in medically underserved areas throughout North Carolina. The School of Nursing created this executive/distance curriculum
      with funding from a three-year grant from the federal Health Services Research Administration (HRSA )and a partnership with the Graduate
      School and the Department of Mental Health, Developmental Disabilities and Substance Abuse Services. The program recruits students
415   who come from minority and disadvantaged backgrounds and prepares them as PMH-CNS/NPs to remain in and serve their own
      Public Executive Leadership Academy This training program offered by the School of Government provides managers, assistants and                       x       x
      department heads with an opportunity to learn more about themselves as leaders and to acquire skill sets to lead and manage change in
      their communities. Similar to the definition of public engagement, participants of this training program discuss community issues and
      challenges, create frameworks for working with stakeholders and develop tools to diagnose problems and create solutions.
416
      Public Health Grand Rounds Public Health Grand Rounds is a series of satellite broadcasts and webcasts presenting real-world case                         x          x
      studies on public health issues ranging from obesity to bioterrorism, from SARS to food safety. The program is a collaboration between the
      Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill School of Public Health.

417
      Public Policy Practicum In this capstone course in the Department of Public Policy in the College of Arts and Sciences, students                              x      x
      majoring in public policy offer policy analyses and evaluations to North Carolina nonprofit agencies. As of 2000, North Carolina had more
      than 29,000 nonprofit organizations that employed more than 15.9 million people he aims of these agencies include improving economic
      equity, reducing institutionalized racism, increasing access to health and governmental services and generally improving the choices facing
      women, immigrants and the poor. The leaders of these groups, however, don‘t always have the skills they need to deliver these services in
      the best and most efficient way. The students in this class give nonprofits free advice on how to meet their goals. For example, students in
      this course have provided an analysis to help determine the best way for a community health center to deliver low-cost primary care to
      those just slightly out of range of Medicaid. Another project looked at a way to improve the nutritional choices of those living in public
      housing.
418
      Public Service Scholars (Carolina Center for Public Service) Launched in 2003, the Public Service Scholars (PSS) program provides a               x   x   x   x      x     x
      framework for undergraduate students who want to strengthen and maintain their commitment to serving communities throughout North
      Carolina, the nation and the world. PSS encourages students to learn about and practice public service and engagement beyond the scope
      of traditional volunteerism, including organizational service, policy and advocacy work, fundraising and philanthropy. The program is open to
      all full-time undergraduate students with at least four semesters remaining at Carolina.

419
                                                                  DRAFT UNC Tomorrow Existing Programs Summary List

                                                                              A                                                                            B   C   D    E     F     G
      Program/Activity Title                                                                                                                               GR A PE ETCD       H     E
 1                                                                                                                                                          4.1 4.2 4.3 4.4   4.5   4.6
      Public/Private Legal Preparedness Initiative is a two-year initiative is designed to improve emergency preparedness and response by                               x      x
      removing the legal barriers that hinder effective and timely collaboration between the private, nonprofit, and public sectors. The initiative will
      focus on two selected legislative/policy areas: Good Samaritan Liability Preparedness for business and non-profit entities assisting in
      community emergencies and Development of Common Human Resources Polices for use during a public health emergency.
420
      REAL (see Rural Early Adolescent Learning)
421
422 REAP (see Research Enrichment and Apprenticeship Program)
      Renaissance Computing Institute (RENCI) Founded in 2004, RENCI is a major collaborative venture of UNC-Chapel Hill, Duke                                          x      x     x
      University, N.C. State University and the state of North Carolina that uses sophisticated, high-performance computing resources and
      expertise, primarily to help the state plan for and respond to disasters. Hurricanes and the floods and tornadoes that come in their wake
      take a huge personal and economic toll on North Carolina. Between 1980 and 2005, the state endured more than 20 weather-related
      disasters that caused at least $1 billion in damage, according to NOAA‘s National Climate Data Center. The RENCI approach to modeling,
      predicting and responding to hurricanes, severe storms and flooding is multifaceted and includes such projects as the Carolina Floodplain
      Mapping Program, HydroMet, efforts to forecast flash floods and landslides in real time and establish prototyping experimental systems for
      use in disasters. See also NC-FIRST and Outpatient Health Maintenance System (OHMS).


423
424 RENCI (see Renaissance Computing Institute)
      Research Enrichment and Apprenticeship Program (REAP) led by the School of Nursing, creates mentoring partnerships between                               x               x
      faculty researchers and nursing students who are members of a racial/ethnic minority group. The program includes faculty mentors and
      students from North Carolina Central University, Winston-Salem State University, and UNC-Chapel Hill. With funding from the National
      Institute of Nursing Research, NIH, the program has been able to pay students $10 – $12/hour to work up to 172 hours on the mentors
      research project and to pay for them to attend and present at a national conference. Ten students participate each year. Students also
      attend seven 2-hour seminars and conduct an individual research project. The NIH funding will end June 2008. We aim to continue the
      program, because it has been so well received by students and faculty, and to increase the number racial/ethnic minority students in
      master's and doctoral level education in nursing and working toward careers in nursing research.

425
      Research Laboratories of Archaeology The Research Laboratories of Archaeology has a long track record of engagement. This record                         x   x    x
      includes active programs of K-12 outreach, promoting economic development through heritage tourism, and maintaining the North Carolina
      Archaeological Collection (the state's oldest and most important archaeological archive). Many of these initiatives focus on rural and
      underserved communities. Programs focusing on the heritage of our state's American Indian population include the Trail of Tears National
      Historic Trail, Cherokee Pottery Revitalization Project, Cherokee Ancient Village, Occaneechi Village Replication Project, and Town Creek
      Indian Mound state historic site. The Research Laboratories of Archaeology serves as the state coordinator for the national program,
      Project Archaeology, and we offer teacher workshops, lesson plans, and exhibitions related to this project. We are currently working with
      LEARN NC to adapt these lesson plans for a digital history textbook project and to create an online workshop and digital resource library for
      teachers, the Hardaway project, named after the Hardaway site, the oldest excavated human settlement in North Carolina.

426
                                                                   DRAFT UNC Tomorrow Existing Programs Summary List

                                                                                A                                                                           B    C   D   E     F     G
      Program/Activity Title                                                                                                                                GR A PE ETCD       H     E
 1                                                                                                                                                           4.1 4.2 4.3 4.4   4.5   4.6
      Research Triangle Schools Partnership (RTSP) involves faculty from all areas of the School of Education partnering with high needs                             x
      schools in Orange County to support teacher skill development in the following areas: using cognitively guided instruction in elementary
      mathematics; writing in the science curriculum; promoting school readiness in literacy and mathematics; teaching literacy to English
      Language Learners; and building school success behaviors in adolescents. Six seed grants from the School of Education have funded
      these collaborative efforts which began in Fall 2007. As part of this effort, teacher education classes have been offered in Orange County
      elementary and middle schools that bring future teachers into a high needs school environment on a weekly basis.

427
      Roadmap for Medical Research This initiative is intended to focus future NIH funding in 21 broad areas of concentration, encouraging                   x   x              x
      researchers to attack difficult problems using interdisciplinary collaboration and sophisticated computational techniques to create quick
      translations to patient care. UNC-Chapel Hill was the only university to receive eight of 21 grants in the fall 2005 Roadmap competition.
      This funding so far totals $15.5 million and includes starting the Carolina Center of Nanotechnology Excellence, which will marry expertise
      in nanotechnology with patient research at the Lineberger Comprehensive Cancer Center. In 2004, Carolina also received more of the initial
      Roadmap grants than any other university.
428
      Robert E. Bryan Fellowship Program (Carolina Center for Public Service) awards five summer fellowships of up to $3,000 each to                                     x
      support innovative public service projects that address identifiable needs within North Carolina. Any returning, full-time undergraduate or
      graduate student at UNC-Chapel Hill is eligible to apply. Fellows work with community partners and faculty mentors who are familiar with
      their topics or geographic areas, and the students are responsible for the major planning and implementation of their projects. Faculty
      mentors receive $500 stipends for their involvement. The fellowships are named in honor of alumnus Robert Emmet Bryan (1904-1975), a
      native of Newton Grove, North Carolina, who was a strong supporter of public service.

429
      Robert E. Bryan Public Service Award (Carolina Center for Public Service) recognizes individuals (students, faculty or staff) who, as                              x
      representatives of UNC-Chapel Hill, have demonstrated outstanding engagement and service to the state of North Carolina. This award is
      for a particular effort or one-time event (rather than an overall record of service) carried out through the individual‘s role(s) in the University
430   rather than that as a private citizen.
      Robertson Scholars Program The Robertson Scholars Program was created in 2000 through a $24 million gift from Julian Robertson, a                      x   x       x
      1955 graduate of UNC and his wife Josie. Inspired by their sons, one of whom graduated from Duke in 1998 and another who graduated
      from UNC-Chapel Hill in 2001, the Robertsons wanted to encourage further collaboration between the two universities. The establishment of
      this innovative program, which recruits and supports undergraduates on both campuses, was designed to serve as a catalyst for increased
      collaboration between students, faculty, and staff of the two universities. The Robertson Scholars Program provides students---generally 18
      at Duke and 18 at UNC each year---with the tools to further their involvement in community service, the freedom to explore ways in which
      they can make a difference in today's world, and the forum to address the social issues that are most important to them. During this four
      year journey, Robertson Scholars learn to create change and foster collaboration both locally on the two campuses and globally during
      many of their summer enrichment experiences. Whether near or far, Robertson Scholars benefit from the distinctive academic and
      extracurricular opportunities designed to help them learn and grow.

431
                                                                 DRAFT UNC Tomorrow Existing Programs Summary List

                                                                             A                                                                          B    C   D   E     F     G
      Program/Activity Title                                                                                                                            GR A PE ETCD       H     E
 1                                                                                                                                                       4.1 4.2 4.3 4.4   4.5   4.6
      Ronald W. Hyatt Rotary Public Service Awards (Carolina Center for Public Service) are sponsored by the Chapel Hill Rotary Club and                             x
      administered by the Carolina Center for Public Service. $6,000 is available annually for awards of up to $3,000 in support of innovative
      public service projects that exemplify the motto of Rotary International, ―Service above Self.‖ UNC-Chapel Hill recognized student
      organizations, and undergraduate and graduate students (individually or in teams) may apply, as long as they are continuing their studies
      following the completion of their project. The awards are named in honor of the late Dr. Ronald W. Hyatt, Professor of Exercise and Sports
      Science at UNC-Chapel Hill and long-time member of the Chapel Hill Rotary Club, in recognition of his distinguished career at the
      University and his commitment to helping others.
432
      Rotary Center for International Studies in Peace and Conflict Resolution (Center for Global Initiatives), jointly managed with Duke‘s              x           x
      Center for International Development, is currently home to 15 World Peace Fellows from 11 different countries. One of only six centers
      worldwide, the Center selects and trains its fellows based on their ability to have a significant, positive impact on world peace and conflict
      resolution during their future careers. Graduated fellows are working around the globe, including in southern Sudan with the National
      Democratic Institute, in Colombia and Washington, DC with the Organization of American States, and in Ethiopia with the regional office of
      the International Labor Organization.
433
434 RTSP (see Research Triangle Schools Partnership)
      Rural Early Adolescent Learning (REAL) (National Research Center for Rural Education Support) aims to enhance teachers' abilities to                       x
      assist student learning by focusing upon: (1) Competence Enhance Behavior Management (CEBM)--a means of establishing a whole-grade
      system of behavior management that provides structure and consistency across classes while fostering responsible self-directed behavior;
      and (2) Social Dynamics Training (SDT) which promotes teachers' awareness of the impact of peers on motivation and achievement.
435
      Rural Health Research Program is built on the thirty-five year history of rural health services research at the University of North Carolina's                 x      x
      Cecil G. Sheps Center for Health Services Research. The program draws on the experience of a wide variety of scholars and researchers,
      analysts, managers and health service providers associated with the Center. The Program also has an ongoing partnership with the NC
      Foundation for Advanced Health Programs, Inc. of the Office of Research, Demonstrations and Rural Health Development in the NC
      Department of Human Resources. The Rural Health Research Program is working to identify problems in the rural health arena through
      policy-relevant analyses, the geographic and graphical presentation of data, and the dissemination of information to organizations and
      individuals in the health care field who can use this information for policy or administrative purposes. The Program's research involves
      primary data collection, analysis of large secondary data sets, and in-depth policy analysis. The Program brings together a diverse,
      multidisciplinary team including clinicians in medicine, nursing, pharmacy, allied health, mental health, and other professions and disciplines
      along with experts in biostatistics, geography, epidemiology, sociology, anthropology and political science to address complex social issues
      affecting rural populations. The Program's present policy analysis and research agenda focuses on the following substantive areas:
      measures of under-service, Medicare reimbursement policy, Medicaid, and access to care. The Program also has an active dissemination
      component and emphasizes the use of geographic methods in research.


436
437 SARR (see Students for the Advancement of Race Relations)
      SCALE (see Student Coalition for Action in Literacy Education)
438
                                                                 DRAFT UNC Tomorrow Existing Programs Summary List

                                                                             A                                                                         B    C   D   E     F     G
      Program/Activity Title                                                                                                                           GR A PE ETCD       H     E
 1                                                                                                                                                      4.1 4.2 4.3 4.4   4.5   4.6
      School of Law Clinical Programs There are four clinical experiences available to law students: civil, juvenile justice, community                 x           x
      development, and immigration/human rights policy. While the clinics serve an important pedagogical purpose, they also provide legal
      representation to indigent clients who otherwise wouldn‘t have access to it. It is key to the Law School‘s public mission to provide
      professional legal services to those people unable to pay.

      o Civil Clinic In the civil clinic, third-year students represent low-income clients in a variety of civil matters, including landlord/tenant
      matters, family law, consumer issues and public benefits.
      o Juvenile Justice Clinic In the juvenile justice clinic, students represent juveniles in delinquency proceedings ranging from disorderly
      conduct to assault.
      o Community Development Law Clinic The community development law clinic provides legal expertise to nonprofit organizations in many
      of the state‘s most underserved communities. Too often nonprofits that possess vision and leadership are prevented from transforming their
      communities by a lack of technical legal expertise about topics such as forming real estate partnerships to develop affordable housing or
      obtaining tax exemption and a license for an affordable child care center. Often, since nonprofits cannot afford private legal counsel, their
      legal questions go unanswered, and their broader visions go unfulfilled. The CDL Clinic addresses this urgent need. Working under the
      supervision of a member of the law faculty, third-year law students enrolled in the CDL Clinic provide community-based nonprofit
      organizations with business-oriented legal counsel. In recent years, the Clinic has served dozens of organizations from the mountains to the
      coast and has had a positive impact on many of North Carolina‘s most underserved communities.
      o Immigration/Human Rights Clinic The immigration/human rights clinic works with immigrant clients on a number of matters. It was the
      work of this clinic that led to the Orange County Board of Commissions consideration of a proposal that would affirm Orange County‘s view
      of health as a human right.

439
      School of Law Pro Bono Program Since its inception in 1997, the Pro Bono Program has filled hundreds of placements with attorneys in                          x
      nonprofit organizations, private practice, and North Carolina‘s legal services organizations. The program matches law students with
      practicing attorneys across the state to work on cases that the attorneys have taken for free or on reduced rates, providing clients with high
      quality, low cost legal representation. Additionally, working on pro bono projects gives students valuable hands-on experience while
      encouraging attorneys to take on cases that they might not otherwise have the resources to do. For example, every year since Hurricane
      Katrina, students from the Pro Bono Program have journeyed to the Gulf Coast during their spring break to assist with legal matters arising
      as a result of the storm.
440
      School of Social Work Distance Education Programs The School of Social Work operates four distance education programs across the                              x      x
      state: one each at UNC-Asheville and at N.C. Central University in Durham, and two at the Forsyth County Department of Social Services
      (Winston-Salem Distance Education Advanced Standing Program for BSW students and the traditional three-year Distance Education
      Program). The distance education programs recruit students who are employed in human services, are second career students, are parents
      returning to the work force, or are unable to engage in full-time study.
441
      School Success Profile (SSP) (School of Social Work) is a powerful and comprehensive assessment tool for promoting academic                               x
      performance and closing the achievement gap. In a unique school-community partnership, Strowd Roses Foundation, Triangle Community
      Foundation and Carolina are coming together to offer a wealth of resources to the schools to address the achievement gap among
      elementary students. The three-year project will follow a group of third graders, identify the individual needs of the students and work with
      the schools to develop strategies to address those needs. Schools will receive generous funding to purchase materials, training and
      supplies needed to put strategies into action.
442
                                                                DRAFT UNC Tomorrow Existing Programs Summary List

                                                                            A                                                                         B   C   D    E     F     G
      Program/Activity Title                                                                                                                          GR A PE ETCD       H     E
 1                                                                                                                                                     4.1 4.2 4.3 4.4   4.5   4.6
      Science and Math Achievement and Resourcefulness Track Program (SMART) increases the number of underrepresented minority                            x
      students who earn degrees in STEM disciplines by providing support for undergraduate research, scientific communication, peer mentoring
      and preparation for graduate school in science, technology, engineering or mathematics.

443
      Science Education Initiative at Clara J. Peck Elementary School Science teachers and students at this predominantly African-                            x
      American and low-income Greensboro elementary school were able to benefit from a dozen hands-on lessons taught by Cheryl Horton,
      clinical assistant professor of science education in the School of Education. Among other concepts, she taught fourth graders about
      electricity by building circuits from wire, light bulbs and batteries. They also learned about magnetism by observing magnets bouncing up
      and down as they repelled each other. The idea for the collaboration was inspired by a visit to the school on a Tar Heel Bus Tour.

444
445 SEAC (see Student Environmental Action Coalition)
      Seagraves Service Grants for Student Organizations (Carolina Center for Public Service) are available to all officially recognized UNC-                      x
      Chapel Hill student organizations to support public service projects in North Carolina. Through the generosity of an alumnus, grants of up to
      $300 are awarded from a pool of $3,000. The program is named in honor of Mildred Yeager Seagraves, grandmother of the donor. Funds
      may be requested for any costs associated with the proposed service project, including supplies, travel, equipment, and other related
      programming expenses. Proposals are requested in the fall semester for projects to be completed by the end of the same academic year.
446
      Seeding Postdoctoral Innovators in Research and Education (SPIRE) is an NIH-funded postdoctoral program at the Graduate School                      x               x
      that is designed to help young scientists who wish to pursue careers as academic science researchers and educators. By combining
      research training with professional development at Carolina and hands-on teaching at one of eight minority-serving universities (MSUs) in
      the state, SPIRE is helping science scholars succeed in academic careers, bringing engaging teaching methods into the classroom of North
      Carolina minority institutions and increasing diversity in science professions. SPIRE fellows serve as outstanding role models for future
      young scientists and are contributing to the changing infrastructure at North Carolina minority serving universities. Through SPIRE, students
      from the MSUs have participated in numerous professional development activities at Carolina, including research internships and
      networking with renowned science educators. Faculty members at the partner MSUs have adopted new teaching strategies and
      technologies brought to campus by SPIRE fellows and students have provided extremely positive feedback in their teaching evaluations. Of
      the 28 fellows who have exited the program so far, 19 went into tenure track faculty positions and six of these are at MSUs in North Carolina


447
448 SELF (see Project Smoking, Education, Lifestyle and Fitness Improvement)
449 SERCEB (see Southeastern Regional Center for Excellence in Civilian Biodefense)
      SGHC (see Student Global Health Committee)
450
      SHAC (see Student Health Action Coalition)
451
      Sheps Center (See Cecil G. Sheps Center for Health Services Research)
452
453 SITES (see Studio for Instructional Technology in English Studies Lab)
454 SMART (see Science and Math Achievement and Resourcefulness Track Program)
      SOAR (see Southern Astrophysical Research)
455
                                                                 DRAFT UNC Tomorrow Existing Programs Summary List

                                                                             A                                                                         B    C   D   E     F     G
      Program/Activity Title                                                                                                                           GR A PE ETCD       H     E
 1                                                                                                                                                      4.1 4.2 4.3 4.4   4.5   4.6
      SOHP (see Southern Oral History Program)
456
      Sonja Haynes Stone Center for Black Culture and History The Sonja Haynes Stone Center for Black Culture and History opened in                     x   x   x   x
      2004, becoming one of the few such facilities nationwide combining cultural programs, research, community service, teaching and learning
      under one roof. Funded by private donations, the Stone Center contains classrooms, a 10,000-volume library, seminar rooms, an art
      gallery, dance studio and spaces for performances, lectures, meetings and offices. The Stone Center's mission is to "encourage and
      support the critical examination of African and African American diaspora cultures through sustained and open discussion, dialogue and
      debate." In addition to cultural programming and scholarly initiatives, the Stone Center sponsors social justice outreach programs that
      connect the work and resources of the Stone Center with outside communities and seek solutions to socio-economic and other inequities
      that affect the quality of life. Programs include: Communiversity Youth Programs (after-school enrichment programs managed and run by
      UNC-Chapel Hill student volunteers) and the Community Scholars Program, which brings community-based leaders from around the state
      to campus.
457
      Southeast Public Health Leadership Institute The Southeast Public Health Leadership Institute is a year-long leadership development                   x       x      x
      program, within the University of North Carolina School of Public Health, for mid- to senior level public health administrators working in the
      states of Arkansas, North Carolina, South Carolina, Tennessee, Virginia and West Virginia. The Institute supports the strengthening of
      leadership competencies, such as creating a shared vision, personal awareness, systems thinking, risk communication, team building,
      ethical decision making and political and social change strategies. Scholars interact with local and national leaders during 3 working
      retreats, 4 telephone conferences, and 3 online computer discussion forums. Each scholar also completes an individual learning plan, a
      community leadership project, a mentoring relationship and 4 small group assignments.

458
      Southeastern Regional Center for Excellence in Civilian Biodefense (SERCEB) A consortium of investigators from six regional                                   x      x
      universities has been chosen to be part of a new biodefense initiative that will work to develop the next generation of vaccines, drugs and
      diagnostic tests against emerging infections such as SARS, and for defense against organisms such as smallpox that might be used in
      bioterrorist attacks. The Southeast Regional Center of Excellence for Emerging Infections and Biodefense (SERCEB) will include
      researchers from Duke University Medical Center, Emory University, University of Alabama at Birmingham, University of Florida, University
      of North Carolina at Chapel Hill School of Medicine, and Vanderbilt University Medical Center.

459
      Southern Astrophysical Research (SOAR) With help from donors and the U.S. Congress, faculty and students in the UNC Department                            x                x
      of Physics and Astronomy probe the skies from several new vantage points. Carolina is a partner in the SOAR Telescope atop Cerro
      Pachon in northern Chile, and six Panchromatic Robotic Optical Monitoring and Polarimetry Telescopes, or PROMPT, atop Cerro Tololo.
      PROMPT‘s 16-inch telescopes are designed to follow up satellite discoveries within tens of seconds and alert SOAR to action. SOAR
      produces the best-quality images of any observatory in its class in the world at a location that is ideal for viewing the Milky Way, our home
      galaxy and other planets in our solar system. Carolina also has a 3 percent share in the largest telescope in the southern hemisphere,
      SALT (Southern African Large Telescope), located about 300 miles north of Cape Town. The Internet is helping bring images from all three
      telescopes back to faculty and students in Chapel Hill. Public school classrooms across North Carolina also benefit.

460
                                                                 DRAFT UNC Tomorrow Existing Programs Summary List

                                                                             A                                                                           B   C   D    E     F     G
      Program/Activity Title                                                                                                                             GR A PE ETCD       H     E
 1                                                                                                                                                        4.1 4.2 4.3 4.4   4.5   4.6
      Southern Historical Collection, Southern Folklife Collection (Manuscripts Department at Wilson Library) The Manuscripts Department,                             x
      housed at the Wilson Library, includes these two collections. The Southern Historical Collection is a vast collection of distinct archival
      holdings comprised of unique primary documents, such as diaries, letters, photographs, maps and oral histories. It offers documentation of
      all periods of Southern history since the late 18th century. The Southern Folklife Collection (SFC) ranks as one of the nation‘s foremost
      archival resources for the study of American folk music and popular culture. SFC‘s holdings document all forms of Southern musical and
      oral traditions across the entire spectrum of individual and community expressive arts, as well as mainstream media production.

461
      Southern Oral History Program (SOHP) (Center for the Study of the American South) seeks to foster a critical, yet democratic                           x   x    x
      understanding of the South — its history, culture, problems, and prospects. SOHP has a collection of more than 2,900 interviews with men
      and women from all walks of life, and maintains an active research and teaching program. The tapes, videos and transcripts are preserved
      in the University‘s Southern Historical Collection. SOHP is partnering with UNC Press, the Center for Civil Rights and UNC Library to
      explore new ways of producing and disseminating Civil Rights Movement-related scholarship through print and digital media in a new effort,
      "Publishing the Long Civil Rights Movement." SOHP has an ambitious outreach arm, sharing research and expertise with a wide audience.
      Students and staff teach oral history workshops and consult throughout the state.

462
      Spin-off Companies Spin-off companies Faculty discoveries and innovations have resulted in the creation of 32 UNC spin-off companies                            x      x
      since 2000 (36 since the office opened in 1995) and jobs for North Carolinians. For example, an experimental anti-HIV drug being
      developed by Panacos Pharmaceuticals has successfully completed Phase II clinical trials. The drug was developed by Carolina researcher
      Kuo-Hsiung Lee, a professor of natural products in the School of Pharmacy. Its central compound was discovered in an herb grown in
      Taiwan but is also found in the bark of birch trees across North America. Other examples of commercialization leading to spin-offs include
      therapeutic agents for Parkinson‘s Disease, technologies for drug delivery to treat cancer, industrial applications for carbon nanotubes and
      gene therapy treatment for diseases like muscular dystrophy. Inspire Pharmaceuticals is UNC‘s most successful spin-off. Inspire began
      operations in 1995 and is recognized as a leader in discoveries potentially crucial in treating diseases that involve deficiencies in the body‘s
      ability to protect lungs, eyes, sinuses and other mucosal surfaces. Inspire has discovered and developed potential drug candidates for
      treating dry eye, cystic fibrosis, retinal disease and other medical conditions. Scientists at UNC and the UNC start-up company Xintek Inc.
      invented a new X-ray device based on carbon nanotubes that emits a scanning X-ray beam composed of multiple smaller beams while also
      remaining stationary. This technology can also lead to smaller and faster X-ray imaging systems for airport baggage screening and for
      tomographic medical imaging such as CT (computed tomography) scanners. Incubated by the Carolina Entrepreneurial Initiative and
      launched in 2004, the UNC spin-off company Liquidia Technologies Inc., has made important breakthroughs with numerous applications.
      One discovery a liquid molding material that cures when exposed to light that has applications for computer chips, ink jets, medical devices
      and pharmaceutical products. Another breakthrough was a method for creating the world's tiniest custom-shaped manufactured particles for
      delivering drugs and biological materials into the human body. Liquidia's technology is the first-ever method to create organic nanoscale
      particles in any shape, size or composition. A joint project of UNC-Chapel Hill and East Carolina University, Hemocellular Therapeutics
      focuses on developing hemostatic agents to control active bleeding (hemorrhages), an area where no functional therapeutic agent exists.



463
464 SPIRE (see Seeding Postdoctoral Innovators in Research and Education)
      SPROUT (see Student Poverty Reduction Outreach)
465
      SSP (see School Success Profile)
466
                                                                 DRAFT UNC Tomorrow Existing Programs Summary List

                                                                             A                                                                          B    C   D   E     F     G
      Program/Activity Title                                                                                                                            GR A PE ETCD       H     E
 1                                                                                                                                                       4.1 4.2 4.3 4.4   4.5   4.6
      STAR (see Student Teams Achieving Results)
467
      Stimulation Technologies for Military Training The Department of Computer Science, in the College of Arts and Sciences, has an                                 x      x
      ongoing project with the U.S. Army to use improved simulation technologies for military training. The underlying technologies are also
      applicable to emergency response. Two faculty members, Ming Lin and Dinesh Manocha, head the ongoing project. They have applied for
      an appropriation to broaden their current research and establish a center focusing on experiential technologies for urban warfare and
      disaster response. This new center would include additional faculty from applied mathematics and The Renaissance Computing Institute.

468
      Strengthening Bioethics Capacity and Justice in Health Through the project, Strengthening Bioethics Capacity and Justice in Health,                x                  x
      funded by the National Institutes of Health‘s Fogarty International Center, Congolese scholars complete intensive master-level training in
      bioethics at the Catholic University of Louvain in Belgium and then spend up to six months with mentors at UNC. While in Chapel Hill,
      scholars complete Institutional Review Board (IRB) training, develop curricula and training modules around bioethics issues in the
      developing world and strengthen their capacity for independent research.
469
      Strong Couples - Strong Children is a community-based community intervention program whose aim is to strengthen couple and co-                             x          x
      parenting relationships among at-risk, low-income, unmarried, expectant or new parents in Durham, NC. The project is a partnership
      between the UNC-Chapel Hill School of Social Work, the Durham County Health Department, and the Durham County Cooperative
      Extension Service. Interventions consist of: (1) Family-care coordination (wrap around services); (2) A relationship skill-building curriculum;
      and (3) Fatherhood support services. This program seeks to address the high rate of couple dissolution following their baby's birth by
      helping couples to acquire communication and problem-solving skills as well as social assets associated with healthy couple and parenting
      relationships.
470
      Student Coalition for Action in Literacy Education (SCALE) (School of Education) SCALE supports campus-based literacy programs                             x
      throughout the United States. SCALE provides technical assistance to literacy programs through on-site training and resources. In addition,
      SCALE annually hosts a national conference for college literacy programs and their community partners, building a network among their
      leaders. Other SCALE activities include the N.C. LiteracyCorps Project which places AmeriCorps members in literacy programs, the
      America Reads program which places college student tutors with elementary school children and the Collaborative Leadership for
      Community Literacy Project which develops the leadership skills of those supervising N.C. LiteracyCorps members.

471
      Student Environmental Action Coalition (SEAC) Begun at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill in 1988, SEAC is the nation‘s                           x            x
      largest student-run environmental organization and focuses on improving Carolina‘s relationship with the environment through activism.
      SEAC conducts yearly campaigns that tackle issues related to community development, deforestation, corporate accountability and
      campus sustainability. Recent SEAC projects include promoting use of biodiesel on the Point-To-Point Shuttle; installing solar panels on
      Morrison Residence Hall; lobbying for local food in the dining halls; and a leading campaign to improve retailer Victoria‘s Secret‘s paper
      policy. SEAC‘s spring 2007 focus was to ensure passage of the N.C. Renewable Energy Portfolio Standard bills through student call-ins
      and a lobbying day around Earth Day.
472
                                                                DRAFT UNC Tomorrow Existing Programs Summary List

                                                                           A                                                                        B    C   D   E     F     G
      Program/Activity Title                                                                                                                        GR A PE ETCD       H     E
 1                                                                                                                                                   4.1 4.2 4.3 4.4   4.5   4.6
      Student Global Health Committee (SGHC) is composed of students interested in global health from all seven departments of the School            x           x      x
      of Public Health as well as others at the university, we are excited about the opportunity to share ideas and stimulate interests across
      disciplines. The mission of SGHC is to create ―awareness and understanding of global health issues among the UNC community through
      education, advocacy, and service.‖ We view our community as both local and global, and we look to continue and build on successful
      endeavors of years past. To provide an idea of such endeavors, below is a sampling of activities being planned for the 2007-2008 academic
      year: a multi-media series of speakers, films, and workshops related to the topics of "Health and Human Rights" and "Narratives of HIV"; a
      "brownbag" lunch series featuring film reviews and discussions on global health research and methodology; social events including a
      welcome-back event, international dance nights, potlucks, a student-faculty reception, language tables, and networking night; global health
      educational sessions with NC middle and high school students that cover topics such as migration and health, HIV/AIDS, and water and
      sanitation; fundraising events including the biannual global craft fair and an international fashion show.

473
      Student Health Action Coalition (SHAC) is a student led organization whose mission is to provide free health services to local                             x      x
      underserved individuals and communities, partner with communities to develop and implement sustainable programs, and create an
      interdisciplinary service learning environment for students in the health science programs at UNC. SHAC is run by entirely by student
      volunteers from many schools within UNC-CH including thee Schools of Medicine, Pharmacy, Public Health, Physical Therapy, Nursing,
      Dentistry, and Social Work.
474
      Student Poverty Reduction Outreach (SPROUT) Members of this student organization work with Volunteer Income Tax Assistance                         x       x
      (VITA) sites throughout Orange County to help low- to moderate-income citizens maximize their tax refunds and boost their incomes. The
      group‘s assistance focuses on the Earned Income Tax Credit, a provision that returns up to $4,000 in tax refunds to working families who
      earn below a certain income. This organization helps create constructive ties between the University and the community and serves to raise
      student awareness about the plight of the working poor in the Orange County area and beyond.

475
      Student Teams Achieving Results (STAR) at Kenan-Flagler MBA student teams at Kenan-Flagler Business School consult with and                    x           x
      assist North Carolina businesses free of charge in return for the opportunity to learn from experienced business leaders about real-world
      business challenges. Companies served cannot afford the services of professional strategists and it reinforces students‘ commitment to
      public service. Through statewide solicitation of proposals using multiple means of identification (e.g., networks, business service
      organizations, databases), projects are selected that can provide benefit to the company, are good learning opportunities for students, and
      that can be completed in an academic year. The goal is to help struggling North Carolina companies identify the path to sustainability and
      growth, keeping and growing jobs for North Carolina citizens.

476
      Students for the Advancement of Race Relations (SARR) (Campus Y) is a student organization which strives to facilitate communication                       x
      and understanding across racial lines. It is our goal to bring racial issues into the public's consciousness by fostering constructive,
      provocative discourse. We challenge everyone to confront harmful stereotypes and biases and emphasize the collective sense of
      sisterhood and brotherhood that unites us all.
477
      Students Working in the Environment for Active Transformation (SWEAT) (Campus Y) is a student committee which works to                                     x            x
      empower individuals to build strong communities rooted in the environment through education, physical challenge, and service.
478
      Studio for Instructional Technology in English Studies (SITES) Lab (Department of English and Comparative Literature) creates online           x       x
      teaching materials that can be accessed via the web for anyone interested in education. Also hosts software for online writing. Stylistics
      course website and its exercises are aimed at secondary school teachers for classroom use.
479
                                                                DRAFT UNC Tomorrow Existing Programs Summary List

                                                                            A                                                                        B    C   D   E     F     G
      Program/Activity Title                                                                                                                         GR A PE ETCD       H     E
 1                                                                                                                                                    4.1 4.2 4.3 4.4   4.5   4.6
      SUDAN (Students United for Darfur Awareness Now) is a student organization at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill                   x           x
      dedicated to doing whatever it can do to help the people affected by the genocide in Darfur, Sudan. We regularly hosts events both on and
      off the UNC campus with goals of raising awareness and educating about the genocide, lobbying for governmental action, and fundraising
      for relief and developmental efforts.
480
      Summer Bridge is a rigorous, seven-week academic program, Summer Bridge at UNC-Chapel Hill provides top instructional and                           x
      counseling staff to help its participants make the transition from high school to college. We target incoming freshman NC students from
      small/rural high schools that may lack AP or other college preparatory courses, prepare them to take college-level English and math
      courses and provide workshops that acclimate them to UNC-Chapel Hill‘s resources. Upon completion of Summer Bridge, students can
      earn up to 6.0 academic credit hours, and they face the Fall semester equipped with the successful academic strategies that Bridge models.

481
      Summer Undergraduate Research Fellowships (SURF) The Carolina Center for Public Service, in partnership with the Office of                                  x
      Undergraduate Research, awards up to three summer fellowships of $3,000 each to support engaged research, which encourages
      reciprocal and mutually beneficial partnerships between the university and the community. Any returning undergraduate student at UNC-
      Chapel Hill who wishes to engage in undergraduate research, scholarship or performance for at least nine weeks (minimum 20 hours/week)
      over the summer of 2008 is eligible to apply. Faculty advisors must supervise SURF projects. Projects that focus on public policy,
      education, health or economic development, and that have the ability to impact North Carolina are given preference.

482
483 SURF (see Summer Undergraduate Research Fellowships)
      SURGE (Students United for a Responsible Global Environment) is a chapter of the SURGE network. We connect hundreds of                          x           x            x
      students here at UNC-Chapel Hill and in the surrounding area to important initiatives for progressive social change.
484
      SWEAT (see Students Working in the Environment for Active Transformation)
485
      Table Talk (Campus Y) is a student committee which strives to unite students, faculty and community leaders through discussion of                           x
      provocative issues that impact campus and community life. We plan one discussion forum each month-the size of each will vary from small
      roundtable discussions to large debates.
486
      Tar Heel Bus Tour Each spring, the Tar Heel Bus Tour takes new faculty and administrators on a five-day trip across the state to learn          x   x   x   x      x     x
      what it means to be a true Tar Heel. The privately funded tour, which marked its 10th anniversary in 2007, shows newcomers the state in
      which 82 percent of the university‘s undergraduates grow up and how outreach efforts serve North Carolinians. Faculty members see how
      their own interests align with the state‘s needs. The annual Tar Heel Bus Tour also allows an opportunity for faculty and administrators to
      hear from community members about their perceptions of UNC‘s engagement with the state. Since it began in1997, almost 300 faculty
      members and senior administrators have participated in the annual experience, visiting a wide array of communities where UNC faculty are
      working in partnership to address community issues. Two examples of outcomes of the tour are a service-learning course at the School of
      Government that places students in communities visited, and a small grants program opportunity for participants offered each year by the
      Carolina Center for Public Service. After visiting Peck Elementary School in Greensboro, the 2005 Bus Tour participants met with the
      principal and faculty to identify priority issues. As a result, they used the grant money to develop science education and tutoring programs
      for the school and held a series of grant writing work shops for teachers.

487
                                                                 DRAFT UNC Tomorrow Existing Programs Summary List

                                                                             A                                                                          B    C   D   E     F     G
      Program/Activity Title                                                                                                                            GR A PE ETCD       H     E
 1                                                                                                                                                       4.1 4.2 4.3 4.4   4.5   4.6
      Targeted Rural Literacy Initiative (TRI) (National Research Center for Rural Education Support) is designed to meet the needs of                           x
      teachers and students in rural communities by providing a dual-level professional development intervention for both K-1 classroom teachers
      and their struggling readers. This model has the potential to be disseminated widely across rural areas of the state to impact early literacy.

488
      Task Force for a Healthier North Carolina UNC has partnered with the state‘s Health and Wellness Trust Fund (HWTF) Commission to                               x      x
      create a task force to examine barriers that limit access to health insurance and offer policy recommendations to overcome the barriers.
      Medicare Part D is the first topic the task force will tackle. Other topics, which will also receive public forums, are ―Children, Working
      Families and S-CHIP‖ and ―Small Business and Employer-Sponsored Health Insurance.‖ The task force will explore strategies to improve
      access to group health insurance for small-businesses (with 50 or fewer employees) and limit financial exposure for the underinsured.
489
      TEACCH (see Treatment and Education of Autistic and Related Communication Children with Handicaps)
490
      Teen Media Health Project This five-year project was funded by the National Institute of Child Health and Human Development and is                             x      x
      housed in the School of Journalism and Mass Communication. The team examined the effects of a range of media – television, music,
      movies, magazines, Internet and newspapers – on adolescents‘ sexual health through surveys of more than 3,200 North Carolina teens
      about media consumption and health behaviors, and content analysis of the most popular movies, television shows, music lyrics,
      magazines, newspapers and websites to measure the amount and kind of sexual content in each.

491
      Threads of HOPE (Center for Health Promotion and Disease Prevention) The concept of hope from the field of positive psychology offers                          x      x
      a framework for health behavior change that highlights the importance of enhancing participants‘ ability to envision, act on, and achieve
      goals that will lead to the desired health and life changes. Threads of HOPE, address economic empowerment through community-led
      strategic planning and the development of a micro-enterprise business.
492
      Thurston Arthritis Research Center The Thurston Arthritis Research Center was established at the University of North Carolina‘s School                 x              x
      of Medicine in 1981. Our mission is to investigate the causes, consequences and treatments of arthritis and autoimmune diseases and to
      reduce their impacts on patients, their families and society. Thurston has proudly served the people of North Carolina with a long tradition of
      excellence. Through our Community Outreach and Outcomes-Based Research programs and the North Carolina Family Practice Network,
      faculty members have established satellite clinics in rural and economically disadvantaged communities to update local physicians and
      other health care providers on the latest scientific knowledge and treatments, as well as educating the public on disease self-management.
      The Thurston Arthritis Research Center's public outreach initiatives include: the North Carolina Action Plan; the National Arthritis Action
      Plan; Arthritis and Public Health; serving as an information resource for several smaller arthritis programs around the state; bringing
      evidence-based programming to North Carolina; and participating in the development and evaluation of new therapies to treat arthritis and
      autoimmune diseases.

493
      Translational and Clinical Sciences Institute (TraCS) UNC created TraCS in January 2007. The vision for the Institute is to transform              x   x       x      x
      clinical and translational science by creating a platform for the development of a continuous cycle of knowledge, discovery and
      dissemination based on listening to the needs and concerns of communities across our state, translating those needs into hypotheses for
      discovery, and disseminating that knowledge to our citizenry in a partnership that will improve local and global health.

494
                                                                   DRAFT UNC Tomorrow Existing Programs Summary List

                                                                                A                                                                             B    C   D   E     F     G
      Program/Activity Title                                                                                                                                  GR A PE ETCD       H     E
 1                                                                                                                                                             4.1 4.2 4.3 4.4   4.5   4.6
      Treatment and Education of Autistic and Related Communication Children with Handicaps (TEACCH) A division of the UNC                                     x   x   x   x      x
      Department of Psychiatry, TEACCH has the following mission: to enable individuals with autism to function as meaningfully and as
      independently as possible in the community; to provide exemplary services throughout North Carolina to individuals with autism and their
      families and those who serve and support them; to generate knowledge; to integrate clinical services with relevant theory and research; and
      to disseminate information about theory, practice, and research on autism through training and publications locally, nationally and
      internationally.
495
496 TRI (see Targeted Rural Literacy Initiative)
      Tri-County Family Dental Center The School of Dentistry has a long-standing relationship with Tri-County Community Health Council Inc.,                      x              x
      which began 30 years ago as a part-time health program for the Sampson County migrant farm worker community and has grown to
      encompass five community health centers. The School has worked with Tri-County leadership in advising on every step in creating the 18-
      chair dental clinic. Starting in fall 2007, the school will send two general dentistry residents to the new dental center to provide oral health
      care as a part of a pilot program. UNC-Chapel Hill regularly sends dental students on rotations to Tri-County to help provide care for
      patients. The Tri-County pilot residency will extend the dental clinic‘s ability to provide patient treatment and give the school‘s students
      greater insight into effective oral health care delivery in underserved areas (Tri-County serves five counties in rural southeastern North
      Carolina), knowledge they will bring back to the School and take into their careers.

497
      TRIM (see Barbers Trimming Cancer Risk Among Black Men)
498
      Tutoring Against Tobacco This program is part of a student organization, Carolina Cancer Focus. The program‘s goal is to encourage                               x          x
      students to make responsible decisions about tobacco use. Its focus is on media literacy and helping students think critically about the role
499   that media plays in their lives, especially tobacco advertising.
      UNC Baccalaureate Education in Science and Teaching (UNC-BEST) is a unique new program designed to graduate science teachers                                 x   x
      for tomorrow, where biology and physics majors obtain an undergraduate degree in science and high-school science teaching licensure
      through an integration of Arts and Sciences and Education courses and experiences. Supported by scholarships from the Burroughs
      Wellcome Foundation, the UNC-BEST program will admit the first cohort of 20 or more students in Fall 2008. BWF Scholars receive an
      annual scholarship during their junior and senior years and, after graduation, they receive a salary supplement for up to five years if they
500   teach in a North Carolina public school.
      UNC Center for Innovative Clinical Trials (School of Public Health) conducts methodological, applied and interdisciplinary research on                                      x
      the design and analysis of clinical trials. Building on UNC‘s reputation and excellence in translating research to practice, the Center seeks to
      advance statistical science in clinical trials and quickly move it forward into clinical and statistical practice in existing and future studies. The
      Center‘s interdisciplinary focus brings together faculty from several UNC departments and additional collaborators from industry, who will
      engage jointly in both methodological and applied research in clinical trials design, analysis and evaluation. See also Gillings Innovative
      Laboratory.
501
502 UNC CNRC (see Clinical Nutrition Research Center)
                                                                DRAFT UNC Tomorrow Existing Programs Summary List

                                                                            A                                                                         B    C   D   E     F     G
      Program/Activity Title                                                                                                                          GR A PE ETCD       H     E
 1                                                                                                                                                     4.1 4.2 4.3 4.4   4.5   4.6
      UNC Health Care System Indigent Care The UNC Health Care System, which serves more than 400,000 patients a year, recently                                    x      x
      overhauled its policies to improve access to the system for those in financial need. To increase access and improve financial assistance,
      the system has hired five more financial counselors; negotiated a contract with Piedmont Health Systems to increase primary care
      availability to the uninsured in Orange, Chatham, Alamance and Caswell counties; developed protocols for referrals to the system from
      community health centers; added a statement about the availability of financial assistance counseling to telephone appointment reminders;
      trained clinic staff to offer financial counseling to all new patients; trained financial counselors to mare sure patients are aware of a no-
      interest payment plan for medical bills; posted signs in English and Spanish about available financial assistance; established and staffed a
      toll-free Charity Care Helpline for patients; and placed two Medicaid intake employees on site, including one who is bilingual. These and
      other new policies and procedures will be monitored by the system‘s Financial Assistance Oversight Committee.

503
      UNC IPRC (see Injury Prevention Research Center)
504
      UNC Libraries Providing a sound K-12 education and supporting K-12 educators is a priority for all North Carolinians. The library regularly      x       x
      hosts ―research days‖ for area schools including Chapel Hill High School, the Hillsborough Middle School, the Culbreth Middle School in
      Chapel Hill, and several other K-12 schools from Durham and Cary. An average of 12 schools visit each year, teaching some 500 students
      annually about library research and introducing them to the Carolina campus. In association with World View, an international program for
      educators, the library educates teachers and administrators throughout the state on relevant UNC library services and resources. Last
      August, the library hosted the follow-up meeting for the 2006 trip to China and created the ―Bringing China into the Classroom‖ website for
      teachers.
505
      UNC Partnership in Global Health The Office of Global Health was awarded a Fogarty International Center (NIH) "Framework Program for             x                  x
      Global Health" grant to establish the UNC Partnership in Global Health. This is a three-year, $400,000 grant to expand global health
      curriculum and research opportunities campus wide and engage faculty and students in an interdisciplinary study of global health issues. A
      coordinated Administrative Group, with partners from across campus, the region and the world, will implement the various activities of the
      Framework Program. The goals of the Partnership include: develop university-wide global health curricula for undergraduate and graduate
      students and develop new multidisciplinary courses; create an administrative framework to coordinate global health activities across UNC;
      and support and expand research endeavors and strengthen the curricula in global health through key supporting activities.

506
      UNC/National University of Singapore Joint Undergraduate Degree Program UNC-Chapel Hill and the National University of Singapore                 x   x
      (NUS) have partnered to form a joint-degree program for undergraduate students from both universities. The program is the first of its kind
      among UNC‘s U.S. peers and allows students to broaden their educational and international experiences. The program offers
      undergraduate students at both schools the opportunity to graduate with a degree from both institutions. The joint-degree program is an
      effective way for UNC students to pursue courses and research in Asian studies and for NUS students to explore the many study options
      available at UNC. For both parties, they are able to access a greater range of classes and form lasting global connections.

507
508 UNC-BEST (see UNC Baccalaureate for Education in Science and Teaching)
                                                                  DRAFT UNC Tomorrow Existing Programs Summary List

                                                                              A                                                                           B    C   D   E     F     G
      Program/Activity Title                                                                                                                              GR A PE ETCD       H     E
 1                                                                                                                                                         4.1 4.2 4.3 4.4   4.5   4.6
      UNC-Chapel Hill Air Force ROTC The Department of Aerospace Studies administers the United States Air Force Reserve Officer Training                      x       x
      Corps (AFROTC) Program, which has been an integral part of the University‘s tradition of scholarship, excellence and achievement since
      1947. As the University continues its pursuit of excellence as the nation‘s oldest state liberal arts university, Air Force ROTC continues to
      develop outstanding officers who will serve the nation. Air Force ROTC offers both undergraduate and graduate students many
      opportunities, including specialized academics, scholarships and financial assistance, applied professional training, job placement and a
      variety of extracurricular activities. Air Force ROTC is more than a department in the College of Arts and Sciences. It is also a professional
      organization designed to provide students with growth and development opportunities beyond the classroom.

509
      UNC-Chapel Hill Army ROTC The Army Reserve Officers‘ Training Corps (ROTC) was established at the University in September 1996. It                   x           x
      is designed to provide a course of military instruction that will permit qualified students to prepare themselves for commissions as second
      lieutenants while they pursue other academic courses leading to baccalaureate or advanced degrees from the University. Upon being
      commissioned as a second lieutenant, each student has the opportunity to serve in the active Army, Army Reserve, or National Guard in
      one of 17 career fields. Each year, Carolina‘s Army ROTC awards two-, three- and four-year merit based scholarships to qualified
      individuals on a rolling basis. Scholarships, valued up to $19,000 per year, include tuition and fees, books and a monthly stipend.
510
      UNC-Chapel Hill Sustainability Office Carolina is working to institutionalize sustainability across the campus. Policies, practices,                                          x
      curricula, staffing and funding allocations increasingly reflect this commitment to the multiple goals of ecological integrity, economic vitality
      and social equity. Some of the principles guiding this initiative include ecosystem protection, environmental justice, pollution prevention,
      rigorous science and data, partnerships, innovative
      environmental management and operations and environmental accountability. Constructing high performance buildings is one commitment
      that Carolina has made to sustainability. To reduce the environmental impact associated with Carolina‘s construction boom, aspects of the
      U.S. Green Building Council‘s Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design (LEED) guidelines are applied to each building project on
      campus.
511
      University Cancer Research Fund The state has provided an extraordinary opportunity for Carolina and its Health Care System, Health                                     x
      Affairs Schools, and UNC Lineberger Comprehensive Cancer Center to build on existing strengths and become the country‘s leading public
      comprehensive cancer center. Cancer is now the leading cause of death in North Carolina in spite of multiple advances that produce long-
      term cures in approximately two-thirds of the patients diagnosed. The N.C. Legislature and Gov. Mike Easley created the University Cancer
      Research Fund, providing $25 million this year, $40 million next year, and $50 million thereafter to support cancer research. Our initiatives
      through the UCRF will be dedicated to ensuring that future generations of North Carolinians will develop cancer less often and live longer
      and better when they do. To accomplish this goal, we will extend discoveries statewide through expanded outreach to clinics, health
      systems and underserved populations.
512
                                                                 DRAFT UNC Tomorrow Existing Programs Summary List

                                                                             A                                                                          B   C   D    E     F     G
      Program/Activity Title                                                                                                                            GR A PE ETCD       H     E
 1                                                                                                                                                       4.1 4.2 4.3 4.4   4.5   4.6
      Upward Bound (TRiO) Program (School of Education) provides services to 90 eligible high school youth to assist them in building skills                x   x
      and motivation that will ensure success in education beyond high school. The Program is a part of the School of Education and integrated
      into the campus community-at-large. UB-UNC recruits and serves students who are 9th or 10th graders and are low-income and potential
      first generation college students, including 30% higher risk youth, from the target high schools, who remain enrolled in the program
      throughout high school and immediately after high school graduation. The Upward Bound Program at the University of North Carolina at
      Chapel Hill has been serving the community since 1966. For over the past forty–one years the program has assisted in preparing and
      serving over thirty-five hundred students many of which have gone on to careers in law, medicine, education as well as public service and
      community out reach. The majority of the resources provided for this program is made possible through a TRiO grant from United States
      Department of Education at an annual cost $425,000.

513
      Urban Investment Strategies Center (Kenan Institute) helps develop innovative solutions to the challenges of revitalizing distressed                           x
      communities. The center focuses its research, outreach and education initiatives on addressing the growing gap between the ―haves‖ and
      ―have nots‖ in U.S. society. This gap has widened during the past two decades, reversing a quarter-century trend toward growing economic
      equality. The center acts as a catalyst in fostering urban prosperity by creating knowledge in key areas of community competitiveness. It
      advises communities on how to use their assets to thrive and prosper; develop market-based solutions that build community capital; and
      promote urban development. The center also teaches government, community and nonprofit leaders to become more entrepreneurial and
      business-like in their operations and service delivery.

514
      Virtual Museum of University History The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill is the nation's oldest state university, with a rich             x   x    x
      history of more than two centuries. This virtual museum (www.museum.unc.edu) retells that history much as a physical museum might do,
      with texts and images arranged in a series of roughly chronological exhibits. Along the way, there is much for the university's friends to take
      pride in, and other truths that are now painful to remember. The virtual museum is Carolina's open eye to its own past. Like all museums,
      this one will be constantly evolving. The Virtual Museum of University History is a collaboration between The UNC Center for the Study of
      the American South and The University Library.
515
      Virtual North Carolina Project (Institute of the Environment) Virtual North Carolina is a web-based database and decision support system                       x            x
      that helps communities throughout North Carolina achieve sustainability. The system guides communities through the process of assessing
      their performance on key measures of environmental quality, public health, economic vitality, provision of infrastructure, and social equity.
      The project is a core part of the Institute‘s Center for Sustainable Community Design, which aims to ensure that the communities of
      tomorrow avoid the environmental problems created by current typical patterns of growth.
516
      VITA (see Volunteer Income Tax Assistance)
517
                                                                 DRAFT UNC Tomorrow Existing Programs Summary List

                                                                            A                                                                           B    C   D   E     F     G
      Program/Activity Title                                                                                                                            GR A PE ETCD       H     E
 1                                                                                                                                                       4.1 4.2 4.3 4.4   4.5   4.6
      Volunteer Income Tax Assistance (VITA) The Master of Accounting Student Association (MACSA) at the Kenan-Flagler Business School                               x
      sponsors this program as its major philanthropy project each year. The focus of this project is to provide free tax assistance to low income
      Carolina employees, graduate students and low-income residents of the Chapel Hill/Carrboro community. This project supports the
      Chancellor‘s 2003 request that UNC departments and organizations provide aid to its low-income staff. The free income tax assistance
      program contributes to the spirit of this request; provides a much needed service to this NC population; and generates goodwill throughout
      the community at large. Approximately 40 to 50 percent of the Master of Accounting students (40 to 60 students) participate in this project
      year, supervised by members of the school‘s accounting faculty. For the spring of 2007, the community service hours of the accounting
      students for this project totaled approximately 250, serving 42 clients. To inform potential users of this service, the MAC program
      advertises in the Daily Tar Heel and UNC employee newspaper; and produces flyers that are inserted in the pay checks of low-income
      employees and sent to student organization leaders and university departments.

518
      Wake to Wellness Grants (Center for Health Promotion and Disease Prevention) The purpose of the Wake to Wellness Grants Program is                         x          x
      to provide funding to Wake County Public School System (WCPSS) elementary schools to implement programs that help meet one or more
      nutrition and/or physical activity requirements of state, district, and local school wellness policies. These grants support public schools in
519   their efforts to develop programs that create healthier school environments.

520 WBI (see What's the Big Idea?)
      What's the Big Idea? (WBI) (Friday Center for Continuing Education) is an important research dissemination and outreach initiative that
      provides North Carolinians with a pathway to the University's ground-breaking research in the sciences.
521
      White Paper on “Transitioning Economy: Will the Biotechnology Bet Pay Off?” The white paper was prepared in 2005 by MBA                                        x
      students David Lamore, Alvaro Ramos, Sabrina Washington and Vyada Vongphachanh for a Sustainable Enterprise Course taught by
      professors Albert Segars and James Johnson. The paper explores whether building a new economy around the biotechnology cluster
      rooted in the Research Triangle Park (RTP) is a strategic alternative for the large workforce that was formerly employed in the tobacco
      industry. They conclude that biotech is an effective strategy for job and wealth creation in the long term, but that commercial
      biomanufacturing and the creation of lower-skilled jobs may not come to fruition in the desired short term. The paper recommends a more
      holistic approach, including the use of several concurrent strategies in conjunction with the biotech strategy to provide short- and medium-
      term solutions. It also recommends a more focused disbursement of Golden LEAF grants.

522
      William and Ida Friday Center for Continuing Education offers a wide range of educational programs and services that substantially                 x   x       x      x
      broaden the population of persons throughout the state that the University is able to serve. The Friday Center‘s programs and services fall
      into three main categories: a conference center for educational functions conducted by university departments and other organizations,
      noncredit educational activities for professional development and personal enrichment, and a range of flexible learning opportunities for part-
      time students to earn academic credit. Here are some Friday Center programs of note (described in respective sections): Correctional
      Education Program (CEP) Carolina Courses Online, Nursing Refresher Program, Carolina Business Institute, and What's the Big Idea?
      (WBI).
523
      Wilson 20/20 The purpose of this community-wide planning process is to involve a broad cross-section of the community in identifying and                       x
      coming to consensus on an overarching realistic vision for the future of the greater Wilson community. The management committee of this
      effort selected the School of Government to provide consulting services for the planning process. Faculty and staff at the School of
      Government are providing direct support in building the infrastructure, gathering information, and planning the visioning summit and writing
524   the final report.
                                                                 DRAFT UNC Tomorrow Existing Programs Summary List

                                                                             A                                                                          B    C   D   E     F     G
      Program/Activity Title                                                                                                                            GR A PE ETCD       H     E
 1                                                                                                                                                       4.1 4.2 4.3 4.4   4.5   4.6
      WISEWOMAN (Well-Integrated Screening and Evaluation for Women Across the Nation) (Center for Health Promotion and Disease                                      x      x
      Prevention) is a cardiovascular disease (CVD) prevention program for underserved and underinsured women ages 40 to 64. It provides
      screening for CVD risk factors, lifestyle counseling to improve diet and physical activity, and clinical referral and follow-up services. Women
      who participate in WISEWOMAN also receive breast and cervical cancer screening through the National Breast and Cervical Cancer Early
      Detection Program. WISEWOMAN is funded by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and is currently in nine states. North
      Carolina has been a part of the WISEWOMAN program since its inception in 1995.

525
      Workforce Issues in Library and Information Science (WILIS) The changes in the demographic composition of the workforce being                          x       x      x
      created by the aging of the baby boomers is expected to create shortages of librarians and information industry workers in North Carolina.
      In order to gain a better understanding of what happens to graduates of the six LIS programs in the state, The School of Information and
      Library Science and UNC Institute on Aging have partnered in a three-year research project funded by the Institute of Museum and Library
      Services. WILIS is studying the complex personal, organizational and social factors that affect recruitment, job satisfaction and retention of
      library and information science graduates from six LIS programs across the state. More than 8,000 graduates who completed their
      educational programs between 1964 and 2005 are included in the study. The results will assist educational programs, employers, policy
      makers and other stakeholder to engage in more effective workforce planning.

526
      World View World View‘s mission is to support schools and colleges in preparing students to succeed in an interconnected world. World              x   x   x
      View helps educators integrate a global perspective into their curriculum, respond to the rapid ethnic and cultural change from immigrant
      students, improve ESL programs, and promote foreign language training and international travel. For the past nine years, World View has
      co-sponsored an annual Hispanics/Latinos seminar in March with the Consortium in Latin American Studies at the University of North
      Carolina at Chapel Hill and Duke University. Sessions include working with Latino parents and strategies for teaching ESL at the
      elementary, middle, high school and community college levels.
527
      WUNC FM, the National Public Radio affiliate licensed to UNC-Chapel Hill, operates a five-station radio network serving more than 250,000                      x
      weekly listeners from Greensboro to the Outer Banks. The station broadcasts news and cultural programming from studios located at its
      Chapel Hill headquarters, as well as from the American Tobacco Historic District in Durham and the N.C. General Assembly in Raleigh.
      WUNC has the largest public radio news staff in North Carolina and produces public radio programs including ―The State of Things,‖ ―The
      Story‖ with Dick Gordon and ―The People‘s Pharmacy.‖ WUNC-FM can be heard at 91.5 FM in the Triangle and Triad, at 90.9 FM in the
      Rocky Mount/Wilson/Greenville area and at 88.9 along the Outer Banks. A classical music service for the Outer Banks airs at 90.5 and 90.9
      FM.
528
529 YES (see Youth for Elderly Service)
      Youth for Elderly Service (YES) (Campus Y) works to better the lives of elderly individuals in the community by building meaningful                            x
      relationships. Student volunteers also strive to broaden the social consciousness of the committee members through individual experiences
      and community enrichment.
530
                               DRAFT UNC Tomorrow Existing Programs Summary List

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      Program/Activity Title                                                       GR A PE ETCD       H     E
 1                                                                                  4.1 4.2 4.3 4.4   4.5   4.6




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                               DRAFT UNC Tomorrow Existing Programs Summary List

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                               DRAFT UNC Tomorrow Existing Programs Summary List

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                               DRAFT UNC Tomorrow Existing Programs Summary List

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Program/Activitity Title                                                                                                                 GR
                                                                                                                                          4.1
15-501 Global Health Dinner Club The 15-501 Global Health Dinner Club is part of a global health initiative between UNC-Chapel            x
Hill and Duke funded by the GlaxoSmithKline Foundation. It is a new and important mechanism for nurturing collaboration and
strengthening ties between faculty and students who work in global health at UNC and Duke. The Dinner Club is primarily
organized by students at both UNC and Duke brings together UNC and Duke faculty and students to discuss research
collaborations and promote ongoing collaboration.



African Studies Center The staff and programs of the African Studies Center work to provide the University and the people of              x
North Carolina with a campus hub for interdisciplinary inquiry and communication on Africa, including the sponsorship of a wide
variety of activities that bring together interested faculty and students from a large number of academic disciplines, focusing on the
interconnected issues of democratization, development, health, and gender.



Amnesty International UNC Amnesty International works to free prisoners of conscience; gain fair trials for political prisoners;          x
end torture, political killings and "disappearances;" abolish the death penalty throughout the world; and promote economic, social
and cultural rights.
APPLES (Assisting People in Planning Learning Experiences in Service The APPLES Service Learning Program is a student                     x
initiated, student-led, student-funded program engaging students, faculty and community agencies in service-learning partnerships.
The goal of APPLES is to foster socially aware and civically involved students through participation in an enriched curriculum and
hands-on experiences that address the needs of North Carolina communities. The focus of the program is on the connection made
between service in the community and what students learn in an academic setting. More than 150 community organizations in the
Triangle region partner with the APPLES program each year. APPLES provides extensive support for faculty who teach service-
learning courses or would like to develop such courses. Support includes consultation during course development and
implementation; assistance in identifying community partners; provision of trained student facilitators; $500 course enhancement
grants; a two-day faculty development institute for faculty, staff, students, and community partners; discussion series and
workshops held in collaboration with the Center for Teaching and Learning; a resource library, a faculty listserv, and a faculty
BlackBoard site. This past year, 69 APPLES service-learning courses were offered in 22 departments, enrolling 1,214 students.
These students volunteered 46,010 hours in the Triangle community through APPLES service-learning experiences. Examples
include students enrolled in an intermediate Spanish course who volunteered with the Spanish School Reading Partners program
to help Spanish-speakers develop English language skills; public relations students who developed public service announcements,
fact sheets and brochures for the Special Olympics of Orange County; and students in a biomedical engineering course who
modified an iPod to respond to movement to encourage a blind toddler to crawl. This year, APPLES launched its first Global
Alternative Spring Break experience to Guanajuato, Mexico. This signature program provided 11 students, their professor and a
graduate student with a first-hand experience on the global forces that shape migration to North Carolina, as well as its effects on
migrant families and sending communities. Students returned to UNC eager and well-equipped to serve local Latino communities
through individual, sustained projects. This is a collaborative effort between APPLES and the Center for Global Initiatives.




Campus Y The Campus Y is the oldest and largest student organization on the UNC-Chapel Hill campus. Since the Y‘s founding                x
more than 150 years ago, Campus Y students have led UNC efforts to address social justice issues and encourage volunteerism
throughout the community and around the world. Seventeen active issue-based program committees and projects span a wide
range of issues, including human rights, hunger, supporting immigrants and literacy. These committees and programs are
completely student driven and student run. The Campus Y is also one of four groups that have worked together to create the
STRETCH (STudents REaching Toward CHange) conference. This day-and-a-half annual leadership and service conference is
planned and run by students to promote leadership and community engagement.


Carolina Asia Center The Carolina Asia Center, a unit of the College of Arts and Sciences, is a core element of UNC-Chapel                x
Hill‘s initiative to strengthen its position as a world-class international university.
CAC (pronounced ―see ay see‖) is the hub for three sets of inter-related activities focusing on Asia: Cutting-edge Research;
Innovative Teaching; and Strategic Partnerships.

Carolina Center for Public Service The Center‘s Public Service Scholars program provides a framework for students to                      x
complete service; connects students who care about similar issues with one another; guides participants in training that can make
their service more effective; links coursework to service; offers unique opportunities to participants; and recognizes students for
their commitment to service. Since its inception in 2003, the program has rapidly grown from 78 to more than 1,000 students. In
four years, participants have logged more than 165,000 hours of service in communities throughout North Carolina, the nation and
the world. In 2007, 96 students graduated as Public Service Scholars, with nearly 40,000 hours of service to their credit.
Carolina Center for Public Service UNC-Chapel Hill‘s public service programs reach every region of North Carolina, helping             x
communities protect public health, improve schools and medical services, stimulate business, plan for growth, understand cultural
heritage, and enrich the quality of people‘s daily lives. Launched in 1999, the Carolina Center for Public Service coordinates and
catalyzes campus outreach activities around the state. The Center has also created the Carolina Center for Public Service
Database matching its public service projects with all 100 North Carolina counties. This Internet resource contains descriptions of
858 projects currently and will continue to grow. The website attracts between 400 and 550 unique users each quarter.



Carolina Center for the Study of the Middle East and Muslimn Civilizations (CCSMEMC) The Carolina Center for the Study of              x
the Middle East and Muslim Civilizations represents a fruitful hybrid between traditional area studies approaches and cross-regional
Islamic studies. The University aims to support a full range of traditional Middle East Studies, including the region's non-Muslim
peoples and civilizations, while at the same time broadening the focus to include Muslim peoples and civilizations outside of the
traditional area studies limits.




Carolina Connects This chancellor-initiated tour of North Carolina is designed to highlight for local citizens the many ways that      x
UNC relates directly to their communities and their needs. A special website (http://www.unc.edu/depts/design/connects/)
chronicles the visits to every region of the state, to more than 50 communities from Manteo and Shallotte in the East to Asheville
and Cullowhee in the West and points in between. ―Carolina Connects‖ stops focused on the Carolina Covenant program, the
Citizen-Soldier initiative and multiple research and public service projects. Chancellor Moeser also visits with alumni, legislators
and news media outlets to highlight the ways in which the University‘s faculty, staff and students serve communities and people.
Each stop spotlights the University‘s teaching, research and public service work, particularly in the areas of economic
development, health care and public education because we know those are issues of interest to North Carolinians. Carolina
Connects is also an opportunity for Carolina faculty and staff to listen to the people – to ask the question, ―What problems do you
need the university to work on?‖



Center for AIDS Research (CFAR) The purpose of the UNC CFAR is to provide infrastructure to support investigation of the               x
HIV/AIDS epidemic using clinical research, behavioral research, research into HIV biology and pathogenesis at the molecular level,
and educational outreach. The UNC CFAR is a consortium of three complementary institutions: UNC-Chapel Hill, Research
Triangle Institute, and Family Health International.

Center for European Studies / European Union Center of Excellence Our mission is to advance understanding of the social,               x
political and economic events that shape contemporary Europe, in particular the European integration project. This is accomplished
by supporting faculty and graduate student research through our roles as a National Resource Center funded by the US Dept of
Education and as an EUCE funded by the European Commission. At the same time, the Center disseminates knowledge about
contemporary Europe by enricdhing our university's work in graduate and undergraduate education and in outreach programs with
public schools, business and media organizations.


Center for Global Initiatives The Center for Global Initiatives is a catalyst for the innovative work of faculty and students at the   x
University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. Formerly known as the University Center for International Studies (UCIS), the center is
entrepreneurial and nimble in its approach to fostering initiatives that deepen knowledge and understanding of our complex world.
The center offers an annual interdisciplinary conference titled, ―Navigating the Global American South Conference,‖ which explores
the changing face of the southern United States and its interaction with the rest of the world.


Center for Global Initiatives: Carolina Navigators The K-12 Outreach Program, part of the Center for Global Studies, enriches          x
international education in North Carolina schools by providing free educational presentations that engage students in learning
about other countries, cultures, world regions, global issues and international current events. Presentations are designed to
supplement classroom instruction and can be tailored for teaching needs, regional issues, instructional purpose and appropriate
grade level. The Center for Global Studies supported the School of Education‘s production of a ―Handbook for Educators Who
Work with Children from Mexico.‖ The handbook is available on CD and is free of charge.
Center for Infant and Young Children Feeding and Care The mission of the Center for Infant and Young Child Feeding and                     x
Care in the Maternal and Child Health Department of the School of Public Health at UNC, Chapel Hill is to create an enabling
environment, at the community, state, national and global levels, in which every mother is supported to achieve optimal infant and
young child feeding and care, and every child achieves its full potential through the best start on life. The goals include: promoting
attention to the mother/child dyad for addressing health and survival, growth and development, advancing breastfeeding,
complementary feeding, and related maternal health outcomes through development and dissemination of the evidence-base to
enhance policy, programs and training throughout the world, increasing the recognition of the importance of the mother/child as the
unit for study and care, and collaborating with academic, advocacy, and action organizations worldwide and training the leaders
and practitioners of tomorrow.


Center for International Business and Education Research UNC-Chapel Hill is home to one of the U.S. Department of                          x
Education's Centers for International Business and Research (CIBERs). These university-based centers promote education and
training that will contribute to the ability of United States business to prosper in an international economy. UNC‘s CIBER offers a
range of programs to help undergraduates, MBAs, University faculty, working professionals, K-12 teachers and policymakers.
CIBER seeks to prepare students for global business leadership through experiential education, equip educators to better
incorporate global business concepts and experiences into their teaching and research, and infuse companies and communities
with strategies and processes to enhance their global competitiveness.



Center for Slavic, Eurasian, and East European Studies (CSEEES) is a multi-disciplinary collaboration committed to                         x
enhancing knowledge about and experience of Eastern Europe and Eurasia in the university, state, and nation. The CSEEES
contributes to the preparing of students for successful professional careers through its Curriculum in Russian and East European
Studies, which offers BA and MA degrees and a Graduate Certificate; outreach activities aimed at increasing awareness among K-
12 and Community College students and educators about regional culture, history, and issues; and support for faculty and student
activities on and off campus, including fellowships targeted at graduate study of Foreign Language and Area Studies (FLAS). The
Center also promotes partnerships in North Carolina and beyond by engaging in collaborative programs; supporting conference,
workshop and seminar activities; and actively promoting scholarly and student exchanges, research, and study abroad. One of the
key CSEEES outreach activities is developing capacity of NC teachers to meet the challenges of public education. We partner
with other organizations and local schools to increase international awareness of teachers and students. The Center is also
committed to enhancing expertise and increasing community awareness of energy and environmental issues through public
programs and support for faculty, students, and scholarly exchanges.




Chichewa Language and Malawi Culture Workshops                                                                                             x
China Social Science Infrastructure Program (R24)                                                                                          x

Clinical Translation Science Award (CTSA)                                                                                                  x

Doris Duke Fellowships The DDCRF Program allows medical students to take a year-long break from their formal training to                   x
pursue a clinical research project. The University of Iowa offers fellows the opportunity to train with outstanding mentors in virtually
every clinical science department and discipline.




Durham Scholars Program is directed by James Johnson, professor of geography and director of the Urban Investment                          x
Strategies Center at the Frank Hawkins Kenan Institute of Private Enterprise at the UNC Kenan-Flagler Business School.
Established in 1993, the foundation of this program is an after-school college preparatory academy where students work on
improving both academic and social skills. Each year, 30 sixth-grade students are chosen from Durham neighborhoods where the
poverty rate exceeds 40 percent. With the help of teachers and volunteer mentors, students do homework, publish a weekly
newsletter and take part in volunteer activities. Consistent with the theory of social capital, the program gets parents involved in a
parallel set of educational programs, including nutrition workshops, consumer-credit counseling and conflict-resolution guidance.
Parents also visit their children‘s school once a month. The second part of the program is designed to help 11th and 12th graders
prepare for college. Eight need-based college scholarships are offered to Durham-area high school graduates on a competitive
basis. Recipients also participate in workshops and volunteer activities, including mentoring younger students in the after-school
program. As students in the after-school program reach 11th grade, they become eligible for the college scholarships. The
initiative, set to take place over a period of 20 years, will impact nearly 250 students.
Emerging Leaders in Public Health The Emerging Leaders in Public Health Program is designed to prepare the next generation                  x
of public health leaders by identifying and training those individuals with the talent to serve in significant leadership capabilities in
the next decade. The program's topics include balancing communications needs, financial resources and human resources during
times of crises, analyzing crisis scenarios and assessing their potential impact on one's organization and community, creating
sustainable organizations in public health and managing an increasingly diverse workforce.



European Study Center (Honours Program), Winston House, London Carolina‘s newly acquired Winston House—the                                  x
European Study Center in London-- serves as a hub linking the College of Arts and Sciences‘ study abroad and research initiatives
across the European continent. The Center also presents exciting new opportunities for students, faculty, and alumni from units
across the Carolina campus, from sister institutions across the university system, and from partner institutions elsewhere, to
implement programs that take full advantage of London‘s cultural riches. Winston House is available for use by administrators,
researchers, staff, faculty, students—anyone who believes that he or she can enrich and enliven his or her program by meeting
and working in London.


FHI-UNC Fellowship Program Family Health International (FHI) is a nonprofit organization with a mission to improve lives                    x
worldwide by addressing complex public health issues through research, education and services. FHI has offices in North Carolina
and Virginia as well as 49 offices in Africa, Asia, Europe, Latin America and the Middle East. Since its founding in 1971, FHI has
conducted clinical research in more than 95 countries utilizing greater than 1,000 sites. We have conducted more than 500 clinical
trials and 1,000 clinical research studies. FHI‘s research and development programs have brought more than 10 women‘s health
products to market in greater than 30 countries.                       FHI, in partnership with the Office of Global Health in the UNC
School of Public Health is offering a fellowship program for doctoral students and second year masters students in the UNC SPH.
This exciting fellowship program provides you with the opportunity to work with FHI‘s world-renowned researchers in global health
topics such as, HIV/AIDS, infectious diseases, reproductive, maternal and adolescent health. As a part-time research/program
assistant, you will have hands-on learning experiences that will expand your research skills as well as make important contributions
to specific research studies. Your assigned project has the potential to provide you with the basis for your dissertation or master‘s
thesis.




Fort Bragg Base Realignment and Closure Baseline Assessment A community impact assessment was completed in 2006 to                          x
predict the impact of personnel changes on the public schools. The Center for Urban and Regional Studies project focused on Fort
Bragg and 11 surrounding counties (Bladen, Cumberland, Harnett, Hoke, Lee, Montgomery, Moore, Richmond, Robeson,
Sampson and Scotland). Projections will help local governments and school systems prepare for an influx of soldiers and their
families.

Gillings Innovation Labs (GILs) Competitively selected Gillings Innovation Laboratories (GILs) will focus concentrated efforts on           x
solving big public health problems, such as obesity, lack of access to clean water and health care, and epidemics around the world.
 Solutions to these problems can make a large difference in the public‘s health. The GILs are committed to accelerate delivery of
best practices to improve people‘s lives and anticipate new public health challenges. Some examples of GILs are the UNC Center
for Innovative Clinical Trials and the Carolina Global Water Partnership.
    The UNC Center for Innovative Clinical Trials at the UNC School of Public Health conducts methodological, applied and
interdisciplinary research on the design and analysis of clinical trials. Building on UNC‘s reputation and excellence in translating
research to practice, the Center seeks to advance statistical science in clinical trials and quickly move it forward into clinical and
statistical practice in existing and future studies. The Center‘s interdisciplinary focus brings together faculty from several UNC
departments and additional collaborators from industry, who will engage jointly in both methodological and applied research in
clinical trials design, analysis and evaluation.
    The Carolina Global Water Partnership will focus on increasing the availability and usage of water treatment technologies that
can be used in homes in the developing world that do not have clean running water. Phase I of the project will explore several
different business models, including whether microfinance institutions can make it easier for poor consumers to purchase point-of-
use water filters and other treatment technologies and whether microfinancing, or microfranchising, can successfully provide seed
capital for local entrepreneurs to produce, market and distribute the filters. During this phase, researchers will also look at ways to
reduce costs through improved design, production and distribution models.
Global Health Faculty Partnership Grants Program Designed to foster the development of multidisciplinary research projects                 x
and partnerships in global health, grants will be made to UNC-Chapel Hill faculty for international travel to establish or maintain
research relationships with colleagues in other countries (e.g., clarifying joint research interests, planning, organizing institutional
linkages, jointly developing or writing research proposals to funding agencies). GHP grant funds cannot be used to support data
collection, other actual research activity, or attendance at meetings and conferences. Grant awards will be made in amounts up to
$5,000.

GlobeMed GlobeMed is a national non-profit organization that connects student-led chapters at universities across the United               x
States directly to health organizations around the world. In forming partnerships and designing innovative health projects, we allow
ourselves and members of the community to engage, educate, and enable. Enabling students to construct change will allow them
to deepen their own education. Educating our students and community will provide a greater capacity to improve global health. This
will be done through workshops, course curriculum designs, and distance learning. Engaging students will make them more aware
of global health challenges through the various service projects that our organization will offer. While a common vision and mission
unites members at each of our campuses, the strength of the GlobeMed network rests in each chapter‘s unique projects and
efforts.


Graduate Certificate in Global Health                                                                                                      x
The purpose of the Graduate Certificate in Global Health prepares residential SPH students to work in changing environments and
with diverse populations, and to respond competently to the challenges presented by permeable geographic and cultural
boundaries.
The Certificate complements currently enrolled graduate students' departmental requirements by offering courses, seminars, and
fieldwork or internships that provide for a comprehensive understanding of global health conditions, needs, and solutions that cross
borders in both developing and industrialized countries and regions. Students will gain competence in identifying and analyzing
factors that generate disparities in health status, health resources, and access to health information and health services,
particularly for ethnic minorities and other marginalized and vulnerable population groups.
The Graduate Certificate in Global Health is open to students currently enrolled in a graduate degree program of the University of
North Carolina School of Public Health.


GSK Student Seed Grant Program The GlaxoSmithKline Foundation has awarded the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill                  x
and Duke University a grant to bring the two institutions together to share resources and ideas in the area of global health: the GSK
UNC-Duke Global Health Project. Both Duke and UNC are committed to the development of global health research, curricula, and
capacity building both at home and in international training programs in Tanzania and Malawi, respectively. This grant is designed
to foster the development of multidisciplinary research projects and partnerships in global health between the two universities.

Funds have been designated to support student research in the form of seed grants. The grants will be awarded based on the
soundness of the research proposal and how well it demonstrates the principles of the larger grant (please note: students don't
have to focus their research on Malawi or Tanzania; research can be done any where in the world)




GSK UNC Duke Global Health Project Application materials were due January 15, 2008                                                         x
This program is available for UNC graduate students (and Duke students).
    The GlaxoSmithKline Foundation has awarded the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill and Duke University a grant to
bring the two institutions together to share resources and ideas in the area of global health: the GSK UNC-Duke Global Health
Project. Both Duke and UNC are committed to the development of global health research, curricula, and capacity building both at
home and in international training programs in Tanzania and Malawi, respectively. This grant is designed to foster the development
of multidisciplinary research projects and partnerships in global health between the two universities.
   GSK Student Seed Grant Program: Funds have been designated to support student research in the form of seed grants. The
grants will be awarded based on the soundness of the research proposal and how well it demonstrates the principles of the larger
grant.
Hickory Metropolitan Higher Education Center The Hickory-Morganton metropolitan area is the largest in the state without a                x
university. In fact, there is not a public university closer than about an hour‘s drive of Hickory. In 2002, the leadership of Hickory
created the Hickory Metropolitan Higher Education Center — a virtual institution of higher education. The HMHEC is an
educational consortium among several N.C. universities and colleges that assists students who have completed their initial two
years of college courses in earning degrees by enrolling them in part-time classes. Graduate degree programs are also available.
In 2005, UNC-Chapel Hill‘s Office of Economic and Business Development announced a partnership with the HMHEC to offer
undergraduate, graduate and nondegree programs at the center and to promote the university‘s distance-learning programs and
online courses there. Since that time the following activities, among others, have occurred in HMHEC: training of nearly 40 local
officials at HMHEC in the essentials of economic development by School of Government faculty and staff; strong enrollments in
training provided by the Northwest AHEC; training in the A Su Salud program; two college fairs; and publicity in the seven-county
Hickory service area for several Carolina online certificate and masters programs — a graduate certificate in technology and
communication by the School of Journalism, a certificate program in Community Preparedness and Disaster Management through
the School of Public Health and also an Executive MPH and MHA degrees.



Hubert H. Humphrey Fellowship Program The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill participates in the Hubert H.                       x
Humphrey program, a U.S. Department of State funded program geared towards developing leaders for a global society. The
Hubert H. Humphrey Fellowship Program provides a year of professional enrichment in the United States for experienced
professionals from designated countries around the world. Fellows are selected based on their potential for leadership and their
commitment to public service in either the public or private sector. At UNC the Fellows take graduate classes in the College of Arts
and Sciences, the Kenan-Flagler Business School, and schools of Government, Law, and Public Health to learn about effective
polices in their respective fields. The Fellows also receive leadership development training, participate in professional internships
that respond to their long-term career goals, and consult with leaders from businesses, government agencies and nonprofit
organizations. By providing these professionals with a shared experience of society, culture, and current approaches to the fields in
which they work, the program provides a basis for establishing long-lasting productive partnerships and relationships between U.S.
professionals and their colleagues from other countries.



Institute for Global Health and Infectious Diseases The Institute of Global Health and Infectious Diseases came out of                    x
discussions Mike Cohen, Director of the Center for Infectious Diseases in the School of Medicine, and I had with a variety of
leaders across campus. UNC-Chapel Hill is among a small minority of public and private universities with extensive and long-
standing strength in global health, including broad and important areas, such as nutrition, water, and infectious diseases. The new
Institute is seen as a way to catalyze this amazing depth and breadth of global health research, education and service being done
across UNC and around the world, making the work even stronger and deeper. The Office of Global Health in the UNC School of
Public Health (OGH) has been playing a central coordinating role for global health across campus, particularly through funding from
the Fogarty International Center and the Framework Program in Global Health grant that the OGH received. The new Institute will
expand on these efforts and has strong institutional support for sustainability.



Institute for Latin American Studies (ILAS) The Institute for the Study of the Americas (ISA) at the University of North Carolina         x
at Chapel Hill is dedicated to the pursuit of knowledge of the Latin American experience in the Western Hemisphere. It builds on a
long-standing and distinguished tradition of scholarly interest in Latin America, an interest that embraces the diverse regions that
make up Latin America, including Mexico and Central America, South America, and the Caribbean.


Institute for Pharmacogenomics and Individualized Therapy, Pharmacogenomics for Every Nation Initiative By translating                    x
genetic discoveries into new ways to diagnose and treat disease, a new research institute launched at UNC will make drugs safer
and more effective and speed laboratory discoveries to physicians and patients. The Institute for Pharmacogenomics and
Individualized Therapy (IPIT), based at the UNC School of Pharmacy, brings together researchers and clinicians across Carolina to
create therapies and treatments for patients suffering from a wide variety of conditions. The institute initially will partner with the
UNC Lineberger Comprehensive Cancer Center to focus on cancer therapy, with planned expansion into cardiovascular disease,
psychiatric disorders and global health. The results will have both economic and health benefits. Pharmacogenomics is a new field
exploring how information in our genes influences our response to drugs. It involves integrating pharmacology with modern
advances in genome analysis. The institute‘s goal is to fully integrate personalized medicine into medical practice by providing
tools and tests for physicians to identify patients at risk for adverse reactions or those who are likely to benefit from a particular
treatment. Institute researchers will also identify drug targets, such as genetic markers in tumor cells, to guide development of new
drugs. IPIT will house one of 10 research centers that form the National Institutes of Health‘s Pharmacogenomics Research
Network. The institute‘s researchers also lead the Pharmacogenomics for Every Nation Initiative, a global effort to help countries
make better informed public health decisions using genetic information.
Institute for the Environment The UNC Institute for the Environment is leading UNC‘s world-renowned environmental community                 x
in developing solutions to critical challenges. The Institute carries out its public service mission in several ways, including through
its Environmental Resource Program, which promotes environmental stewardship and public health through education, research
and community service, and through various field sites, at which students and faculty work with communities to examine
environmental issues of local concern. The North Carolina Naturally program provides a state-wide database and decision support
tool for conservation and planning. An upcoming project is the report ―Energy and Environment in North Carolina.‖ The report, to
be released this summer, would assess all known UNC system energy and environment programs and would provide thoughts,
from faculty leaders' perspectives, about how the Carolina and the system could assist all sectors of the state with this critical issue.



Integrated Media Project on Latinos in North Carolina (SOJ)                                                                                 x

Interdisciplinary Health Communication Certificate Program through the School of Journalism and Mass Communication,                         x
Information and Library Sciences, School of Public Health and Department of Psychology The Certificate prepares current
degree-seeking residential UNC-Chapel Hill graduate students to use theory-informed health communication strategies in applied
practice, academic and research settings. It supplements students� degree programs with focused training in one of two tracks:
Psychological processes - examining how health communication leads people to change their health behaviors.
Integrated communication strategies - examining how to create and deliver health communication messages and interventions
through interpersonal communication, print media and electronic media.



International Health Forum The School of Medicine has a long and distinguished history of international activity. Throughout the            x
School's fifty years as four-year institution, faculty members and students have studied the impact of global health and disease
upon their own interests and those of their current and future patients. They have collaborated with research colleagues in foreign
institutions, exchanged teaching and learning settings with peers in other countries, and experienced firsthand the difficulties and
rewards of providing medical care, conducting research and studying medicine under conditions far different from those at home,
but conditions which provide valuable insight into North Carolina's health care needs.

Each year between 30 and 40 School of Medicine students travel abroad for international projects and electives. Many of these
projects are arranged individually by students with the help of faculty mentors. Other students participate in programs that have
been designed by School of Medicine faculty and cooperating colleagues abroad.




International Social Studies Project is designed to serve public school teachers and pre-service teachers as well as school                 x
districts in their need for up to date information about those areas of the world that change faster than school textbooks. We
disgned and deliverd professional development workshops in school districts and at professional conferences for social studies
teachers. We also developed arts based lessons for delivery in schools that included plays for school groups and provided
teaching packets to teachers who brought their classes to the plays that were performed by professional actors . We had
workshops on Africa, South America, the Middle East, Asia and Europe. We delivered workshops across North Carolina in 12
counties. Through our workshops at professional conferences, 37 North Carolina counties were served.



Kenan-Flagler Leadership/Management Training Program and Urban Investment Strategies Center (UISC) focusing on K-                           x
12 education The Kenan-Flagler Business School and the Kenan Institute‘s Urban Investment Strategies Center (UISC) are
delivering a leadership/management training program for priority high schools. The first ―class‖ of school leadership has completed
the training, and a second set of schools has been selected for the next round. The Kenan Institute is working with
Edenton/Chowan education, civic and business leadership to revitalize K-12 education. UISC is leading the development of a lab
school in partnership with Union Baptist Church in Durham as an innovative model of 21st century education. In partnership with
Golden LEAF Foundation, N.C. New Schools Project, NCDPI, NC REAL and others, Kenan-Flagler is developing a model for a
pilot K-20 and beyond entrepreneurship education initiative.


Kenan-Flagler and Tsinghua University Center for Logistics and Digital Strategy The Kenan Institute's Center for Logistics                  x
and Digital Strategy (CLDS) and Tsinghua University have recently established the Kenan-Tsinghua Center For Logistics And
Economic Development, a joint research center in logistics. Tsinghua University is considered the MIT of China and the partnership
positions both organizations as leaders in logistics for emerging global markets.
The joint Center will focus on logistics and global supply-chain management research that enhances trade between the United
States and China, supports economic development and addresses issues such as offshore outsourcing.
Kenan Institute Asia The Kenan Institute Asia (K.I.Asia) works in a variety of ways to promote sustainable development in Asia.             x



Kenan Institute Charlotte is a joint venture of the Frank Hawkins Kenan Institute of Private Enterprise at Carolina‘s Kenan-                x
Flagler Business School and the Belk School of Business at UNC-Charlotte. Established in December 1997, KI Charlotte develops
models for creating jobs and alleviating poverty in the inner city, using Charlotte as its laboratory. KI Charlotte provides training and
technical assistance to minority small business owners and entrepreneurs preparing to launch ventures to help them grow,
generate more jobs and pump more money into the inner city economy. Promising businesses are able to receive technical
assistance and capital form the Urban Venture Fund, which target businesses that are three to five years old and have at least $1
million in assets. KI Charlotte also provides business-style training for leaders of nonprofit organizations, to help them build
organizations that are economically self-sustaining rather than dependent on government and philanthropic contributions. Its civic
entrepreneurship program teaches local government leaders how to market their communities, attract foreign investment and
create new wealth.


Kenan Institute for Private Enterprise, Center for Air Commerce, Center for Entrepreneurial Studies, Center for International               x
Business Education and Research, Center for Logistics and Digital Strategy, Center for Real Estate Development, Center for
Sustainable Enterprise, Center for Urban Investment Strategies
Center for Competitive Economies With the loss of multiple traditional industries, North Carolina at every community level is
facing the challenge of how to sustain, grow and prosper in the 21st century. Housed in the Kenan Institute of Private Enterprise at
the Kenan-Flagler Business School, the Center for Competitive Economies works with leaders at the community, county and
regional level to address the challenges of global competitiveness and create custom solutions that build on the unique assets of
each region. The Center has worked with Advantage Carolina, AdvantageWest Regional Partnership; Carteret County; Charlotte
Regional Partnership, City of Salisbury, Kerr-Tar Council of Governments, and multiple state agencies. Funding for this program is
provided through grants from the entities served.



Kenan Institute Urban Investment Strategies Centrer: The Kenan Institute‘s Urban Investment Strategies Center helps develop
innovative solutions to the challenges of revitalizing distressed communities. The center
focuses its research, outreach and education initiatives on addressing the growing gap between the ―haves‖ and ―have nots‖ in U.S.
society. This gap has widened during the past two decades, reversing a quarter-century trend toward growing economic equality.
The center acts as a catalyst in fostering urban prosperity by creating knowledge in key areas of community competitiveness. It
advises communities on how to use their assets to thrive and prosper;
develop market-based solutions that build community capital; and promote urban development. The center also teaches
government, community and nonprofit leaders to become more entrepreneurial and business-like in their operations and service
delivery. Web site: www.kenan-flagler.unc.edu/KI/urbanInvestment
Contact: James Johnson, 919-962-2214, jim_johnson@unc.edu


Kenan Institute’s Center for Air Commerce The Kenan Institute's Center for Air Commerce offers a range of services that help
clients anticipate trends and prepare to take strategic advantage. It helps communities plan how they will leverage their airports
and surrounding commercial areas to attract industry and promote economically and environmentally sustainable growth; airport
authorities plan and develop airports as retail, entertainment and business meeting destinations and vital networks for air
commerce; air shippers and service industries anticipate trends and business opportunities; companies streamline their supply
chains and integrate the latest information technologies to improve performance and profits.



Kenan Center for Competitive Economies With the loss of multiple traditional industries, North Carolina at every community                  x
level is facing the challenge of how to sustain, grow and prosper in the 21st century. Housed in the Kenan Institute of Private
Enterprise at the Kenan-Flagler Business School, the Center for Competitive Economies works with leaders at the community,
county and regional level to address the challenges of global competitiveness and create custom solutions that build on the unique
assets of each region. The Center has worked with Advantage Carolina, AdvantageWest Regional Partnership; Carteret County;
Charlotte Regional Partnership, City of Salisbury, Kerr-Tar Council of Governments, and multiple state agencies. Funding for this
program is provided through grants from the entities served.



Kenan Institute’s Center for Entrepreneurial Studies, Entrepreneurial career opportunities come in many forms, whether you
want to start your own company, work for a start-up, find an entrepreneurial opportunity within a larger company, or go into related
areas such as venture capital or social entrepreneurship. The Center for Entrepreneurial Studies works with each student to
develop an individualized plan for career success.
Kenan institute's Center for International Business Education and Research (CIBER) UNC-CIBER is a critical partner in                   x
realizing UNC's commitment to educate new generations of skilled, globally-aware individuals who are capable of leading change in
a highly global environment.

Kenan Institute’s Center for Logistics and Digital Strategy, New intelligent technologies, operating in the Web-enabled
information environment, allow virtual integration of the extended global enterprise in a way not feasible before the advent of the
electronic age. In the Center's Intelligent Systems Laboratory (ISL) we are able to develop customized logistics solutions that meet
an organization's distinct competitive needs. We are able to assess the benefits of these new technologies and offer a roadmap for
implementation.


Kenan Institute’s Center for Real Estate Development, The Kenan Institute's Center for Real Estate Development (CRED)
provides thought leadership through global education, research and outreach to help business leaders create and manage the built
environment in ways that ensure positive impact and sustainable results. The Center offers the only program in real estate
education from a top-ranked business school that is based in the context of real estate development. Without these skills, the
ability to structure a project's financials is often not enough to support a successful outcome.


Kenan Institute’s Center for Sustainable Enterprise, The CSE at UNC's Kenan-Flagler Business School helps executives and
future business leaders understand how social and environmental considerations are changing the competitive landscape of
business.

Kings College Initiatives UNC-Chapel Hill undergraduates have studied abroad at King's College since 2002, and the two                  x
universities began a formal exchange program for undergraduates in 2004. In 2005, the collaboration expanded to provide
opportunities for graduate students and for faculty.
    Graduate students at both institutions benefit from having access to distinguished faculty advisers in both the United States and
the United Kingdom. UNC officials plan to expand the exchange further so that students eventually will be able to graduate with a
joint degree from both institutions.

Learn NC, The Learners‘ and Educators‘ Assistance and Resource Network of North Carolina (LEARN NC) is a collaborative                  x
statewide network of teachers and partners devoted to improving student performance and enhancing teacher proficiencies by
creating and sharing high-quality teaching and learning resources via the World Wide Web. Offered free through the UNC School
of Education, LEARN NC provides curriculum and instructional tools aligned with the state‘s Standard Course of Study and a virtual
classroom of online courses for K-12 students and teachers. LEARN NC has trained 30,000 teachers and others (as of 2000) in all
115 public school systems as well as charter schools, N.C.‘s Catholic Diocese and the N.C. Independent School Association.
About 20,000 teachers and students visit the LEARN NC website every day, where they can choose from more than 10,000 pages
of educational resources, including 3,000 lesson plans. In the online learning group, LEARN NC offered 40 K-12 courses, including
23 Advanced Placement courses, online this year. In the 2006-2007 school year, LEARN NC served more than 2,000 students
throughout North Carolina, and many students spread throughout 23 states and four foreign countries. One recent LEARN NC
project is a collaboration with UNC‘s Research Laboratories of Archaeology to create a teaching resource called ―Intrigue of the
Past‖ about North Carolina‘s first peoples. LEARN NC is also are very active in professional development courses for teachers. In
the 2006-2007 school year, LEARN NC online offered 28 teacher development courses online, which helped more than 1,000
teaches renew their certifications or learn to develop and teach their own online courses. o The University of North Carolina Online
 o Alternative licensure for teachers o Math and Science Online




Malawi-Carolina Summer Public Health Institute The third annual Malawi-UNC Summer Institute will be held in June 2008 at                x
the University of Malawi College of Medicine in Blantyre. UNC has over 250 employees in Malawi conducting research and
providing health care on nutrition and infectious diseases such as HIV and malaria.


Malawi Project (School of Dentistry) The project provides an experience for four dental students to go for nearly a month to            x
provide much-needed dental care and oral health education in Malawi. The program's goals are the following: 1) Provide a cultural
exchange between UNC students and Malawians. 2) Educate Malawian school-aged children about oral health and hygiene and
about the HIV/AIDS epidemic and risks associated with the disease (ages 6-18). 3) Provide emergency, preventive and restorative
care to those in need in the Lilongwe Hospital. The participating dental students are learning while delivering important services
and will return better prepared to meet unmet health needs in their own communities. Related to this program, the School also
sponsors outreach efforts in Mexico and Honduras
Management Academy for Public Health Management Academy prepares teams of health professionals for new management                       x
challenges in community health. Management Academy will build your skills in managing money, people, data and partnerships.
Every team writes and presents a public health business plan designed to attack a key public health problem in your community.




National University of Singapore / UNC Joint Undergraduate Degree Programs in Economics, English, Geography,                            x
History, Political Science An innovative joint undergraduate degree program joining the academic strengths of the University and
the National University of Singapore (NUS). The joint program is believed to be a first at the undergraduate level outside of a
professional school setting among UNC‘s U.S. peer campuses. Students will apply for the program after being admitted to either
university. Eligible UNC undergraduates in the College of Arts and Sciences can take two to four semesters of classes at NUS and
earn diplomas from both universities. NUS students can study in Chapel Hill and also receive a degree from both campuses.



NC Institute for Public Health is the service and outreach arm of the prestigious School of Public Health at the University of North    x
Carolina at Chapel Hill. Its mission is to bring the public health scholarship and practice communities together for the common
purpose of improving the public's health and human well-being.
NCIPH is a key public health resource for imparting timely and practical knowledge about ongoing and emerging public health
issues. Its intention is to raise public awareness and stimulate discourse about public health issues, policy, and practice. Examples
of emerging public health issues include disaster and disease preparedness, accreditation, health disparities, and obesity.
As a constituent of UNC, the Institute is committed to the public health needs of North Carolina, placing those first. But public
health issues go beyond geographic boundaries. The Institute provides services to the public health communities of neighboring
states, the nation, and the world.
NCIPH provides a range of learning and development experiences that constitute the largest, most comprehensive set of public
health professional development resources in the country. It provides high-quality credit and non-credit education in accessible
venues at affordable prices.
Consulting Services provides a range of consulting services that rely on evidence-based scholarship, assessment, and strategic
planning.
 Evaluation Services at the Institute provides comprehensive, customer- focused, high quality program planning and evaluation
services, in accordance with the American Evaluation Association guidelines and in keeping with the Institute's mission of linking
practice and academia.



North Carolina ECHO (Exploring Cultural Heritage Online) is a partnership of the State Library of North Carolina/Department of          x
Cultural Resources and the School of Information and Library Science (SILS) and Academic Affairs Libraries (AAL) at Carolina. NC
ECHO aims to provide deep, wide, and comprehensive access to the holdings of North Carolina‘s cultural institutions. In particular,
SILS and the AAL are supporting the development of mechanisms that allow cultural institutions across the state of North Carolina
to provide digital access to their collections through a single portal. Particular aims are to allow K-12 educators and students to
benefit from these resources even though they may not be physically nearby, and to showcase the cultural heritage of North
Carolina for tourism and economic development purposes.



North Carolina Innocence Project The School of Journalism and Mass Communication is exploring new ways to contribute to                 x
this effort among top-tier law schools to review and investigate credible claims of innocence by death row inmates. Previously, the
school has offered coursework in investigative journalism, and faculty and students have worked independently to research cases
and pursue leads. This project teaches our students critical reporting skills and honors the most important traditions of journalism:
advocacy and reform.

Nourish International At Nourish International, we work to bridge the gap between students and developing communities,                  x
between good ideas and the resources they require.
   Since 2002, Nourish International has sought innovative and effective ways to make a tangible reduction in poverty around the
world. From its humble beginnings at one university to its current presence across the U.S., Nourish has achieved its goal by
teaching students the principles of sustainable enterprise and investing in pioneering development projects.
Office of Economic and Business Development (OEBD) matches faculty and campus expertise and resources with economic                           x
development issues facing North Carolina and its communities and organizations. This office is led by Jesse White Jr., who
headed the Appalachian Regional Commission and the Southern Growth Policies Board.
During its first year of operations, OEBD worked within the university to develop a network of faculty interested in economic
development work in North Carolina. It also worked on several economic development projects in the state, including Carolina‘s
response to the state‘s successful bid to have Credit Suisse First Boston locate a major facility in the RTP area. At the
announcement ceremony, the company stated that the assets of our universities were a deciding factor in locating in North
Carolina. In addition, OEBD took the leadership role, along with the Friday Center for Continuing Education, in having UNC-Chapel
Hill become an associate of the Hickory Metropolitan Higher Education Council. Carolina can now offer credit, noncredit and
special courses and seminars in the Hickory facility. Another successful project was OEBD‘s role in helping the North Carolina
Rural Economic Development Center secure a Kellogg Foundation grant to create an entrepreneurial support system in rural North
Carolina. A multiyear, multimillion dollar grant, Carolina‘s School of Government will play a significant role in training local officials.
OEBD also continued work in Carteret County begun by the Carolina Center for Competitive Economies by analyzing the marine
sciences cluster there and working with the Economic Development Council of the county.




Office of Global Health The Office of Global Health at the UNC School of Public Health is the organizing unit for global health               x
activities at the School. Based in the Dean's Office, the OGH is lead by the Associate Dean for Global Health, Peggy Bentley, and
the Director, Gretchen Van Vliet. This organizational structure allows global health to be integrated into each department in the
School, rather than as a separate department. This makes interdisciplinary global health research, teaching and practice easier to
accomplish and more effective.
    The Office of Global Health actively supports the faculty, staff, and students of the UNC School of Public Health in their efforts
to improve the health of the world's populations. The goals of the OGH include increasing awareness of the great diversity of global
health research, teaching, and service activities underway in the School; creating more global educational and research
opportunities for students and faculty; serving as a resource for faculty engaged in global health research by identifying funding
opportunities and supporting proposal development; and enhancing cooperative partnerships with investigators and institutions
from around the university, the state, the nation, and the world.


Pharmacogenomics for Every Nation Initiative The Institute for Pharmacogenomics and Individualized Therapy (IPIT) will                        x
house one of 10 research centers that form the National Institutes of Health‘s Pharmacogenomics Research Network. The
institute‘s researchers also lead the Pharmacogenomics for Every Nation Initiative, a global effort to help countries make better
informed public health decisions using genetic information.
Program for School Studies International The proposed program would establish a network of partnerships of educators.                         x
Cross nationally, educators speak a common "language" and have shared understandings about fundamentals of teaching and
learning and students' developmental needs. Those understandings extend to teacher preparation and retention. The proposed
program would identify major focus areas and invite global partners to engage in research, collaboration and information sharing.



Project Malawi (School of Public Health) The project provides an experience for four dental students to go for nearly a month to              x
provide much-needed dental care and oral health education in Malawi. The program's goals are the following: 1) Provide a cultural
exchange between UNC students and Malawians. 2) Educate Malawian school-aged children about oral health and hygiene and
about the HIV/AIDS epidemic and risks associated with the disease (ages 6-18). 3) Provide emergency, preventive and restorative
care to those in need in the Lilongwe Hospital. The participating dental students are learning while delivering important services
and will return better prepared to meet unmet health needs in their own communities. Related to this program, the School also
sponsors outreach efforts in Mexico and Honduras.



Research Enrichment and Apprenticeship Program (REAP) led by the School of Nursing, creates mentoring partnerships                            x
between faculty researchers and nursing students who are members of a racial/ethnic minority group. The program includes
faculty mentors and students from North Carolina Central University, Winston-Salem State University, and UNC-Chapel Hill. With
funding from the National Institute of Nursing Research, NIH, the program has been able to pay students $10 – $12/hour to work
up to 172 hours on the mentors research project and to pay for them to attend and present at a national conference. Ten students
participate each year. Students also attend seven 2-hour seminars and conduct an individual research project. The NIH funding will
end June 2008. We aim to continue the program, because it has been so well received by students and faculty, and to increase
the number racial/ethnic minority students in master's and doctoral level education in nursing and working toward careers in
nursing research.
Research Laboratories of Archaeology The Research Laboratories of Archaeology has a long track record of engagement.                      x
This record includes active programs of K-12 outreach, promoting economic development through heritage tourism, and
maintaining the North Carolina Archaeological Collection (the state's oldest and most important archaeological archive). Many of
these initiatives focus on rural and underserved communities, and contribute directly to the goals outlined in sections 4.3 (Public
Education) and 4.4 (Communities and Economic Transformation) of the UNC Tomorrow Commission's Final Report.


Research Laboratories of Archaeology, Trail of Tears National Historic Trail We conducted an inventory for the National                   x
Park Service to support expansion of the Trail of Tears National Historic Trail into NC; prepared National Register of Historic
Places nominhations for eight Trail of Tears sites in Western North Carolina; prepared permanent Trail of Tears exhibit for the
Cherokee County Historical Museum (Murphy, NC); developed 18 outdoor public exhibits in the Trail of Tears for cherokee,
Graham, Macon, Clay, Swain, and Jackson Counties.

Research Laboratories of Archaeology, Cherokee Pottery Revitalization Project With the Museum of the Cherokee Indian, we                  x
organized a workshop for Cherokee potters, which reintroduced traditional pottery styles (based on items in the N.C.
Archaeological Collection) and led to the founding of the Cherokee Potters Guild.

Research Laboratories of Archaeology Preserving North Carolina’s Archaeological Heritage                                                  x
N.C. Archaeological Collection. As a service to the state, we maintain the pre-eminent repository for
archaeological collections from North Carolina. This is the archive on which most of our knowledge of
the state‘s ancient history is based. The collection contains over 7 million artifacts from more than 7,000
sites, which go back some 12,000 years.

Research Laboratories of Archaeology Occaneechi Village Replication Project We provided technical assistance to the                       x
occaneechi Band of Saponi Nation in replicating their ancestral villages at Hillsborough and Pleasant Grove, NC; we annually
assist the tribe with its Occaneechi School Days educational program for children.

Research Laboratories of Archaeology Town Creek Indian Mound (State Historic Site). The RLA conducted excavations at                      x
Town Creek for 50 years and was instrumental in developing this locality into a state historic site; we curate all artifact collections
from the site, advise on site interpretation, and regularly offer public programs there.



Research Laboratories of Archaeology Cherokee Ancient Village We are providing technical assistance to the Cherokee                       x
Nation of Oklahoma for the reconstruction of a traditional village at the Cherokee Heritage Center, Park Hill, Oklahoma.



School of Journalism and Mass Communication Community Media Project The Carolina Community Media Project of the                           x
School of Journalism and Mass Communication operates the ―Community Journalism Road Show,‖ which offers free on-site
workshops to improve the quality of local journalism for the 192 community newspapers in North Carolina. The project‘s founding
director, Jock Lauterer, conducts day-long seminars to provide a basic framework in journalism fundamentals. The project is
dedicated to the proposition that strong community media help strengthen communities, and that communities — rural and
suburban — with a vital civic life and a sense of place are key to livability in a free democratic society. The Community Media
Project enters its seventh summer in 2007, and Lauterer expects to reach all 192 community newspapers by 2010 – and then start
the road show all over again.
School of Law Clinical Programs There are four clinical experiences available to law students: civil, juvenile justice, community         x
development, and immigration/human rights policy. While the clinics serve an important pedagogical purpose, they also provide
legal representation to indigent clients who otherwise wouldn‘t have access to it. It is key to the Law School‘s public mission to
provide professional legal services to those people unable to pay.

o Civil Clinic In the civil clinic, third-year students represent low-income clients in a variety of civil matters, including
landlord/tenant matters, family law, consumer issues and public benefits.
o Juvenile Justice Clinic In the juvenile justice clinic, students represent juveniles in delinquency proceedings ranging from
disorderly conduct to assault.
o Community Development Law Clinic The community development law clinic provides legal expertise to nonprofit organizations
in many of the state‘s most underserved communities. Too often nonprofits that possess vision and leadership are prevented from
transforming their communities by a lack of technical legal expertise about topics such as forming real estate partnerships to
develop affordable housing or obtaining tax exemption and a license for an affordable child care center. Often, since nonprofits
cannot afford private legal counsel, their legal questions go unanswered, and their broader visions go unfulfilled. The CDL Clinic
addresses this urgent need. Working under the supervision of a member of the law faculty, third-year law students enrolled in the
CDL Clinic provide community-based nonprofit organizations with business-oriented legal counsel. In recent years, the Clinic has
served dozens of organizations from the mountains to the coast and has had a positive impact on many of North Carolina‘s most
underserved communities.
o Immigration/Human Rights Clinic The immigration/human rights clinic works with immigrant clients on a number of matters. It
was the work of this clinic that led to the Orange County Board of Commissions consideration of a proposal that would affirm
Orange County‘s view of health as a human right.



Strengthening Bioethics Capacity and Justice in Health Through their project, Strengthening Bioethics Capacity and Justice in             x
Health, funded by the National Institutes of Health‘s Fogarty International Center, Congolese scholars complete intensive master-
level training in bioethics at the Catholic University of Louvain in Belgium and then spend up to six months with mentors at UNC.
While in Chapel Hill, scholars complete Institutional Review Board (IRB) training, develop curricula and training modules around
bioethics issues in the developing world and strengthen their capacity for independent research.




Strong Couples - Strong Children is a community-based community intervention program whose aim is to strengthen couple                    x
and co-parenting relationships among at-risk, low-income, unmarried, expectant or new parents in Durham, NC. The project is a
partnership between the UNC-Chapel Hill School of Social Work, the Durham County Health Department, and the Durham County
Cooperative Extension Service. Interventions consist of: (1) Family-care coordination (wrap around services); (2) A relationship
skill-building curriculum; and (3) Fatherhood support services. This program seeks to address the high rate of couple dissolution
following their baby's birth by helping couples to acquire communication and problem-solving skills as well as social assest
associated with healthy couple and parenting relationships.



Student Global Health Committee is composed of students interested in global health from all seven departments of the school              x
as well as others at the university, we are excited about the opportunity to share ideas and stimulate interests across disciplines.
The mission of SGHC is to create ―awareness and understanding of global health issues among the UNC community through
education, advocacy, and service.‖ We view our community as both local and global, and we look to continue and build on
successful endeavors of years past. To provide an idea of such endeavors, below is a sampling of activities being planned for the
2007-2008 academic year:
- a multi-mkedia series of speakers, films, and workshops related to the topics of "Health and Human Rights" and "Narrativesw of
HIV"; - a "brownbag" lunch series featuring film reviews and discussions on global halth research adn methodology; social events
including a welcome-back event, international dance nights, potlucks, a student-faculty reception, language tables, and networking
night; global health educational sessions with NC middle and high school students that cover topics such as migration and halth,
HIV/AIDS, and water and sanitation; fundraising eventsw including the biannual global craft fair and an internatinonal fashion show.
                                                    As the organization, the school, and the field evolve, it is an exciting time to be
interested and involved with global public health. With ongoing upper-level research, outstanding faculty, new coursework
opportunities, and exceptional funding resources, the UNC School of Public Health looks to build on its role as a leader in global
health. The global health curriculum is designed to involve all departments, integrating the skills and resources of each discipline.
The recently revised Global Health Certificate program (www.sph.unc.edu/ogh/certificate/) provides an opportunity for students and
faculty to interact across these disciplines as well as an opportunity to formalize the training. The Office of Global Health
(www.sph.unc.edu/ogh/), under the leadership and vision of Dr. Peggy Bentley, serves as a great resource and advocate for
Student Teams Achieving Results (STAR) at Kenan-Flagler MBA student teams at Kenan-Flagler Business School consult with                 x
and assist North Carolina businesses free of charge in return for the opportunity to learn from experienced business leaders about
real-world business challenges. Companies served cannot afford the services of professional strategists and it reinforces students‘
commitment to public service. Through statewide solicitation of proposals using multiple means of identification (e.g., networks,
business service organizations, databases), projects are selected that can provide benefit to the company, are good learning
opportunities for students, and that can be completed in an academic year. The goal is to help struggling North Carolina companies
identify the path to sustainability and growth, keeping and growing jobs for North Carolina citizens.



Task Force for a Healthier North Carolina UNC has partnered with the state‘s Health and Wellness Trust Fund (HWTF)                      x
Commission to create a task force to examine barriers that limit access to health insurance and offer policy recommendations to
overcome the barriers. Medicare Part D is the first topic the task force will tackle. Other topics, which will also receive public
forums, are ―Children, Working Families and S-CHIP‖ and ―Small Business and Employer-Sponsored Health Insurance.‖ The task
force will explore strategies to improve access to group health insurance for small-businesses (with 50 or fewer employees) and
limit financial exposure for the underinsured.

Tutoring Against Tobacco This program is part of a student organization, Carolina Cancer Focus. The program‘s goal is to                x
encourage students to make responsible decisions about tobacco use. Its focus is on media literacy and helping students think
critically about the role that media plays in their lives, especially tobacco advertising.

University Continuing Education Programs Through its academic departments and other administrative units, Carolina offers a             x
wide variety of continuing education courses and events. These noncredit offerings do not carry academic credit but provide
opportunities for learners to experience personal enrichment, achieve professional advancement and meet other important
educational goals. Conducted in a range of formats, both on campus and at numerous other locations throughout North Carolina
and beyond, these activities reflect the depth of the university‘s missions in teaching and public service. In 2005-2006, continuing
education programs offered by university departments reached more than 109,000 participants in North Carolina and beyond, an
increase of more than 11,000 in comparison with the previous year. The 2,284 courses and events for which data was provided
were offered by 27 schools and departments of the university in a variety of formats, primarily on site but also by means of distance
education. Learning events were held in 58 North Carolina counties, 19 states outside North Carolina and several foreign countries.
In addition, many of Carolina‘s professional schools have online programs that offer academic credentials to off-campus students,
such as certificates in programs through the Allied Health Sciences department (molecular diagnostic science) and the School of
Public Health (community preparedness and disaster management and field epidemiology). Students may earn master‘s degrees
from the School of Nursing and School of Public Health, and doctorates in physical therapy or health leadership through online
courses. In 2005-2006, these online and hybrid courses for credit had more than 1,200 participants in five schools or departments
at Carolina.



UNC Partnerhip in Global Health This is a three-year, $400,000 grant to expand global health curriculum and research                    x
opportunities campuswide and engage faculty and students in an interdisciplinary study of global health issues. A coordinated
Administrative Group, with partners from across campus, the region and the world, will implement the various activities of the
Framework Program.


Upward Bound (TRiO) Program at The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill (UB-UNC) provides services to 90 eligible high           x
school youth to assist them in building skills and motivation that will ensure success in education beyond high school. The
Program is a part of the School of Education and integrated into the campus community-at-large. UB-UNC recruits and serves
students who are 9th or 10th graders and are low-income and potential first generation college students, including 30% higher risk
youth, from the target high schools, who remain enrolled in the program throughout high school and immediately after high school
graduation. The Upward Bound Program at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill has been serving the community since
1966. For over the past forty–one years the program has assisted in preparing and serving over thirty-five hundred students many
of which have gone on to careers in law, medicine, education as well as public service and community out reach. The majority of
the resources provided for this program is made possible through a TRiO grant from United States Department of Education at an
annual cost $425,000.


World View World View‘s mission is to support schools and colleges in preparing students to succeed in an interconnected                x
world. World View helps educators integrate a global perspective into their curriculum, respond to the rapid ethnic and cultural
change from immigrant students, improve ESL programs, and promote foreign language training and international travel. For the
past nine years, World View has co-sponsored an annual Hispanics/Latinos seminar in March with the Consortium in Latin
American Studies at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill and Duke University. Sessions include working with Latino
parents and strategies for teaching ESL at the elementary, middle, high school and community college levels.
A PE ETCD     H     E
4.2 4.3 4.4   4.5   4.6
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Program/Activitity Title                                                                                                                 GR
                                                                                                                                          4.1
A Su Salud Spanish for ―To Your Health,‖ A Su Salud is a Spanish-language program for students and practicing health
professionals that uses DVD-based video, DVD- and Web-based interactive exercises, and a comprehensive print workbook to
teach intermediate-level Spanish language skills and promote cultural awareness. The program, which focuses specifically on
health-related tasks and situations and intermediate-level students, was developed at UNC after an overwhelming 92 percent of
students reported the need and interest for instruction to improve their ability to communicate with Spanish-speaking clients. The
program was developed with administrative support from the Office of the Provost and the Office of Distance Education and E-
learning Policy, part of The William and Ida Friday Center for Continuing Education. The intermediate course is offered as an
elective to residential and distance education students at the UNC School of Public Health as well as the other UNC health science
schools, the School of Social Work and to undergraduates in the UNC College of Arts and Sciences‘ Department of Romance
Languages. The office of Continuing Education at UNC‘s School of Public Health and the Friday Center also offer the intermediate
course via a distance learning format to those outside the university. Overall enrollment through the various formats of the course
total about 500. Plans are now well under way to offer an introductory version of A Su Salud in the spring of 2008; pilots of this
version have already been conducted in Chapel Hill and several other locations around the state.



American Indian Center This is one of the only centers on the East Coast to focus solely on American Indian issues and
research. The Center‘s mission is to establish the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill as a leading public university for
American Indian scholarship and make American Indian issues a permanent part of the intellectual life of the University. North
Carolina is home to one of the largest American Indian populations in the eastern United States, and the center will serve as the
University‘s portal to American Indian communities across the state and the nation. The center will enable Carolina to serve the
state‘s American Indian population.

American Indian Studies (see Access) Created in 1998 in the College of Arts and Sciences, this program aims to increase
understanding of the historical experiences, cultural traditions and innovations, and political status of Indian peoples in the United
States. The program offers courses in American Indian subjects, hosts speakers on American
Indian topics, supports American Indian student organizations with public activities, and works with the N.C. Commission on Indian
Affairs and others to help meet the needs of Indian communities in the state. An undergraduate minor in American Indian Studies
was established in 2003.


APPLES (Assisting People in Planning Learning Experiences in Service The APPLES Service Learning Program is a student                     x
initiated, student-led, student-funded program engaging students, faculty and community agencies in service-learning partnerships.
The goal of APPLES is to foster socially aware and civically involved students through participation in an enriched curriculum and
hands-on experiences that address the needs of North Carolina communities. The focus of the program is on the connection made
between service in the community and what students learn in an academic setting. More than 150 community organizations in the
Triangle region partner with the APPLES program each year. APPLES provides extensive support for faculty who teach service-
learning courses or would like to develop such courses. Support includes consultation during course development and
implementation; assistance in identifying community partners; provision of trained student facilitators; $500 course enhancement
grants; a two-day faculty development institute for faculty, staff, students, and community partners; discussion series and
workshops held in collaboration with the Center for Teaching and Learning; a resource library, a faculty listserv, and a faculty
BlackBoard site. This past year, 69 APPLES service-learning courses were offered in 22 departments, enrolling 1,214 students.
These students volunteered 46,010 hours in the Triangle community through APPLES service-learning experiences. Examples
include students enrolled in an intermediate Spanish course who volunteered with the Spanish School Reading Partners program
to help Spanish-speakers develop English language skills; public relations students who developed public service announcements,
fact sheets and brochures for the Special Olympics of Orange County; and students in a biomedical engineering course who
modified an iPod to respond to movement to encourage a blind toddler to crawl. This year, APPLES launched its first Global
Alternative Spring Break experience to Guanajuato, Mexico. This signature program provided 11 students, their professor and a
graduate student with a first-hand experience on the global forces that shape migration to North Carolina, as well as its effects on
migrant families and sending communities. Students returned to UNC eager and well-equipped to serve local Latino communities
through individual, sustained projects. This is a collaborative effort between APPLES and the Center for Global Initiatives.
Area Health Education Centers (AHEC) The mission of the N.C. AHEC Program is to meet the state‘s health and health
workforce needs by providing educational programs in partnership with academic institutions, health care agencies and other
organizations committed to improving the health of the people of North Carolina. AHEC educational programs and information
services target improving the distribution and retention of health-care providers, with a special emphasis on primary care and
prevention; improving the diversity and cultural competence of the health care workforce in all health disciplines; enhancing the
quality of care and improving health care outcomes; and addressing the health care needs of underserved communities and
populations. There are nine AHEC regional centers throughout the state. In 2004-2005, AHEC offered 7,745 continuing education
programs in allied health, dentistry, medicine, mental health, nursing, pharmacy, public health and other topics with 184,194
attendees. In addition, health science students in these subject areas receive part of their training under AHEC auspices in
community hospitals, rural health centers, public health departments and other health-related settings. In 2004-2005, these health
science students completed 9,707 student months of training through AHEC-supported community-based rotations. AHEC also
provides support for 326 primary care residency positions. These residency programs, located at five of the nine AHEC regional
centers, have now graduated nearly 2,000 physicians since 1980. During the past 25 years, 67 percent of the AHEC-trained
family practice residents have remained in the state to practice.



Campus Y The Campus Y is the oldest and largest student organization on the UNC-Chapel Hill campus. Since the Y‘s founding            x
more than 150 years ago, Campus Y students have led UNC efforts to address social justice issues and encourage volunteerism
throughout the community and around the world. Seventeen active issue-based program committees and projects span a wide
range of issues, including human rights, hunger, supporting immigrants and literacy. These committees and programs are
completely student driven and student run. The Campus Y is also one of four groups that have worked together to create the
STRETCH (STudents REaching Toward CHange) conference. This day-and-a-half annual leadership and service conference is
planned and run by students to promote leadership and community engagement.



Carolina Association of Black Journalists’ Minority Journalism Program for High School Journalism Students (also
Access) The Carolina Association of Black Journalists (CABJ) is an affiliated student chapter of the National Association of Black
Journalists (NABJ). CABJ is based out of the School of Journalism and Mass Communication at the University of North Carolina at
Chapel Hill. Founded in 1991, CABJ won NABJ‘s coveted ―Student Chapter of the Year‖ award in 2001, 2002 and 2007, and was
nominated for the award in 2005.

Carolina Business News Initiative, School of Journalism trains journalists to understand and explain complicated business
topics, operating under the assumption that people turn to mass communication to help them understand changes in the economic
world that affect their lives. The initiative includes coaching business editors and reporters at N.C. newspapers to improve the
quality of their sections by deeper and more-thorough coverage and providing critiques of business coverage in the state.



Carolina Center for Educational Excellence The Carolina Center for Educational Excellence (CCEE) provides workshops,
seminars, Internet-supported demonstrations, graduate classes and other opportunities for study to improve learning environments
for students in pre-school through 12th grade, university students and the professionals who support them. Equipped with state-of-
the-art technology, the CCEE facility includes flexible classroom space, ample room for seminars and conferences, a NASA-
supported science and mathematics teaching laboratory and a school counseling and psychology clinic.


Carolina Center for Public Service The Center‘s Public Service Scholars program provides a framework for students to                  x
complete service; connects students who care about similar issues with one another; guides participants in training that can make
their service more effective; links coursework to service; offers unique opportunities to participants; and recognizes students for
their commitment to service. Since its inception in 2003, the program has rapidly grown from 78 to more than 1,000 students. In
four years, participants have logged more than 165,000 hours of service in communities throughout North Carolina, the nation and
the world. In 2007, 96 students graduated as Public Service Scholars, with nearly 40,000 hours of service to their credit.



Carolina Center for Public Service UNC-Chapel Hill‘s public service programs reach every region of North Carolina, helping            x
communities protect public health, improve schools and medical services, stimulate business, plan for growth, understand cultural
heritage, and enrich the quality of people‘s daily lives. Launched in 1999, the Carolina Center for Public Service coordinates and
catalyzes campus outreach activities around the state. The Center has also created the Carolina Center for Public Service
Database matching its public service projects with all 100 North Carolina counties. This Internet resource contains descriptions of
858 projects currently and will continue to grow. The website attracts between 400 and 550 unique users each quarter.
Carolina Community Media Project , an outreach initiative of the UNC School of Journalism and Mass Communication, is
dedicated to the proposition that strong community media help strengthen communities, and that communities — be they rural or
suburban — with a vital civic life and a sense of place are key to high livability in a free democratic society. Through teaching,
research and outreach, the project supports, enhances and empowers North Carolina‘s community media, beginning with the 192
community newspapers and their online editions, as well as local-emphasis community- oriented radio, TV and cable outlets.
Launched in January 2001, the project is led by founding director Jock Lauterer, who teaches Community Journalism every
semester. His students become intimately involved in the project by producing ―hometown hero‖ story/photo packages about
outstanding UNC students performing public service. Story/photo packages are tailored specifically for the community newspapers
―back home.‖
Since 2001, the project has produced hundreds of such hometown hero stories for the state‘s local press. Also, each summer
since 2001, Lauterer, has taken his ―Community Journalism Roadshow‖ to 107 small newspapers literally ―from Murphy to Manteo.‖
These free on-site workshops are extremely popular and well received.




Carolina Connects This chancellor-initiated tour of North Carolina is designed to highlight for local citizens the many ways that      x
UNC relates directly to their communities and their needs. A special website (http://www.unc.edu/depts/design/connects/)
chronicles the visits to every region of the state, to more than 50 communities from Manteo and Shallotte in the East to Asheville
and Cullowhee in the West and points in between. ―Carolina Connects‖ stops focused on the Carolina Covenant program, the
Citizen-Soldier initiative and multiple research and public service projects. Chancellor Moeser also visits with alumni, legislators
and news media outlets to highlight the ways in which the University‘s faculty, staff and students serve communities and people.
Each stop spotlights the University‘s teaching, research and public service work, particularly in the areas of economic
development, health care and public education because we know those are issues of interest to North Carolinians. Carolina
Connects is also an opportunity for Carolina faculty and staff to listen to the people – to ask the question, ―What problems do you
need the university to work on?‖



Carolina Entrepreneurial Initiative This initiative was funded with a five-year, $3.5 million grant from the Ewing Marion Kauffman
Foundation that is being matched two-to-one by UNC-Chapel Hill. The University is one of seven Kauffman Foundation-designated
―Entrepreneurial Universities‖ chosen through a national competition. UNC is developing new programs to create a surge of
entrepreneurship among students, faculty and staff, including a new minor in entrepreneurship in the College of Arts and Sciences.
The program is led by a team managed by the Frank Hawkins Kenan Institute of Private Enterprise at the UNC Kenan-Flagler
Business School. Successful entrepreneurs, many of them alumni, are advisers, lending their real-world expertise.



Carolina Indian Circle CIC was founded in 1974 to meet the needs of American Indian students on the Chapel Hill campus. At
that time, less than 10 American Indians were enrolled at Carolina. Now, there are more than 200 students at the University from
different cultural and tribal backgrounds. Goals of the CIC include assisting American Indian students academically and socially by
providing a positive atmosphere and a sense of community, educating the university community to ensure that American Indian
heritage is recognized and respected, and providing public service. CIC has hosted an annual spring Pow Wow at Carolina for the
past 19 years.


Carolina Institute for Developmental Disabilities The Carolina Institute for Developmental Disabilities
TEACCH (also PE)
Center for Development and Learning
Neurodevelopmental Disorders Research Center

Carolina North A planned mixed-use campus to be located on almost 1,000 acres north of the main campus. Conceived in the
academic mission of the University, it will help connect the University‘s research programs to the economic well-being of the state.
As a flagship public research university charged with helping to lead a transformation in the state‘s economy, Carolina must
compete with national peers for the talent and resources that drive innovation. Today, that competition demands a new kind of
setting — one that enables public-private partnerships, public engagement and flexible new spaces for research and education.
Much more than a technology park or overflow space for main campus, Carolina North will be a campus for living and learning,
where people can live, work and study in one place.
Carolina Student Transfer Excellence Program (C-STEP). C-STEP is part of a national effort, funded by the Jack Kent Cooke
Foundation, to encourage more low- to moderate-income community-college students to transfer to highly selective four-year
colleges and universities. The program aims to help such students prepare for the academic and social challenges they will face
when they enroll at Carolina, and then to thrive here once they have transferred. C-STEP will identify talented students while they
are still in high school or early in their community-college careers. Once identified for the program, students will work directly with C-
STEP leaders at their community colleges and will participate in monthly events on their campuses and at Carolina. These events
will introduce students to Carolina; help them engage early with the campus, students, staff and faculty and smooth their eventual
transition to Chapel Hill.


Carolina Transportation Program (Department of City and Regional Planning) is an interdisciplinary research and education
program. Our program focuses on the study of transportation planning, transit, non-motorized transportation, and land use patterns,
and their impacts on health, environment, energy and economic development at local, regional, national, and global scale.

Carolina Veterans Organization This group organizes fellowship activities for veterans and other members, provides assistance
to students transitioning from military service to the educational experience, advances interests common to the campus veteran
community, increases awareness of veteran life to interested nonveteran members and offers support for veterans who may be
having difficulty coping with past traumatic military experiences.


Center for Health Promotion and Disease Prevention (HPDP) seeks to bring public health research findings to the daily lives of
individuals and communities with a special focus on North Carolina and populations vulnerable to disease. The majority of its
projects include research within North Carolina and all of its research addresses challenges that many state residents face. Most of
the center‘s faculty researchers have appointments in the School of Public Health or the other four UNC Health Affairs schools.
Programs: HOPE (Health Opportunities Partnership Empowerment) Works, Kids Eating Smart and Moving More, The North
Carolina Way (Worksite Activities for You) to Health, Center of Excellence for Training and Research Translation, Nutrition and
Physical Activity Self-Assessment for Child Care, Wake to Wellness grants, Weight-Wise Pilot Study, Threads of HOPE,
Comprehensive Cancer Control Collaborative of NC, Barbers Trimming Cancer Risk among Black Men, Body and Soul, NC
Tobacco Free Schools and Quitline Marketing, Internet Cigarette Vendors Study.


Center for Mathematics and Science Education provides outreach to inservice mathematics and science teachers. The
partership aims to: (a) to increase the number of teachers of middle school mathematics and science judged "highly qualified"
under the NCLB legislation, and (b) to assist lateral entry teachers who need additional mathematics or science course work to
receive their professional licenses.
o North Carolina Mathematics and Science Education Network (NC- MSEN) Pre-College Program (also Access)


Certificate in Technology and Communication (School of Journalism) The graduate-level Certificate in Technology and
Communication has admitted 159 students since its inception in 2003. Thirty-two students have completed the program.
Approximately 80 percent of participants are working professionals from North Carolina who are using e-learning as a way to
continue their educations without disrupting their careers or family life. The School‘s Executive Education program offers seminars
and workshops to nearly 500 professionals in the fields of journalism and mass communication. Participants come primarily from
North Carolina and the Southeast.

China Social Science Infrastructure Program (R24)                                                                                            x
Chuck Stone Program for Diversity in Education and Media (also Access) The program brings 20 minority and disadvantaged
high school seniors to campus for an intensive one-week summer workshop.


Clinical Center for the Study of Development and Learning A program of the School of Medicine, CDL has provided 40 years
of innovative, high-quality clinical, research, training and technical assistance to support children and adults with developmental
disabilities in North Carolina. As the state‘s University Center for Excellence in Developmental Disabilities, Education, Research
and Service, the CDL pushes the scope of research and services to include a unique focus on how people with developmental
disabilities learn and how their learning skills can be improved. CDL‘s faculty is made up of professionals in the disciplines of
pediatrics, psychology, education, nutrition, social work, physical therapy, occupational therapy, audiology, speech and language
pathology, and pediatric dentistry.
The Community Workshop Series (through the University Library system) The Community Workshop Series is a partnership
program between the University Library and four local public libraries. The free series provides computer and information literacy
programming delivered by the University Library for community residents onsite at the Chapel Hill Public Library, the Carrboro
Cybrary, the Carrboro Branch Library and the Durham Public Library. Offerings include introductory computer and information
literacy classes, as well as advanced topics such as evaluating health information, job searching on the Internet and writing a
resume. Some classes are taught in Spanish, providing special benefit in a region with a growing Latino population. The series
extends the instructional and subject expertise of the university to learners beyond the academy. In its first two years (March 2005-
Feb. 2007), the series offered a total of 270 classes (22 in Spanish), reaching 1,622 participants. In February, the series won the
Innovation Award from the Association of College and Research Libraries‘ Instruction Section, which cited it as ―a programming
innovator [and] a model of creativity and quality.‖



Continuing Education (also Access)

Developmental Disabilities Training Institute (DDTI) Located within the Jordan Institute for Families in the School of Social
Work, DDTI fosters improvements in services and support to people with developmental disabilities by developing the knowledge,
attitudes and skills of staff involved in their lives. This includes identifying best practices as well as providing in-service training
activities, targeted program evaluation and technical assistance to agencies and organizations managing, coordinating or providing
services to individuals and their families. DDTI programs include training on crisis planning and management, person-centered
thinking when working with people who have developmental disabilities, and facilitating support networks for people with
developmental disabilities.

Doctor of Pharmacy Partnership Program Doctor of Pharmacy Partnership Program Launched in fall 2005, the Doctor of
Pharmacy program through the UNC School of Pharmacy enrolls 10 to 15 students per year at Elizabeth City State University. This
partnership enables the Doctor of Pharmacy program to increase the number of graduates each year and to promote increased
numbers of pharmacists working in underserved populations, especially in northeastern North Carolina. Students are co-enrolled in
a BS in the Pharmaceutical Sciences program at ECSU and the Doctor of Pharmacy program at UNC-Chapel Hill. They remain on
the ECSU campus for the first three years of instruction through video-teleconferencing, Web-based teaching, and classes taught
by ECSU faculty. Graduates of this program will receive a doctor of pharmacy degree from UNC-Chapel Hill with acknowledgment
of the partnership with ECSU.

Durham Scholars Program is directed by James Johnson, professor of geography and director of the Urban Investment                           x
Strategies Center at the Frank Hawkins Kenan Institute of Private Enterprise at the UNC Kenan-Flagler Business School.
Established in 1993, the foundation of this program is an after-school college preparatory academy where students work on
improving both academic and social skills. Each year, 30 sixth-grade students are chosen from Durham neighborhoods where the
poverty rate exceeds 40 percent. With the help of teachers and volunteer mentors, students do homework, publish a weekly
newsletter and take part in volunteer activities. Consistent with the theory of social capital, the program gets parents involved in a
parallel set of educational programs, including nutrition workshops, consumer-credit counseling and conflict-resolution guidance.
Parents also visit their children‘s school once a month. The second part of the program is designed to help 11th and 12th graders
prepare for college. Eight need-based college scholarships are offered to Durham-area high school graduates on a competitive
basis. Recipients also participate in workshops and volunteer activities, including mentoring younger students in the after-school
program. As students in the after-school program reach 11th grade, they become eligible for the college scholarships. The
initiative, set to take place over a period of 20 years, will impact nearly 250 students.



Ella Baker Women’s Center for Leadership and Community Activism has plans to establish The Ella Baker Women‘s Center
for Leadership and Community Activism near two low-income housing communities in Chapel Hill and to replicate the model
nationwide. A pilot of the Center‘s flagship program was launched in June 2007, with 10 young women activists (ages 13-18) from
the Trinity Court and Pritchard Park public housing communities in Chapel Hill. Phase I of the pilot involved the youth in eight
weeks of community organization training using curriculum guides and technical assistance from the Innovation Center for
Community and Youth Development, a Kellogg funded nonprofit organization based in Takoma Park, MD. Training focuses on
personal leadership (identity, history, vision, ethics), organizational leadership (critical thinking, decision making, accessing
resources), and community leadership (civic awareness, networking, organizing). Phase II, launched in August 2007, is a year-long
community change project led by the youth and adult partners (UNC faculty, students and community volunteers). Opportunities for
youth to identify and construct solutions to problems in their own communities underscore all activities.



Emerging Leaders in Public Health The Emerging Leaders in Public Health Program is designed to prepare the next generation                  x
of public health leaders by identifying and training those individuals with the talent to serve in significant leadership capabilities in
the next decade. The program's topics include balancing communications needs, financial resources and human resources during
times of crises, analyzing crisis scenarios and assessing their potential impact on one's organization and community, creating
sustainable organizations in public health and managing an increasingly diverse workforce.
Executive Education Program, Kenan-Flagler The graduate-level Certificate in Technology and Communication has admitted
159 students since its inception in 2003. Thirty-two students have completed the program. Approximately 80 percent of
participants are working professionals from North Carolina who are using e-learning as a way to continue their educations without
disrupting their careers or family life. The School‘s Executive Education program offers seminars and workshops to nearly 500
professionals in the fields of journalism and mass communication. Participants come primarily from North Carolina and the
Southeast.

Executive Education Program, School of Journalism

Family Life Project Established at the School of Education in 2002 and funded with a $16.5 million grant from the National
Institute for Child Health and Human Development (NICHD), this study of nearly 1,300 children in rural communities is examining
the biological, individual, family and community processes that lead to good or poor outcomes for rural children. The project was
recently renewed with an additional $12 million NICHD grant to continue research on the 1,300 rural children, now turning 3, who
have been studied since birth.

Fort Bragg Base Realignment and Closure Baseline Assessment A community impact assessment was completed in 2006 to                          x
predict the impact of personnel changes on the public schools. The Center for Urban and Regional Studies project focused on Fort
Bragg and 11 surrounding counties (Bladen, Cumberland, Harnett, Hoke, Lee, Montgomery, Moore, Richmond, Robeson,
Sampson and Scotland). Projections will help local governments and school systems prepare for an influx of soldiers and their
families.

Frank Porter Graham Child Development Institute, First School This initiatives involves working with two schools in the state
to implement a new vision for the education and care of young children from pre-kindergarten through third grade that unites the
best of early childhood,elementary, and special education.

High School Resource Allocation Project (HSRA) was begun in September 2006 as a collaboration between the State Board of
Education, the NC Department of Public Instruction and a visiting professor to the School of Education, now in the Department of
Public Policy. This ongoing statewide effort conducted audits of high schools in all 115 NC school districts. By examining student
achievement, researchers identified high school that have succeeded with struggling students. Then, in data on teacher
backgrounds and spending patterns were examined to determine the links between specific types of expenditures and resources
and student outcomes. The effort provides an unparalleled database for focusing resources in the most efficient ways to affect
student achievement.

iBiblio is one of the world's first Web sites and largest digital libraries. As a way to share and support free software, ibiblio has
grown to host more than 2,000 non-software related projects. From Project Gutenburg (the famous free book archive) to etree.org
(where fans of tape-friendly bands share concert music); from charities and non-profits both in North Carolina and worldwide
(notably those of the Tibetan government) to video documentaries of folk practice; and from educational sites to those of odd
amusements, ibiblio.org typically serves more than 16 million requests for information per day. In addition to its Web-based
services, ibiblio.org is involved in Internet2 projects, 3-D environments and video archiving and supports NASA educational videos
and the streaming of seven not-for-profit radio stations. ibiblio.org is also involved in free software development directly with several
local projects as well as leadership in the Linux Documentation Project.


Impact Awards for Graduate Students These awards recognize and encourage graduate students whose research is making a
difference to our state. Impact Award winners, selected by a faculty review committee, present their research, receive a cash award
and are recognized at the Annual Graduate Student Recognition Event. The research can have a direct impact on the citizens of
North Carolina (and beyond) or a more indirect impact through new knowledge or insights gained, educational, economic, health,
social and cultural or environmental effects that will be derived from the research endeavor. Projects have included research on
issues related to education, economic development, environmental issues, health and social services. One graduate student
worked with the North Carolina Rural Center for Economic Development to research and develop a new economic disaster
response program called R2R or Resources to Recover. This program is aimed at connecting nonprofit, faith-based organizations
to the state‘s workforce development system in an effort to respond to economic disasters, such as the closure of the Pillowtex
plant in Carbarrus County in 2003.


Improving the Care of Acutely Ill Elders Improving the health of North Carolina‘s elderly population by bringing education and
training in geriatric care to nurses in rural or underserved areas is the goal of a new partnership between the School of Nursing and
the N.C. Area Health Education Centers (AHEC) program. In August 2006, the program launched simultaneously in two
rural/underserved regions of North Carolina, including a five-county area where, according to U.S. census data, the poverty rate is
20.4 percent for persons aged 65 years and older. The state average for this age group is 13.7 percent. School of Nursing faculty
will teach two AHEC nurses from each area how to conduct the program workshops and the geriatric clinical simulations. The
AHEC nurses will then lead continuing education programs in their area. AHEC will provide the nurses with access to state-of-the-
art computerized mannequins for the clinical simulations.
Institute for Outdoor Drama Established in 1963, The Institute of Outdoor Drama is a public service agency in the College of Arts
and Sciences of The University of North Carolina in Chapel Hill. It is the only organization in the U.S. providing national leadership
in fostering artistic and managerial excellence and expansion of the outdoor drama movement through training, research and
advisory programs, and it serves as a national clearinghouse for more than 120 constituent theatre companies across the nation.

The outdoor historical dramas are original plays, often with music and dance, based on significant events and performed in
amphitheatres located where the events actually occurred. Born in North Carolina, uniquely American and epic in scope, they focus
on the people who shaped the heritage of the country, preserving and bearing witness to the great things we've accomplished as a
state and nation. They are part of the travel and tourism industry, designed to attract families on vacation.




Interdisciplinary Health Communication Certificate Program through the School of Journalism and Mass Communication,                      x
Information and Library Sciences, School of Public Health and Department of Psychology The Certificate prepares current
degree-seeking residential UNC-Chapel Hill graduate students to use theory-informed health communication strategies in applied
practice, academic and research settings. It supplements students� degree programs with focused training in one of two tracks:
Psychological processes - examining how health communication leads people to change their health behaviors.
Integrated communication strategies - examining how to create and deliver health communication messages and interventions
through interpersonal communication, print media and electronic media.


Joint Plan for Dentistry in North Carolina (also Access) A joint initiative between UNC-Chapel Hill and East Carolina University
to address the increase and distribution of the dental work force statewide and North Carolina citizens' access to dental care. The
plan provides for the construction of a new Dental Sciences Building at UNC-Chapel Hill focusing on enhancing opportunities in
education, service and patient-centered research, and an increase in DDS class size from 81 to up to 100. The plan also provides
for the creation of a new dental school (DDS class size: 50) at East Carolina University and service-learning centers affiliated with
ECU within underserved communities statewide.

Jordan Institute for Families is the research, training and technical assistance arm of the School of Social Work. The Institute is
an example of how a school includes the community voice in institutional planning. Addressing family issues across the lifespan,
the Jordan Institute brings together experts -- including families themselves -- to develop and test policies and practices that
strengthen families and engage communities. The School of Social Work provides extensive training and technical assistance
through the Jordan Institute. Community partners can access a list of programs in their area through an interactive map on the
School‘s website. These projects provide technical assistance, training, and information to help families become healthy and stable.



Kenan Institute Asia The Kenan Institute Asia (K.I.Asia) works in a variety of ways to promote sustainable development in Asia.          x


Learn NC, The Learners‘ and Educators‘ Assistance and Resource Network of North Carolina (LEARN NC) is a collaborative                   x
statewide network of teachers and partners devoted to improving student performance and enhancing teacher proficiencies by
creating and sharing high-quality teaching and learning resources via the World Wide Web. Offered free through the UNC School
of Education, LEARN NC provides curriculum and instructional tools aligned with the state‘s Standard Course of Study and a virtual
classroom of online courses for K-12 students and teachers. LEARN NC has trained 30,000 teachers and others (as of 2000) in all
115 public school systems as well as charter schools, N.C.‘s Catholic Diocese and the N.C. Independent School Association.
About 20,000 teachers and students visit the LEARN NC website every day, where they can choose from more than 10,000 pages
of educational resources, including 3,000 lesson plans. In the online learning group, LEARN NC offered 40 K-12 courses, including
23 Advanced Placement courses, online this year. In the 2006-2007 school year, LEARN NC served more than 2,000 students
throughout North Carolina, and many students spread throughout 23 states and four foreign countries. One recent LEARN NC
project is a collaboration with UNC‘s Research Laboratories of Archaeology to create a teaching resource called ―Intrigue of the
Past‖ about North Carolina‘s first peoples. LEARN NC is also are very active in professional development courses for teachers. In
the 2006-2007 school year, LEARN NC online offered 28 teacher development courses online, which helped more than 1,000
teaches renew their certifications or learn to develop and teach their own online courses. o The University of North Carolina Online
o Alternative licensure for teachers
o Math and Science Online
Lifelong Access Libraries (LAL) As the baby boom generation moves toward the retirement years, there is a need to create
opportunities for these valuable citizens to continue to be active and civically engaged. The School of Information and Library
Science (SILS) and the UNC Institute on Aging (IOA) are actively involved with a project called Lifelong Access Libraries (LAL)
whose aim is to create a model for public libraries to support older adults in ways that facilitate learning, social connections, life
planning and community engagement. The LAL project was created by the Americans for Libraries Council with a grant from
Atlantic Philanthropies. In August 2007, SILS and IOA will host the second annual LAL Fellows Institute -- a week-long training for
public librarians from across the country in how to plan, organize and deliver LAL programs in public libraries. The SILS/IOA team
is also responsible for the evaluation of five LAL Centers of Excellence that are being identified by the Americans for Libraries
Council. North Carolina has been identified as one of possible the Centers of Excellence. We are currently working with the NC
Division of Aging and Adult Services to facilitate LAL initiatives in public libraries across the state.



Management Academy for Public Health Management Academy prepares teams of health professionals for new management                        x
challenges in community health. Management Academy will build your skills in managing money, people, data and partnerships.
Every team writes and presents a public health business plan designed to attack a key public health problem in your community.




Media Law Handbook which was first published in 1992, is widely used by North Carolina journalists for whom it provides a ready
reference to information about libel, privacy, access to public records and meetings, the journalist‘s privilege, copyright law,
advertising regulation, and the North Carolina court system. The handbook‘s contents were researched and written by North
Carolina lawyers and academicians, each of whom contributed the time and effort to compile a chapter. Together with Cathy
Packer, a professor at the School of Journalism and Mass Communication, EGHS partners Amanda Martin and Hugh Stevens
have edited and produced an updated edition (2007), published by the North Carolina Press Foundation and the School of
Journalism and Mass Communication.

Medical Journalism Program (SOJ) at the School of Journalism and Mass Communication communicates with citizens across
the state about important health and environmental issues through a nine-year collaboration with UNC-TV. Since 1998, student
teams under the supervision of Dr. Tom Linden have prepared 17 six- to seven-minute reports on health and environmental issues
that have been broadcast on ―North Carolina Now‖ on UNC-TV. Many of the master‘s projects and theses prepared by graduate
students in our Medical Journalism Program have focused on health problems around the state. Students have prepared series of
articles, radio and video reports on a multitude of health-related issues. These reports are all archived in the Park Library in the
School of Journalism and Mass Communication. In addition, students in the science documentary television class have partnered
with independent Chapel Hill producers and UNC-TV to produce a half-hour documentary on the Haw River that aired on UNC-TV
in April 2001. One goal of the Medical Journalism Program is to provide a laboratory for learning for undergraduate and graduate
students while communicating to a larger statewide audience.



Military History, Department of History, College of Arts and Sciences The Department of History in the College of Arts and
Sciences offers graduate studies within the major field of military history. Military history at the University of North Carolina at
Chapel Hill is part of a collaborative program with Duke University. Four core courses provide students with a fundamental
grounding in the field. Courses include an examination of classic works in military history, theory and the study of war and military
affairs. Readings encompass several disciplines and genres, including sociology and political science, biography, and war and
battle narratives.

Mini Medical School (School of Medicine) UNC Mini-Medical School, features renowned researchers from the UNC-CH School
of Medicine addressing some of the latest developments in medical science. Participants need not have a background in science
or medicine to enroll – just an interest in medicine and a healthy curiosity about the science behind it. The lecture series is
specifically designed for non-medical people.


Morehead-Cain Scholars Program A $100 million gift from the Gordon and Mary Cain Foundation of Houston, Texas -- the
largest donation ever given in support of UNC – has expanded the number of Morehead Scholars as well as the Summer
Enrichment Program and other enrichment opportunities at UNC-Chapel Hill. For more than half a century, the Morehead
Foundation has enhanced the reputation and strength of Carolina by providing scholarships to future leaders.
National College Advising Corps and Carolina College Advising Corps. UNC-Chapel Hill is one of 10 colleges and universities
joining the Jack Kent Cooke Foundation in a $10 million partnership to create advising programs to help low-income students enroll
in college. The network of programs created through the partnership –the National College Advising Corps – will be headquartered
at UNC-Chapel Hill. The University will receive $1 million over four years to create the Carolina College Advising Corps, which will
place recent UNC-Chapel Hill graduates as college advisers in 18 partner high schools across the state. These advisers will help
students plan their college searches, complete admissions and financial-aid applications, and overcome obstacles that might
discourage them from continuing their education. UNC-Chapel Hill will contribute nearly $700,000 to the program, which aims to
boost the number of low-income and first-generation-college students enrolling in two- and four-year colleges and universities.



NC Black and Latino Media Issues Forum Held at the School of Journalism and Mass Communication in spring 2007, this forum
was co-sponsored by the NC Triangle Chapter of the National Association of Hispanic Journalists and the Triangle Association of
Black Journalists. The event provided an open forum for discussions about dispelling certain myths and stereotypes that exist
between ethnic groups, and vocalizing a call to action for better, more ethical and accurate coverage of minority populations by
other minority populations.

NC Civic Education Consortium The Civic Education Consortium works with schools, governments and community organizations
to prepare North Carolina‘s young people to be active, responsible citizens. The consortium has worked alongside Charlotte-
Mecklenburg Schools and local community partners to create a resource notebook and CD-ROM encouraging discussions of
current events and controversial issues. It is currently conducting a student civic profile survey in all Duplin County elementary,
middle and high schools to help principals develop school-improvement plans addressing civic responsibility. The consortium also
administers a small grants program and provides technical assistance to teachers and community leaders across the state.



NC Civic Education Initiative

NC Health Info To assist North Carolinians with their health information needs, the Health Sciences Library developed N.C.
Health Info (www.nchealthinfo.org), a website that provides Internet users with quick and easy access to quality health information.
This summer, N.C. Health Info will be expanded into a health information portal, where North Carolinians of any literacy level may
find health information that is easy-to-read, or presented visually with audio narration. Users will find information about health
insurance, preparedness and public safety, mental health, alternative medicine and wellness, drugs and supplements, lab tests
and diagnostic procedures, educational tools, and news, all with a North Carolina focus. The portal will feature information for
citizen-soldiers and their families, seniors and Spanish speakers. The portal‘s design and development is being led by the Health
Sciences Library and conducted by a multi-institutional group of academic health sciences libraries and public and AHEC libraries
throughout North Carolina.


NC Institute for Public Health is the service and outreach arm of the prestigious School of Public Health at the University of North    x
Carolina at Chapel Hill. Its mission is to bring the public health scholarship and practice communities together for the common
purpose of improving the public's health and human well-being.
NCIPH is a key public health resource for imparting timely and practical knowledge about ongoing and emerging public health
issues. Its intention is to raise public awareness and stimulate discourse about public health issues, policy, and practice. Examples
of emerging public health issues include disaster and disease preparedness, accreditation, health disparities, and obesity.
As a constituent of UNC, the Institute is committed to the public health needs of North Carolina, placing those first. But public
health issues go beyond geographic boundaries. The Institute provides services to the public health communities of neighboring
states, the nation, and the world.
NCIPH provides a range of learning and development experiences that constitute the largest, most comprehensive set of public
health professional development resources in the country. It provides high-quality credit and non-credit education in accessible
venues at affordable prices.
Consulting Services provides a range of consulting services that rely on evidence-based scholarship, assessment, and strategic
planning.
 Evaluation Services at the Institute provides comprehensive, customer- focused, high quality program planning and evaluation
services, in accordance with the American Evaluation Association guidelines and in keeping with the Institute's mission of linking
practice and academia.
North Carolina ECHO (Exploring Cultural Heritage Online) is a partnership of the State Library of North Carolina/Department of                x
Cultural Resources and the School of Information and Library Science (SILS) and Academic Affairs Libraries (AAL) at Carolina. NC
ECHO aims to provide deep, wide, and comprehensive access to the holdings of North Carolina‘s cultural institutions. In particular,
SILS and the AAL are supporting the development of mechanisms that allow cultural institutions across the state of North Carolina
to provide digital access to their collections through a single portal. Particular aims are to allow K-12 educators and students to
benefit from these resources even though they may not be physically nearby, and to showcase the cultural heritage of North
Carolina for tourism and economic development purposes.



North Carolina Global Learning Lab - Globalization and the Transformation fo NC's Economy Global outsourcing and the
growing integration of international markets have altered the structure of regional competition around the globe. North Carolina
provides an interesting context to study the processes of industrial restructuring, because the state has simultaneously experienced
a rapid decline in manufacturing sectors and a rapid growth in hightechnology sectors. This project maps these transformations in
key industries and explores the role of public-sector intermediaries in the process. The website summarizes student work in an
economic development course in the Department of City and Regional Planning at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill.
The full papers are also available for download.


North Carolina Public Health Academy (also Access) The Academy's goal is to broaden public health professional development
opportunities and experiences through AHEC‘s multi-site educational system. "Schools" for different public health professions will
provide public health leaders and clinicians with access to knowledge and skills needed to deal with the rapidly changing public
health environment by linking them to state-of-the-art learning methods. The first schools will be for health directors and medical
residents. In the future, schools will be developed for public health nurses, environmental health specialists and social workers.



North Carolina Scholastic Media Association is a statewide organization that promotes excellence and responsibility in
scholastic journalism and encourages respect for freedom of the press. NCSMA also promotes professional growth of journalism
teachers and speaks for scholastic media in matters of curriculum and instruction that affect journalism education in North
Carolina. Outreach services related to high school journalism have been part of the School of Journalism and Mass
Communication since 1938. NCSMA currently offers a Scholastic Media Institute in Chapel Hill each summer, regional workshops
co-hosted with universities and newspapers across the state during the fall and spring semesters and a statewide high school
publication contest each spring. One recent example of NCSMA services involved a coordinated response to the State Board of
Education‘s approval of the framework for a new core course of study. The framework included provisions for four-course
endorsements in several extracurricular areas, with the exception of communication-related courses. NCSMA, along with
journalism teachers throughout the state, alerted state board members to the need and viability of adding such a communications
endorsement.

Odum Institute for Research in the Social Sciences Founded in 1924, the H. W. Odum Institute for Research in Social Science
is the nation's oldest multidisciplinary social science university institute. Indeed, we are the oldest institute or center at the nation's
first public university, UNC- Chapel Hill.* The mission of the Odum Institute parallels that of the University as a whole -- teaching,
research, and service -- but the Institute's focus is on the social sciences. The Odum Institute is not part of any one school or
department. Rather it stretches across virtually the entire university community and beyond, touching students, faculty, and staff
from public health, social work, business, government, and the arts and sciences. People come from all corners of the university to
take advantage of the training and courses, consulting services, data, software, and facilities that the Institute offers. The Odum
Institute also has served as an incubator for other centers. The institute started the Center for Urban and Regional Studies in 1957
and launched it as an independent center in 1969. The Center for the Study of the American South began in 1992 as an Odum
Institute initiative and is now an independent Center. We currently serve as the administrative home for the Citizen Soldier Support
Program that was developed in 2005.
Office of Economic and Business Development (OEBD) matches faculty and campus expertise and resources with economic                            x
development issues facing North Carolina and its communities and organizations. This office is led by Jesse White Jr., who
headed the Appalachian Regional Commission and the Southern Growth Policies Board.
During its first year of operations, OEBD worked within the university to develop a network of faculty interested in economic
development work in North Carolina. It also worked on several economic development projects in the state, including Carolina‘s
response to the state‘s successful bid to have Credit Suisse First Boston locate a major facility in the RTP area. At the
announcement ceremony, the company stated that the assets of our universities were a deciding factor in locating in North
Carolina. In addition, OEBD took the leadership role, along with the Friday Center for Continuing Education, in having UNC-Chapel
Hill become an associate of the Hickory Metropolitan Higher Education Council. Carolina can now offer credit, noncredit and
special courses and seminars in the Hickory facility. Another successful project was OEBD‘s role in helping the North Carolina
Rural Economic Development Center secure a Kellogg Foundation grant to create an entrepreneurial support system in rural North
Carolina. A multiyear, multimillion dollar grant, Carolina‘s School of Government will play a significant role in training local officials.
OEBD also continued work in Carteret County begun by the Carolina Center for Competitive Economies by analyzing the marine
sciences cluster there and working with the Economic Development Council of the county.



Office of Experiential Education We have integrated engagement with the newly revised undergraduate curriculum that took
effect last fall. One objective of the curriculum is to help undergraduates understand that what they learn in a specific course is not
knowledge in isolation but part of a larger concept. As part of the core curriculum requirements, every student must complete at
least one experiential requirement. The opening of the Office of Experiential Education has been timed to coincide with the
implementation of the ―Making Connections‖ General Education curriculum with its new experiential education graduation
requirement. The office seeks to create, promote, expand and publicize the experiential learning available to undergraduates.



Period of Purple Crying: Keeping Babies Safe in North Carolina is a statewide educational program involving UNC-CH Injury
Prevention Center, School of Medicine, School of Journalism and Mass Communication, and Duke University Medical Center.



Playmakers Repertory Company Housed in the UNC Department of Dramatic Art PlayMakers Repertory Company (PRC) is a
professional theater named in 2003 by the Drama League of New York as ―one of the 50 best regional theatres in the country.‖ As
part of its educational mission, PlayMakers offers the Educational Matinee Series, sponsored by GlaxoSmithKline. The
Educational Matinee Series offers weekday performances followed by discussions with the cast members, director, dramaturgs
and technical staff and is attended by middle and secondary school students from throughout North Carolina.
Audience Discussion Wednesdays is a pre-performance discussion series offered to audiences following selected Wednesday
performances throughout the season. Backstage tours, available to groups at no charge by advance reservation, offer an exciting
and informative look behind the scenes at PlayMakers. PlayMakers dedicates one performance per production dedicated to
ensuring that people with disabilities have equal access to the arts by employing: sign language interpretation for patrons who are
hard of hearing or deaf; assisted listening devices for patrons with partial hearing loss; audio description, Braille playbills, large print
playbills, and a tactile tour for patrons with impaired vision; and wheelchair access. The theater also offers Community Nights
discounts on Tuesdays, when general admission tickets are just $10.




Practica/community-based courses in the professional schools Virtually every professional school requires students to
complete community practica or take community-based courses. For instance, in the School of Public Health, all master‘s students
in health behavior and health education are required to take ―Action-Oriented Community Diagnosis.‖ Using concepts and methods
from anthropology and epidemiology, this powerful service-learning course teaches students to conduct community-based
research. Over the last 25 years, more than 1,000 students have worked with over 262 communities. For example, a recent group
of students on one team, ¡Accion Latina!, interviewed community members and developed a plan to address identified problems
with health, education, employment and transportation. Such projects provide valuable information to community members who
can then develop informed plans.


Preserving North Carolina's Archaeological Heritage N.C. Archaeological Collection. As a service to the state, we maintain the
pre-eminent repository for archaeological collections from North Carolina. This is the archive on which most of our knowledge of
the state‘s ancient history is based. The collection contains over 7 million artifacts from more than 7,000 sites, which go back some
12,000 years.
Program in the Humanities and Human Values in the College of Arts and Sciences sponsors continuing education seminars to
help business executives, public leaders, humanities scholars and teachers explore and respond to emerging issues and
challenges. For example, the Warren A. Nord Executive Seminar for Teachers set for July 2007 is designed to enhance teachers‘
understanding of religion in history and literature over the past century and to help them in their efforts to present religion and
religious themes to students in ways that are constitutionally permissible and pedagogically sound. In addition, the Roger and May
Belle Penn Jones Executive Seminar set for May 2006 will encourage executives, public leaders and humanities scholars to
explore the nature and meaning of a successful life.
Program on Public Life (Center for the Study of the American Self/School of Journalism) This program, which is part of the
Center for the Study of the American South and has its offices within the School of Journalism and Mass Communication, works to
enable Carolina to serve the people of the state and region by informing the public agenda and nurturing leadership. The Program
acts as a ―research brokerage‘‘ in linking intellectual resources to elected officials and civic leaders, and thus contributing to
improving representative democracy in North Carolina and the South. There are three major functional components of the program:




Public Policy Practicum In this capstone course in the Department of Public Policy in the College of Arts and Sciences, students
majoring in public policy offer policy analyses and evaluations to North Carolina nonprofit agencies. As of 2000, North Carolina
had more than 29,000 nonprofit organizations that employed more than 15.9 million people he aims of these agencies include
improving economic equity, reducing institutionalized racism, increasing access to health and governmental services and generally
improving the choices facing women, immigrants and the poor. The leaders of these groups, however, don‘t always have the skills
they need to deliver these services in the best and most efficient way. The students in this class give nonprofits free advice on how
to meet their goals. For example, students in this course have provided an analysis to help determine the best way for a community
health center to deliver low-cost primary care to those just slightly out of range of Medicaid. Another project looked at a way to
improve the nutritional choices of those living in public housing.



Public/Private Legal Preparedness Initiative is a two-year initiative is designed to improve emergency preparedness and
response by removing the legal barriers that hinder effective and timely collaboration between the private, nonprofit, and public
sectors. The initiative will focus on two selected legislative/policy areas: Good Samaritan Liability Preparedness for business and
non-profit entities assisting in community emergencies and Development of Common Human Resources Polices for use during a
public health emergency.
Renaissance Computing Institute (RENCI) Founded in 2004, RENCI is a major collaborative venture of UNC-Chapel Hill, Duke
University, N.C. State University and the state of North Carolina that uses sophisticated, high-performance computing resources
and expertise, primarily to help the state plan for and respond to disasters. Hurricanes and the floods and tornadoes that come in
their wake take a huge personal and economic toll on North Carolina. Between 1980 and 2005, the state endured more than 20
weather-related disasters that caused at least $1 billion in damage, according to NOAA‘s National Climate Data Center.
The RENCI approach to modeling, predicting and responding to hurricanes, severe storms and flooding is multifaceted:



Research Enrichment and Apprenticeship Program (REAP) For the past seven years, the School of Nursing has led a program
that creates mentoring partnerships between faculty researchers and nursing students who are members of a racial/ethnic minority
group. The program includes faculty mentors and students from North Carolina Central University, Winston-Salem State
University, and UNC-Chapel Hill. With funding from the National Institute of Nursing Research, NIH, the program has been able to
pay students $10 – $12/hour to work up to 172 hours on the mentors research project and to pay for them to attend and present at
a national conference. Ten students participate each year. Students also attend seven 2-hour seminars and conduct an individual
research project. The NIH funding will end June 2008. We would like to continue the program, because it has been so well
received by students and faculty, and to increase the number racial/ethnic minority students in master's and doctoral level
education in nursing and working toward careers in nursing research.



Research Laboratories of Archaeology The Research Laboratories of Archaeology has a long track record of engagement.                    x
This record includes active programs of K-12 outreach, promoting economic development through heritage tourism, and
maintaining the North Carolina Archaeological Collection (the state's oldest and most important archaeological archive). Many of
these initiatives focus on rural and underserved communities, and contribute directly to the goals outlined in sections 4.3 (Public
Education) and 4.4 (Communities and Economic Transformation) of the UNC Tomorrow Commission's Final Report.



Research Laboratories of Archaeology, Trail of Tears National Historic Trail We conducted an inventory for the National                 x
Park Service to support expansion of the Trail of Tears National Historic Trail into NC; prepared National Register of Historic
Places nominhations for eight Trail of Tears sites in Western North Carolina; prepared permanent Trail of Tears exhibit for the
Cherokee County Historical Museum (Murphy, NC); developed 18 outdoor public exhibits in the Trail of Tears for cherokee,
Graham, Macon, Clay, Swain, and Jackson Counties.

Research Laboratories of Archaeology, Cherokee Pottery Revitalization Project With the Museum of the Cherokee Indian, we                x
organized a workshop for Cherokee potters, which reintroduced traditional pottery styles (based on items in the N.C.
Archaeological Collection) and led to the founding of the Cherokee Potters Guild.
Research Laboratories of Archaeology Preserving North Carolina’s Archaeological Heritage                                                  x
N.C. Archaeological Collection. As a service to the state, we maintain the pre-eminent repository for
archaeological collections from North Carolina. This is the archive on which most of our knowledge of
the state‘s ancient history is based. The collection contains over 7 million artifacts from more than 7,000
sites, which go back some 12,000 years.
Research Laboratories of Archaeology Occaneechi Village Replication Project We provided technical assistance to the                       x
occaneechi Band of Saponi Nation in replicating their ancestral villages at Hillsborough and Pleasant Grove, NC; we annually
assist the tribe with its Occaneechi School Days educational program for children.

Research Laboratories of Archaeology Town Creek Indian Mound (State Historic Site). The RLA conducted excavations at                      x
Town Creek for 50 years and was instrumental in developing this locality into a state historic site; we curate all artifact collections
from the site, advise on site interpretation, and regularly offer public programs there.



Research Laboratories of Archaeology Cherokee Ancient Village We are providing technical assistance to the Cherokee                       x
Nation of Oklahoma for the reconstruction of a traditional village at the Cherokee Heritage Center, Park Hill, Oklahoma.


Southeast Public Health Leadership Institute The Southeast Public Health Leadership Institute is a year-long leadership
development program, within the University of North Carolina School of Public Health, for mid- to senior level public health
administrators working in the states of Arkansas, North Carolina, South Carolina, Tennessee, Virginia and West Virginia.
The Institute supports the strengthening of leadership competencies, such as creating a shared vision, personal awareness,
systems thinking, risk communication, team building, ethical decision making and political and social change strategies. Scholars
interact with local and national leaders during 3 working retreats, 4 telephone conferences, and 3 online computer discussion
forums. Each scholar also completes an individual learning plan, a community leadership project, a mentoring relationship and 4
small group assignments.



Southeastern Regional Center for Excellence in Civilian Biodefense (SERCEB) A consortium of investigators from six
regional universities has been chosen to be part of a new biodefense initiative that will work to develop the next generation of
vaccines, drugs and diagnostic tests against emerging infections such as SARS, and for defense against organisms such as
smallpox that might be used in bioterrorist attacks.
The Southeast Regional Center of Excellence for Emerging Infections and Biodefense (SERCEB) will include researchers from
Duke University Medical Center, Emory University, University of Alabama at Birmingham, University of Florida, University of North
Carolina at Chapel Hill School of Medicine, and Vanderbilt University Medical Center. The consortium will be centered at Duke and
led by Barton Haynes, M.D., of the Duke Human Vaccine Institute. Its co-leaders are David Stephens, M.D., Emory University;
Richard Whitley, M.D., UAB; Richard Moyer, Ph.D., University of Florida; Frederick Sparling, M.D., University of North Carolina at
Chapel Hill School of Medicine; and Mark Denison, M.D., Vanderbilt University Medical Center.



UNC BEST (UNC Baccaluareate Education in Science and Teaching) is a unique new program where biology and physics                          x
majors obtain an undergraduate degree in science and high-school science teaching licensure through an integration of Arts and
Sciences and Education courses and experiences. Supported by scholarships from the Burroughs Wellcome Foundation, the UNC-
BEST program will admit the first cohort of 20 or more students in Fall 2008.

UNC Libraries Providing a sound K-12 education and supporting K-12 educators is a priority for all North Carolinians. The library
regularly hosts ―research days‖ for area schools including Chapel Hill High School, the Hillsborough Middle School, the Culbreth
Middle School in Chapel Hill, and several other K-12 schools from Durham and Cary. An average of 12 schools visit each year,
teaching some 500 students annually about library research and introducing them to the Carolina campus.
University Continuing Education Programs Through its academic departments and other administrative units, Carolina offers a
wide variety of continuing education courses and events. These noncredit offerings do not carry academic credit but provide
opportunities for learners to experience personal enrichment, achieve professional advancement and meet other important
educational goals. Conducted in a range of formats, both on campus and at numerous other locations throughout North Carolina
and beyond, these activities reflect the depth of the university‘s missions in teaching and public service. In 2005-2006, continuing
education programs offered by university departments reached more than 109,000 participants in North Carolina and beyond, an
increase of more than 11,000 in comparison with the previous year. The 2,284 courses and events for which data was provided
were offered by 27 schools and departments of the university in a variety of formats, primarily on site but also by means of distance
education. Learning events were held in 58 North Carolina counties, 19 states outside North Carolina and several foreign countries.
In addition, many of Carolina‘s professional schools have online programs that offer academic credentials to off-campus students,
such as certificates in programs through the Allied Health Sciences department (molecular diagnostic science) and the School of
Public Health (community preparedness and disaster management and field epidemiology). Students may earn master‘s degrees
from the School of Nursing and School of Public Health, and doctorates in physical therapy or health leadership through online
courses. In 2005-2006, these online and hybrid courses for credit had more than 1,200 participants in five schools or departments
at Carolina.




The William and Ida Friday Center for Continuing Education offers a wide range of educational programs and services that
substantially broaden the population of persons throughout the state that the University is able to serve. The Friday Center‘s
programs and services fall into three main categories: a conference center for educational functions conducted by university
departments and other organizations, noncredit educational activities for professional development and personal enrichment, and a
range of flexible learning opportunities for part-time students to earn academic credit. The Friday Center also administers an
inmate education program, providing on-site study and correspondence instruction to incarcerated learners throughout North
Carolina. In fiscal year 05-06, the Friday Center for Continuing education offered 2,284 courses and events to 45,708 North
Carolina residents representing 58 of North Carolina‘s counties, 3,986 individuals from 19 other states and 1,226 individuals from
five other countries. In this fiscal year, the Friday Center served a total of 100,734 individuals. Here are some Friday Center
programs of note:


The William and Ida Friday Center for Continuing Education, Correctional Education In a state with one of the nation‘s
highest per capita rates of incarceration, the Friday Center‘s Correctional Education Program (CEP) has for 35 years coordinated a
program through which academic credit courses and educational services have been provided to qualified inmates throughout the
North Carolina correctional system; the program has been supported through contracts with the N.C. Department of Correction for
the past 30 years. Based on clear evidence that individuals who earn college credits while incarcerated are least likely to return to
prison and most likely to become contributing citizens, the CEP administers an informal consortium of eight University of North
Carolina institutions through which a total of 70 on-site classroom courses, including some utilizing the North Carolina Information
Highway, are offered annually to approximately 1,000 students at 23 correctional facilities.



The William and Ida Friday Center for Continuing Education, Nursing Refresher Program Since 1990, the Friday Center has
worked with the School of Nursing, the North Carolina AHEC program and the North Carolina Board of Nursing to offer an
educational program for nurses who wish to return to the profession after being inactive. The Medical-Surgical Nursing Review is
now recognized as a valuable tool in addressing the state‘s shortage of nurses, having enabled hundreds of nurses to reinstate
their lapsed licenses. The program consists of an intense didactic review presented via correspondence instruction and a clinical
practicum conducted by a proctor in one of the AHEC regions across the state. Each year more than 200 nurses complete the
program and rejoin the profession. A pilot online version of the didactic part of the program is currently under development and is
scheduled for testing in the coming months.




The William and Ida Friday Center for Continuing Education, Carolina Business Institute Now in its 15th year, with more than            x
750 graduates, CBI is a noncredit professional development program offered on an intensive schedule in the summer that
introduces the world of business to non-business majors who are recent college graduates or soon-to-be graduates. The program
is offered by the Friday Center in cooperation with the Kenan-Flagler Business School. Taught by a mixture of faculty and
graduates of Kenan-Flagler, CBI blends theory with applied business skills, and offers an integrated program that includes classes
in marketing, accounting, management and organization, finance and operations management. Students work through a sequence
of lectures and case studies based on real business situations and experience a computer-based management simulation.
Working in teams, students manage their own businesses through a hands-on approach, in competition with other teams.
Workforce Issues in Library and Information Science (WILIS) The changes in the demographic composition of the workforce
being created by the aging of the baby boomers is expected to create shortages of librarians and information industry workers in
North Carolina. In order to gain a better understanding of what happens to graduates of the six LIS programs in the state, The
School of Information and Library Science and UNC Institute on Aging have partnered in a three-year research project funded by
the Institute of Museum and Library Services. WILIS is studying the complex personal, organizational and social factors that affect
recruitment, job satisfaction and retention of library and information science graduates from six LIS programs across the state.
More than 8,000 graduates who completed their educational programs between 1964 and 2005 are included in the study. The
results will assist educational programs, employers, policy makers and other stakeholder to engage in more effective workforce
planning.
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Program/Activitity Title                                                                                                               GR
                                                                                                                                        4.1
Ackland Art Museum Open to the public free of charge, the Ackland Art Museum exhibits from a permanent collection of more
than 15,000 works of art, particularly rich in Old Master paintings and sculptures by artists including Degas, Rubens and Pisarro;
Indian miniatures; Japanese paintings; and North Carolina folk art.



Alvin Ailey Arts in Education Program Now in its seventh year, the program is committed to bringing dance into the classrooms,
communities and lives of people throughout the world. It is designed to promote student learning by engaging analytic and creative
thinking skills while introducing students to the work and mission of the late Alvin Ailey, dancer, choreographer and company
founder.
APPLES (Assisting People in Planning Learning Experiences in Service The APPLES Service Learning Program is a student                   x
initiated, student-led, student-funded program engaging students, faculty and community agencies in service-learning partnerships.
The goal of APPLES is to foster socially aware and civically involved students through participation in an enriched curriculum and
hands-on experiences that address the needs of North Carolina communities. The focus of the program is on the connection made
between service in the community and what students learn in an academic setting. More than 150 community organizations in the
Triangle region partner with the APPLES program each year. APPLES provides extensive support for faculty who teach service-
learning courses or would like to develop such courses. Support includes consultation during course development and
implementation; assistance in identifying community partners; provision of trained student facilitators; $500 course enhancement
grants; a two-day faculty development institute for faculty, staff, students, and community partners; discussion series and
workshops held in collaboration with the Center for Teaching and Learning; a resource library, a faculty listserv, and a faculty
BlackBoard site. This past year, 69 APPLES service-learning courses were offered in 22 departments, enrolling 1,214 students.
These students volunteered 46,010 hours in the Triangle community through APPLES service-learning experiences. Examples
include students enrolled in an intermediate Spanish course who volunteered with the Spanish School Reading Partners program
to help Spanish-speakers develop English language skills; public relations students who developed public service announcements,
fact sheets and brochures for the Special Olympics of Orange County; and students in a biomedical engineering course who
modified an iPod to respond to movement to encourage a blind toddler to crawl. This year, APPLES launched its first Global
Alternative Spring Break experience to Guanajuato, Mexico. This signature program provided 11 students, their professor and a
graduate student with a first-hand experience on the global forces that shape migration to North Carolina, as well as its effects on
migrant families and sending communities. Students returned to UNC eager and well-equipped to serve local Latino communities
through individual, sustained projects. This is a collaborative effort between APPLES and the Center for Global Initiatives.




Area Health Education Centers, Pediatric Specialty Services at the Zimmer Cancer Center in Wilmington The Zimmer
Cancer Center, Southeastern North Carolina‘s only community cancer center dedicated solely to the diagnosis, treatment and
support of people with cancer, is part of the Coastal AHEC, and Pediatric Specialty Services helps parents find care locally that
wouldn‘t otherwise be available. Specialists, such as those from UNC Lineberger Comprehensive Cancer Center, travel to
Wilmington on a regular basis to treat children with special medical needs.



Campus Y The Campus Y is the oldest and largest student organization on the UNC-Chapel Hill campus. Since the Y‘s founding              x
more than 150 years ago, Campus Y students have led UNC efforts to address social justice issues and encourage volunteerism
throughout the community and around the world. Seventeen active issue-based program committees and projects span a wide
range of issues, including human rights, hunger, supporting immigrants and literacy. These committees and programs are
completely student driven and student run. The Campus Y is also one of four groups that have worked together to create the
STRETCH (STudents REaching Toward CHange) conference. This day-and-a-half annual leadership and service conference is
planned and run by students to promote leadership and community engagement.



Carolina Asia Center The Carolina Asia Center, a unit of the College of Arts and Sciences, is a core element of UNC-Chapel              x
Hill‘s initiative to strengthen its position as a world-class international university.
CAC (pronounced ―see ay see‖) is the hub for three sets of inter-related activities focusing on Asia: Cutting-edge Research;
Innovative Teaching; and Strategic Partnerships.

Carolina Association of Black Journalists’ Minority Journalism Program for High School Journalism Students (also
Access) The Carolina Association of Black Journalists (CABJ) is an affiliated student chapter of the National Association of Black
Journalists (NABJ). CABJ is based out of the School of Journalism and Mass Communication at the University of North Carolina at
Chapel Hill. Founded in 1991, CABJ won NABJ‘s coveted ―Student Chapter of the Year‖ award in 2001, 2002 and 2007, and was
nominated for the award in 2005.
Carolina Center for Educational Excellence The Carolina Center for Educational Excellence (CCEE) provides workshops,
seminars, Internet-supported demonstrations, graduate classes and other opportunities for study to improve learning environments
for students in pre-school through 12th grade, university students and the professionals who support them. Equipped with state-of-
the-art technology, the CCEE facility includes flexible classroom space, ample room for seminars and conferences, a NASA-
supported science and mathematics teaching laboratory and a school counseling and psychology clinic.


Carolina Center for Jewish Studies at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill unites the general public, students and
faculty from various academic disciplines who share a common passion for a deeper understanding of Jewish history, culture and
thought.
With nine affiliated faculty members, undergraduate minors in Jewish Studies and Modern Hebrew, more than 1,000 students
taking Jewish Studies courses each year, and an active outreach program and popular lecture series, the Center is a dynamic
resource both on campus and beyond.
Looking ahead, the Center plans to create a comprehensive undergraduate program, complete with a B.A. in Jewish Studies.


Carolina Center for Public Service The Center‘s Public Service Scholars program provides a framework for students to                   x
complete service; connects students who care about similar issues with one another; guides participants in training that can make
their service more effective; links coursework to service; offers unique opportunities to participants; and recognizes students for
their commitment to service. Since its inception in 2003, the program has rapidly grown from 78 to more than 1,000 students. In
four years, participants have logged more than 165,000 hours of service in communities throughout North Carolina, the nation and
the world. In 2007, 96 students graduated as Public Service Scholars, with nearly 40,000 hours of service to their credit.



Carolina Center for Public Service UNC-Chapel Hill‘s public service programs reach every region of North Carolina, helping             x
communities protect public health, improve schools and medical services, stimulate business, plan for growth, understand cultural
heritage, and enrich the quality of people‘s daily lives. Launched in 1999, the Carolina Center for Public Service coordinates and
catalyzes campus outreach activities around the state. The Center has also created the Carolina Center for Public Service
Database matching its public service projects with all 100 North Carolina counties. This Internet resource contains descriptions of
858 projects currently and will continue to grow. The website attracts between 400 and 550 unique users each quarter.


Carolina Connects This chancellor-initiated tour of North Carolina is designed to highlight for local citizens the many ways that      x
UNC relates directly to their communities and their needs. A special website (http://www.unc.edu/depts/design/connects/)
chronicles the visits to every region of the state, to more than 50 communities from Manteo and Shallotte in the East to Asheville
and Cullowhee in the West and points in between. ―Carolina Connects‖ stops focused on the Carolina Covenant program, the
Citizen-Soldier initiative and multiple research and public service projects. Chancellor Moeser also visits with alumni, legislators
and news media outlets to highlight the ways in which the University‘s faculty, staff and students serve communities and people.
Each stop spotlights the University‘s teaching, research and public service work, particularly in the areas of economic
development, health care and public education because we know those are issues of interest to North Carolinians. Carolina
Connects is also an opportunity for Carolina faculty and staff to listen to the people – to ask the question, ―What problems do you
need the university to work on?‖



Carolina Institute for Developmental Disabilities The Carolina Institute for Developmental Disabilities
TEACCH (also PE)
Center for Development and Learning
Neurodevelopmental Disorders Research Center

Carolina Online Lateral Entry Program is an on-line lateral entry licensure program, currently in a pilot year, which supports
unlicensed individuals holding a math or science undergraduate degree through their first year of public school teaching while
obtaining their initial teacher licensure.
Carolina Performing Arts Series The Carolina Performing Arts series at the recently remodeled Memorial Hall is meant to serve
diverse audiences through multi-disciplinary performing arts programs in presentation, creation and education. Carolina Performing
Arts commissions new work, sponsors artist residencies and organizes collaborative projects with local, national and international
partners. In addition to establishing UNC-Chapel Hill as a leader in the performing arts in the southeastern United States, the
series also invites outstanding professional artists to perform and to teach; to foster a deep appreciation of a wide variety of the
performing arts in the University, in the local community and throughout the region. A recent example of this artist outreach is a
week-long residency by the Alvin Ailey American Dance Theatre Arts in Education Program, in which the professional dancers
taught master classes for 160 local middle school students. Memorial Hall reopened in fall 2005 after a three-year, $18 million
renovation designed to make the famed venue a focal point for the performing arts across the region. Memorial Hall hosts the
Carolina Performing Arts Series and anchors the planned Arts Common, which will extend southward from Franklin Street to
Playmakers Theatre, the oldest building on campus dedicated to the arts.




Center for Civil Rights in the School of Law has been actively engaged in a portfolio of outreach efforts that impact North Carolina
and the South, generally. In four low-income communities in Moore County, in the town of Clayton, in Hoke County and elsewhere,
the center has represented and assisted minority residents to seek greater municipal services and political participation. It has
also assisted efforts to stem the tide of resegregation in North Carolina‘s public schools, including intervening in the long-running
Leandro case on behalf of non-white children in Charlotte. The center was started because of the need to have an institutional
presence in the South to protect the civil rights of non-white and low-income communities in a time when 50 years of civil rights
progress stands at risk.


Center for Developmental Science The Center for Developmental Science (CDS) is a behavioral research center whose purpose
is to pursue questions in basic science related to developmental studies. CDS aims to transcend the limitations of institutional and
disciplinary divisions. Its faculty represent several universities and specialize in many disciplines including anthropology, behavioral
genetics, developmental psychology, developmental psychobiology, education, epidemiology, experimental psychology, internal
medicine, behavioral neurobiology, nursing, pediatrics, psychiatry, public health and sociology.



Center for European Studies / European Union Center of Excellence Our mission is to advance understanding of the social,                   x
political and economic events that shape contemporary Europe, in particular the European integration project. This is accomplished
by supporting faculty and graduate student research through our roles as a National Resource Center funded by the US Dept of
Education and as an EUCE funded by the European Commission. At the same time, the Center disseminates knowledge about
contemporary Europe by enricdhing our university's work in graduate and undergraduate education and in outreach programs with
public schools, business and media organizations.


Center for Global Initiatives The Center for Global Initiatives is a catalyst for the innovative work of faculty and students at the       x
University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. Formerly known as the University Center for International Studies (UCIS), the center is
entrepreneurial and nimble in its approach to fostering initiatives that deepen knowledge and understanding of our complex world.
The center offers an annual interdisciplinary conference titled, ―Navigating the Global American South Conference,‖ which explores
the changing face of the southern United States and its interaction with the rest of the world.



Center for Global Initiatives Carolina Navigators The K-12 Outreach Program, part of the Center for Global Studies, enriches               x
international education in North Carolina schools by providing free educational presentations that engage students in learning
about other countries, cultures, world regions, global issues and international current events. Presentations are designed to
supplement classroom instruction and can be tailored for teaching needs, regional issues, instructional purpose and appropriate
grade level. The Center for Global Studies supported the School of Education‘s production of a ―Handbook for Educators Who
Work with Children from Mexico.‖ The handbook is available on CD and is free of charge.


Center for Mathematics and Science Education provides outreach to inservice mathematics and science teachers. The
partership aims to: (a) to increase the number of teachers of middle school mathematics and science judged "highly qualified"
under the NCLB legislation, and (b) to assist lateral entry teachers who need additional mathematics or science course work to
receive their professional licenses.
o North Carolina Mathematics and Science Education Network (NC- MSEN) Pre-College Program (also Access)
Center for Slavic, Eurasian, and East European Studies (CSEEES) is a multi-disciplinary collaboration committed to                      x
enhancing knowledge about and experience of Eastern Europe and Eurasia in the university, state, and nation. The CSEEES
contributes to the preparing of students for successful professional careers through its Curriculum in Russian and East European
Studies, which offers BA and MA degrees and a Graduate Certificate; outreach activities aimed at increasing awareness among K-
12 and Community College students and educators about regional culture, history, and issues; and support for faculty and student
activities on and off campus, including fellowships targeted at graduate study of Foreign Language and Area Studies (FLAS). The
Center also promotes partnerships in North Carolina and beyond by engaging in collaborative programs; supporting conference,
workshop and seminar activities; and actively promoting scholarly and student exchanges, research, and study abroad. One of the
key CSEEES outreach activities is developing capacity of NC teachers to meet the challenges of public education. We partner
with other organizations and local schools to increase international awareness of teachers and students. The Center is also
committed to enhancing expertise and increasing community awareness of energy and environmental issues through public
programs and support for faculty, students, and scholarly exchanges.



Chuck Stone Program for Diversity in Education and Media (also Access) The program brings 20 minority and disadvantaged
high school seniors to campus for an intensive one-week summer workshop.



Clinical Center for the Study of Development and Learning A program of the School of Medicine, CDL has provided 40 years
of innovative, high-quality clinical, research, training and technical assistance to support children and adults with developmental
disabilities in North Carolina. As the state‘s University Center for Excellence in Developmental Disabilities, Education, Research
and Service, the CDL pushes the scope of research and services to include a unique focus on how people with developmental
disabilities learn and how their learning skills can be improved. CDL‘s faculty is made up of professionals in the disciplines of
pediatrics, psychology, education, nutrition, social work, physical therapy, occupational therapy, audiology, speech and language
pathology, and pediatric dentistry.

Continuing Education Through its academic departments and other administrative units, Carolina offers a wide variety of
continuing education courses and events. These noncredit offerings do not carry academic credit but provide opportunities for
learners to experience personal enrichment, achieve professional advancement and meet other important educational goals.
Conducted in a range of formats, both on campus and at numerous other locations throughout North Carolina and beyond, these
activities reflect the depth of the university‘s missions in teaching and public service. In 2005-2006, continuing education programs
offered by university departments reached more than 109,000 participants in North Carolina and beyond, an increase of more than
11,000 in comparison with the previous year. The 2,284 courses and events for which data was provided were offered by 27
schools and departments of the university in a variety of formats, primarily on site but also by means of distance education.
Learning events were held in 58 North Carolina counties, 19 states outside North Carolina and several foreign countries. In
addition, many of Carolina‘s professional schools have online programs that offer academic credentials to off-campus students,
such as certificates in programs through the Allied Health Sciences department (molecular diagnostic science) and the School of
Public Health (community preparedness and disaster management and field epidemiology). Students may earn master‘s degrees
from the School of Nursing and School of Public Health, and doctorates in physical therapy or health leadership through online
courses. In 2005-2006, these online and hybrid courses for credit had more than 1,200 participants in five schools or departments
at Carolina.



DESTINY (Delivering Edge-Cutting Science Technology and Internet Across North Carolina for Years to Come) The
DESTINY program at the Morehead Planetarium and Science Center is UNC-Chapel Hill‘s traveling science laboratory, taking the
latest technology and teaching tools to N.C. schools using two custom-built buses. The program develops and delivers a standards-
based, hands-on curriculum and teacher professional development with a team of educators and a fleet of vehicles that travel
throughout the state. The two 40-foot, 33,000-pound buses, called Destiny and Discovery, bring the latest science and technology
equipment to students who otherwise would not see a high-tech laboratory or what a career in science can offer. Since the
program‘s inception, 250,000 students have been impacted by DESTINY‘s traveling science laboratories and innovative curriculum
modules. In 2005-2006 alone, DESTINY served 8,363 students through wet-lab instruction provided by DESTINY educators on the
traveling labs or in classrooms at 158 schools across North Carolina, trained 455 teachers in DESTINY professional development
workshops, and awarded 701 certificates.
Documenting the American South, UNC Libraries Documenting the American South (DocSouth) is a digital publishing initiative
that provides Internet access to texts, images, and audio files related to southern history, literature, and culture. Currently
DocSouth includes ten thematic collections of books, diaries, posters, artifacts, letters, oral history interviews, and songs.
The University Library of the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill sponsors Documenting the American South, and the texts
and materials come primarily from its southern holdings. The UNC University Library is committed to the long-term availability of
these collections and their online records. An editorial board guides development of this digital library.



Environmental Resource Program The ERP is the outreach and public service unit of the Institute for the Environment. It links
Carolina‘s environmental resources with the citizens of North Carolina and is one of only a handful of university-supported
programs of its kind in the nation. ERP‘s mission is to promote environmental stewardship and public health through education,
research and community service. Based on the belief that one of the best ways to protect the environment and promote public
health is through an informed citizenry, ERP provides technical assistance to community groups, offers K-12 teacher professional
development, conducts policy research for nonprofits and government agencies, and sponsors undergraduate environmental
internships.

Evaluation, Assessment and Policy Connections (SOE) (EvAP) Evaluation, Assessment & Policy Connections (EvAP) is an
evaluation unit that conducts evaluations and provides training and technical assistance in evaluation, assessment and strategic
planning to educational, community and service organizations across the United States. The mission of EvAP is to build the
evaluation capacity and effectiveness of public, nonprofit and private organizations in order to meet the challenges of developing
and sustaining successful programs. EvAP specializes in training evaluators and conducting program evaluations and is committed
to sharing evaluation expertise, instruments and processes while serving as an evaluation training center for School of Education
students and the broader education and service communities.



Family Life Project Established at the School of Education in 2002 and funded with a $16.5 million grant from the National
Institute for Child Health and Human Development (NICHD), this study of nearly 1,300 children in rural communities is examining
the biological, individual, family and community processes that lead to good or poor outcomes for rural children. The project was
recently renewed with an additional $12 million NICHD grant to continue research on the 1,300 rural children, now turning 3, who
have been studied since birth.

"Fast Track" Expanded pipeline of science and mathematics teachers Based on the pressing need for increased numbers of
highly qualified mathematics and science teachers, the School of Education is engaged in initiatives to expand the pipeline of
science and mathematics teachers. One initiative is a partnership with the College of Arts and Sciences to create licensure
programs for science majors who become interested in teaching In cooperation with area school systems, this ―fast track‖
approach to educating future science teachers will enable undergraduate science students to become certified teachers without
lengthening the time needed to graduate. Students who have participated in the creation of new scientific knowledge through
research with world-class scholars will put that experience to use in the public schools at the high school level, according to
standards mandated by the N.C. Standard Course of Study. The program is being piloted in the departments of Biology, Physics
and Astronomy with funds provided by the Provost and the Physics Teacher Education Coalition, a joint program of the National
Science Foundation, the U.S. Department of Education and the American Physical Society. The first
graduates of the program are expected by 2010. Another initiative is the launch of the Carolina Online Lateral Entry (COLE)
Program for working ―lateral entry‖ teachers. This program allows teachers who have been hired but are not yet licensed to earn
North Carolina licensure in mathematics or science at the middle grades or secondary level while completing their first two years of
teaching.




First Nation Graduate Circle FNGC is an organization of American Indian graduate and professional students at the University of
North Carolina at Chapel Hill. One of FNGC‘s important concerns is ensuring that American Indian cultural heritage is recognized
and respected at Carolina through appropriate curriculum, research and administrative support. The circle educates members of
the North Carolina community about the unique cultural heritage of American Indian people in North Carolina and American Indian
people throughout the United States, Canada and Mexico. Some of its goals are to provide mentoring and support to American
Indian undergraduates and to sponsor lectures and other events related to the academic and professional accomplishments of
American Indians.

Fogarty AITRP and Ellison Fellowships (see H, also GR)

Fort Bragg Base Realignment and Closure Baseline Assessment A community impact assessment was completed in 2006 to                     x
predict the impact of personnel changes on the public schools. The Center for Urban and Regional Studies project focused on Fort
Bragg and 11 surrounding counties (Bladen, Cumberland, Harnett, Hoke, Lee, Montgomery, Moore, Richmond, Robeson,
Sampson and Scotland). Projections will help local governments and school systems prepare for an influx of soldiers and their
families.
Frank Porter Graham Child Development Institute For the past 40 years, FPG research and outreach has shaped how the
nation cares for and educates young children. FPG has a proud history of serving as an objective, knowledgeable force for social
change to enhance the lives of children and families. Researchers focus on parent and family support; early care and education;
child health and development; early identification and intervention; equity, access and inclusion; and early childhood policy. FPG is
one of the oldest multidisciplinary centers devoted to the study of children and families. Most of the institute‘s work addresses
young children ages birth through 8 years. FPG has a special focus on children who experience biological or environmental factors
that challenge early development and learning. FPG Child Development Institute currently supports 45 projects working across the
nation and around the world. Research and outreach projects address parent and family support; early care and education; child
health and development; early identification and early intervention; equity, access and inclusion; and early childhood policy.
Example of projects directly affecting the children of North Carolina include the Family Life Project, the Nuestros Niños Early
Language and Literacy Project and the Partnerships for Inclusion. The purpose of Nuestros Niños Early Language and Literacy
Project is to develop and test an intervention designed to improve the quality of teaching practices related to literacy and language
learning among Latino children enrolled in North Carolina‘s More at Four Pre-Kindergarten program for at-risk children.
Partnerships for Inclusion promotes the inclusion of young children with disabilities, birth through 5 years, and their families in all
aspects of community life. PFI is a statewide technical assistance project with offices in the western, central and eastern regions of
North Carolina.




Frank Porter Graham Child Development Institute, First School This initiatives involves working with two schools in the state
to implement a new vision for the education and care of young children from pre-kindergarten through third grade that unites the
best of early childhood,elementary, and special education.

Get Real and HEEL Breast Cancer Program (Get Recreation, Get Exercise, Get Active, Get Living) The purpose of the
program is to provide post-diagnosed breast cancer patients with individualized prescriptive exercise and recreational therapy as a
way to help alleviate the symptoms of cancer treatment, improve quality of life, and survivorship. Patients come from the 13-county
region under the N.C. Triangle Affiliate of the Susan Komen Breast Cancer Foundation service area (Caswell, Chatham, Durham,
Edgecombe, Franklin, Granville, Harnett, Johnston, Nash, Orange, Person, Vance and Wake). Each patient is assigned to a
personal trainer (a student trained by the Department of Exercise and Sport Science-EXSS) and a licensed recreation therapist,
working out three times a week over a six-month period, free of charge. Professors from the UNC Departments of Exercise and
Sport Science, Allied Health Sciences and Biostatics, along with clinicians from UNC, are leading the way. Housed at the
Department of Exercise and Sport Science, the program‘s facility at the Women‘s Gym is designated for use of cancer patients
only. Parking is provided to all patients free of charge in a very convenient location a few yards from the program facility. Since
opening six months ago, the program has been contacted by more that 200 patients and physicians requesting more information
on how to participate in the program. So far, 25 women have either completed six months of participation in the program or are
currently participating in the program.



Hardaway Project With funding from the Alcoa Foundation, we have helped create a traveling exhibit
called ―Ancient Carolinians‖ which will open this week at Morehead Planetarium then travel to science
museums throughout the state; we provided content for two archaeological episodes of UNC-TV‘s
Exploring North Carolina series; we initiated and co-organized the Archaeology Days program at NC
Museum of Natural Sciences which attracted over 8,000 visitors in two days; and we are currently
creating an online workshop and a digital resource library for teachers (in collaboration with Learn NC).
This project is named after the Hardaway site, the oldest excavated human settlement in North Carolina.




Hickory Metropolitan Higher Education Center The Hickory-Morganton metropolitan area is the largest in the state without a                x
university. In fact, there is not a public university closer than about an hour‘s drive of Hickory. In 2002, the leadership of Hickory
created the Hickory Metropolitan Higher Education Center — a virtual institution of higher education. The HMHEC is an
educational consortium among several N.C. universities and colleges that assists students who have completed their initial two
years of college courses in earning degrees by enrolling them in part-time classes. Graduate degree programs are also available.
In 2005, UNC-Chapel Hill‘s Office of Economic and Business Development announced a partnership with the HMHEC to offer
undergraduate, graduate and nondegree programs at the center and to promote the university‘s distance-learning programs and
online courses there. Since that time the following activities, among others, have occurred in HMHEC: training of nearly 40 local
officials at HMHEC in the essentials of economic development by School of Government faculty and staff; strong enrollments in
training provided by the Northwest AHEC; training in the A Su Salud program; two college fairs; and publicity in the seven-county
Hickory service area for several Carolina online certificate and masters programs — a graduate certificate in technology and
communication by the School of Journalism, a certificate program in Community Preparedness and Disaster Management through
the School of Public Health and also an Executive MPH and MHA degrees.
High School Reform The School of Education is conducting performance audits of high schools in all 115 school districts in North
Carolina. The goal is to ensure accountability and guide the smart, targeted use of resources in the state‘s public high schools. By
examining student achievement, the researchers are identifying those high schools that succeed with struggling students and
comparing them with high schools that have been labeled as high priority or chronically under-performing. The researchers are
analyzing data on teacher background and spending patterns to determine if there are significant differences between the high-
performing and low-performing high schools. In addition, the researchers are visiting low-performing high schools, where fewer
than 60 percent of the students reached proficiency on end-of-courses tests in the last two years, as well as some high-performing
schools. They are interviewing leaders from those schools to determine how they used their resources and what barriers they
encountered.



High School Resource Allocation Project (HSRA) was begun in September 2006 as a collaboration between the State Board of
Education, the NC Department of Public Instruction and a visiting professor to the School of Education, now in the Department of
Public Policy. This ongoing statewide effort conducted audits of high schools in all 115 NC school districts. By examining student
achievement, researchers identified high school that have succeeded with struggling students. Then, in data on teacher
backgrounds and spending patterns were examined to determine the links between specific types of expenditures and resources
and student outcomes. The effort provides an unparalleled database for focusing resources in the most efficient ways to affect
student achievement.

Highway Safety Research Center For more than 40 years, the UNC Highway Safety Research Center has conducted
interdisciplinary research aimed at reducing deaths, injuries and related societal costs of roadway crashes. The center has been a
leading research institute that has helped shape the field of transportation safety. In terms of miles driven, motor-vehicle related
deaths in the United States are only one-third as likely as they were 30 years ago. Despite such progress, between 40,000 and
43,000 deaths still occur on U.S. highways every year. The Highway Safety Research driver licensing system reduces
hospitalizations and medical costs for young drivers. The state‘s graduated driver licensing (GDL) system has reduced
hospitalizations and resulting hospital costs by about one-third for 16-year-old drivers. In the 46 months after North Carolina started
GDL, hospitalizations of 16-year-old drivers declined by 36.5 percent and, consequently, hospital costs for these young drivers
dropped by 31.2 percent, or $650,000 per year. The GDL system places restrictions on young drivers that limit their exposure to
high-risk driving situations, such as driving during nighttime hours and driving with multiple passengers, while they are still adjusting
to the complexities involved in driving. GDL programs have been implemented in 40 states and the District of Columbia. North
Carolina‘s program was adopted on Dec. 1, 1997, making the state the second to implement the system. A Highway Safety
Research Center study published in 2001, based on motor vehicle crash data, showed that young drivers have been involved in
fewer crashes since GDL was implemented in the state. This previous study, published in the Journal of the American Medical
Association, also showed a 57 percent drop in fatal accidents involving 16-year-old drivers.



Improving Academic Achievement Two efforts specifically target the improvement of academic achievement of low-performing
student populations. These efforts are a targeted reading rural literacy intiative (TRI, a part of the National Research Center for
Rural Education Support) and the High School Resource Allocation Project (HSRA). To meet the needs of rural communities,
teachers, and students, we have developed The Targeted Reading Intervention (TRI) is designed to meet the needs of teachers
and students in rural communities by providing a dual-level professional development intervention for both K-1 classroom
teachers and their struggling readers. This model has potential to be disseminated widely across rural areas of the state to impact
early literacy. The HSRA was begun in September 2006 as a collaboration between the State Board of Education, the NC
Department of Public Instruction and a visiting professor to the School of Education, now in the Department of Public Policy. This
ongoing statewide effort conducted audits of high schools in all 115 NC school districts. By examining student achievement,
researchers identified high school that have succeeded with struggling students. Then, in data on teacher backgrounds and
spending patterns were examined to determine the links between specific types of expenditures and resources and student
outcomes. The effort provides an unparalleled database for focusing resources in the most efficient ways to affect student
achievement .
Impacting Drop Out Rates Three initiatives aimed at impacting drop out rates are noteworthy: Upward Bound and two projects of
the Rural Early Adolescent Learning (REAL) initiative (part of the National Research Center for Rural Education Support) address
this priority. The Upward Bound (TRiO) Program at The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill (UB-UNC) is designed to
provide services to 90 eligible high school youth to assist them in building skills and motivation that will ensure success in
education beyond high school. The Program is a part of the School of Education and integrated into the campus community-at-
large.
UB-UNC recruits and serves students who are 9th or 10th graders and are low-income and potential first generation college
students, including 30% higher risk youth, from the target high schools, that remain enrolled in the program throughout high school
and immediately after high school graduation. The Upward Bound Program at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill has
been serving the community since 1966. For over the past forty–one years the program has assisted in preparing and serving over
thirty-five hundred students many of which have gone on to careers in law, medicine, education as well as public service and
community out reach. The majority of the resources provided for this program is made possible through a TRiO grant from United
States Department of Education at an annual cost $425,000. The Rural Early Adolescent Learning aims to enhance teachers'
abilities to assist student learning by focusing upon: (1) Competence Enhance Behavior Management (CEBM)--a means of
establishing a whole-grade system of behavior management that provides structure and consistency across classes while fostering
responsible self-directed behavior; and (2) Social Dynamics Training (SDT) which promotes teachers‘awareness of the impact of
peers on motivation and achievement.




Information Services To The Public UNC‘s libraries most recently ranked 17th among North America‘s 113 leading academic
research libraries. The University Library uses its collections, services, and expertise to support inquiry and learning for all North
Carolinians. During fiscal year 2005-2006, 19 percent of library loans were to individuals not affiliated with the university. Of the
32,000 interlibrary loans that the University Library (excluding Health Sciences and Law libraries) filled last year, 50 percent were
for readers elsewhere in North Carolina, with an additional 16 percent to other readers in the southeast region. Reference librarians
provide services to students and faculty at other universities; K-12 students, educators, and home-schoolers; journalists;
businesses and small business owners; state agencies; and others. The library‘s North Carolina Collection (NCC) is the country‘s
largest collection of materials about the Tar Heel state and serves as the state‘s primary historical collection.



INSPIRE is a science outreach student organization that was founded in 2002 and has been organized and run by UNC
undergraduates every spring and fall semester since, with a current faculty adviser in the College of Arts and Sciences. The
mission of the program is to provide K-12 teachers with enthusiastic undergraduate volunteers to help teach science in their
classrooms. In addition to providing this service to the community, the program also exposes undergraduates to the current state of
science education in North Carolina public schools, and encourages their consideration of science teaching careers. Each
semester, 30 to 40 undergraduates are partnered with participating K-12 teachers in the community (primarily Chapel Hill, Orange
County and Durham public schools), and each spends two to three hours per week in the classroom for 10 weeks. Each paired
teacher and INSPIRE volunteer negotiate the nature of this partnership to best serve the teacher‘s needs. Each student keeps a
log of weekly activities on the INSPIRE blackboard site and teacher evaluations are collected at the end each semester. The
response from teachers has been overwhelmingly positive. To date, more than 250 students have participated in the program,
logging more than 5,000 hours in the classroom.


Institute for the Environment The UNC Institute for the Environment is leading UNC‘s world-renowned environmental community                 x
in developing solutions to critical challenges. The Institute carries out its public service mission in several ways, including through
its Environmental Resource Program, which promotes environmental stewardship and public health through education, research
and community service, and through various field sites, at which students and faculty work with communities to examine
environmental issues of local concern. The North Carolina Naturally program provides a state-wide database and decision support
tool for conservation and planning. An upcoming project is the report ―Energy and Environment in North Carolina.‖ The report, to
be released this summer, would assess all known UNC system energy and environment programs and would provide thoughts,
from faculty leaders' perspectives, about how the Carolina and the system could assist all sectors of the state with this critical issue.



Interdisciplinary Health Communication Certificate Program through the School of Journalism and Mass Communication,                         x
Information and Library Sciences, School of Public Health and Department of Psychology The Certificate prepares current
degree-seeking residential UNC-Chapel Hill graduate students to use theory-informed health communication strategies in applied
practice, academic and research settings. It supplements students� degree programs with focused training in one of two tracks:
Psychological processes - examining how health communication leads people to change their health behaviors.
Integrated communication strategies - examining how to create and deliver health communication messages and interventions
through interpersonal communication, print media and electronic media.
International Social Studies Project is designed to serve public school teachers and pre-service teachers as well as school              x
districts in their need for up to date information about those areas of the world that change faster than school textbooks. We
disgned and deliverd professional development workshops in school districts and at professional conferences for social studies
teachers. We also developed arts based lessons for delivery in schools that included plays for school groups and provided
teaching packets to teachers who brought their classes to the plays that were performed by professional actors . We had
workshops on Africa, South America, the Middle East, Asia and Europe. We delivered workshops across North Carolina in 12
counties. Through our workshops at professional conferences, 37 North Carolina counties were served.


Jack Kent Cook Foundation In partnership with this private, independent foundation established in 2000 to help young people of
exceptional promise reach their full potential through education, UNC-Chapel Hill has launched two notable programs. One is the
National College Advising Corps and Carolina College Advising Corps. UNC-Chapel Hill is one of 10 colleges and universities
joining the Jack Kent Cooke Foundation in a $10 million partnership to create advising programs to help low-income students enroll
in college. The network of programs created through the partnership – to be called the National College Advising Corps – will be
headquartered at UNC-Chapel Hill. The University will receive $1 million over four years to create the Carolina College Advising
Corps, which will place recent UNC-Chapel Hill graduates as college advisers in 18 partner high schools across the state. These
advisers will help students plan their college searches, complete admissions and financial-aid applications, and overcome
obstacles that might discourage them from continuing their education. UNC-Chapel Hill will contribute nearly $700,000 to the
program, which aims to boost the number of low-income and first-generation-college students enrolling in two- and four-year
colleges and universities. The other Cooke Foundation project is Carolina Student Transfer Excellence Program (C-STEP). C-
STEP is part of a national effort, funded by the Jack Kent Cooke Foundation, to encourage more low- to moderate-income
community-college students to transfer to highly selective four-year colleges and universities. The program aims to help such
students prepare for the academic and social challenges they will face when they enroll at Carolina, and then to thrive here once
they have transferred. C-STEP will identify talented students while they are still in high school or early in their community-college
careers. Once identified for the program, students will work directly with C-STEP leaders at their community colleges and will
participate in monthly events on their campuses and at Carolina. These events will introduce students to Carolina; help them
engage early with the campus, students, staff and faculty and smooth their eventual transition to Chapel Hill.




Jordan Institute for Families is the research, training and technical assistance arm of the School of Social Work. The Institute is
an example of how a school includes the community voice in institutional planning. Addressing family issues across the lifespan,
the Jordan Institute brings together experts -- including families themselves -- to develop and test policies and practices that
strengthen families and engage communities. The School of Social Work provides extensive training and technical assistance
through the Jordan Institute. Community partners can access a list of programs in their area through an interactive map on the
School‘s website. These projects provide technical assistance, training, and information to help families become healthy and stable.


K-12 Classroom Resources and Support Providing a sound K-12 education and supporting K-12 educators is a priority for all
North Carolinians. Specific University Library contributions to this effort include the following: Documenting the American South
(http://docsouth.unc.edu) is the award-winning digital publishing initiative of the University Library. In order to optimize the
extraordinary primary resources of DocSouth for classroom use, the library has conducted four summer workshops for middle-
school and high-school teachers to help them learn about the site and ways to integrate it with classroom instruction. A ―Classroom
Resources‖ section of the site provides additional help for teachers, including suggested activities and lesson plans that are part of
the LEARN NC database from UNC‘s School of Education. In partnership with UNC‘s World View International Program for
Educators, the library educates teachers and administrators throughout the state on relevant UNC library services and resources.
Last August, the library hosted the follow-up meeting for the 2006 trip to China and created the ―Bringing China into the Classroom‖
website for teachers. The library regularly hosts ―research days‖ for area schools including Chapel Hill High School, the
Hillsborough Middle School, the Culbreth Middle School in Chapel Hill, and several other K-12 schools from Durham and Cary. An
average of 12 schools visit each year, teaching some 500 students annually about library research and introducing them to the
Carolina campus.



K-12 International Outreach Program: The K-12 Outreach Program, part of the Center for Global Studies, enriches
international education in North Carolina schools by providing free educational presentations that engage students in learning
about other countries, cultures, world regions, global issues and international current events. Presentations are designed to
supplement classroom instruction and can be tailored for teaching needs, regional issues, instructional purpose and appropriate
grade level. The Center for Global Studies supported the School of Education‘s production
of a ―Handbook for Educators Who Work with Children from Mexico.‖ The handbook is available on CD and is free of charge. Web
sites: www.ucis.unc.edu/k12outreach/index.html www.ucis.unc.edu/resources/handbook.html (for handbook) Contact: Tara Muller,
919-843-6860, k12outreach@unc.edu
Kellogg Health Scholars Program The goal of the Health Scholars Program is to reduce and eliminate health disparities by
developing young leaders who participate in community-based participatory research (CBPR). CBPR is a collaborative approach
through which research endeavors are chosen based on the needs of a community. It aims to combine academic study with social
and policy initiatives that will improve health outcomes. The University of North Carolina School of Public Health is one of eight
national training sites for the program. The UNC Center for Health Promotion and Disease Prevention, a research center with
expertise in community research, administers the UNC grant. Kellogg Health Scholars at UNC become involved in any number of
community-based initiatives to promote individual wellness, community competence and social change.




Kenan Institute Asia The Kenan Institute Asia (K.I.Asia) works in a variety of ways to promote sustainable development in Asia.         x


Learn NC, The Learners‘ and Educators‘ Assistance and Resource Network of North Carolina (LEARN NC) is a collaborative                  x
statewide network of teachers and partners devoted to improving student performance and enhancing teacher proficiencies by
creating and sharing high-quality teaching and learning resources via the World Wide Web. Offered free through the UNC School
of Education, LEARN NC provides curriculum and instructional tools aligned with the state‘s Standard Course of Study and a virtual
classroom of online courses for K-12 students and teachers. LEARN NC has trained 30,000 teachers and others (as of 2000) in all
115 public school systems as well as charter schools, N.C.‘s Catholic Diocese and the N.C. Independent School Association.
About 20,000 teachers and students visit the LEARN NC website every day, where they can choose from more than 10,000 pages
of educational resources, including 3,000 lesson plans. In the online learning group, LEARN NC offered 40 K-12 courses, including
23 Advanced Placement courses, online this year. In the 2006-2007 school year, LEARN NC served more than 2,000 students
throughout North Carolina, and many students spread throughout 23 states and four foreign countries. One recent LEARN NC
project is a collaboration with UNC‘s Research Laboratories of Archaeology to create a teaching resource called ―Intrigue of the
Past‖ about North Carolina‘s first peoples. LEARN NC is also are very active in professional development courses for teachers. In
the 2006-2007 school year, LEARN NC online offered 28 teacher development courses online, which helped more than 1,000
teaches renew their certifications or learn to develop and teach their own online courses. o The University of North Carolina Online
o Alternative licensure for teachers
o Math and Science Online




Making Choices Making Choices One recent project of the School of Social Work and Jordan Institute was the development of
this character education curriculum for use in elementary schools. Funded by the U.S. Department of Education, the project
encouraged school children to use language skills to express their feelings and consider alternative solutions, the goal being to
help them make friends more easily and reduce social aggression and bullying. Designed as a school-based curriculum for
students in kindergarten through fifth grade, Making Choices brings the latest research on child development into the classroom.


Master’s for Experienced Teachers (MEDX) is a highly popular program which has a ten-year history of graduating teacher
leaders who stay in the classroom and serve as teacher leaders within their respective schools. The graduates return to their
schools with new knowledge and experience, enriched and renewed as education professionals and empowered to work toward
improving their schools and districts. Just since 2003, 231 career educators have graduated from the program. Most recently, 19
teachers graduated from a middle grades mathematics specialization. The teachers were from several counties in NC that were
participants in an NSF-Funded Middle Math Project, of which the Center for Mathematics and Science Education was a
subcontract. As part of their involvement with the grant, they were required to submit for their National Boards, so many in that
cohort graduated with an M.Ed. in Middle Grades Math and their National Boards.



Master’s for School Administrators – Off Campus program (MSA Flex) is designed to accommodate practicing educators
who cannot or do not want to stop working to pursue their professional goal of becoming school-site administrators. This off-
campus program is cohort based and is held in counties that request the program and have sufficient numbers of educators
interested in becoming school administrators. It also utilizes face-to-face sessions at locations convenient to the students‘ regular
work places and a variety of distance education activities (using Blackboard) that students access from their homes or from the
schools in which they work.There are currently three operational off-campus cohorts: in Wake, Orange and Lee counties and in
Alamance-Burlington. Past cohorts have been based in Alamance and Durham counties. Approximately 75 educators have
graduated from the MSA FLEX who work in Durham, Orange, Nash-Rocky Mount, Forsyth, Wake, Alamance-Burlington, Chapel
Hill-Carrboro, Nash-Rocky Mount, Pamlico, Lee, and Guilford counties.
Mini Medical School (School of Medicine) UNC Mini-Medical School, features renowned researchers from the UNC-CH School
of Medicine addressing some of the latest developments in medical science. Participants need not have a background in science
or medicine to enroll – just an interest in medicine and a healthy curiosity about the science behind it. The lecture series is
specifically designed for non-medical people.




Morehead Planetarium and Science Center, DESTINY (Delivering Edge-Cutting Science Technology and Internet Across North
Carolina for Years to Come) The DESTINY program at the Morehead Planetarium and Science Center is UNC-Chapel Hill‘s
traveling science laboratory, taking the latest technology and teaching tools to N.C. schools using two custom-built buses. The
program develops and delivers a standards-based, hands-on curriculum and teacher professional development with a team of
educators and a fleet of vehicles that travel throughout the state. The two 40-foot, 33,000-pound buses, called Destiny and
Discovery, bring the latest science and technology equipment to students who otherwise would not see a high-tech laboratory or
what a career in science can offer. Since the program‘s inception, 250,000 students have been impacted by DESTINY‘s traveling
science laboratories and innovative curriculum modules. In 2005-2006 alone, DESTINY served 8,363 students through wet-lab
instruction provided by DESTINY educators on the traveling labs or in classrooms at 158 schools across North Carolina, trained
455 teachers in DESTINY professional development workshops, and awarded 701 certificates.



Mujeres Avanzando hacia Nuevas Oportunidades / Women Working Toward New Opportunities (MANO): MANO is a
student organization that addresses the ESL and other pressing needs of non-native, primarily Spanish-speaking women in the
Chapel Hill/Carrboro area. Students offer year-round classes twice a week at Carrboro Elementary School. Their objectives are to
teach English skills based on the needs of each participant; provide childcare,
tutoring and mentoring for children of participants during the classes; and serve as a valuable resource for the well-being of these
families and their integration into the community. Another student organization, Building Opportunities through Language
Development (BOLD), is the brother program of MANO and offers ESL classes for Spanish-speaking men. Web site:
www.unc.edu/student/orgs/mano Contact: Sarah Long, sarahnl@email.unc.edu

National Demonstration Program for Citizen-Soldier Support UNC-Chapel Hill has spearheaded this Citizen-Soldier Support
initiative, which received $1.8 million in funding in the Department of Defense appropriations bill finalized by Congress in 2004 and
another $5 million in 2006. The program serves N.C. National Guard and Reserve personnel who are challenged, along with their
families, by the demands and risks of mobilization, deployment and return from duty. Partners include Duke University, N.C. State,
UNC-Charlotte, East Carolina, UNC-Greensboro, Virginia Tech, Bryn Mawr College and UNC-TV. Currently, the program serves
communities in and around Asheville, Charlotte, Greensboro, Rocky Mount and Wilmington.


National Research Center for Rural Education Support (NRCRES) Targeted Rural Literacy Initiative (TRI) (SOE) is designed
to meet the needs of teachers and students in rural communities by providing a dual-level professional development intervention
for both K-1 classroom teachers and their struggling readers. This model has the potential to be disseminated widely across rural
areas of the state to impact early literacy.


National Research Center for Rural Education Support (NRCRES) Established in 2004 by a $10 million, five-year award from
the U.S. Department of Education to the UNC-Chapel Hill School of Education, the National Research Center on Rural Education
Support (NRCRES) in the School of Education is working to improve teaching, learning and student achievement in rural schools
nationwide. Led by investigator Lynne Vernon-Feagans, a team of 20 researchers is conducting research studies focused on
issues that face children as they begin their education, issues that face students during the transition to early adolescence and the
role that distance education can play in rural schools. Their research is designed to help rural kindergarten and first-grade teachers
reach their struggling learners and to use state-of-the-art distance education to extend their consultation model to the nation‘s
teachers


National Research Center for Rural Education Support (NRCRES) The Rural Early Adolescent Learning (REAL) aims to
enhance teachers' abilities to assist student learning by focusing upon: (1) Competence Enhance Behavior Management (CEBM)--
a means of establishing a whole-grade system of behavior management that provides structure and consistency across classes
while fostering responsible self-directed behavior; and (2) Social Dynamics Training (SDT) which promotes teachers‘awareness of
the impact of peers on motivation and achievement.

NC Archeological Society The RLA has supported this nonprofit organization of amateur
archaeologists and has published its journal, North Carolina Archaeology, since 1949.
NC Botanical Garden Besides its displays of native and unusual plants and its nature trails, the N.C. Botanical Garden offers art
exhibits, nature walks and courses on topics ranging from home gardening to botanical illustration. The garden is open to the public
daily for recreation and learning, including certificate programs in botanical illustration and native plant studies and classes and
workshops in gardening, botany, ecology, and botanical illustration. The Visiting Plants Program provides native plants to
elementary schools for classroom study, while school children may visit the garden for workshops, classes, guided tours, hikes and
programs correlated with the N.C. Standard Course of Study.

NC Civic Education Consortium The Civic Education Consortium works with schools, governments and community organizations
to prepare North Carolina‘s young people to be active, responsible citizens. The consortium has worked alongside Charlotte-
Mecklenburg Schools and local community partners to create a resource notebook and CD-ROM encouraging discussions of
current events and controversial issues. It is currently conducting a student civic profile survey in all Duplin County elementary,
middle and high schools to help principals develop school-improvement plans addressing civic responsibility. The consortium also
administers a small grants program and provides technical assistance to teachers and community leaders across the state.


NC Civic Education Initiative

North Carolina Collection, Wilson Library Housed in Wilson Library, the North Carolina Collection documents the history,
literature and culture of our state by actively collecting, organizing and providing access to publications, photographs and artifacts.
The North Carolina Collection covers the entire range of the state‘s written history, from
16th-century accounts by explorers and early settlers to present-day journals, books and newspapers. In addition to statewide
histories, the collection is especially robust on local history, holding materials from each of North Carolina‘s 100 counties. Web
site: www.lib.unc.edu/ncc/


North Carolina College Media Association (SOJ)

North Carolina Global Learning Lab - Globalization and the Transformation fo NC's Economy Global outsourcing and the
growing integration of international markets have altered the structure of regional competition around the globe. North Carolina
provides an interesting context to study the processes of industrial restructuring, because the state has simultaneously experienced
a rapid decline in manufacturing sectors and a rapid growth in hightechnology sectors. This project maps these transformations in
key industries and explores the role of public-sector intermediaries in the process. The website summarizes student work in an
economic development course in the Department of City and Regional Planning at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill.
The full papers are also available for download.



North Carolina Health Careers Access Program (NC-HCAP) Through a variety of programs and activities geared toward
disadvantaged students -- from elementary to graduate school -- as well as to their parents, mentors and communities, NC-HCAP
works to increase the number of these students trained and employed in the health professions in our state. When these students
pursue their careers in North Carolina's underserved communities, they promote a higher quality of life for us all.



North Carolina Scholastic Media Association is a statewide organization that promotes excellence and responsibility in
scholastic journalism and encourages respect for freedom of the press. NCSMA also promotes professional growth of journalism
teachers and speaks for scholastic media in matters of curriculum and instruction that affect journalism education in North
Carolina. Outreach services related to high school journalism have been part of the School of Journalism and Mass
Communication since 1938. NCSMA currently offers a Scholastic Media Institute in Chapel Hill each summer, regional workshops
co-hosted with universities and newspapers across the state during the fall and spring semesters and a statewide high school
publication contest each spring. One recent example of NCSMA services involved a coordinated response to the State Board of
Education‘s approval of the framework for a new core course of study. The framework included provisions for four-course
endorsements in several extracurricular areas, with the exception of communication-related courses. NCSMA, along with
journalism teachers throughout the state, alerted state board members to the need and viability of adding such a communications
endorsement.
Office of Economic and Business Development (OEBD) matches faculty and campus expertise and resources with economic                           x
development issues facing North Carolina and its communities and organizations. This office is led by Jesse White Jr., who
headed the Appalachian Regional Commission and the Southern Growth Policies Board.
During its first year of operations, OEBD worked within the university to develop a network of faculty interested in economic
development work in North Carolina. It also worked on several economic development projects in the state, including Carolina‘s
response to the state‘s successful bid to have Credit Suisse First Boston locate a major facility in the RTP area. At the
announcement ceremony, the company stated that the assets of our universities were a deciding factor in locating in North
Carolina. In addition, OEBD took the leadership role, along with the Friday Center for Continuing Education, in having UNC-Chapel
Hill become an associate of the Hickory Metropolitan Higher Education Council. Carolina can now offer credit, noncredit and
special courses and seminars in the Hickory facility. Another successful project was OEBD‘s role in helping the North Carolina
Rural Economic Development Center secure a Kellogg Foundation grant to create an entrepreneurial support system in rural North
Carolina. A multiyear, multimillion dollar grant, Carolina‘s School of Government will play a significant role in training local officials.
OEBD also continued work in Carteret County begun by the Carolina Center for Competitive Economies by analyzing the marine
sciences cluster there and working with the Economic Development Council of the county.



Office of Technology Development The Office of Technology Development (OTD), in support of the university's mission to
encourage innovation and disseminate knowledge, serves the university and the public by licensing discoveries developed by
faculty, students and staff. OTD also assists faculty in obtaining research support from corporate sponsors. We negotiate and
create agreements, provide patent assistance, and assist in obtaining corporate sponsored research. A complete list of our
services is available.



Office of Undergraduate Research includes a number of internships and opportunities for students to conduct community
engaged research. These opportunities include fellowships supported by APPLES Service Learning Program and the Carolina
Center for Public Service, FPG Child Development Center and the Smallwood Foundation.

Partnerships for Inclusion, Frank Porter Graham Child Development Institute A program of Frank Porter Graham Child
Development Institute, PFI is a statewide technical assistance project with offices in the western, central and eastern regions of
North Carolina. PFI promotes the inclusion of young children with disabilities, from birth through five, in all aspects of community
life. PFI collaborates with local inter-agency groups to sponsor public forums, specializes in staff development activities that meet
the needs of mixed audiences from different agencies and
provides technical assistance to improve the quality of community services to children and families. Other services include the
North Carolina Early Intervention Library, which contains print and video materials available to parents and professionals.



Pediatric Telemedicine Clinic, School of Medicine Parents whose children need to see medical specialists are taking
advantage of technology that lets them stay in the Wilmington area while being checked out by doctors located hundreds of miles
away.
Telemedicine, a growing trend using the Internet, video conferencing, telephone and other tools to allow for remote visits by
doctors, is increasingly being tapped to improve health care access in rural areas.
In Southeastern North Carolina, doctors are using the equipment to address the statewide shortage in several pediatric
subspecialties, including the physicians who treat children with physical disabilities or lung problems.

Pilot study of mental health among Latino immigrants Through Russell Sage and William T. Grant-funded studies, Krista M.
Perreira, an assistant professor in the Department of Public Policy in the College of Arts and Sciences, investigates how
acculturation and migration processes influence the mental health and academic achievement of Latino youth in North Carolina.
She also studies ways to improve the well-being of immigrant youth by improving the understanding of their health, education, and
labor market experiences. She has become a local expert in collecting data from hard-to-reach, Latino immigrant populations.
Through this research, she is actively engaged in 10 schools across five different school systems in the state. In addition, she
works with the N.C. Department of Health and Human Services and many Latino-serving organizations throughout the state to
promote the development of evidence-based health and education interventions.
Preventing child obesity and diabetes (School of Nursing) A School of Nursing-based research team began a three-year
intervention in January 2007 to reduce risk for type 2 diabetes among middle school students in rural North Carolina. Researchers
will study students at six North Carolina middle schools to determine if changes in schools can lower risk factors for type 2
diabetes. The study is part of the nationwide HEALTHY study sponsored by the National Institutes of Health. The research team
provides intervention schools with new physical activity equipment and with lesson plans to increase aerobic activity in physical
education classes. School cafeterias offer more nutritious food options along with a marketing campaign encouraging students to
select healthier choices. Schools also restrict choices made in vending machines. The intervention includes health education for
families and classroom-based education interventions for students. Given the rising prevalence of high weight and high glucose
among our children in North Carolina and across the United States, there is a critical need now to intervene and change behaviors
to prevent young people from developing diabetes or cardiovascular disease.



Program for School Studies International The proposed program would establish a network of partnerships of educators.                  x
Cross nationally, educators speak a common "language" and have shared understandings about fundamentals of teaching and
learning and students' developmental needs. Those understandings extend to teacher preparation and retention. The proposed
program would identify major focus areas and invite global partners to engage in research, collaboration and information sharing.



Project Archaeology As state coordinators for this national program, we have offered teacher
workshops and published a book of 4th through 8th grade lesson plans called Intrigue of the Past: North
Carolina‘s First People. We are currently working closely with LEARN NC (UNC School of Education)
in adapting these lesson plans for their digital history textbook project.




Project for Historical Education (PHE) Currently in its 10th year, the PHE in the Department of History sponsors regular
workshops for N.C. teachers. The PHE was founded in 1991 by UNC history professors Leon Fink and Lloyd Kramer as part of a
conference on ―How We Learn History.‖ Funded by the Z. Smith Reynolds Foundation, the Arts and Sciences Foundation and the
N.C. Humanities Council, PHE sponsors day-long seminars for North Carolina social studies teachers on four Saturdays each
academic year. The seminars, typically led by UNC faculty members with assistance from teachers, present recent developments
in historical research, as well as practical strategies for integrating those developments into middle school and high school lesson
plans. PHE has also published a book of essays on historical education in the United States, ―Learning History in America:
Schools, Cultures and Politics,‖ edited by Lloyd Kramer, Donald Reid, and William L. Barney (Minneapolis: University of Minnesota
Press, 1994).

Project Measure at Carolina Population Center MEASURE Evaluation is a USAID-funded project implemented by the Carolina
Population Center at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill in partnership with John Snow Inc., Tulane University, Macro
International Inc., and Constella Futures. MEASURE provides technical assistance to health ministers, district caregivers and local
trainees to successfully manage data for better informed program planning and policy-making. The project‘s overall objective is to
improve the collection, analysis, and presentation of data to promote better use of data in planning, policy-making, managing,
monitoring, and evaluating population, health, and nutrition programs.




Project Smoking, Education, Lifestyle and Fitness (SELF) Improvement (Department of Health Behavior and Health
Education Professor Eugenia Eng and Strengthening The Black Family, Inc. are conducting a participatory
evaluation of Project SELF Improvement in low-income African-American communities in Wake County. The goal of the project is
to reduce chronic disease risk factors such as lack of physical activity, poor nutrition and tobacco use among the 1,000 residents.
Tobacco interventions will focus on prevention of use among adolescents. Contact: Eugenia Eng, 919-966-3909,
eugenia_eng@unc.edu
RENCI, Outpatient Health Maintenance System (OHMS), a device designed to decrease emergency room visits by people with
asthma and other acute respiratory diseases. RENCI is working with the UNC School of Medicine to develop a wireless device that
measures a patient‘s daily respiratory health as well as environmental factors (e.g., airborne particulates, pollution, humidity and
temperature). The device will encrypt and relay that information daily to the patient‘s physician, giving both doctor and patient a
long-range, holistic picture of the patient‘s health. As conditions change, doctor and patient will be able to work together, noting
how environmental factors correlate with respiratory distress and adjusting medications and lifestyle to better manage the patient‘s
health. For those in remote areas without easy access to medical care, for an aging population with more health issues and
reduced mobility, and for those without quality health insurance who often depend on emergency rooms, OHMS potentially offers a
way for people to take more control of their health without straining the budget and without the need for face-to-face doctor visits. A
pilot study to test the device will begin this summer. If successful, the device could improve the quality of life for asthma patients
and those with other chronic conditions, such as diabetes and heart disease. Our healthcare system also would benefit from
OHMS: emergency room visits are the most costly type of healthcare and roughly 75 percent of U.S. healthcare costs are related
to chronic diseases.



Research laboratories of Archaeology K-12 Outreach and Raising Public Awareness of Archaeology Project
Archaeology. As state coordinators for this national program, we have offered teacher workshops and published a book of 4th
through 8th grade lesson plans called Intrigue of the Past: North Carolina's First People. We are currently working closely with
LEARN|NC (UNC School of Education) in adapting these lesson plans for their digital history textbook project.
                                                                         Hardaway Project. With funding from the Alcoa Foundation,
we have helped create a traveling exhibit called "Ancient Carolinians" which opens at Morehead Planetarium then travels to
science museums throughout the state; we initiated and co-organized the Archaeology Days program at NC Museum of Natural
Sciences which attracted over 8,000 visitors in two days; and we are currently creating an online workshop and a digital resource
library for teachers (in collaboration with LEARN NC). This project is named after the Hardaway site, the oldest excavated human
settlement in North Carolina.
      NC Archaeological Society. The RLA has supported this nonprofit organization of amateur archaeologists and has published
its journal, North Carolina Archaeology, since 1949.



RENCI, Prototyping experimental systems for use in disasters When storms disrupt the power and transportation infrastructure,
emergency communications and information gathering are affected, too. RENCI‘s experimental disaster response vehicle (EDRV)
includes a wireless network and sensing package activated via a retractable helium balloon and a remote-controlled helicopter for
search and rescue and damage assessment. Working together, these devices will be used to determine how to best establish an
emergency communications network, acquire video from impacted areas, drop remote sensors and gather sensor data.




Research Triangle Schools Partnership (RTSP) involves faculty from all areas of the School of Education partnering with high
needs schools in Orange County to support teacher skill development in the following areas: using cognitively guided instruction in
elementary mathematics; writing in the science curriculum; promoting school readiness in literacy and mathematics; teaching
literacy to English Language Learners; and building school success behaviors in adolescents. Six seed grants from the School of
Education have funded these collaborative efforts which began in Fall 2007. As part of this effort, teacher education classes have
been offered in Orange County elementary and middle schools that bring future teachers into a high needs school environment on
a weekly basis.

Robertson Scholars Program The Robertson Scholars Program was created in 2000 through a $24 million gift from Julian
Robertson, a 1955 graduate of UNC and his wife Josie. Inspired by their sons, one of whom graduated from Duke in 1998 and
another who graduated from UNC-Chapel Hill in 2001, the Robertsons wanted to encourage further collaboration between the two
universities. The establishment of this innovative program, which recruits and supports undergraduates on both campuses, was
designed to serve as a catalyst for increased collaboration between students, faculty, and staff of the two universities. The
Robertson Scholars Program provides students---generally 18 at Duke and 18 at UNC each year---with the tools to further their
involvement in community service, the freedom to explore ways in which they can make a difference in today's world, and the
forum to address the social issues that are most important to them. During this four year journey, Robertson Scholars learn to
create change and foster collaboration both locally on the two campuses and globally during many of their summer enrichment
experiences. Whether near or far, Robertson Scholars benefit from the distinctive academic and extracurricular opportunities
designed to help them learn and grow. Click here to learn more about the opportunities enjoyed by students in the Robertson
Scholars Program.

SCALE (Student Coalition for Action in Literacy Education) SCALE supports campus-based literacy programs locally,
statewide, and nationally through our Literacy Action Networks. In these programs, college students serve as literacy tutors or
teachers in their community.
School of Social Work Distance Education Programs The School of Social Work operates four distance education programs
across the state: one each at UNC-Asheville and at N.C. Central University in Durham, and two at the Forsyth County Department
of Social Services (Winston-Salem Distance Education Advanced Standing Program for BSW students and the traditional three-
year Distance Education Program). The distance education programs recruit students who are employed in human services, are
second career students, are parents returning to the work force, or are unable to engage in full-time study.



Science and Mathematics Teachers for Tomorrow This is a multipronged effort designed to graduate science and mathematics
teachers for tomorrow who lead reformed instruction designed to improve middle and high-school students' science and
mathematics knowledge. One cornerstone in the effort is an unique new program called UNC-BEST (UNC Baccaluareate
Education in Science and Teaching). Biology and physics majors obtain an undergraduate degree in science and high-school
science teaching licensure through an integration of Arts and Sciences and Education courses and experiences. Supported by
scholarships from the Burroughs Wellome Foundation, the UNC-BEST program will admit the first cohort of 20 or more students in
Fall 2008. A second cornerstone is the Carolina Online Lateral Entry program, an on-line lateral entry licensure program, currently
in a pilot year, which supports unlicensed individuals holding a math or science undergraduate degree through their first year of
public school teaching while obtaining their initial teacher licensure. A third cornerstone is a Science, Technology, Engineering, and
Mathematics (STEM) funded center in which the School of Education and the national Center for Teaching Quality partner--the
Leadership Center for Math and Science Teachers (LC-MaST)-- designed to help science and mathematics teachers to become
nationally board certified. A fourth cornerstone is the work of the Center for Mathematics and Science Education (CMSE), which
provided outreach to inservice mathematics and science teachers. An example of the CMSE work can be seen in their recent
partnership with Durhjam Public Schools to improve middle school mathematics and science instruction. The partership aims to:
(a) to increase the number of teachers of middle school mathematics and science judged "highly qualified" under the NCLB
legislation, and (b) to assist lateral entry teachers who need additional mathematics or science course work to receive their
professional licenses.




Science Education Initiative at Clara J. Peck Elementary School Science teachers and students at this predominantly African-
American and low-income Greensboro elementary school were able to benefit from a dozen hands-on lessons taught by Cheryl
Horton, clinical assistant professor of science education in the School of Education. Among other concepts, she taught fourth
graders about electricity by building circuits from wire, light bulbs and batteries. They also learned about magnetism by observing
magnets bouncing up and down as they repelled each other. The idea for the collaboration was inspired by a visit to the school on
a Tar Heel Bus Tour.

Southern Astrophysical Research (SOAR) With help from donors and the U.S. Congress, faculty and students in the UNC
Department of Physics and Astronomy probe the skies from several new vantage points. Carolina is a partner in the SOAR
Telescope atop Cerro Pachon in northern Chile, and six Panchromatic Robotic Optical Monitoring and Polarimetry Telescopes, or
PROMPT, atop Cerro Tololo. PROMPT‘s 16-inch telescopes are designed to follow up satellite discoveries within tens of seconds
and alert SOAR to action. SOAR produces the best-quality images of any observatory in its class in the world at a location that is
ideal for viewing the Milky Way, our home galaxy and other planets in our solar system. Carolina also has a 3 percent share in the
largest telescope in the southern hemisphere, SALT (Southern African Large Telescope), located about 300 miles north of Cape
Town. The Internet is helping bring images from all three telescopes back to faculty and students in Chapel Hill. Public school
classrooms across North Carolina also benefit.



Student Coalition for Action in Literacy Education (SCALE) SCALE was founded in the fall of 1989 when two UNC-Chapel Hill
undergraduate tutors joined together to mobilize and support college students who wanted to address the literacy needs of this
country. Today, SCALE sponsors Read. Write. Act., the annual and only national conference specifically for campus-based literacy
programs and their community partners. SCALE promotes National Literacy Action Week, the first week of February, in order to
increase awareness of this country‘s literacy needs and to highlight the crucial role of college students in the literacy movement.
Current SCALE programs include America Reads, the North Carolina LiteracyCorps, Collaborative Leadership for Community
Literacy, and Project SHINE. In addition, SCALE offers a comprehensive Resource Library, a useful Toolkit including training
workshop agendas and on-line trainings, and technical assistance for programs around the country.
Tar Heel Bus Tour Each spring, the Tar Heel Bus Tour takes new faculty and administrators on a five-day trip across the state to       x
learn what it means to be a true Tar Heel. The privately funded tour, which marks its 10th anniversary in 2007, shows newcomers
the state in which 82 percent of the university‘s undergraduates grow up and how outreach efforts serve North Carolinians. Faculty
members see how their own interests align with the state‘s needs. The annual Tar Heel Bus Tour also allows an opportunity for
faculty and administrators to hear from community members about their perceptions of UNC‘s engagement with the state. Since it
began in1997, almost 300 faculty members and senior administrators have participated in the annual experience, visiting a wide
array of communities where UNC faculty are working in partnership to address community issues.
Two examples of outcomes of the tour are a service-learning course at the School of Government that places students in
communities visited, and a small grants program opportunity for participants offered each year by the Carolina Center for Public
Service. After visiting Peck Elementary School in Greensboro, the 2005 Bus Tour participants met with the principal and faculty to
identify priority issues. As a result, they used the grant money to develop science education and tutoring programs for the school
and held a series of grant writing work shops for teachers.



Teacher Retention The School of Education addresses the teacher shortage by supporting teacher renewal and career
development--factors which are purported to aid teacher retention. One focus of the teacher retention effort is the highly popular
Master's for Experienced Teachers (MEDX) program, which has a ten-year history of graduating teacher leaders who stay in the
classroom and serve as teacher leaders within their respective schools. The graduates have returned to their schools with new
knowledge and experience, enriched and renewed as education professionals and empowered to work toward improving their
schools and districts. Just since 2003, 231 career educators have graduated from the program. Most recently, 19 teachers
graduated from a middle grades mathematics specialization. The teachers were from several counties in NC that were participants
in an NSF-Funded Middle Math Project, of which the Center for Mathematics and Science Education was a subcontract. As part of
their involvement with the grant, they were required to submit for their National Boards, so many in that cohort graduated with an
M.Ed. in Middle Grades Math and their National Boards. A second arm of the School of Education, LEARN NC, reaches statewide
to address retention. Since 1997, LEARN NC has delivered direct services to all of North Carolina's 115 school systems. LEARN
NC connects school leadership, teachers and students with the expertise and resources of UNC-CH. Top quality K-12 resources
translate university research into focused instructional resources, classroom content and professional development for teachers
and administrators. The collaborative web-based tools enable LEARN NC to work with organizations statewide and expands the
reach of university programs to K-12 teachers.




Teaching and Leadership Skill Enhancement Innovative collaborations of import working toward teaching and leadership skill
enhancement are seen in the Research Triangle Schools Partnership (RTSP) and our Master's for School Administrators-Off
Campus program (MSA FLEX). As part of the RTSP effort, faculty from all areas of the School of Education have partnered with
high needs schools in Orange county to support teacher skill development in the following areas: using cognitively guided
instruction in elementary mathematics; writing in the science curriculum; promoting school readiness in literacy and mathematics;
teaching literacy to English Language Learners; and building school success behaviors in adolescents. Six seed grants from the
School of Education have funded these collaborative efforts which began in Fall 2007. As part of this effort, teacher education
classes have been offered in Orange County elementary and middle schools that bring future teachers into a high needs school
environment on a weekly basis. The MSA FLEX has been designed to accommodate practicing educators who cannot or do not
want to stop working to pursue their professional goal of becoming school-site administrators. This off-campus program is cohort
based and is held in counties that request the program and have sufficient numbers of educators interested in becoming school
administrators. It also utilizes face-to-face sessions at locations convenient to the students‘ regular work places and a variety of
distance education activities (using Blackboard) that students access from their homes or from the schools in which they
work.There are currently three operational off-campus cohorts: in Wake, Orange and Lee counties and in Alamance-Burlington.
Past cohorts have been based in Alamance and Durham counties. Approximately 75 educators have graduated from the MSA
FLEX who work in Durham, Orange, Nash-Rocky Mount, Forsyth, Wake, Alamance-Burlington, Chapel Hill-Carrboro, Nash-Rocky
Mount, Pamlico, Lee, and Guilford counties.




Treatment and Education of Autistic and Related Communication Children with Handicaps (TEACCH) A division of the
UNC Department of Psychiatry, TEACCH has the following mission: to enable individuals with autism to function as meaningfully
and as independently as possible in the community; to provide exemplary services throughout North Carolina to individuals with
autism and their families and those who serve and support them; to generate knowledge; to integrate clinical services with relevant
theory and research; and to disseminate information about theory, practice, and research on autism through training and
publications locally, nationally and internationally.
UNC Libraries, Documenting the American South is the award-winning digital publishing initiative of the University Library. In
order to optimize the extraordinary primary resources of DocSouth for classroom use, the library has conducted four summer
workshops for middle-school and high-school teachers to help them learn about the site and ways to integrate it with classroom
instruction. A ―Classroom Resources‖ section of the site provides additional help for teachers, including suggested activities and
lesson plans that are part of the LEARN NC database from UNC‘s School of Education. Also, in partnership with UNC World View.



UNC Project for Historical Education (PHE) Currently in its 10th year, the PHE in the Department of History sponsors regular
workshops for N.C. teachers. The PHE was founded in 1991 by UNC history professors Leon Fink and Lloyd Kramer as part of a
conference on ―How We Learn History.‖ Funded by the Z. Smith Reynolds Foundation, the Arts and Sciences Foundation and the
N.C. Humanities Council, PHE sponsors day-long seminars for North Carolina social studies teachers on four Saturdays each
academic year. The seminars, typically led by UNC faculty members with assistance from teachers, present recent developments
in historical research, as well as practical strategies for integrating those developments into middle school and high school lesson
plans. PHE has also published a book of essays on historical education in the United States, ―Learning History in America:
Schools, Cultures and Politics,‖ edited by Lloyd Kramer, Donald Reid, and William L. Barney (Minneapolis: University of Minnesota
Press, 1994).


University Continuing Education Programs Through its academic departments and other administrative units, Carolina offers a             x
wide variety of continuing education courses and events. These noncredit offerings do not carry academic credit but provide
opportunities for learners to experience personal enrichment, achieve professional advancement and meet other important
educational goals. Conducted in a range of formats, both on campus and at numerous other locations throughout North Carolina
and beyond, these activities reflect the depth of the university‘s missions in teaching and public service. In 2005-2006, continuing
education programs offered by university departments reached more than 109,000 participants in North Carolina and beyond, an
increase of more than 11,000 in comparison with the previous year. The 2,284 courses and events for which data was provided
were offered by 27 schools and departments of the university in a variety of formats, primarily on site but also by means of distance
education. Learning events were held in 58 North Carolina counties, 19 states outside North Carolina and several foreign countries.
In addition, many of Carolina‘s professional schools have online programs that offer academic credentials to off-campus students,
such as certificates in programs through the Allied Health Sciences department (molecular diagnostic science) and the School of
Public Health (community preparedness and disaster management and field epidemiology). Students may earn master‘s degrees
from the School of Nursing and School of Public Health, and doctorates in physical therapy or health leadership through online
courses. In 2005-2006, these online and hybrid courses for credit had more than 1,200 participants in five schools or departments
at Carolina.



Upward Bound (TRiO) Program at The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill (UB-UNC) provides services to 90 eligible high           x
school youth to assist them in building skills and motivation that will ensure success in education beyond high school. The
Program is a part of the School of Education and integrated into the campus community-at-large. UB-UNC recruits and serves
students who are 9th or 10th graders and are low-income and potential first generation college students, including 30% higher risk
youth, from the target high schools, who remain enrolled in the program throughout high school and immediately after high school
graduation. The Upward Bound Program at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill has been serving the community since
1966. For over the past forty–one years the program has assisted in preparing and serving over thirty-five hundred students many
of which have gone on to careers in law, medicine, education as well as public service and community out reach. The majority of
the resources provided for this program is made possible through a TRiO grant from United States Department of Education at an
annual cost $425,000.


William and Ida Friday Center for Continuing Education offers a wide range of educational programs and services that                    x
substantially broaden the population of persons throughout the state that the University is able to serve. The Friday Center‘s
programs and services fall into three main categories: a conference center for educational functions conducted by university
departments and other organizations, noncredit educational activities for professional development and personal enrichment, and a
range of flexible learning opportunities for part-time students to earn academic credit. The Friday Center also administers an
inmate education program, providing on-site study and correspondence instruction to incarcerated learners throughout North
Carolina. In fiscal year 05-06, the Friday Center for Continuing education offered 2,284 courses and events to 45,708 North
World View World View‘s mission is to support schools and colleges in preparing students to succeed in an interconnected                x
world. World View helps educators integrate a global perspective into their curriculum, respond to the rapid ethnic and cultural
change from immigrant students, improve ESL programs, and promote foreign language training and international travel. For the
past nine years, World View has co-sponsored an annual Hispanics/Latinos seminar in March with the Consortium in Latin
American Studies at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill and Duke University. Sessions include working with Latino
parents and strategies for teaching ESL at the elementary, middle, high school and community college levels.
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Program/Activitity Title                                                                                                                 GR
                                                                                                                                          4.1
A Su Salud Spanish for ―To Your Health,‖ A Su Salud is a Spanish-language program for students and practicing health
professionals that uses DVD-based video, DVD- and Web-based interactive exercises, and a comprehensive print workbook to
teach intermediate-level Spanish language skills and promote cultural awareness. The program, which focuses specifically on
health-related tasks and situations and intermediate-level students, was developed at UNC after an overwhelming 92 percent of
students reported the need and interest for instruction to improve their ability to communicate with Spanish-speaking clients. The
program was developed with administrative support from the Office of the Provost and the Office of Distance Education and E-
learning Policy, part of The William and Ida Friday Center for Continuing Education. The intermediate course is offered as an
elective to residential and distance education students at the UNC School of Public Health as well as the other UNC health science
schools, the School of Social Work and to undergraduates in the UNC College of Arts and Sciences‘ Department of Romance
Languages. The office of Continuing Education at UNC‘s School of Public Health and the Friday Center also offer the intermediate
course via a distance learning format to those outside the university. Overall enrollment through the various formats of the course
total about 500. Plans are now well under way to offer an introductory version of A Su Salud in the spring of 2008; pilots of this
version have already been conducted in Chapel Hill and several other locations around the state.



Ackland Art Museum Open to the public free of charge, the Ackland Art Museum exhibits from a permanent collection of more
than 15,000 works of art, particularly rich in Old Master paintings and sculptures by artists including Degas, Rubens and Pisarro;
Indian miniatures; Japanese paintings; and North Carolina folk art.

Advisory Committee to the Program on Public Life The Program on Public Life works to enable the University of North Carolina
at Chapel Hill to serve the people of the state and region by informing the public agenda and nurturing leadership. Established in
1997 and now residing in the Center for the Study of the American South, the Program serves as a vehicle for the university to
exercise its scholarly strength, civic tradition and historic mission of public service in North Carolina and the South.
Our goals are to provide ―research brokerage‖ so that the work of scholars at UNC-Chapel Hill and other institutions contributes to
the work of elected officials, journalists and civic leaders; to serve North Carolina and the South by supporting and fostering
enlightened leadership; and to offer a gathering place for leaders – in political and civic life and in the news media – to engage in
substantive debate along with periods of study and reflection. Our current projects include an annual Leadership Seminar for
Southern Legislators, a once-a-semester Journalists Roundtable, a Carolina Seminar on School Improvement, evening discussion
sessions for North Carolina legislators, and working roundtables on such topics as coastal development and business innovation
and entrepreneurship.



Advisory Council to the Office of Technology Development UNC-Chapel Hill's Office of Technology Development works with
researchers at the university to facilitate the development of new products, services and processes based on Carolina research
discoveries by: Managing the invention disclosure process, providing commercial opportunity assessments, pursuing and
managing intellectual property protection, marketing technology and UNC capabilities, navigating laws, policy and contractual
obligations, negotiating licenses, monitoring licenses for up to 20 years.

African Studies Center The staff and programs of the African Studies Center work to provide the University and the people of              x
North Carolina with a campus hub for interdisciplinary inquiry and communication on Africa, including the sponsorship of a wide
variety of activities that bring together interested faculty and students from a large number of academic disciplines, focusing on the
interconnected issues of democratization, development, health, and gender.



American Indian Center This is one of the only centers on the East Coast to focus solely on American Indian issues and
research. The Center‘s mission is to establish the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill as a leading public university for
American Indian scholarship and make American Indian issues a permanent part of the intellectual life of the University. North
Carolina is home to one of the largest American Indian populations in the eastern United States, and the center will serve as the
University‘s portal to American Indian communities across the state and the nation. The center will enable Carolina to serve the
state‘s American Indian population.

American Indian Studies (see Access) Created in 1998 in the College of Arts and Sciences, this program aims to increase
understanding of the historical experiences, cultural traditions and innovations, and political status of Indian peoples in the United
States. The program offers courses in American Indian subjects, hosts speakers on American
Indian topics, supports American Indian student organizations with public activities, and works with the N.C. Commission on Indian
Affairs and others to help meet the needs of Indian communities in the state. An undergraduate minor in American Indian Studies
was established in 2003.
APPLES (Assisting People in Planning Learning Experiences in Service The APPLES Service Learning Program is a student                       x
initiated, student-led, student-funded program engaging students, faculty and community agencies in service-learning partnerships.
The goal of APPLES is to foster socially aware and civically involved students through participation in an enriched curriculum and
hands-on experiences that address the needs of North Carolina communities. The focus of the program is on the connection made
between service in the community and what students learn in an academic setting. More than 150 community organizations in the
Triangle region partner with the APPLES program each year. APPLES provides extensive support for faculty who teach service-
learning courses or would like to develop such courses. Support includes consultation during course development and
implementation; assistance in identifying community partners; provision of trained student facilitators; $500 course enhancement
grants; a two-day faculty development institute for faculty, staff, students, and community partners; discussion series and
workshops held in collaboration with the Center for Teaching and Learning; a resource library, a faculty listserv, and a faculty
BlackBoard site. This past year, 69 APPLES service-learning courses were offered in 22 departments, enrolling 1,214 students.
These students volunteered 46,010 hours in the Triangle community through APPLES service-learning experiences. Examples
include students enrolled in an intermediate Spanish course who volunteered with the Spanish School Reading Partners program
to help Spanish-speakers develop English language skills; public relations students who developed public service announcements,
fact sheets and brochures for the Special Olympics of Orange County; and students in a biomedical engineering course who
modified an iPod to respond to movement to encourage a blind toddler to crawl. This year, APPLES launched its first Global
Alternative Spring Break experience to Guanajuato, Mexico. This signature program provided 11 students, their professor and a
graduate student with a first-hand experience on the global forces that shape migration to North Carolina, as well as its effects on
migrant families and sending communities. Students returned to UNC eager and well-equipped to serve local Latino communities
through individual, sustained projects. This is a collaborative effort between APPLES and the Center for Global Initiatives.




Area Health Education Centers (AHEC) The mission of the N.C. AHEC Program is to meet the state‘s health and health
workforce needs by providing educational programs in partnership with academic institutions, health care agencies and other
organizations committed to improving the health of the people of North Carolina. AHEC educational programs and information
services target improving the distribution and retention of health-care providers, with a special emphasis on primary care and
prevention; improving the diversity and cultural competence of the health care workforce in all health disciplines; enhancing the
quality of care and improving health care outcomes; and addressing the health care needs of underserved communities and
populations. There are nine AHEC regional centers throughout the state. In 2004-2005, AHEC offered 7,745 continuing education
programs in allied health, dentistry, medicine, mental health, nursing, pharmacy, public health and other topics with 184,194
attendees. In addition, health science students in these subject areas receive part of their training under AHEC auspices in
community hospitals, rural health centers, public health departments and other health-related settings. In 2004-2005, these health
science students completed 9,707 student months of training through AHEC-supported community-based rotations. AHEC also
provides support for 326 primary care residency positions. These residency programs, located at five of the nine AHEC regional
centers, have now graduated nearly 2,000 physicians since 1980. During the past 25 years, 67 percent of the AHEC-trained
family practice residents have remained in the state to practice.



Area Health Education Centers, Pediatric Specialty Services at the Zimmer Cancer Center in Wilmington The Zimmer
Cancer Center, Southeastern North Carolina‘s only community cancer center dedicated solely to the diagnosis, treatment and
support of people with cancer, is part of the Coastal AHEC, and Pediatric Specialty Services helps parents find care locally that
wouldn‘t otherwise be available. Specialists, such as those from UNC Lineberger Comprehensive Cancer Center, travel to
Wilmington on a regular basis to treat children with special medical needs.

Business Accelerator for Sustainable Entrepreneurship, Kenan-Flagler Business School, As an interdisciplinary UNC
program, BASE will be the first accelerator designed specifically to support buisinesses that address the triple bottom line:
financial profitability, social equity, and envionmentatl sustainability. The program will connect resident and affiliate businesses to a
range of resources from sustainability expertise to sustainable capital with the goal of accelerating their growth and impact.


Campus Y The Campus Y is the oldest and largest student organization on the UNC-Chapel Hill campus. Since the Y‘s founding                  x
more than 150 years ago, Campus Y students have led UNC efforts to address social justice issues and encourage volunteerism
throughout the community and around the world. Seventeen active issue-based program committees and projects span a wide
range of issues, including human rights, hunger, supporting immigrants and literacy. These committees and programs are
completely student driven and student run. The Campus Y is also one of four groups that have worked together to create the
STRETCH (STudents REaching Toward CHange) conference. This day-and-a-half annual leadership and service conference is
planned and run by students to promote leadership and community engagement.
Campus Y, Best Buddies Best Buddies is a committee of the Campus Y that pairs college students with individuals in the
community who have intellectual disabilities. Most of the buddies live in group homes and have few opportunities to interact with
people outside of their homes. Best Buddies helps to expand their social circles and exposes them to new experiences and
opportunities through one-to-one friendships with students. Best Buddies is a nonprofit organization
that has grown into an international organization with more than 77 million college students worldwide, affecting the lives of 250
million people with intellectual disabilities.



Carolina Business News Initiative, School of Journalism trains journalists to understand and explain complicated business
topics, operating under the assumption that people turn to mass communication to help them understand changes in the economic
world that affect their lives. The initiative includes coaching business editors and reporters at N.C. newspapers to improve the
quality of their sections by deeper and more-thorough coverage and providing critiques of business coverage in the state.



Carolina Center for Public Service The Center‘s Public Service Scholars program provides a framework for students to                      x
complete service; connects students who care about similar issues with one another; guides participants in training that can make
their service more effective; links coursework to service; offers unique opportunities to participants; and recognizes students for
their commitment to service. Since its inception in 2003, the program has rapidly grown from 78 to more than 1,000 students. In
four years, participants have logged more than 165,000 hours of service in communities throughout North Carolina, the nation and
the world. In 2007, 96 students graduated as Public Service Scholars, with nearly 40,000 hours of service to their credit.



Carolina Center for Public Service UNC-Chapel Hill‘s public service programs reach every region of North Carolina, helping                x
communities protect public health, improve schools and medical services, stimulate business, plan for growth, understand cultural
heritage, and enrich the quality of people‘s daily lives. Launched in 1999, the Carolina Center for Public Service coordinates and
catalyzes campus outreach activities around the state. The Center has also created the Carolina Center for Public Service
Database matching its public service projects with all 100 North Carolina counties. This Internet resource contains descriptions of
858 projects currently and will continue to grow. The website attracts between 400 and 550 unique users each quarter.


Carolina Connects This chancellor-initiated tour of North Carolina is designed to highlight for local citizens the many ways that         x
UNC relates directly to their communities and their needs. A special website (http://www.unc.edu/depts/design/connects/)
chronicles the visits to every region of the state, to more than 50 communities from Manteo and Shallotte in the East to Asheville
and Cullowhee in the West and points in between. ―Carolina Connects‖ stops focused on the Carolina Covenant program, the
Citizen-Soldier initiative and multiple research and public service projects. Chancellor Moeser also visits with alumni, legislators
and news media outlets to highlight the ways in which the University‘s faculty, staff and students serve communities and people.
Each stop spotlights the University‘s teaching, research and public service work, particularly in the areas of economic
development, health care and public education because we know those are issues of interest to North Carolinians. Carolina
Connects is also an opportunity for Carolina faculty and staff to listen to the people – to ask the question, ―What problems do you
need the university to work on?‖



Carolina Entrepreneurial Initiative This initiative was funded with a five-year, $3.5 million grant from the Ewing Marion Kauffman
Foundation that is being matched two-to-one by UNC-Chapel Hill. The University is one of seven Kauffman Foundation-designated
―Entrepreneurial Universities‖ chosen through a national competition. UNC is developing new programs to create a surge of
entrepreneurship among students, faculty and staff, including a new minor in entrepreneurship in the College of Arts and Sciences.
The program is led by a team managed by the Frank Hawkins Kenan Institute of Private Enterprise at the UNC Kenan-Flagler
Business School. Successful entrepreneurs, many of them alumni, are advisers, lending their real-world expertise.



 The Carolina Global Water Partnership will focus on increasing the availability and usage of water treatment technologies that
can be used in homes in the developing world that do not have clean running water. Phase I of the project will explore several
different business models, including whether microfinance institutions can make it easier for poor consumers to purchase point-of-
use water filters and other treatment technologies and whether microfinancing, or microfranchising, can successfully provide seed
capital for local entrepreneurs to produce, market and distribute the filters. During this phase, researchers will also look at ways to
reduce costs through improved design, production and distribution models. See also Gillings Innovation Laboratory.
Carolina Indian Circle CIC was founded in 1974 to meet the needs of American Indian students on the Chapel Hill campus. At
that time, less than 10 American Indians were enrolled at Carolina. Now, there are more than 200 students at the University from
different cultural and tribal backgrounds. Goals of the CIC include assisting American Indian students academically and socially by
providing a positive atmosphere and a sense of community, educating the university community to ensure that American Indian
heritage is recognized and respected, and providing public service. CIC has hosted an annual spring Pow Wow at Carolina for the
past 19 years.


Carolina Mammography Registry – Focus on American Indian Women in North Carolina CMR is a collaborative research
project begun in 1993 to study the performance of screening mammography in community practice. CMR has a commitment to
understanding and improving breast health care for American Indian women in North Carolina and has three projects actively
focused on this population. A University of North Carolina at Pembroke faculty member is working with CMR to build a special
mammography registry for American Indian women, an oral history project of American Indian women breast cancer survivors and
an American Indian Breast Health Survey. Currently there are more than 1.2 million records in CMR.



Carolina North A planned mixed-use campus to be located on almost 1,000 acres north of the main campus. Conceived in the
academic mission of the University, it will help connect the University‘s research programs to the economic well-being of the state.
As a flagship public research university charged with helping to lead a transformation in the state‘s economy, Carolina must
compete with national peers for the talent and resources that drive innovation. Today, that competition demands a new kind of
setting — one that enables public-private partnerships, public engagement and flexible new spaces for research and education.
Much more than a technology park or overflow space for main campus, Carolina North will be a campus for living and learning,
where people can live, work and study in one place.



Carolina Performing Arts Series The Carolina Performing Arts series at the recently remodeled Memorial Hall is meant to serve
diverse audiences through multi-disciplinary performing arts programs in presentation, creation and education. Carolina Performing
Arts commissions new work, sponsors artist residencies and organizes collaborative projects with local, national and international
partners. In addition to establishing UNC-Chapel Hill as a leader in the performing arts in the southeastern United States, the
series also invites outstanding professional artists to perform and to teach; to foster a deep appreciation of a wide variety of the
performing arts in the University, in the local community and throughout the region. A recent example of this artist outreach is a
week-long residency by the Alvin Ailey American Dance Theatre Arts in Education Program, in which the professional dancers
taught master classes for 160 local middle school students. Memorial Hall reopened in fall 2005 after a three-year, $18 million
renovation designed to make the famed venue a focal point for the performing arts across the region. Memorial Hall hosts the
Carolina Performing Arts Series and anchors the planned Arts Common, which will extend southward from Franklin Street to
Playmakers Theatre, the oldest building on campus dedicated to the arts.




Carolina Troop Supporters: America‘s Network of Troop Supporters is a student-led non-profit organization founded at Carolina
in March 2004. Carolina Troop Supporters is the executive branch of this organization, yet seven university branches exist across
the state and the country. All branches have been founded for the purpose of showing appreciation, care and support to the United
States Armed Forces in this country and especially to military personnel
serving abroad. Sending weekly letters and care packages to soldiers in countries such as Iraq, Liberia or Korea is among the main
objectives of the organization. It is also a goal to increase student and community awareness of military experiences in foreign
nations and in the United States. Web site: http://www.carolinatroopsupporters.org
Contact: Jane Montoya, ctsinfo@carolinatroopsupporters.org

Carolina Working Group on Economic Development a network of faculty and administrators interested in engaged scholarship
and public service in economic development. The Working Group will be a joint project of the Office of Economic and Business
Development, the Carolina Center for Public Service, the Odum Institute, and the University Center for International Studies. Any
Carolina faculty member or administrator is welcome to join. The Working Group defines economic development broadly as both
business and community development. Areas of interest include business administration, social science, professional education,
technology commercialization, globalization issues, information technology, and the physical and health sciences. Working Group
topics need not be confined to North Carolina, but a special focus will be given to research with implications for the state's
economy.
Cecil G. Sheps Center for Health Services Research a unit of Carolina‘s Division of Health Affairs, seeks to improve the health
of individuals, families and populations by understanding the problems, issues and alternatives in the design and delivery of health
care services. This is accomplished through an interdisciplinary program of research, consultation, technical assistance and
training that focuses on timely and policy-relevant questions concerning the accessibility, adequacy, organization, cost and
effectiveness of health care services and the dissemination of this information to policy makers and the general public. Its current
research programs include the following areas: Aging, Disability and Long-Term Care; Child Health Services; General Health
Services Research; Health Care Economics and Finance; Health Care Organization; Health Disparities; Health Policy Analysis;
Health Professions and Primary Care; Medical Practice and Prevention; Medication Error Quality Initiative; Mental Health and
Substance Abuse Services and Systems; North Carolina Institute of Medicine; Rural Health Research Program; Southeast
Regional Center for Health Workforce Studies; and Women‘s Health Services Research.



Center for Aging Research and Educational Services (CARES), School of Social Work, Founded in 1988, CARES has worked
in close partnership with state agencies, local health and service networks, families and other public and private stakeholders to
improve outcomes for a growing population of North Carolinians. CARES is currently engaged in a broad array of initiatives to
transform the state‘s long-term care network in all 100 of North Carolina‘s counties.



Center for Banking and Finance in the School of Law was created to provide legal expertise to banking lawyers and financial
officials. The decision to create the Banking Center in Chapel Hill was an obvious one since Charlotte is the nation‘s banking
capital. The Center annually brings together leading scholars of banking, business, and finance, along with the general counsel
and leading executives of major banks and investment houses, to hear key federal regulators, scholars, and others address cutting-
edge issues in the financial industry.

Center for Civil Rights in the School of Law has been actively engaged in a portfolio of outreach efforts that impact North Carolina
and the South, generally. In four low-income communities in Moore County, in the town of Clayton, in Hoke County and elsewhere,
the center has represented and assisted minority residents to seek greater municipal services and political participation. It has
also assisted efforts to stem the tide of resegregation in North Carolina‘s public schools, including intervening in the long-running
Leandro case on behalf of non-white children in Charlotte. The center was started because of the need to have an institutional
presence in the South to protect the civil rights of non-white and low-income communities in a time when 50 years of civil rights
progress stands at risk.

Center for Community Capital (CCC): (Department of City and Regional Planning) explores ways to increase economic
opportunity for undercapitalized communities and households, focusing on techniques that are both effective in building wealth and
assets and are sustainable from a business perspective.
The center focuses its research and analysis on the experience and impact of financial capital as it flows into, within and out of
U.S. households and communities, particularly those that have been left out of the financial mainstream.




Center for Environmental Health and Susceptibility (CEHS) The goal of this Center is to bring together a broad group of
environmental health researchers to understand the mechanistic basis of chemical toxicity and integrate this knowledge with
epidemiology in order to reduce the burden of environmentally related disease. The Community Outreach and Education Core
(COEC) of the UNC-Chapel Hill Center for Environmental Health and Susceptibility translates Center research into knowledge that
can be used to improve public health and educates the public about how individual and group susceptibilities interact with
environmental factors to cause disease. The COEC staff has worked with Center scientists and North Carolina citizens to: develop
educational and informational materials to share innovative CEHS research with diverse audiences, conduct workshops for
community-based and professional organizations, educators, and youth on a variety of environmental health issues, participate in a
variety of working groups, committees, and partnerships with state agencies and non-profit organizations to increase awareness of
relevant environmental health research, coordinate science seminars at the NC Division of Public Health to share the results of
CEHS research with the Division‘s Public Health Management Team, utilize multimedia programming to reach broad and varied
audiences with prevention messages related to environmental health, and publish the CEHS Sentinel newsletter.




Center for European Studies / European Union Center of Excellence Our mission is to advance understanding of the social,                x
political and economic events that shape contemporary Europe, in particular the European integration project. This is accomplished
by supporting faculty and graduate student research through our roles as a National Resource Center funded by the US Dept of
Education and as an EUCE funded by the European Commission. At the same time, the Center disseminates knowledge about
contemporary Europe by enricdhing our university's work in graduate and undergraduate education and in outreach programs with
public schools, business and media organizations.
Center for Health Promotion and Disease Prevention (HPDP) seeks to bring public health research findings to the daily lives of
individuals and communities with a special focus on North Carolina and populations vulnerable to disease. The majority of its
projects include research within North Carolina and all of its research addresses challenges that many state residents face. Most of
the center‘s faculty researchers have appointments in the School of Public Health or the other four UNC Health Affairs schools.
Programs: HOPE (Health Opportunities Partnership Empowerment) Works, Kids Eating Smart and Moving More, The North
Carolina Way (Worksite Activities for You) to Health, Center of Excellence for Training and Research Translation, Nutrition and
Physical Activity Self-Assessment for Child Care, Wake to Wellness grants, Weight-Wise Pilot Study, Threads of HOPE,
Comprehensive Cancer Control Collaborative of NC, Barbers Trimming Cancer Risk among Black Men, Body and Soul, NC
Tobacco Free Schools and Quitline Marketing, Internet Cigarette Vendors Study.



Center for International Business and Education Research UNC-Chapel Hill is home to one of the U.S. Department of                      x
Education's Centers for International Business and Research (CIBERs). These university-based centers promote education and
training that will contribute to the ability of United States business to prosper in an international economy. UNC‘s CIBER offers a
range of programs to help undergraduates, MBAs, University faculty, working professionals, K-12 teachers and policymakers.
CIBER seeks to prepare students for global business leadership through experiential education, equip educators to better
incorporate global business concepts and experiences into their teaching and research, and infuse companies and communities
with strategies and processes to enhance their global competitiveness.



Center for Sustainable Enterprise (Kenan-Flagler) The CSE at UNC‘s Kenan-Flagler Business School helps executives and
future business leaders understand how social and environmental considerations are changing the competitive landscape of
business. The CSE provides education, research and outreach to business students, executives and organizations to help them
benefit from the opportunities inherent in sustainable enterprise. Sustainable enterprise employs strategies that approach social
and environmental challenges as profitable business opportunities, while simultaneously minimizing any harmful effects. The new
CSE Knowledge Bank is a free searchable database
that contains scholarly research from the University on a broad range of sustainability topics.


Center for Urban and Regional Studies Evaluation of Durham Housing Authority‘s Hope VI Community Supportive Services
Grant This project of the Center for Urban and Regional Studies (―Evaluation of the Durham Housing Authority‘s Hope VI
Community Supportive Services Grant‖) is an evaluation of a variety of social services provided to those who were relocated from
the Few Gardens public housing development in Durham to allow for its redevelopment. The evaluation will inform DHA (and other
housing agencies in North Carolina and the nation) about the effectiveness of their services and will provide recommendations for
improving services to displaced public housing residents.


Center for Urban and Regional Studies Facilitating Collaboration among School Boards and Local Governments
Representatives from school boards, municipalities and county government in Cabarrus, Guilford, Johnston and Union counties
explored ways to improve coordination and communication between school boards and local governments at this summit convened
by the Center for Urban and Regional Studies and the Orange County Dispute Settlement Center. After ―Summit on
Intergovernmental Collaboration and School Siting,‖ the four counties created individualized plans for improving coordination and
communication institutionalizing collaboration between those who approve new development and infrastructure and those who
choose where and how schools are designed. Knowledge gained will be used to assist other communities.



Center for Urban and Regional Studies Transitioning to the New Economy Subtitled ―Early Lessons from North Carolina‘s
Biomanufacturing Training Program,‖ this project in the Center for Urban and Regional Studies is an evaluation of the impact of
North Carolina‘s BioWork training program on job placement and career transition. The results of the study will be used to inform
current training policy in the state as well as make recommendations for additional support services that will help high school
degree holders in North Carolina secure jobs in biotechnology and biomanufacturing.
Center for Urban and Regional Studies at The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill conducts and supports research on
urban and regional affairs—research that helps to build healthy, sustainable communities across the country and around the world.
The Center's Faculty Fellows—all leading scholars in their respective fields—participate in both multidisciplinary research and more
narrowly focused projects to generate new knowledge about urban and regional processes, problems and solutions. By supporting
this network of scholars and connecting them to government agencies and foundations that commission research, the Center plays
a vital role in linking the University community to ongoing efforts to address contemporary social problems.
Created in 1957, the Center for Urban and Regional Studies is one of the oldest university-based research centers of its kind. The
Center's mission is to promote and support within UNC-Chapel Hill, high-quality basic and applied research on urban, regional and
rural planning and policy issues. The Center seeks to generate new knowledge of urban and regional processes and problems and
ultimately to improve living conditions in our communities. This is done by involving the University's faculty and graduate students
in large, multidisciplinary research projects and smaller, more narrowly focused projects. The Center's mission also includes
promoting the use of the research it facilitates.
Many public and non-profit organizations have research needs such as collecting and analyzing basic data on urban and regional
conditions; surveying clients and prospective clients and interpreting their needs; defining and assessing problems; evaluating the
impacts of programs; and forecasting urban and regional trends. The Center matches these needs with the interests and expertise
of its Faculty Fellows -- an interdisciplinary group of UNC scholars who are leaders in their respective fields.
The Center conducts a wide variety of basic and applied research for foundations and federal, state, and local governments. It has
studied urban crime, housing and community development, urban poverty, natural hazards, coastal planning, environmental
protection, land use, growth management, and economic development. Not only does the Center enjoy a widespread reputation for
research excellence, but its recommendations frequently influence urban policy and planning decisions throughout North Carolina
and the U.S. Located on University property in the historic district of the Town of Chapel Hill, the Center is adjacent to the central
campus and all its resources. But the Center itself, with its permanent staff and comprehensive research facilities, is also easy to
reach for visitors.




Center for Urban and Regional Studies o Disaster Preparedness Demonstration Project In collaboration with MDC Inc., the
Center for Urban and Regional Studies is working in 11 mid-Atlantic states to create an emergency preparedness demonstration
program that is founded on strong, comprehensive field research and specific guiding. Hertford County is serving as the site for the
pilot project, which has the goal of better preparing disadvantaged groups and the nation as a whole for future disaster events.
FEMA will use the research and findings to develop a model emergency preparedness program for disadvantaged groups
nationwide. The North Carolina Division of Emergency Management will also use the findings to inform its preparedness efforts.



Center for Urban and Regional Studies o Reducing the Risk of Foreclosure Taking place in several communities in Eastern
North Carolina, this project in the Center for Urban and Regional Studies is examining the financial impacts of floodplain buyout
programs in North Carolina on participating low-income homeowners, focusing in particular on whether buyouts increase the
likelihood of foreclosure. The results will help the state and local governments create or improve support services for low-income
disaster victims participating in buyout programs.

Center on Coastal Law in the School of Law has worked with the Sea Grant Program and its N.C. State University office to bring
environmental, land use and legal expertise to emerging issues of coastal development along the North Carolina coast. For
example, a one-day seminar held on these issues in Wilmington drew an overflow audience of more than 90 attorneys,
governmental officials and coastal community advocates. The center seeks to bring much- needed expertise to the area of coastal
development law.

Center on Poverty, Work and Opportunity This center, in the School of Law, is a forum for the best minds in the state and the
nation to work on issues of poverty, work and opportunity. The center has four goals: to address the pressing needs of people
currently living at or below the poverty level; to provide a non-partisan
interdisciplinary forum to examine innovative and practical ideas to move more Americans out of poverty; to raise public awareness
of issues related to work and poverty; and to train a new generation to
combat the causes and effects of poverty and improve the circumstances of working people.


Chuck Stone Program for Diversity in Education and Media (also Access) The program brings 20 minority and disadvantaged
high school seniors to campus for an intensive one-week summer workshop.
Community Development Academy (School of Government) Community Development Academy (School of Government)
Housed at the School of Government, the Community Development Academy provides training for local governments in community
development and delivers one six-day program annually. The mission of the academy is to help develop scholarship on community
economic development. The training provides knowledge about the law of community development and helps local government
officials get certification to administer federal grants and participate in community development programs.
Community Economic Development Program (School of Government) This program at the School of Government provides
public officials with training, research and assistance that support local efforts to create jobs and wealth, expand the tax base and
maintain vibrant communities. It currently has a partnership with the North Carolina Rural Economic Development Center to help
small rural communities in the creation and implementation of strategies for community and economic development in the 21st
century. Faculty & staff at the School of Government are providing training to town civic leaders and conducing applied research
on identifying case studies that exemplify how small communities have been successful in development activities.



Community Media Project/Bucket Brigade - School of Journalism and Mass Communication

Community Outreach Partnership Centers Program In partnership with the city of Durham, Duke, Carolina‘s Center for Urban
and Regional Studies established a Community Outreach Partnership Center in Durham. The center served nearly 4,000 residents
in six Durham neighborhoods and involved 20 faculty and staff members and more than 100 students from the two universities.
Nine separate projects ranging from crime prevention to housing to job skills/job training were conducted. A computer lab was
established and regular computer training courses were offered to neighborhood residents. The facility also hosted GED, Adult
Basic Education and English as a Second Language (ESL) classes and served as home to several youth programs, including a
writing/photography/oral history project titled ―Community Stories,‖ which received an award for its innovativeness.



Community Workshops in the Library (CWL) The Health Sciences Library teaches consumer health information classes to the
public through this national award-winning partnership between area public libraries and UNC University Libraries. CWL offers free
instruction on computer and information literacy topics including three health information classes: Finding and Evaluating Online
Health Information, Online Health Information for Seniors and Online Health Information for Caregivers. The Workshops recently
won the 2007 Instruction Innovation Award from the Association of College and Research Libraries. In addition to these formal
classes, HSL responds to requests for health literacy training for healthcare providers and students. HSL librarians provide
educational sessions, presentations, and classes on a wide variety of consumer health topics to UNC campus associations and
organizations, as well as to community groups, and clubs throughout the state.



Cost Effectiveness of Supportive Housing This project is exploring the cost-effectiveness of supportive housing developments
for chrnoically homeless individuals in four counties across North Carolina. As part of this effort, researchers from the School of
Social Work assist staff from county Housing Support Teams in tracking the costs of providing services to chronically homeless
individuals before and after entering permanent supportive housing.

Creating Indicators and Improving Outcomes: Analytic Assistance for child Welfare, Work First, and the Food Stamp
program in North Carolina This project tracks the experiences of all children who enter the child welfare system, as well as the
experiences of all families who receive Work First or households who receive food stamps. This information is provided to all
county departments of social services and stakeholdres across the state so they can observe and track outcomes for children and
families they serve. Longitudinal information is provided on the number of children reported as victims of maltreatment, the
proportion that enter foster care, the length of time they remain in care, and their rate of reentry to care. Information is also
provided on the length of time familes receive Work First or food stamps, the rate at which they leave the program, the proportion
that obtain jobs, their earnings, and stability of employment.



CRP Economic Development Workshop Core Practicum Application workshops in the area of economic development,
community development, real estate, transportation, land use and the environment enable students to hone skills attained in other
coursework and to generate useful analyses, plans and recommendations to public and non-profit clients, thereby providing
community engagement and valuable service to the state.

DCRP Economic Development Workshop Practicum
Application workshops in the area of economic development, community development, real estate, transportation, land use and the
environment enable students to hone skills attained in other coursework and to generate useful analyses, plans and
recommendations to public and non-profit clients, thereby providing community engagement and valuable service to the state.



Developmental Disabilities Training Institute (DDTI) Located within the Jordan Institute for Families in the School of Social
Work, DDTI fosters improvements in services and support to people with developmental disabilities by developing the knowledge,
attitudes and skills of staff involved in their lives. This includes identifying best practices as well as providing in-service training
activities, targeted program evaluation and technical assistance to agencies and organizations managing, coordinating or providing
services to individuals and their families. DDTI programs include training on crisis planning and management, person-centered
thinking when working with people who have developmental disabilities, and facilitating support networks for people with
developmental disabilities.
Economic Development Institute (Department of City and Regional Planning) Economic Development Institute sponsors in-
service training and technical assistance activities on urban, regional, rural, and international economic development. Graduate
students are involved in these activities and receive support through research assistantships and internships. The Institute
sponsors UNC's Economic Development Course. This week-long, in-service training course attracts professional economic
developers from the southeast and other parts of North America and is accredited by the International Economic Development
Council.


Educational Renaissance, School of Pharmacy

Ella Baker Women’s Center for Leadership and Community Activism has plans to establish The Ella Baker Women‘s Center
for Leadership and Community Activism near two low-income housing communities in Chapel Hill and to replicate the model
nationwide. A pilot of the Center‘s flagship program was launched in June 2007, with 10 young women activists (ages 13-18) from
the Trinity Court and Pritchard Park public housing communities in Chapel Hill. Phase I of the pilot involved the youth in eight
weeks of community organization training using curriculum guides and technical assistance from the Innovation Center for
Community and Youth Development, a Kellogg funded nonprofit organization based in Takoma Park, MD. Training focuses on
personal leadership (identity, history, vision, ethics), organizational leadership (critical thinking, decision making, accessing
resources), and community leadership (civic awareness, networking, organizing). Phase II, launched in August 2007, is a year-long
community change project led by the youth and adult partners (UNC faculty, students and community volunteers). Opportunities for
youth to identify and construct solutions to problems in their own communities underscore all activities.



Energy and Environment in North Carolina Report

ENNEAD Society of Dental Volunteers ENNEAD Society of Dental Volunteers ENNEAD was created in 2003 by four dental
students and with the mentoring of Dr. Eugene Sandler, a School of Dentistry faculty member. The initiative focuses on helping
meet oral health needs in the community, heightening awareness of health disparities and giving students the skills and dedication
necessary to become future community leaders and volunteers. Nine student leaders, who serve as board members, are
responsible for taking requests from the community, designing projects to meet the needs outlined in those requests, and then
organizing a group of student volunteers to carry out those projects. ENNEAD provides doctor of dental surgery, dental hygiene
and dental assisting students with opportunities to volunteer at community health fairs, elementary schools and mobile dental
clinics. Almost 200 students in these fields are on the volunteer listserv. ENNEAD initiatives include mouth guard fabrication for
local student-athletes, in concert with the N.C. Dental Society‘s statewide initiative; presentations to schools and other
organizations on the importance of good oral heath habits; and participation at free clinics, working with the Open Door Dental
Clinic of Alamance executive director and N.C. Missions of Mercy president, Dr. Steven Slott of Burlington. In October 2005, 45
ENNEAD volunteers along with 22 community dentists and 10 hygienists provided almost $70,000 worth of care to 267 patients at
a two-day Missions of Mercy clinic in Burlington. The clinic received nationwide recognition as a winner of USA Weekend
Magazine‘s ―Make a Difference Day‖ Competition.



Environmental Finance Center (EFC) (SOG) The School of Government houses one of nine university-based EFCs funded by
the Environmental Protection Agency. The Carolina EFC is dedicated to enhancing the ability of governments to provide
environmental pro- grams and services in fair, effective and financially sustainable ways. It provides a bridge between students and
faculty in the University who work principally on environmental financing, management and
planning tools, and government workers who use these tools for the public interest. Carolina‘s EFC reaches local communities
through the delivery of interactive applied-training programs and technical assistance, increasing the capacity of other
organizations to address the financial aspects of environmental protection.


Environmental Resource Program The ERP is the outreach and public service unit of the Institute for the Environment. It links
Carolina‘s environmental resources with the citizens of North Carolina and is one of only a handful of university-supported
programs of its kind in the nation. ERP‘s mission is to promote environmental stewardship and public health through education,
research and community service. Based on the belief that one of the best ways to protect the environment and promote public
health is through an informed citizenry, ERP provides technical assistance to community groups, offers K-12 teacher professional
development, conducts policy research for nonprofits and government agencies, and sponsors undergraduate environmental
internships.

Evaluation, Assessment and Policy Connections (SOE) (EvAP) Evaluation, Assessment & Policy Connections (EvAP) is an
evaluation unit that conducts evaluations and provides training and technical assistance in evaluation, assessment and strategic
planning to educational, community and service organizations across the United States. The mission of EvAP is to build the
evaluation capacity and effectiveness of public, nonprofit and private organizations in order to meet the challenges of developing
and sustaining successful programs. EvAP specializes in training evaluators and conducting program evaluations and is committed
to sharing evaluation expertise, instruments and processes while serving as an evaluation training center for School of Education
students and the broader education and service communities.
Executive Education Program, Kenan-Flagler The graduate-level Certificate in Technology and Communication has admitted
159 students since its inception in 2003. Thirty-two students have completed the program. Approximately 80 percent of
participants are working professionals from North Carolina who are using e-learning as a way to continue their educations without
disrupting their careers or family life. The School‘s Executive Education program offers seminars and workshops to nearly 500
professionals in the fields of journalism and mass communication. Participants come primarily from North Carolina and the
Southeast.

Executive Education Program, School of Journalism

Family and Children’s Resource Program, School of Social Work, is a multifaceted resource for all who seek to improve the
lives of the families and children served by North Carolina‘s child welfare system. Since it was founded in 1993, it has worked in
close partnership with state agencies, local professionals, families, and other stakeholders to enhance both the process and the
outcomes associated with child protective services, foster care and adoption in our state. The program‘s collaborative efforts within
North Carolina have contributed to a reduction in the amount of time children spend in foster care and spawned a continuing series
of ongoing reforms involving local, state, federal, and foundation-based partnerships. FCRP is actively involved in serving all 100
North Carolina counties.


Financial Indicators for Local Public Health Systems (also ETCD) The UNC Public Health Leadership Program in conjunction
with various partners are working with Local Public Health Agencies (LPHA) in northeast North Carolina to implement a set of
indicators to measure, monitor and improve their financial operations and strategic planning.

Fort Bragg Base Realignment and Closure Baseline Assessment A community impact assessment was completed in 2006 to                        x
predict the impact of personnel changes on the public schools. The Center for Urban and Regional Studies project focused on Fort
Bragg and 11 surrounding counties (Bladen, Cumberland, Harnett, Hoke, Lee, Montgomery, Moore, Richmond, Robeson,
Sampson and Scotland). Projections will help local governments and school systems prepare for an influx of soldiers and their
families.

Frank Porter Graham Child Development Institute For the past 40 years, FPG research and outreach has shaped how the
nation cares for and educates young children. FPG has a proud history of serving as an objective, knowledgeable force for social
change to enhance the lives of children and families. Researchers focus on parent and family support; early care and education;
child health and development; early identification and intervention; equity, access and inclusion; and early childhood policy. FPG is
one of the oldest multidisciplinary centers devoted to the study of children and families. Most of the institute‘s work addresses
young children ages birth through 8 years. FPG has a special focus on children who experience biological or environmental factors
that challenge early development and learning. FPG Child Development Institute currently supports 45 projects working across the
nation and around the world. Research and outreach projects address parent and family support; early care and education; child
health and development; early identification and early intervention; equity, access and inclusion; and early childhood policy.
Example of projects directly affecting the children of North Carolina include the Family Life Project, the Nuestros Niños Early
Language and Literacy Project and the Partnerships for Inclusion. The purpose of Nuestros Niños Early Language and Literacy
Project is to develop and test an intervention designed to improve the quality of teaching practices related to literacy and language
learning among Latino children enrolled in North Carolina‘s More at Four Pre-Kindergarten program for at-risk children.
Partnerships for Inclusion promotes the inclusion of young children with disabilities, birth through 5 years, and their families in all
aspects of community life. PFI is a statewide technical assistance project with offices in the western, central and eastern regions of
North Carolina.



Frank Porter Graham Child Development Institute, First School This initiatives involves working with two schools in the state
to implement a new vision for the education and care of young children from pre-kindergarten through third grade that unites the
best of early childhood,elementary, and special education.
Gillings Innovation Labs (GILs) Competitively selected Gillings Innovation Laboratories (GILs) will focus concentrated efforts on        x
solving big public health problems, such as obesity, lack of access to clean water and health care, and epidemics around the world.
 Solutions to these problems can make a large difference in the public‘s health. The GILs are committed to accelerate delivery of
best practices to improve people‘s lives and anticipate new public health challenges. Some examples of GILs are the UNC Center
for Innovative Clinical Trials and the Carolina Global Water Partnership.

The UNC Center for Innovative Clinical Trials at the UNC School of Public Health conducts methodological, applied and
interdisciplinary research on the design and analysis of clinical trials. Building on UNC‘s reputation and excellence in translating
research to practice, the Center seeks to advance statistical science in clinical trials and quickly move it forward into clinical and
statistical practice in existing and future studies. The Center‘s interdisciplinary focus brings together faculty from several UNC
departments and additional collaborators from industry, who will engage jointly in both methodological and applied research in
clinical trials design, analysis and evaluation.

The Carolina Global Water Partnership will focus on increasing the availability and usage of water treatment technologies that can
be used in homes in the developing world that do not have clean running water. Phase I of the project will explore several different
business models, including whether microfinance institutions can make it easier for poor consumers to purchase point-of-use water
filters and other treatment technologies and whether microfinancing, or microfranchising, can successfully provide seed capital for
local entrepreneurs to produce, market and distribute the filters. During this phase, researchers will also look at ways to reduce
costs through improved design, production and distribution models.




Good Schools – Good Neighborhoods This project, a collaboration of the Center for Urban and Regional Studies and the N.C.
Smart Growth Alliance, identified trends in school construction in North Carolina and key factors affecting the location and design
of schools. The study suggested ways local governments, school boards and the N.C. Department of Public Instruction could
overcome obstacles to building and maintaining walkable, neighborhood-scale schools. Focus groups were conducted in
Cabarrus, Wake, Pitt, Henderson and Buncombe counties.


Graduate Student Fellowship in Greene County (re: tobacco farming and other resources) Christopher Sherman, a
master‘s in public administration student, received a 2006 Robert E. Bryan Fellowship to document the needs of tobacco farmers
and landowners in Greene County and link the farmers with available resources from the government and nonprofit organizations.
Greene County, a rural county in eastern North Carolina, is the most tobacco-dependent county in the state and the second most
tobacco-dependent county in the United States. Sherman‘s project helped address transition issues as farmers are no longer
subsidized for their tobacco crops and must compete on the open world market. He plans to develop a website that expands on
these issues to help farmers beyond Greene County.



Graduate Student Workshops, Capstone Projects, Practica (School of Government and Department of City and Regional
Planning)

Handicaps (TEACCH) (see PE, H, GR)

Helping Families Build Assets Researchers at the Center for Urban and Regional Studies worked with several groups, including
the Corporation for Enterprise Development, the N.C. Department of Labor and the N.C. Division of Community Assistance, as well
as members of the Individual Development Account (IDA) and Asset-Building Collaborative of North Carolina and 11 local IDA
programs across the state. This project included both a process and impact evaluation of the two IDA demonstration programs in
North Carolina. Results and recommendations were provided to state policy makers and local program managers in order to
improve the implementation and expansion of IDA programs statewide. (IDAs are matched savings accounts that enable low-
income American families to save, build assets and enter the financial mainstream.)
Hickory Metropolitan Higher Education Center The Hickory-Morganton metropolitan area is the largest in the state without a               x
university. In fact, there is not a public university closer than about an hour‘s drive of Hickory. In 2002, the leadership of Hickory
created the Hickory Metropolitan Higher Education Center — a virtual institution of higher education. The HMHEC is an
educational consortium among several N.C. universities and colleges that assists students who have completed their initial two
years of college courses in earning degrees by enrolling them in part-time classes. Graduate degree programs are also available.
In 2005, UNC-Chapel Hill‘s Office of Economic and Business Development announced a partnership with the HMHEC to offer
undergraduate, graduate and nondegree programs at the center and to promote the university‘s distance-learning programs and
online courses there. Since that time the following activities, among others, have occurred in HMHEC: training of nearly 40 local
officials at HMHEC in the essentials of economic development by School of Government faculty and staff; strong enrollments in
training provided by the Northwest AHEC; training in the A Su Salud program; two college fairs; and publicity in the seven-county
Hickory service area for several Carolina online certificate and masters programs — a graduate certificate in technology and
communication by the School of Journalism, a certificate program in Community Preparedness and Disaster Management through
the School of Public Health and also an Executive MPH and MHA degrees.



High-Speed Internet Connectivity in Distressed Urban Areas This Center for Urban and Regional Studies project evaluated the
factors that deny significant portions of the urban population in four North Carolina cities (Charlotte, Durham, Asheville and
Wilmington) from participating fully in the ―knowledge economy.‖ By developing a better understanding of these factors, this project
enabled local and state policymakers to be better equipped to develop programs and target resources to improve high-speed
internet access among these urban populations, in particular those living and running small businesses in economically distressed
neighborhoods.

Housing and Community Economic and Real Estate Development Workshop (DCRP) Application workshops in the area of
economic development, community development, real estate, transportation, land use and the environment enable students to
hone skills attained in other coursework and to generate useful analyses, plans and recommendations to public and non-profit
clients, thereby providing community engagement and valuable service to the state.



Hubbard Program (Program on Aging, School of Medicine) The Program on Aging in the School of Medicine offers the
Hubbard Program as a training opportunity for students from multiple disciplines to practice collaboratively in the care of its older
patients. Through weekly home visits with patients and case conference meetings, advanced trainees in family medicine,
pharmacy, occupational therapy, social workers and nurses gain knowledge and skills in collaborative interdisciplinary practice
while providing care to frail, older patients. The Hubbard team provides a team assessment and then formulates a set of prioritized
recommendations that are implemented by the primary-care providers and others involved in the ongoing care of the patient.



Impact Awards for Graduate Students These awards recognize and encourage graduate students whose research is making a
difference to our state. Impact Award winners, selected by a faculty review committee, present their research, receive a cash award
and are recognized at the Annual Graduate Student Recognition Event. The research can have a direct impact on the citizens of
North Carolina (and beyond) or a more indirect impact through new knowledge or insights gained, educational, economic, health,
social and cultural or environmental effects that will be derived from the research endeavor. Projects have included research on
issues related to education, economic development, environmental issues, health and social services. One graduate student
worked with the North Carolina Rural Center for Economic Development to research and develop a new economic disaster
response program called R2R or Resources to Recover. This program is aimed at connecting nonprofit, faith-based organizations
to the state‘s workforce development system in an effort to respond to economic disasters, such as the closure of the Pillowtex
plant in Carbarrus County in 2003.



Improving the Care of Acutely Ill Elders Improving the health of North Carolina‘s elderly population by bringing education and
training in geriatric care to nurses in rural or underserved areas is the goal of a new partnership between the School of Nursing and
the N.C. Area Health Education Centers (AHEC) program. In August 2006, the program launched simultaneously in two
rural/underserved regions of North Carolina, including a five-county area where, according to U.S. census data, the poverty rate is
20.4 percent for persons aged 65 years and older. The state average for this age group is 13.7 percent. School of Nursing faculty
will teach two AHEC nurses from each area how to conduct the program workshops and the geriatric clinical simulations. The
AHEC nurses will then lead continuing education programs in their area. AHEC will provide the nurses with access to state-of-the-
art computerized mannequins for the clinical simulations.


Institute for Defense and Business (Kenan-Flagler)                                                                                       x
Institute for Economic Development (Department of City and Regional Planning) The primary objective of the economic
development focus area is to provide students with the knowledge and know-how needed to perform at the cutting edge of
economic development practice in this rapidly changing field. We also emphasize providing a solid conceptual and methodological
foundation of how and why the economies of communities and regions change. With this foundation the economic development
professional can continue to grow and learn over a lifelong career.




Institute for Economic Development European Exchange Program, (Department of City and Regional Planning) The
economic development faculty and students have participated in an exchange program with the Vienna University of Economics
and Business in Austria since the mid-1980s. Students who elect to take advantage of spending a semester at the Vienna
University of Economics and Business are able to observe at close hand the fascinating process of regional economic restructuring
in Eastern Europe and to consider their implications for regions in Western Europe and in the United States.




Institute for Global Health and Infectious Diseases The Institute of Global Health and Infectious Diseases came out of                      x
discussions Mike Cohen, Director of the Center for Infectious Diseases in the School of Medicine, and I had with a variety of
leaders across campus. UNC-Chapel Hill is among a small minority of public and private universities with extensive and long-
standing strength in global health, including broad and important areas, such as nutrition, water, and infectious diseases. The new
Institute is seen as a way to catalyze this amazing depth and breadth of global health research, education and service being done
across UNC and around the world, making the work even stronger and deeper. The Office of Global Health in the UNC School of
Public Health (OGH) has been playing a central coordinating role for global health across campus, particularly through funding from
the Fogarty International Center and the Framework Program in Global Health grant that the OGH received. The new Institute will
expand on these efforts and has strong institutional support for sustainability.



Institute for the Environment The UNC Institute for the Environment is leading UNC‘s world-renowned environmental community                 x
in developing solutions to critical challenges. The Institute carries out its public service mission in several ways, including through
its Environmental Resource Program, which promotes environmental stewardship and public health through education, research
and community service, and through various field sites, at which students and faculty work with communities to examine
environmental issues of local concern. The North Carolina Naturally program provides a state-wide database and decision support
tool for conservation and planning. An upcoming project is the report ―Energy and Environment in North Carolina.‖ The report, to
be released this summer, would assess all known UNC system energy and environment programs and would provide thoughts,
from faculty leaders' perspectives, about how the Carolina and the system could assist all sectors of the state with this critical issue.



Institute for the Environment, Carolina Environmental Student Alliance CESA‘s mission is to provide a meeting ground for
the campus and community to unite in connecting different disciplines of thought, study and action through the common goal of
environmental awareness. CESA is sponsored by the Institute for the Environment and is open to all students and community
members with an interest in the environment. CESA‘s projects in 2006 included working on Carolina‘s section of the Mountain to
Sea Trail in Sparta, volunteering at Carolina‘s Battle Park in Chapel Hill to do trail work and invasive species removal, and gleaning
machine-harvested fields for food donations to local shelters and food pantries. Programs: Environmental Resource Program,
One North Carolina Naturally, Energy and Environment in North Carolina, Environmental Field Site Program.



Institute for the Environment, Environmental Resource Program, The ERP is the outreach and public service unit of the
Institute for the Environment. It links Carolina‘s environmental resources with the citizens of North Carolina and is one of only a
handful of university-supported programs of its kind in the nation. ERP‘s mission is to promote environmental stewardship and
public health through education, research and community service. Based on the belief that one of the
best ways to protect the environment and promote public health is through an informed citizenry, ERP provides technical
assistance to community groups, offers K-12 teacher professional development, conducts policy research for nonprofits and
government agencies, and sponsors undergraduate environmental internships. Web site: www.cep.unc.edu/erp
Institute for the Environment, One North Carolina Naturally, This project focuses on coordinating conservation efforts with a
web-based database and decision support framework for regional-scale conservation and development decisions. One North
Carolina Naturally is a comprehensive statewide conservation plan that involves the public, governmental agencies, private
organizations and landowners to maintain functional ecosystems, biological diversity and working landscapes through the
stewardship of land and water resources. The project is part of a larger effort by the state to conserve and restore the state‘s
natural heritage and sustain a healthy life for all North Carolinians and visitors. Web site: www.cep.unc.edu/oncn



Institute of Marine Sciences Since the 1940s, scientists at UNC‘s Institute of Marine Sciences in Morehead City have served
North Carolina by addressing important questions related to the nature, use, development, protection and enhancement of coastal
marine resources. Its work includes the Neuse River Monitoring and Modeling Project on the Neuse River, which has been
designated as one of the nation‘s 20 most pollution-endangered rivers. Marine Science researchers are involved in the South East
Atlantic Coastal Observing System (SEA COOS) and the South Atlantic Bight Synoptic Offshore Observational Network
(SABSOON) to collect, manage and disseminate critical information about coastal oceanic and atmospheric interactions, which
enhances understanding of environmental and meteorological impacts on the ocean and coastal resources. In North Carolina,
SEACOOS utilizes an instrumentation buoy off of Cape Lookout Shoals and a high-frequency radar system along the Outer Banks.



Interdisciplinary Health Communication Certificate Program through the School of Journalism and Mass Communication,                    x
Information and Library Sciences, School of Public Health and Department of Psychology The Certificate prepares current
degree-seeking residential UNC-Chapel Hill graduate students to use theory-informed health communication strategies in applied
practice, academic and research settings. It supplements students� degree programs with focused training in one of two tracks:
Psychological processes - examining how health communication leads people to change their health behaviors.
Integrated communication strategies - examining how to create and deliver health communication messages and interventions
through interpersonal communication, print media and electronic media.



Jordan Institute for Families is the research, training and technical assistance arm of the School of Social Work. The Institute is
an example of how a school includes the community voice in institutional planning. Addressing family issues across the lifespan,
the Jordan Institute brings together experts -- including families themselves -- to develop and test policies and practices that
strengthen families and engage communities. The School of Social Work provides extensive training and technical assistance
through the Jordan Institute. Community partners can access a list of programs in their area through an interactive map on the
School‘s website. These projects provide technical assistance, training, and information to help families become healthy and stable.


Kellogg Health Scholars Program The goal of the Health Scholars Program is to reduce and eliminate health disparities by
developing young leaders who participate in community-based participatory research (CBPR). CBPR is a collaborative approach
through which research endeavors are chosen based on the needs of a community. It aims to combine academic study with social
and policy initiatives that will improve health outcomes. The University of North Carolina School of Public Health is one of eight
national training sites for the program. The UNC Center for Health Promotion and Disease Prevention, a research center with
expertise in community research, administers the UNC grant. Kellogg Health Scholars at UNC become involved in any number of
community-based initiatives to promote individual wellness, community competence and social change.




Kenan-Flagler Leadership/Management Training Program and Urban Investment Strategies Center (UISC) focusing on K-                      x
12 education The Kenan-Flagler Business School and the Kenan Institute‘s Urban Investment Strategies Center (UISC) are
delivering a leadership/management training program for priority high schools. The first ―class‖ of school leadership has completed
the training, and a second set of schools has been selected for the next round. The Kenan Institute is working with
Edenton/Chowan education, civic and business leadership to revitalize K-12 education. UISC is leading the development of a lab
school in partnership with Union Baptist Church in Durham as an innovative model of 21st century education. In partnership with
Golden LEAF Foundation, N.C. New Schools Project, NCDPI, NC REAL and others, Kenan-Flagler is developing a model for a
pilot K-20 and beyond entrepreneurship education initiative.


Kenan-Flagler and Tsinghua University Center for Logistics and Digital Strategy The Kenan Institute's Center for Logistics             x
and Digital Strategy (CLDS) and Tsinghua University have recently established the Kenan-Tsinghua Center For Logistics And
Economic Development, a joint research center in logistics. Tsinghua University is considered the MIT of China and the partnership
positions both organizations as leaders in logistics for emerging global markets.
The joint Center will focus on logistics and global supply-chain management research that enhances trade between the United
States and China, supports economic development and addresses issues such as offshore outsourcing.
Kenan Institute Asia The Kenan Institute Asia (K.I.Asia) works in a variety of ways to promote sustainable development in Asia.             x



Kenan Institute Charlotte is a joint venture of the Frank Hawkins Kenan Institute of Private Enterprise at Carolina‘s Kenan-                x
Flagler Business School and the Belk School of Business at UNC-Charlotte. Established in December 1997, KI Charlotte develops
models for creating jobs and alleviating poverty in the inner city, using Charlotte as its laboratory. KI Charlotte provides training and
technical assistance to minority small business owners and entrepreneurs preparing to launch ventures to help them grow,
generate more jobs and pump more money into the inner city economy. Promising businesses are able to receive technical
assistance and capital form the Urban Venture Fund, which target businesses that are three to five years old and have at least $1
million in assets. KI Charlotte also provides business-style training for leaders of nonprofit organizations, to help them build
organizations that are economically self-sustaining rather than dependent on government and philanthropic contributions. Its civic
entrepreneurship program teaches local government leaders how to market their communities, attract foreign investment and
create new wealth.


Kenan Institute for Private Enterprise, Center for Air Commerce, Center for Entrepreneurial Studies, Center for International               x
Business Education and Research, Center for Logistics and Digital Strategy, Center for Real Estate Development, Center for
Sustainable Enterprise, Center for Urban Investment Strategies
Center for Competitive Economies With the loss of multiple traditional industries, North Carolina at every community level is
facing the challenge of how to sustain, grow and prosper in the 21st century. Housed in the Kenan Institute of Private Enterprise at
the Kenan-Flagler Business School, the Center for Competitive Economies works with leaders at the community, county and
regional level to address the challenges of global competitiveness and create custom solutions that build on the unique assets of
each region. The Center has worked with Advantage Carolina, AdvantageWest Regional Partnership; Carteret County; Charlotte
Regional Partnership, City of Salisbury, Kerr-Tar Council of Governments, and multiple state agencies. Funding for this program is
provided through grants from the entities served.



Kenan Institute Urban Investment Strategies Centrer: The Kenan Institute‘s Urban Investment Strategies Center helps develop
innovative solutions to the challenges of revitalizing distressed communities. The center
focuses its research, outreach and education initiatives on addressing the growing gap between the ―haves‖ and ―have nots‖ in U.S.
society. This gap has widened during the past two decades, reversing a quarter-century trend toward growing economic equality.
The center acts as a catalyst in fostering urban prosperity by creating knowledge in key areas of community competitiveness. It
advises communities on how to use their assets to thrive and prosper;
develop market-based solutions that build community capital; and promote urban development. The center also teaches
government, community and nonprofit leaders to become more entrepreneurial and business-like in their operations and service
delivery. Web site: www.kenan-flagler.unc.edu/KI/urbanInvestment
Contact: James Johnson, 919-962-2214, jim_johnson@unc.edu


Kenan Institute’s Center for Air Commerce The Kenan Institute's Center for Air Commerce offers a range of services that help
clients anticipate trends and prepare to take strategic advantage. It helps communities plan how they will leverage their airports
and surrounding commercial areas to attract industry and promote economically and environmentally sustainable growth; airport
authorities plan and develop airports as retail, entertainment and business meeting destinations and vital networks for air
commerce; air shippers and service industries anticipate trends and business opportunities; companies streamline their supply
chains and integrate the latest information technologies to improve performance and profits.



Kenan Center for Competitive Economies With the loss of multiple traditional industries, North Carolina at every community                  x
level is facing the challenge of how to sustain, grow and prosper in the 21st century. Housed in the Kenan Institute of Private
Enterprise at the Kenan-Flagler Business School, the Center for Competitive Economies works with leaders at the community,
county and regional level to address the challenges of global competitiveness and create custom solutions that build on the unique
assets of each region. The Center has worked with Advantage Carolina, AdvantageWest Regional Partnership; Carteret County;
Charlotte Regional Partnership, City of Salisbury, Kerr-Tar Council of Governments, and multiple state agencies. Funding for this
program is provided through grants from the entities served.



Kenan Institute’s Center for Entrepreneurial Studies, Entrepreneurial career opportunities come in many forms, whether you
want to start your own company, work for a start-up, find an entrepreneurial opportunity within a larger company, or go into related
areas such as venture capital or social entrepreneurship. The Center for Entrepreneurial Studies works with each student to
develop an individualized plan for career success.
Kenan institute's Center for International Business Education and Research (CIBER) UNC-CIBER is a critical partner in                    x
realizing UNC's commitment to educate new generations of skilled, globally-aware individuals who are capable of leading change in
a highly global environment.

Kenan Institute’s Center for Logistics and Digital Strategy, New intelligent technologies, operating in the Web-enabled
information environment, allow virtual integration of the extended global enterprise in a way not feasible before the advent of the
electronic age. In the Center's Intelligent Systems Laboratory (ISL) we are able to develop customized logistics solutions that meet
an organization's distinct competitive needs. We are able to assess the benefits of these new technologies and offer a roadmap for
implementation.


Kenan Institute’s Center for Real Estate Development, The Kenan Institute's Center for Real Estate Development (CRED)
provides thought leadership through global education, research and outreach to help business leaders create and manage the built
environment in ways that ensure positive impact and sustainable results. The Center offers the only program in real estate
education from a top-ranked business school that is based in the context of real estate development. Without these skills, the
ability to structure a project's financials is often not enough to support a successful outcome.


Kenan Institute’s Center for Sustainable Enterprise, The CSE at UNC's Kenan-Flagler Business School helps executives and
future business leaders understand how social and environmental considerations are changing the competitive landscape of
business.

Learn NC, The Learners‘ and Educators‘ Assistance and Resource Network of North Carolina (LEARN NC) is a collaborative                   x
statewide network of teachers and partners devoted to improving student performance and enhancing teacher proficiencies by
creating and sharing high-quality teaching and learning resources via the World Wide Web. Offered free through the UNC School
of Education, LEARN NC provides curriculum and instructional tools aligned with the state‘s Standard Course of Study and a virtual
classroom of online courses for K-12 students and teachers. LEARN NC has trained 30,000 teachers and others (as of 2000) in all
115 public school systems as well as charter schools, N.C.‘s Catholic Diocese and the N.C. Independent School Association.
About 20,000 teachers and students visit the LEARN NC website every day, where they can choose from more than 10,000 pages
of educational resources, including 3,000 lesson plans. In the online learning group, LEARN NC offered 40 K-12 courses, including
23 Advanced Placement courses, online this year. In the 2006-2007 school year, LEARN NC served more than 2,000 students
throughout North Carolina, and many students spread throughout 23 states and four foreign countries. One recent LEARN NC
project is a collaboration with UNC‘s Research Laboratories of Archaeology to create a teaching resource called ―Intrigue of the
Past‖ about North Carolina‘s first peoples. LEARN NC is also are very active in professional development courses for teachers. In
the 2006-2007 school year, LEARN NC online offered 28 teacher development courses online, which helped more than 1,000
teaches renew their certifications or learn to develop and teach their own online courses. o The University of North Carolina Online
o Alternative licensure for teachers
o Math and Science Online




Lifelong Access Libraries (LAL) As the baby boom generation moves toward the retirement years, there is a need to create
opportunities for these valuable citizens to continue to be active and civically engaged. The School of Information and Library
Science (SILS) and the UNC Institute on Aging (IOA) are actively involved with a project called Lifelong Access Libraries (LAL)
whose aim is to create a model for public libraries to support older adults in ways that facilitate learning, social connections, life
planning and community engagement. The LAL project was created by the Americans for Libraries Council with a grant from
Atlantic Philanthropies. In August 2007, SILS and IOA will host the second annual LAL Fellows Institute -- a week-long training for
public librarians from across the country in how to plan, organize and deliver LAL programs in public libraries. The SILS/IOA team
is also responsible for the evaluation of five LAL Centers of Excellence that are being identified by the Americans for Libraries
Council. North Carolina has been identified as one of possible the Centers of Excellence. We are currently working with the NC
Division of Aging and Adult Services to facilitate LAL initiatives in public libraries across the state.



Local Elected Leaders Academy The School of Government, in partnership with the NC League of Municipalities and the NC
Association of County Commissioners, created the Local Elected Leaders Academy in fall 2007. Through this new educational
program, municipal and county elected officials will gain the knowledge and skills they need to lead and govern their communities
in the 21st century. Three levels of programming are offered through the Local Elected Leaders Academy: (1)Offered in alternating
years, the Essentials of County Government and Essentials of Municipal Government courses, held across the state, provide an
introduction to North Carolina government; (2) Focused, in-depth courses provide knowledge and tools for elected officials to use in
their own communities (e.g., WaterVision summit on May 22, 2008, in RTP); (3) Advanced programs will help leaders plan and
implement strategies at the regional and statewide level.
Making Choices Making Choices One recent project of the School of Social Work and Jordan Institute was the development of
this character education curriculum for use in elementary schools. Funded by the U.S. Department of Education, the project
encouraged school children to use language skills to express their feelings and consider alternative solutions, the goal being to
help them make friends more easily and reduce social aggression and bullying. Designed as a school-based curriculum for
students in kindergarten through fifth grade, Making Choices brings the latest research on child development into the classroom.



Media Law Handbook which was first published in 1992, is widely used by North Carolina journalists for whom it provides a ready
reference to information about libel, privacy, access to public records and meetings, the journalist‘s privilege, copyright law,
advertising regulation, and the North Carolina court system. The handbook‘s contents were researched and written by North
Carolina lawyers and academicians, each of whom contributed the time and effort to compile a chapter. Together with Cathy
Packer, a professor at the School of Journalism and Mass Communication, EGHS partners Amanda Martin and Hugh Stevens
have edited and produced an updated edition (2007), published by the North Carolina Press Foundation and the School of
Journalism and Mass Communication.


Medical Journalism Program (SOJ) at the School of Journalism and Mass Communication communicates with citizens across
the state about important health and environmental issues through a nine-year collaboration with UNC-TV. Since 1998, student
teams under the supervision of Dr. Tom Linden have prepared 17 six- to seven-minute reports on health and environmental issues
that have been broadcast on ―North Carolina Now‖ on UNC-TV. Many of the master‘s projects and theses prepared by graduate
students in our Medical Journalism Program have focused on health problems around the state. Students have prepared series of
articles, radio and video reports on a multitude of health-related issues. These reports are all archived in the Park Library in the
School of Journalism and Mass Communication. In addition, students in the science documentary television class have partnered
with independent Chapel Hill producers and UNC-TV to produce a half-hour documentary on the Haw River that aired on UNC-TV
in April 2001. One goal of the Medical Journalism Program is to provide a laboratory for learning for undergraduate and graduate
students while communicating to a larger statewide audience.



Military History, Department of History, College of Arts and Sciences The Department of History in the College of Arts and
Sciences offers graduate studies within the major field of military history. Military history at the University of North Carolina at
Chapel Hill is part of a collaborative program with Duke University. Four core courses provide students with a fundamental
grounding in the field. Courses include an examination of classic works in military history, theory and the study of war and military
affairs. Readings encompass several disciplines and genres, including sociology and political science, biography, and war and
battle narratives.

Mujeres Avanzando hacia Nuevas Oportunidades / Women Working Toward New Opportunities (MANO) MANO is a
student organization that addresses the ESL and other pressing needs of non-native, primarily Spanish-speaking women in the
Chapel Hill/Carrboro area. Students offer year-round classes twice a week at Carrboro Elementary School. Their objectives are to
teach English skills based on the needs of each participant; provide childcare,
tutoring and mentoring for children of participants during the classes; and serve as a valuable resource for the well-being of these
families and their integration into the community. Another student organization, Building Opportunities through Language
Development (BOLD), is the brother program of MANO and offers ESL classes for Spanish-speaking men. Web site:
www.unc.edu/student/orgs/mano


National Demonstration Program for Citizen-Soldier Support UNC-Chapel Hill has spearheaded this Citizen-Soldier Support
initiative, which received $1.8 million in funding in the Department of Defense appropriations bill finalized by Congress in 2004 and
another $5 million in 2006. The program serves N.C. National Guard and Reserve personnel who are challenged, along with their
families, by the demands and risks of mobilization, deployment and return from duty. Partners include Duke University, N.C. State,
UNC-Charlotte, East Carolina, UNC-Greensboro, Virginia Tech, Bryn Mawr College and UNC-TV. Currently, the program serves
communities in and around Asheville, Charlotte, Greensboro, Rocky Mount and Wilmington.


National Research Center for Rural Education Support (NRCRES) Targeted Rural Literacy Initiative (TRI) (SOE) is designed
to meet the needs of teachers and students in rural communities by providing a dual-level professional development intervention
for both K-1 classroom teachers and their struggling readers. This model has the potential to be disseminated widely across rural
areas of the state to impact early literacy.
National Research Center for Rural Education Support (NRCRES) Established in 2004 by a $10 million, five-year award from
the U.S. Department of Education to the UNC-Chapel Hill School of Education, the National Research Center on Rural Education
Support (NRCRES) in the School of Education is working to improve teaching, learning and student achievement in rural schools
nationwide. Led by investigator Lynne Vernon-Feagans, a team of 20 researchers is conducting research studies focused on
issues that face children as they begin their education, issues that face students during the transition to early adolescence and the
role that distance education can play in rural schools. Their research is designed to help rural kindergarten and first-grade teachers
reach their struggling learners and to use state-of-the-art distance education to extend their consultation model to the nation‘s
teachers


National Research Center for Rural Education Support (NRCRES) The Rural Early Adolescent Learning (REAL) aims to
enhance teachers' abilities to assist student learning by focusing upon: (1) Competence Enhance Behavior Management (CEBM)--
a means of establishing a whole-grade system of behavior management that provides structure and consistency across classes
while fostering responsible self-directed behavior; and (2) Social Dynamics Training (SDT) which promotes teachers‘awareness of
the impact of peers on motivation and achievement.


Native Health Initiative (NHI) The NHI, organized by medical student Anthony Fleg, focuses on the health disparities facing
American Indians communities in North Carolina. Now in its fourth year, the project is a collaboration between student volunteers
and American Indian communities. The principles behind NHI include educating future health care providers on the health issues
facing Native communities, providing sustainable benefits to the communities
involved, supporting meaningful cultural exchange and empowering American Indian youth through mentoring and training.
Projects began in the summer of 2005 in Waccamaw, Siouan and Lumbee communities, and NHI‘s work has since expanded.
Each summer, the NHI sends students to work with tribes throughout the state.


NC Black and Latino Media Issues Forum Held at the School of Journalism and Mass Communication in spring 2007, this forum
was co-sponsored by the NC Triangle Chapter of the National Association of Hispanic Journalists and the Triangle Association of
Black Journalists. The event provided an open forum for discussions about dispelling certain myths and stereotypes that exist
between ethnic groups, and vocalizing a call to action for better, more ethical and accurate coverage of minority populations by
other minority populations.

NC Botanical Garden Besides its displays of native and unusual plants and its nature trails, the N.C. Botanical Garden offers art
exhibits, nature walks and courses on topics ranging from home gardening to botanical illustration. The garden is open to the public
daily for recreation and learning, including certificate programs in botanical illustration and native plant studies and classes and
workshops in gardening, botany, ecology, and botanical illustration. The Visiting Plants Program provides native plants to
elementary schools for classroom study, while school children may visit the garden for workshops, classes, guided tours, hikes and
programs correlated with the N.C. Standard Course of Study.


NC Cancer Hospital The N.C. General Assembly approved $180 million in funding for a new cancer hospital to be built by the
UNC Health Care System that will replace an aging cancer treatment facility originally built in the 1950s as a tuberculosis
sanatorium. The new hospital will also serve as the clinical home for the UNC Lineberger Comprehensive Cancer Center, one of
only 38 such National Cancer Institute-designated centers in the United States. Tentatively scheduled to open in late 2009, the
Cancer Hospital will provide North Carolinians with complete clinical cancer care and research facilities in one building. The seven-
story, 320,000-square-foot hospital is being built in front of the N.C. Neurosciences Hospital, just to the east of the building it is to
replace, the N.C. Clinical Cancer Center (also known as the Gravely Building).



NC Civic Education Consortium The Civic Education Consortium works with schools, governments and community organizations
to prepare North Carolina‘s young people to be active, responsible citizens. The consortium has worked alongside Charlotte-
Mecklenburg Schools and local community partners to create a resource notebook and CD-ROM encouraging discussions of
current events and controversial issues. It is currently conducting a student civic profile survey in all Duplin County elementary,
middle and high schools to help principals develop school-improvement plans addressing civic responsibility. The consortium also
administers a small grants program and provides technical assistance to teachers and community leaders across the state.


NC Civic Education Initiative
NC Health Info To assist North Carolinians with their health information needs, the Health Sciences Library developed N.C.
Health Info (www.nchealthinfo.org), a website that provides Internet users with quick and easy access to quality health information.
This summer, N.C. Health Info will be expanded into a health information portal, where North Carolinians of any literacy level may
find health information that is easy-to-read, or presented visually with audio narration. Users will find information about health
insurance, preparedness and public safety, mental health, alternative medicine and wellness, drugs and supplements, lab tests
and diagnostic procedures, educational tools, and news, all with a North Carolina focus. The portal will feature information for
citizen-soldiers and their families, seniors and Spanish speakers. The portal‘s design and development is being led by the Health
Sciences Library and conducted by a multi-institutional group of academic health sciences libraries and public and AHEC libraries
throughout North Carolina.


North Carolina Center for Public Health Preparedness (also ETCD) The North Carolina Center for Public Health Preparedness
is a program of the North Carolina Institute for Public Health, the service and outreach arm of the University of North Carolina's
School of Public Health. The overall mission of NCCPHP is to improve the capacity of the public health workforce to prepare for
and respond to terrorism and other emerging public health threats by: assessing the competency of the public health workforce in
core public health skills and bioterrorism preparedness, facilitating training to meet the assessed needs, and carrying out applied
research on emerging health issues.


North Carolina College Media Association (SOJ)

North Carolina ECHO (Exploring Cultural Heritage Online) is a partnership of the State Library of North Carolina/Department of          x
Cultural Resources and the School of Information and Library Science (SILS) and Academic Affairs Libraries (AAL) at Carolina. NC
ECHO aims to provide deep, wide, and comprehensive access to the holdings of North Carolina‘s cultural institutions. In particular,
SILS and the AAL are supporting the development of mechanisms that allow cultural institutions across the state of North Carolina
to provide digital access to their collections through a single portal. Particular aims are to allow K-12 educators and students to
benefit from these resources even though they may not be physically nearby, and to showcase the cultural heritage of North
Carolina for tourism and economic development purposes.



North Carolina Global Learning Lab - Globalization and the Transformation fo NC's Economy Global outsourcing and the
growing integration of international markets have altered the structure of regional competition around the globe. North Carolina
provides an interesting context to study the processes of industrial restructuring, because the state has simultaneously experienced
a rapid decline in manufacturing sectors and a rapid growth in hightechnology sectors. This project maps these transformations in
key industries and explores the role of public-sector intermediaries in the process. The website summarizes student work in an
economic development course in the Department of City and Regional Planning at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill.
The full papers are also available for download.



North Carolina Innocence Project The School of Journalism and Mass Communication is exploring new ways to contribute to                 x
this effort among top-tier law schools to review and investigate credible claims of innocence by death row inmates. Previously, the
school has offered coursework in investigative journalism, and faculty and students have worked independently to research cases
and pursue leads. This project teaches our students critical reporting skills and honors the most important traditions of journalism:
advocacy and reform.

North Carolina Journalism Hall of Fame to recognize North Carolinians who have contributed to the mass communication
profession. School of Journalism and Mass Communication.

North Carolina Scholastic Media Association is a statewide organization that promotes excellence and responsibility in
scholastic journalism and encourages respect for freedom of the press. NCSMA also promotes professional growth of journalism
teachers and speaks for scholastic media in matters of curriculum and instruction that affect journalism education in North
Carolina. Outreach services related to high school journalism have been part of the School of Journalism and Mass
Communication since 1938. NCSMA currently offers a Scholastic Media Institute in Chapel Hill each summer, regional workshops
co-hosted with universities and newspapers across the state during the fall and spring semesters and a statewide high school
publication contest each spring. One recent example of NCSMA services involved a coordinated response to the State Board of
Education‘s approval of the framework for a new core course of study. The framework included provisions for four-course
endorsements in several extracurricular areas, with the exception of communication-related courses. NCSMA, along with
journalism teachers throughout the state, alerted state board members to the need and viability of adding such a communications
endorsement.
Odum Institute for Research in the Social Sciences Founded in 1924, the H. W. Odum Institute for Research in Social Science
is the nation's oldest multidisciplinary social science university institute. Indeed, we are the oldest institute or center at the nation's
first public university, UNC- Chapel Hill.* The mission of the Odum Institute parallels that of the University as a whole -- teaching,
research, and service -- but the Institute's focus is on the social sciences. The Odum Institute is not part of any one school or
department. Rather it stretches across virtually the entire university community and beyond, touching students, faculty, and staff
from public health, social work, business, government, and the arts and sciences. People come from all corners of the university to
take advantage of the training and courses, consulting services, data, software, and facilities that the Institute offers. The Odum
Institute also has served as an incubator for other centers. The institute started the Center for Urban and Regional Studies in 1957
and launched it as an independent center in 1969. The Center for the Study of the American South began in 1992 as an Odum
Institute initiative and is now an independent Center. We currently serve as the administrative home for the Citizen Soldier Support
Program that was developed in 2005.


Office of Economic and Business Development (OEBD) matches faculty and campus expertise and resources with economic                           x
development issues facing North Carolina and its communities and organizations. This office is led by Jesse White Jr., who
headed the Appalachian Regional Commission and the Southern Growth Policies Board.
During its first year of operations, OEBD worked within the university to develop a network of faculty interested in economic
development work in North Carolina. It also worked on several economic development projects in the state, including Carolina‘s
response to the state‘s successful bid to have Credit Suisse First Boston locate a major facility in the RTP area. At the
announcement ceremony, the company stated that the assets of our universities were a deciding factor in locating in North
Carolina. In addition, OEBD took the leadership role, along with the Friday Center for Continuing Education, in having UNC-Chapel
Hill become an associate of the Hickory Metropolitan Higher Education Council. Carolina can now offer credit, noncredit and
special courses and seminars in the Hickory facility. Another successful project was OEBD‘s role in helping the North Carolina
Rural Economic Development Center secure a Kellogg Foundation grant to create an entrepreneurial support system in rural North
Carolina. A multiyear, multimillion dollar grant, Carolina‘s School of Government will play a significant role in training local officials.
OEBD also continued work in Carteret County begun by the Carolina Center for Competitive Economies by analyzing the marine
sciences cluster there and working with the Economic Development Council of the county.




Office of Technology Development The Office of Technology Development (OTD), in support of the university's mission to
encourage innovation and disseminate knowledge, serves the university and the public by licensing discoveries developed by
faculty, students and staff. OTD also assists faculty in obtaining research support from corporate sponsors. We negotiate and
create agreements, provide patent assistance, and assist in obtaining corporate sponsored research. A complete list of our
services is available.



One Atmosphere Research Program The UNC Ambient Air Research Facility is used to study the chemistry of gaseous air
pollutants. Framed in wood, the structure is lined with transparent Teflon film walls through which ultraviolet, infra-red and natural
light can pass. Located three miles east of Pittsboro, N.C., the structure is the nation‘s largest and the world‘s second largest
outdoor smog chamber. Human lung cells, which are used to represent the lining of the respiratory tract, have been incorporated
into the research conducted there by connecting the chambers to incubators in the adjacent lab via aircarrying glass and Teflon
tubes. Findings from this program have provided North Carolina as well as global audiences with information regarding the
interaction of sunlight with various air pollutants and the combined effect on human lung cells. Throughout the last three decades,
the School‘s contributions to clean air have been substantial. The studies from the One Atmosphere Research Program have
helped the EPA demonstrate how control of hydrocarbon gases might affect ozone and nitrogen dioxide levels in urban areas.
Since 1975, the School‘s researchers have also provided the EPA with data to test mathematical computer models that help the
EPA regulate ozone levels throughout the country.



One North Carolina Naturally: This project focuses on coordinating conservation efforts with a web-based database and decision
support framework for regional-scale conservation and development decisions. One North Carolina Naturally is a comprehensive
statewide conservation plan that involves the public, governmental agencies, private organizations and landowners to maintain
functional ecosystems, biological diversity and working landscapes
through the stewardship of land and water resources. The project is part of a larger effort by the state to conserve and restore the
state‘s natural heritage and sustain a healthy life for all North Carolinians and visitors.
Partnerships for Inclusion, Frank Porter Graham Child Development Institute A program of Frank Porter Graham Child
Development Institute, PFI is a statewide technical assistance project with offices in the western, central and eastern regions of
North Carolina. PFI promotes the inclusion of young children with disabilities, from birth through five, in all aspects of community
life. PFI collaborates with local inter-agency groups to sponsor public forums, specializes in staff development activities that meet
the needs of mixed audiences from different agencies and
provides technical assistance to improve the quality of community services to children and families. Other services include the
North Carolina Early Intervention Library, which contains print and video materials available to parents and professionals.




Pediatric Telemedicine Clinic, School of Medicine Parents whose children need to see medical specialists are taking
advantage of technology that lets them stay in the Wilmington area while being checked out by doctors located hundreds of miles
away.
Telemedicine, a growing trend using the Internet, video conferencing, telephone and other tools to allow for remote visits by
doctors, is increasingly being tapped to improve health care access in rural areas.
In Southeastern North Carolina, doctors are using the equipment to address the statewide shortage in several pediatric
subspecialties, including the physicians who treat children with physical disabilities or lung problems.



Period of Purple Crying: Keeping Babies Safe in North Carolina is a statewide educational program involving UNC-CH Injury
Prevention Center, School of Medicine, School of Journalism and Mass Communication, and Duke University Medical Center.


Pilot study of mental health among Latino immigrants Through Russell Sage and William T. Grant-funded studies, Krista M.
Perreira, an assistant professor in the Department of Public Policy in the College of Arts and Sciences, investigates how
acculturation and migration processes influence the mental health and academic achievement of Latino youth in North Carolina.
She also studies ways to improve the well-being of immigrant youth by improving the understanding of their health, education, and
labor market experiences. She has become a local expert in collecting data from hard-to-reach, Latino immigrant populations.
Through this research, she is actively engaged in 10 schools across five different school systems in the state. In addition, she
works with the N.C. Department of Health and Human Services and many Latino-serving organizations throughout the state to
promote the development of evidence-based health and education interventions.


Playmakers Repertory Company Housed in the UNC Department of Dramatic Art PlayMakers Repertory Company (PRC) is a
professional theater named in 2003 by the Drama League of New York as ―one of the 50 best regional theatres in the country.‖ As
part of its educational mission, PlayMakers offers the Educational Matinee Series, sponsored by GlaxoSmithKline. The
Educational Matinee Series offers weekday performances followed by discussions with the cast members, director, dramaturgs
and technical staff and is attended by middle and secondary school students from throughout North Carolina.
Audience Discussion Wednesdays is a pre-performance discussion series offered to audiences following selected Wednesday
performances throughout the season. Backstage tours, available to groups at no charge by advance reservation, offer an exciting
and informative look behind the scenes at PlayMakers. PlayMakers dedicates one performance per production dedicated to
ensuring that people with disabilities have equal access to the arts by employing: sign language interpretation for patrons who are
hard of hearing or deaf; assisted listening devices for patrons with partial hearing loss; audio description, Braille playbills, large print
playbills, and a tactile tour for patrons with impaired vision; and wheelchair access. The theater also offers Community Nights
discounts on Tuesdays, when general admission tickets are just $10.




Practica/community-based courses in the professional schools Virtually every professional school requires students to
complete community practica or take community-based courses. For instance, in the School of Public Health, all master‘s students
in health behavior and health education are required to take ―Action-Oriented Community Diagnosis.‖ Using concepts and methods
from anthropology and epidemiology, this powerful service-learning course teaches students to conduct community-based
research. Over the last 25 years, more than 1,000 students have worked with over 262 communities. For example, a recent group
of students on one team, ¡Accion Latina!, interviewed community members and developed a plan to address identified problems
with health, education, employment and transportation. Such projects provide valuable information to community members who
can then develop informed plans.
Preventing child obesity and diabetes (School of Nursing) A School of Nursing-based research team began a three-year
intervention in January 2007 to reduce risk for type 2 diabetes among middle school students in rural North Carolina. Researchers
will study students at six North Carolina middle schools to determine if changes in schools can lower risk factors for type 2
diabetes. The study is part of the nationwide HEALTHY study sponsored by the National Institutes of Health. The research team
provides intervention schools with new physical activity equipment and with lesson plans to increase aerobic activity in physical
education classes. School cafeterias offer more nutritious food options along with a marketing campaign encouraging students to
select healthier choices. Schools also restrict choices made in vending machines. The intervention includes health education for
families and classroom-based education interventions for students. Given the rising prevalence of high weight and high glucose
among our children in North Carolina and across the United States, there is a critical need now to intervene and change behaviors
to prevent young people from developing diabetes or cardiovascular disease.



Program in the Humanities and Human Values in the College of Arts and Sciences sponsors continuing education seminars to
help business executives, public leaders, humanities scholars and teachers explore and respond to emerging issues and
challenges. For example, the Warren A. Nord Executive Seminar for Teachers set for July 2007 is designed to enhance teachers‘
understanding of religion in history and literature over the past century and to help them in their efforts to present religion and
religious themes to students in ways that are constitutionally permissible and pedagogically sound. In addition, the Roger and May
BellePenn Jones Executive Seminar set for May 2007 will encourage
executives, public leaders and humanities scholars to explore the nature and meaning of a successful life.


Program on Public Life (Center for the Study of the American Self/School of Journalism) North Carolina policy research
These projects include publication of white papers under the title Carolina Context, circulated to about 700 people, including all
legislators; dinner discussions among UNC faculty and state legislators; working roundtables on state issues, such as a session on
high school reform, conducted in collaboration with the Office of the Governor, that led to the high-school innovations fund, a
session on the ―coastalization‘‘ phenomenon in collaboration with the Department of Environment and Natural Resources and a
four-semester series of seminars on North Carolina economic development, co-sponsored with the UNC Office of Business and
Economic Development.


Program on Public Life (Center for the Study of the American Self/School of Journalism) Research on electoral trends
With a website and a newsletter titled SouthNow, the program publishes reports on regional trends. It tracks North Carolina trends
in a publication called NC DataNet. In 2000, the program served as a ―state partner‘‘ to the national Alliance for Better Campaigns
in monitoring local television coverage of the governor‘s race and other elections in North Carolina. In connection with this initiative,
Capitol Broadcasting Company took the lead among broadcasters in offering free-time messages from major-party statewide
candidates.


Program on Public Life (Center for the Study of the American Self/School of Journalism) Southern leadership The
program initiated and has cosponsored eight annual Leadership Seminars for Southern Legislators on the Chapel Hill campus,
attracting more than 120 lawmakers from 10 states. The program has conducted 18 Southern Journalists Roundtables, with a
combined participation of more than 200 from across the region and Washington D.C. It has brought to campus two major
conferences: the 1998 forum, ―Journalism and American Federalism,‘‘ jointly conducted with the Washington-based Project for
Excellence in Journalism, and the 2005

Program on Public Life (Center for the Study of the American Self/School of Journalism) This program, which is part of the
Center for the Study of the American South and has its offices within the School of Journalism and Mass Communication, works to
enable Carolina to serve the people of the state and region by informing the public agenda and nurturing leadership. The Program
acts as a ―research brokerage‘‘ in linking intellectual resources to elected officials and civic leaders, and thus contributing to
improving representative democracy in North Carolina and the South. There are three major functional components of the program:



Project for Historical Education (PHE) Currently in its 10th year, the PHE in the Department of History sponsors regular
workshops for N.C. teachers. The PHE was founded in 1991 by UNC history professors Leon Fink and Lloyd Kramer as part of a
conference on ―How We Learn History.‖ Funded by the Z. Smith Reynolds Foundation, the Arts and Sciences Foundation and the
N.C. Humanities Council, PHE sponsors day-long seminars for North Carolina social studies teachers on four Saturdays each
academic year. The seminars, typically led by UNC faculty members with assistance from teachers, present recent developments
in historical research, as well as practical strategies for integrating those developments into middle school and high school lesson
plans. PHE has also published a book of essays on historical education in the United States, ―Learning History in America:
Schools, Cultures and Politics,‖ edited by Lloyd Kramer, Donald Reid, and William L. Barney (Minneapolis: University of Minnesota
Press, 1994).


Project U~Stars, Frank Porter Graham Child Development Institute The project works with 49 schools in the state to help
kindergarten through third grade teachers recognize outstanding potential in their students.
Psychiatric Mental Health Nurse Practitioners (PMH-NP) The School of Nursing has opened a master‘s program and post-
master‘s certificate program (the first and only in the state) to prepare psychiatric mental health nurse practitioners. These
advanced-practice nurses will provide ―one-stop‖ diagnostic assessment, crisis intervention, psychotherapy, community
intervention and medication prescription and management in medically underserved areas throughout North Carolina. The School
of Nursing created this executive/distance curriculum with funding from a three-year grant from the federal Health Services
Research Administration (HRSA )and a partnership with the Graduate School and the Department of Mental Health, Developmental
Disabilities and Substance Abuse Services. The program recruits students who come from minority and disadvantaged
backgrounds and prepares them as PMH-CNS/NPs to remain in and serve their own communities after graduation. (This
commitment is a condition for funding of the students‘ tuition.) The first 12 students will graduate in 2007-2008; 10 of the 12 are
students of ethnic minority origin. Enrollment in the program will exceed 40 students in fall 2007. These graduates will make a
positive contribution to transforming the North Carolina mental health system. What happens here in North Carolina may become
the model for competent and compassionate mental health care for the nation.



Public Executive Leadership Academy This training program offered by the School of Government provides managers,
assistants and department heads with an opportunity to learn more about themselves as leaders and to acquire skill sets to lead
and manage change in their communities. Similar to the definition of public engagement, participants of this training program
discuss community issues and challenges, create frameworks for working with stakeholders and develop tools to diagnose
problems and create solutions.


Public Policy Practicum In this capstone course in the Department of Public Policy in the College of Arts and Sciences, students
majoring in public policy offer policy analyses and evaluations to North Carolina nonprofit agencies. As of 2000, North Carolina
had more than 29,000 nonprofit organizations that employed more than 15.9 million people he aims of these agencies include
improving economic equity, reducing institutionalized racism, increasing access to health and governmental services and generally
improving the choices facing women, immigrants and the poor. The leaders of these groups, however, don‘t always have the skills
they need to deliver these services in the best and most efficient way. The students in this class give nonprofits free advice on how
to meet their goals. For example, students in this course have provided an analysis to help determine the best way for a community
health center to deliver low-cost primary care to those just slightly out of range of Medicaid. Another project looked at a way to
improve the nutritional choices of those living in public housing.



Renaissance Computing Institute (RENCI) Founded in 2004, RENCI is a major collaborative venture of UNC-Chapel Hill, Duke
University, N.C. State University and the state of North Carolina that uses sophisticated, high-performance computing resources
and expertise, primarily to help the state plan for and respond to disasters. Hurricanes and the floods and tornadoes that come in
their wake take a huge personal and economic toll on North Carolina. Between 1980 and 2005, the state endured more than 20
weather-related disasters that caused at least $1 billion in damage, according to NOAA‘s National Climate Data Center.
The RENCI approach to modeling, predicting and responding to hurricanes, severe storms and flooding is multifaceted:



RENCI, Carolina Floodplain Mapping Program, at the request of the state of North Carolina Floodplain Mapping Program with
funding from the Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) , is modernizing the floodplain maps by computing a series of
worst-case scenario flood models for coastal North Carolina using Ocracoke, RENCI‘s IBM Blue Gene/L supercomputer. Over
500,000 Ocracoke computing hours will be needed to complete the research. The new floodplain models will replace outdated,
lower resolution models that do not account for extensive coastal elevation and land use datasets developed over the last seven
years. Better representation of the physical world will also account for the rapid growth over the last 15 years of housing,
commercial and tourist developments. The new models will provide federal and state emergency response agencies with a more
accurate, reliable and available source of floodplain information. For homeowners, the new models will reveal much information
about their year-to-year flood risks, including the likelihood of experiencing a 100-year, or base, flood in any given year. The 100-
year flood is a regulatory standard used by federal agencies and most states to administer floodplain management programs. The
100-year flood is also used by the National Flood Insurance Program as the basis for insurance requirements nationwide.



RENCI, Forecasting flash floods and landslides in real time RENCI and researchers in the Department of Geography in the College
of Arts and Sciences are developing an advanced information and modeling system designed to forecast flash flooding and
landslides in North Carolina. The work interfaces with state and county emergency services personnel in a test area of Macon
County.


RENCI, HydroMet RENCI developed this new storm modeling and forecasting system that merges atmospheric and hydrology data
with coastal storm surge data to produce models with nine times the resolution of typical weather forecasts HyrdroMet models will
run daily on RENCI‘s IBM BlueGene supercomputer beginning in June 2007, giving communities and emergency response teams
the accurate data needed to implement better and more cost-effective evacuation and emergency response plans.
RENCI, Institute for Marine Sciences, NC-FIRST targets first responders and aims to help them interpret and easily access
weather data so they can make better decisions during weather emergencies. It includes two components: classroom training on
interpreting weather data and a weather data Web portal. NC-FIRST classroom training helps first responders understand
scientific weather data ranging from satellite and radar images to text forecasts and new National Weather Service products. The
NC-FIRST Weather Data Portal pulls together a wide range of weather data into an easy-to-use Web environment. Designed for
North Carolina emergency personnel, the weather portal tailors its information to the user‘s county, providing an accurate, real-time
picture of local weather conditions. The NC-FIRST tropical storm training modules were introduced in the summer of 2007. Last
December, RENCI unveiled modules designed to help emergency managers handle winter weather emergencies. Hundreds of
emergency management personnel in counties across North Carolina have been trained in using the portal.



RENCI, Outpatient Health Maintenance System (OHMS), a device designed to decrease emergency room visits by people with
asthma and other acute respiratory diseases. RENCI is working with the UNC School of Medicine to develop a wireless device that
measures a patient‘s daily respiratory health as well as environmental factors (e.g., airborne particulates, pollution, humidity and
temperature). The device will encrypt and relay that information daily to the patient‘s physician, giving both doctor and patient a
long-range, holistic picture of the patient‘s health. As conditions change, doctor and patient will be able to work together, noting
how environmental factors correlate with respiratory distress and adjusting medications and lifestyle to better manage the patient‘s
health. For those in remote areas without easy access to medical care, for an aging population with more health issues and
reduced mobility, and for those without quality health insurance who often depend on emergency rooms, OHMS potentially offers a
way for people to take more control of their health without straining the budget and without the need for face-to-face doctor visits. A
pilot study to test the device will begin this summer. If successful, the device could improve the quality of life for asthma patients
and those with other chronic conditions, such as diabetes and heart disease. Our healthcare system also would benefit from
OHMS: emergency room visits are the most costly type of healthcare and roughly 75 percent of U.S. healthcare costs are related
to chronic diseases.



RENCI, Prototyping experimental systems for use in disasters When storms disrupt the power and transportation infrastructure,
emergency communications and information gathering are affected, too. RENCI‘s experimental disaster response vehicle (EDRV)
includes a wireless network and sensing package activated via a retractable helium balloon and a remote-controlled helicopter for
search and rescue and damage assessment. Working together, these devices will be used to determine how to best establish an
emergency communications network, acquire video from impacted areas, drop remote sensors and gather sensor data.



Research Enrichment and Apprenticeship Program (REAP) led by the School of Nursing, creates mentoring partnerships                        x
between faculty researchers and nursing students who are members of a racial/ethnic minority group. The program includes
faculty mentors and students from North Carolina Central University, Winston-Salem State University, and UNC-Chapel Hill. With
funding from the National Institute of Nursing Research, NIH, the program has been able to pay students $10 – $12/hour to work
up to 172 hours on the mentors research project and to pay for them to attend and present at a national conference. Ten students
participate each year. Students also attend seven 2-hour seminars and conduct an individual research project. The NIH funding will
end June 2008. We aim to continue the program, because it has been so well received by students and faculty, and to increase
the number racial/ethnic minority students in master's and doctoral level education in nursing and working toward careers in
nursing research.


Research Laboratories of Archaeology The Research Laboratories of Archaeology has a long track record of engagement.                      x
This record includes active programs of K-12 outreach, promoting economic development through heritage tourism, and
maintaining the North Carolina Archaeological Collection (the state's oldest and most important archaeological archive). Many of
these initiatives focus on rural and underserved communities, and contribute directly to the goals outlined in sections 4.3 (Public
Education) and 4.4 (Communities and Economic Transformation) of the UNC Tomorrow Commission's Final Report.


Research Laboratories of Archaeology, Trail of Tears National Historic Trail We conducted an inventory for the National                   x
Park Service to support expansion of the Trail of Tears National Historic Trail into NC; prepared National Register of Historic
Places nominhations for eight Trail of Tears sites in Western North Carolina; prepared permanent Trail of Tears exhibit for the
Cherokee County Historical Museum (Murphy, NC); developed 18 outdoor public exhibits in the Trail of Tears for cherokee,
Graham, Macon, Clay, Swain, and Jackson Counties.

Research Laboratories of Archaeology, Cherokee Pottery Revitalization Project With the Museum of the Cherokee Indian, we                  x
organized a workshop for Cherokee potters, which reintroduced traditional pottery styles (based on items in the N.C.
Archaeological Collection) and led to the founding of the Cherokee Potters Guild.
Research Laboratories of Archaeology Preserving North Carolina’s Archaeological Heritage                                                  x
N.C. Archaeological Collection. As a service to the state, we maintain the pre-eminent repository for
archaeological collections from North Carolina. This is the archive on which most of our knowledge of
the state‘s ancient history is based. The collection contains over 7 million artifacts from more than 7,000
sites, which go back some 12,000 years.

Research Laboratories of Archaeology Occaneechi Village Replication Project We provided technical assistance to the                       x
occaneechi Band of Saponi Nation in replicating their ancestral villages at Hillsborough and Pleasant Grove, NC; we annually
assist the tribe with its Occaneechi School Days educational program for children.

Research Laboratories of Archaeology Town Creek Indian Mound (State Historic Site). The RLA conducted excavations at                      x
Town Creek for 50 years and was instrumental in developing this locality into a state historic site; we curate all artifact collections
from the site, advise on site interpretation, and regularly offer public programs there.


Research Laboratories of Archaeology Cherokee Ancient Village We are providing technical assistance to the Cherokee                       x
Nation of Oklahoma for the reconstruction of a traditional village at the Cherokee Heritage Center, Park Hill, Oklahoma.



School of Law Pro Bono Program Since its inception in 1997, the Pro Bono Program has filled hundreds of placements with
attorneys in nonprofit organizations, private practice, and North Carolina‘s legal services organizations. The program matches law
students with practicing attorneys across the state to work on cases that the attorneys have taken for free or on reduced rates,
providing clients with high quality, low cost legal representation. Additionally, working on pro bono projects gives students valuable
hands-on experience while encouraging attorneys to take on cases that they might not otherwise have the resources to do. For
example, every year since Hurricane Katrina, students from the Pro Bono Program have journeyed to the Gulf Coast during their
spring break to assist with legal matters arising as a result of the storm.



School of Social Work Distance Education Programs The School of Social Work operates four distance education programs
across the state: one each at UNC-Asheville and at N.C. Central University in Durham, and two at the Forsyth County Department
of Social Services (Winston-Salem Distance Education Advanced Standing Program for BSW students and the traditional three-
year Distance Education Program). The distance education programs recruit students who are employed in human services, are
second career students, are parents returning to the work force, or are unable to engage in full-time study.



Science Education Initiative at Clara J. Peck Elementary School Science teachers and students at this predominantly African-
American and low-income Greensboro elementary school were able to benefit from a dozen hands-on lessons taught by Cheryl
Horton, clinical assistant professor of science education in the School of Education. Among other concepts, she taught fourth
graders about electricity by building circuits from wire, light bulbs and batteries. They also learned about magnetism by observing
magnets bouncing up and down as they repelled each other. The idea for the collaboration was inspired by a visit to the school on
a Tar Heel Bus Tour.

Sonja Haynes Stone Center for Black Culture and History The Sonja Haynes Stone Center for Black Culture and History
opened in 2004, becoming one of the few such facilities nationwide combining cultural programs, research, community service,
teaching and learning under one roof. Funded by private donations, the Stone Center contains classrooms, a 10,000-volume
library, seminar rooms, an art gallery, dance studio and spaces for performances, lectures, meetings and offices.


Southeastern Regional Center for Excellence in Civilian Biodefense (SERCEB) A consortium of investigators from six
regional universities has been chosen to be part of a new biodefense initiative that will work to develop the next generation of
vaccines, drugs and diagnostic tests against emerging infections such as SARS, and for defense against organisms such as
smallpox that might be used in bioterrorist attacks.
The Southeast Regional Center of Excellence for Emerging Infections and Biodefense (SERCEB) will include researchers from
Duke University Medical Center, Emory University, University of Alabama at Birmingham, University of Florida, University of North
Carolina at Chapel Hill School of Medicine, and Vanderbilt University Medical Center. The consortium will be centered at Duke and
led by Barton Haynes, M.D., of the Duke Human Vaccine Institute. Its co-leaders are David Stephens, M.D., Emory University;
Richard Whitley, M.D., UAB; Richard Moyer, Ph.D., University of Florida; Frederick Sparling, M.D., University of North Carolina at
Chapel Hill School of Medicine; and Mark Denison, M.D., Vanderbilt University Medical Center.
Southern Historical Collection, Southern Folklife Collection in the Manuscripts Department at Wilson Library The
Manuscripts Department, housed at the Wilson Library, includes these two collections. The Southern Historical Collection is a vast
collection of distinct archival holdings comprised of unique primary documents,
such as diaries, letters, photographs, maps and oral histories. It offers documentation of all periods of Southern history since the
late 18th century. The Southern Folklife Collection (SFC) ranks as one of the nation‘s foremost archival resources for the study of
American folk music and popular culture. SFC‘s holdings document all forms of Southern musical and oral traditions across the
entire spectrum of individual and community expressive arts, as well as mainstream media production.

Southern Oral History Program SOHP, a program of the Center for the Study of the American South, seeks to foster a critical,
yet democratic understanding of the South — its history, culture, problems, and prospects. SOHP has a collection of more than
2,900 interviews with men and women from all walks of life, and maintains an active research and teaching program. The tapes,
videos and transcripts are preserved in the University‘s Southern Historical Collection. SOHP has an ambitious outreach arm,
sharing research and expertise with a wide audience. Students and staff teach oral history workshops and consult throughout the
state. Web site: www.sohp.org/index.html


Spin-off Companies Spin-off companies Faculty discoveries and innovations have resulted in the creation of 32 UNC spin-off
companies since 2000 (36 since the office opened in 1995) and jobs for North Carolinians. For example, an experimental anti-HIV
drug being developed by Panacos Pharmaceuticals has successfully completed Phase II clinical trials. The drug was developed by
Carolina researcher Kuo-Hsiung Lee, a professor of natural products in the School of Pharmacy. Its central compound was
discovered in an herb grown in Taiwan but is also found in the bark of birch trees across North America. Other examples of
commercialization leading to spin-offs include therapeutic agents for Parkinson‘s Disease, technologies for drug delivery to treat
cancer, industrial applications for carbon nanotubes and gene therapy treatment for diseases like muscular dystrophy. Inspire
Pharmaceuticals is UNC‘s most successful spin-off. Inspire began operations in 1995 and is recognized as a leader in discoveries
potentially crucial in treating diseases that involve deficiencies in the body‘s ability to protect lungs, eyes, sinuses and other
mucosal surfaces. Inspire has discovered and developed potential drug candidates for treating dry eye, cystic fibrosis, retinal
disease and other medical conditions. Scientists at UNC and the UNC start-up company Xintek Inc. invented a new X-ray device
based on carbon nanotubes that emits a scanning X-ray beam composed of multiple smaller beams while also remaining
stationary. This technology can also lead to smaller and faster X-ray imaging systems for airport baggage screening and for
tomographic medical imaging such as CT (computed tomography) scanners. Incubated by the Carolina Entrepreneurial Initiative
and launched in 2004, the UNC spin-off company Liquidia Technologies Inc., has made important breakthroughs with numerous
applications. One discovery a liquid molding material that cures when exposed to light that has applications for computer chips, ink
jets, medical devices and pharmaceutical products. Another breakthrough was a method for creating the world's tiniest custom-
shaped manufactured particles for delivering drugs and biological materials into the human body. Liquidia's technology is the first-
ever method to create organic nanoscale particles in any shape, size or composition. A joint project of UNC-Chapel Hill and East
Carolina University, Hemocellular Therapeutics focuses on developing hemostatic agents to control active bleeding (hemorrhages),
an area where no functional therapeutic agent exists.



SPIRE (Seeding Postdoctoral Innovators in Research and Education) is an NIH-funded postdoctoral program at the Graduate
School that is designed to help young scientists who wish to pursue careers as academic science researchers and educators. By
combining research training with professional development at Carolina and hands-on teaching at one of eight minority-serving
universities (MSUs) in the state, SPIRE is helping science scholars succeed in academic careers, bringing engaging teaching
methods into the classroom of North Carolina minority institutions and increasing diversity in science professions. . SPIRE fellows
serve as outstanding role models for future young scientists and are contributing to the changing infrastructure at North Carolina
minority serving universities. Through SPIRE, students from the MSUs have participated in numerous professional development
activities at Carolina, including research internships and networking with renowned science educators. Faculty members at the
partner MSUs have adopted new teaching strategies and technologies brought to campus by SPIRE fellows and students have
provided extremely positive feedback in their teaching evaluations. Of the 28 fellows who have exited the program so far, 19 went
into tenure track faculty positions and six of these are at MSUs in North Carolina




Stimulation Technologies for Military Training: The Departmentof Computer Science, in the College of Arts and Sciences,
hasan ongoing project with the U.S. Army to use improved simulationtechnologies for military training. The underlying
technologiesare also applicable to emergency response. Two faculty members,Ming Lin and Dinesh Manocha, head the ongoing
project. Theyhave applied for an appropriation to broaden their current researchand establish a center focusing on experiential
technologies forurban warfare and disaster response. This new center would include additional faculty from applied mathematics
and The RenaissanceComputing Institute.
Strong Couples - Strong Children is a community-based community intervention program whose aim is to strengthen couple
and co-parenting relationships among at-risk, low-income, unmarried, expectant or new parents in Durham, NC. The project is a
partnership between the UNC-Chapel Hill School of Social Work, the Durham County Health Department, and the Durham County
Cooperative Extension Service. Interventions consist of: (1) Family-care coordination (wrap around services); (2) A relationship
skill-building curriculum; and (3) Fatherhood support services. This program seeks to address the high rate of couple dissolution
following their baby's birth by helping couples to acquire communication and problem-solving skills as well as social assest
associated with healthy couple and parenting relationships.



Student Coalition for Action in Literacy Education (SCALE) SCALE was founded in the fall of 1989 when two UNC-Chapel Hill                x
undergraduate tutors joined together to mobilize and support college students who wanted to address the literacy needs of this
country. Today, SCALE sponsors Read. Write. Act., the annual and only national conference specifically for campus-based literacy
programs and their community partners. SCALE promotes National Literacy Action Week, the first week of February, in order to
increase awareness of this country‘s literacy needs and to highlight the crucial role of college students in the literacy movement.
Current SCALE programs include America Reads, the North Carolina LiteracyCorps, Collaborative Leadership for Community
Literacy, and Project SHINE. In addition, SCALE offers a comprehensive Resource Library, a useful Toolkit including training
workshop agendas and on-line trainings, and technical assistance for programs around the country.




Student Environmental Action Coalition Begun at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill in 1988, SEAC
is the nation‘s largest student-run environmental organization and focuses on improving Carolina‘s relationship with the
environment through activism. SEAC conducts yearly campaigns that tackle issues related to community development,
deforestation, corporate accountability and campus sustainability. Recent SEAC projects include promoting use of biodiesel on the
Point-To-Point Shuttle; installing solar panels on Morrison Residence Hall; lobbying for local food in the dining halls; and a leading
campaign to improve retailer Victoria‘s Secret‘s paper policy. SEAC‘s spring 2007 focus was
to ensure passage of the N.C. Renewable Energy Portfolio Standard bills through student call-ins and a lobbying day around Earth
Day. Web site: studentorgs.unc.edu/seac


Student Health Action Coalition (SCALE) SCALE was founded in the fall of 1989 when two UNC-Chapel Hill undergraduate
tutors joined together to mobilize and support college students who wanted to address the literacy needs of this country. Today,
SCALE sponsors Read. Write. Act., the annual and only national conference specifically for campus-based literacy programs and
their community partners. SCALE promotes National Literacy Action Week, the first week of February, in order to increase
awareness of this country‘s literacy needs and to highlight the crucial role of college students in the literacy movement. Current
SCALE programs include America Reads, the North Carolina LiteracyCorps, Collaborative Leadership for Community Literacy,
and Project SHINE. In addition, SCALE offers a comprehensive Resource Library, a useful Toolkit including training workshop
agendas and on-line trainings, and technical assistance for programs around the country.



Student Poverty Reduction Outreach (SPROUT) Members of this student organization work with Volunteer Income Tax
Assistance (VITA) sites throughout Orange County to help low- to moderate-income citizens maximize their tax refunds and boost
their incomes. The group‘s assistance focuses on the Earned Income Tax Credit, a provision that returns up to $4,000 in tax
refunds to working families who earn below a certain income. This organization helps create constructive ties between the
University and the community and serves to raise student awareness about the plight of
the working poor in the Orange County area and beyond. Web site: studentorgs.unc.edu/sprout



Student Teams Achieving Results (STAR) at Kenan-Flagler MBA student teams at Kenan-Flagler Business School consult with
and assist North Carolina businesses free of charge in return for the opportunity to learn from experienced business leaders about
real-world business challenges. Companies served cannot afford the services of professional strategists and it reinforces students‘
commitment to public service. Through statewide solicitation of proposals using multiple means of identification (e.g., networks,
business service organizations, databases), projects are selected that can provide benefit to the company, are good learning
opportunities for students, and that can be completed in an academic year. The goal is to help struggling North Carolina companies
identify the path to sustainability and growth, keeping and growing jobs for North Carolina citizens.
Tar Heel Bus Tour Each spring, the Tar Heel Bus Tour takes new faculty and administrators on a five-day trip across the state to             x
learn what it means to be a true Tar Heel. The privately funded tour, which marks its 10th anniversary in 2007, shows newcomers
the state in which 82 percent of the university‘s undergraduates grow up and how outreach efforts serve North Carolinians. Faculty
members see how their own interests align with the state‘s needs. The annual Tar Heel Bus Tour also allows an opportunity for
faculty and administrators to hear from community members about their perceptions of UNC‘s engagement with the state. Since it
began in1997, almost 300 faculty members and senior administrators have participated in the annual experience, visiting a wide
array of communities where UNC faculty are working in partnership to address community issues.
Two examples of outcomes of the tour are a service-learning course at the School of Government that places students in
communities visited, and a small grants program opportunity for participants offered each year by the Carolina Center for Public
Service. After visiting Peck Elementary School in Greensboro, the 2005 Bus Tour participants met with the principal and faculty to
identify priority issues. As a result, they used the grant money to develop science education and tutoring programs for the school
and held a series of grant writing work shops for teachers.



Task Force for a Healthier North Carolina UNC has partnered with the state‘s Health and Wellness Trust Fund (HWTF)
Commission to create a task force to examine barriers that limit access to health insurance and offer policy recommendations to
overcome the barriers. Medicare Part D is the first topic the task force will tackle. Other topics, which will also receive public
forums, are ―Children, Working Families and S-CHIP‖ and ―Small Business and Employer-Sponsored Health Insurance.‖ The task
force will explore strategies to improve access to group health insurance for small-businesses (with 50 or fewer employees) and
limit financial exposure for the underinsured.


Teen Media Health Project This five-year project was funded by the National Institute of Child Health and Human Development
and is housed in the School of Journalism and Mass Communication. The team examined the effects of a range of media –
television, music, movies, magazines, Internet and newspapers – on adolescents‘ sexual health through surveys of more than
3,200 North Carolina teens about media consumption and health behaviors, and content analysis of the most popular movies,
television shows, music lyrics, magazines, newspapers and websites to measure the amount and kind of sexual content in each.


Tri-County Family Dental Center The School of Dentistry has a long-standing relationship with Tri-County Community Health
Council Inc., which began 30 years ago as a part-time health program for the Sampson County migrant farm worker community
and has grown to encompass five community health centers. The School has worked with Tri-County leadership in advising on
every step in creating the 18-chair dental clinic. Starting in fall 2007, the school will send two general dentistry residents to the new
dental center to provide oral health care as a part of a pilot program. UNC-Chapel Hill regularly sends dental students on rotations
to Tri-County to help provide care for patients. The Tri-County pilot residency will extend the dental clinic‘s ability to provide patient
treatment and give the school‘s students greater insight into effective oral health care delivery in underserved areas (Tri-County
serves five counties in rural southeastern North Carolina), knowledge they will bring back to the School and take into their careers.



UNC Dentistry in Service to Communities Education, Service and Workforce Development: In 2002, the UNC School of
Dentistry received a $1.3 million grant from the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation initiative, ―Pipeline, Profession & Practice:
Community- Based Dental Education.‖ The Carolina project has made changes in clinical education at community sites in
underserved settings; in the School of Dentistry‘s curriculum in culture, communication and
social science; and in minority and disadvantaged student recruitment. During this period, additional funding from the W.K. Kellogg
Foundation has allowed the University to increase scholarship availability and provide laptop computers to a selected group of
students entering dental school. Web site: http://www.dent.unc.edu/



UNC Libraries, UNC’s World View International Program for Educators, the library educates teachers and administrators
throughout the state on relevant UNC library services and resources. Last August, the library hosted the follow-up meeting for the
2006 trip to China and created the ―Bringing China into the Classroom‖ website for teachers.

UNC-Chapel Hill Air Force ROTC The Department of Aerospace Studies administers the United States Air Force Reserve Officer
Training Corps (AFROTC) Program, which has been an integral part of the University‘s tradition of scholarship, excellence and
achievement since 1947. As the University continues its pursuit of excellence as the nation‘s oldest state liberal arts university, Air
Force ROTC continues to develop outstanding officers who will serve the nation. Air Force ROTC offers both undergraduate and
graduate students many opportunities, including specialized academics, scholarships and financial assistance, applied professional
training, job placement and a variety of extracurricular activities. Air Force ROTC is more than a department in the College of Arts
and Sciences. It is also a professional organization designed to provide students with growth and development opportunities
beyond the classroom.
UNC-Chapel Hill Army ROTC The Army Reserve Officers‘ Training Corps (ROTC) was established at the University in September
1996. It is designed to provide a course of military instruction that will permit qualified students to prepare themselves for
commissions as second lieutenants while they pursue other academic courses leading to baccalaureate or advanced degrees from
the University. Upon being commissioned as a second lieutenant, each student has the opportunity to serve in the active Army,
Army Reserve, or National Guard in one of 17 career fields. Each year, Carolina‘s Army ROTC awards two-, three- and four-year
meritbased scholarships to qualified individuals on a rolling basis. Scholarships, valued up to $19,000 per year, include tuition and
fees, books and a monthly stipend.


Volunteer Income Tax Assistance (VITA) The Master of Accounting Student Association (MACSA) at the Kenan-Flagler
Business School sponsors this program as its major philanthropy project each year. The focus of this project is to provide free tax
assistance to low income Carolina employees, graduate students and low-income residents of the Chapel Hill/Carrboro community.
 This project supports the Chancellor‘s 2003 request that UNC departments and organizations provide aid to its low-income staff.
The free income tax assistance program contributes to the spirit of this request; provides a much needed service to this NC
population; and generates goodwill throughout the community at large. Approximately 40 to 50 percent of the Master of Accounting
students (40 to 60 students) participate in this project year, supervised by members of the school‘s accounting faculty. For the
spring of 2007, the community service hours of the accounting students for this project totaled approximately 250, serving 42
clients. To inform potential users of this service, the MAC program advertises in the Daily Tar Heel and UNC employee
newspaper; and produces flyers that are inserted in the pay checks of low-income employees and sent to student organization
leaders and university departments.



White Paper on “Transitioning Economy: Will the Biotechnology Bet Pay Off?” Center for Community Capitalism The
white paper was prepared in 2005 by MBA students David Lamore, Alvaro Ramos, Sabrina Washington and Vyada Vongphachanh
for a Sustainable Enterprise Course taught by professors Albert Segars and James Johnson. The paper explores whether building
a new economy around the biotechnology cluster rooted
in the Research Triangle Park (RTP) is a strategic alternative for the large workforce that was formerly employed in the tobacco
industry. They conclude that biotech is an effective strategy for job and wealth creation in the long term, but that commercial
biomanufacturing and the creation of lower-skilled jobs may not come to fruition in the desired short term. The paper recommends
a more holistic approach, including the use of several concurrent strategies in conjunction with the biotech strategy to provide short-
 and medium-term solutions. It also recommends a more focused disbursement
of Golden LEAF grants.



The William and Ida Friday Center for Continuing Education offers a wide range of educational programs and services that                  x
substantially broaden the population of persons throughout the state that the University is able to serve. The Friday Center‘s
programs and services fall into three main categories: a conference center for educational functions conducted by university
departments and other organizations, noncredit educational activities for professional development and personal enrichment, and a
range of flexible learning opportunities for part-time students to earn academic credit. The Friday Center also administers an
inmate education program, providing on-site study and correspondence instruction to incarcerated learners throughout North
Carolina. In fiscal year 05-06, the Friday Center for Continuing education offered 2,284 courses and events to 45,708 North
Carolina residents representing 58 of North Carolina‘s counties, 3,986 individuals from 19 other states and 1,226 individuals from
five other countries. In this fiscal year, the Friday Center served a total of 100,734 individuals. Here are some Friday Center
programs of note:


The William and Ida Friday Center for Continuing Education, Correctional Education In a state with one of the nation‘s
highest per capita rates of incarceration, the Friday Center‘s Correctional Education Program (CEP) has for 35 years coordinated a
program through which academic credit courses and educational services have been provided to qualified inmates throughout the
North Carolina correctional system; the program has been supported through contracts with the N.C. Department of Correction for
the past 30 years. Based on clear evidence that individuals who earn college credits while incarcerated are least likely to return to
prison and most likely to become contributing citizens, the CEP administers an informal consortium of eight University of North
Carolina institutions through which a total of 70 on-site classroom courses, including some utilizing the North Carolina Information
Highway, are offered annually to approximately 1,000 students at 23 correctional facilities.
The William and Ida Friday Center for Continuing Education, Friday Center Online Programs Tracing its origins to
correspondence courses begun in 1913, the Self-paced Courses program offers both correspondence and online courses. Carolina
Courses Online, begun in 1997, offers courses on a semester schedule, with class discussions and other communication taking
place online. Each year more than 2,000 students enroll in one of the approximately 150 courses offered through Self-Paced
Courses, and more than 3,500 students enroll in one of the approximately 200 courses offered through Carolina Courses Online.
Through these two distance education programs, the University is able to serve a variety of individuals with special needs,
including students who are home-bound, who have families and full-time jobs, who are recovering from health problems, who are
away from campus to complete an internship, or who are incarcerated.



The William and Ida Friday Center for Continuing Education, Carolina Business Institute Now in its 15th year, with more than
750 graduates, CBI is a noncredit professional development program offered on an intensive schedule in the summer that
introduces the world of business to non-business majors who are recent college graduates or soon-to-be graduates. The program
is offered by the Friday Center in cooperation with the Kenan-Flagler Business School. Taught by a mixture of faculty and
graduates of Kenan-Flagler, CBI blends theory with applied business skills, and offers an integrated program that includes classes
in marketing, accounting, management and organization, finance and operations management. Students work through a sequence
of lectures and case studies based on real business situations and experience a computer-based management simulation.
Working in teams, students manage their own businesses through a hands-on approach, in competition with other teams.



Wilson 20/20 The purpose of this community-wide planning process is to involve a broad cross-section of the community in
identifying and coming to consensus on an overarching realistic vision for the future of the greater Wilson community. The
management committee of this effort selected the School of Government to provide consulting services for the planning process.
Faculty and staff at the School of Government are providing direct support in building the infrastructure, gathering information, and
planning the visioning summit and writing the final report.


Workforce Issues in Library and Information Science (WILIS) The changes in the demographic composition of the workforce
being created by the aging of the baby boomers is expected to create shortages of librarians and information industry workers in
North Carolina. In order to gain a better understanding of what happens to graduates of the six LIS programs in the state, The
School of Information and Library Science and UNC Institute on Aging have partnered in a three-year research project funded by
the Institute of Museum and Library Services. WILIS is studying the complex personal, organizational and social factors that affect
recruitment, job satisfaction and retention of library and information science graduates from six LIS programs across the state.
More than 8,000 graduates who completed their educational programs between 1964 and 2005 are included in the study. The
results will assist educational programs, employers, policy makers and other stakeholder to engage in more effective workforce
planning.


WUNC FM, the National Public Radio affiliate licensed to UNC-Chapel Hill, operates a five-station radio network serving more than
250,000 weekly listeners from Greensboro to the Outer Banks. The station broadcasts news and cultural programming from
studios located at its Chapel Hill headquarters, as well as from the American Tobacco Historic District in Durham and the N.C.
General Assembly in Raleigh. WUNC has the largest public radio news staff in North Carolina and produces public radio programs
including ―The State of Things,‖ ―The Story‖ with Dick Gordon and ―The People‘s Pharmacy.‖ WUNC-FM can be heard at 91.5 FM
in the Triangle and Triad, at 90.9 FM in the Rocky Mount/Wilson/Greenville area and at 88.9 along the Outer Banks. A classical
music service for the Outer Banks airs at 90.5 and 90.9 FM.
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Program/Activitity Title                                                                                                                 GR
                                                                                                                                          4.1




15-501 Global Health Dinner Club The 15-501 Global Health Dinner Club is part of a global health initiative                               x
between UNC-Chapel Hill and Duke funded by the GlaxoSmithKline Foundation. It is a new and important
mechanism for nurturing collaboration and strengthening ties between faculty and students who work in global
health at UNC and Duke. The Dinner Club is primarily organized by students at both UNC and Duke brings together
UNC and Duke faculty and students to discuss research collaborations and promote ongoing collaboration.


A Su Salud Spanish for ―To Your Health,‖ A Su Salud is a Spanish-language program for students and practicing health
professionals that uses DVD-based video, DVD- and Web-based interactive exercises, and a comprehensive print workbook to
teach intermediate-level Spanish language skills and promote cultural awareness. The program, which focuses specifically on
health-related tasks and situations and intermediate-level students, was developed at UNC after an overwhelming 92 percent of
students reported the need and interest for instruction to improve their ability to communicate with Spanish-speaking clients. The
program was developed with administrative support from the Office of the Provost and the Office of Distance Education and E-
learning Policy, part of The William and Ida Friday Center for Continuing Education. The intermediate course is offered as an
elective to residential and distance education students at the UNC School of Public Health as well as the other UNC health science
schools, the School of Social Work and to undergraduates in the UNC College of Arts and Sciences‘ Department of Romance
Languages. The office of Continuing Education at UNC‘s School of Public Health and the Friday Center also offer the intermediate
course via a distance learning format to those outside the university. Overall enrollment through the various formats of the course
total about 500. Plans are now well under way to offer an introductory version of A Su Salud in the spring of 2008; pilots of this
version have already been conducted in Chapel Hill and several other locations around the state.




Ackland Art Museum Open to the public free of charge, the Ackland Art Museum exhibits from a permanent collection of more
than 15,000 works of art, particularly rich in Old Master paintings and sculptures by artists including Degas, Rubens and Pisarro;
Indian miniatures; Japanese paintings; and North Carolina folk art.

Active Living by Design is a national program of the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation and is a part of the North Carolina
Institute for Public Health at the UNC School of Public Health in Chapel Hill, North Carolina. This program establishes innovative
approaches to increase physical activity through community design, public policies and communications strategies.
Active Living by Design is funding 25 community partnerships across the country to demonstrate how changing community design
will impact physical activity.




African Studies Center The staff and programs of the African Studies Center work to provide the University and the people of              x
North Carolina with a campus hub for interdisciplinary inquiry and communication on Africa, including the sponsorship of a wide
variety of activities that bring together interested faculty and students from a large number of academic disciplines, focusing on the
interconnected issues of democratization, development, health, and gender.



AHEC Digital Library Created by a partnership of the Health Sciences Library, the N.C. AHEC Program, the N.C. AHEC
Information and Library System and the Duke Endowment, the ADL virtual library (http://library.ncahec.net/) contains the highest
quality medical information, with more than 450 full-text medical journals, 10 clinical databases and 70 medical textbooks. A major
objective of the ADL is to provide community healthcare providers with access to clinical information resources equal to those
available from academic medical libraries. Currently, the ADL has more than 15,800 members, including 33 community hospitals,
1,500 individual health professionals and more than 4,000 healthcare preceptors of students from UNC-Chapel Hill (preceptors
receive UNC-Chapel Hill library resources through the ADL at no charge.
Amigas Latina Motivando el Alma (ALMA) / Latina Friends Motivating the Soul As immigrating Latinos adapt to the
mainstream culture of the United States they face enormous mental and physical stressors, such as (e.g., shifting cultural
practices; negative encounters with American schools, employers or other institutions; work and housing insecurity; geographic and
linguistic isolation; unreliable transportation; lack of awareness of services; and loss of family and social support) with limited
resources to address them. Local health care agencies have noted the increased need for physical and mental health care
services, but are not equipped to meet the growing demand. Waiting for mental health stress symptoms to progress and multiply
debilitates the individual, family, and community. Treating depressive and anxiety symptoms using preventative strategies has
significant public health implications and provides an opportunity to minimize anxiety and depressive health disparities among
Latinos.
This project focuses on promoting emotional health and reducing mental health stressors for Latinas. The intervention is a peer
education model using Latinas as lay health advisors to offer coping skills for other Latinas in their community. Using this peer-to-
peer support mechanism provides a unique, time efficient and cost-effective way to promote mental health stress reduction
strategies among Latinas. The intervention will be piloted in Durham and Chatham Counties in Spring and Summer 2008.



Annual Minority Health Conference (School of Public Health) The Annual Minority Health Conference was launched by the
Minority Student Caucus in 1977 and has been conducted nearly every year since then. Major objectives are to highlight health
issues of concern to people of color and to attract students interested in minority health to the School. Planning and
implementation of the Conference are led by the School's Minority Student Caucus, which designates the chair of the Planning
Committee each year. The Conference is co-sponsored by various organizations in and outside the University, including the North
Carolina Department of Health.
APPLES (Assisting People in Planning Learning Experiences in Service The APPLES Service Learning Program is a student                   x
initiated, student-led, student-funded program engaging students, faculty and community agencies in service-learning partnerships.
The goal of APPLES is to foster socially aware and civically involved students through participation in an enriched curriculum and
hands-on experiences that address the needs of North Carolina communities. The focus of the program is on the connection made
between service in the community and what students learn in an academic setting. More than 150 community organizations in the
Triangle region partner with the APPLES program each year. APPLES provides extensive support for faculty who teach service-
learning courses or would like to develop such courses. Support includes consultation during course development and
implementation; assistance in identifying community partners; provision of trained student facilitators; $500 course enhancement
grants; a two-day faculty development institute for faculty, staff, students, and community partners; discussion series and
workshops held in collaboration with the Center for Teaching and Learning; a resource library, a faculty listserv, and a faculty
BlackBoard site. This past year, 69 APPLES service-learning courses were offered in 22 departments, enrolling 1,214 students.
These students volunteered 46,010 hours in the Triangle community through APPLES service-learning experiences. Examples
include students enrolled in an intermediate Spanish course who volunteered with the Spanish School Reading Partners program
to help Spanish-speakers develop English language skills; public relations students who developed public service announcements,
fact sheets and brochures for the Special Olympics of Orange County; and students in a biomedical engineering course who
modified an iPod to respond to movement to encourage a blind toddler to crawl. This year, APPLES launched its first Global
Alternative Spring Break experience to Guanajuato, Mexico. This signature program provided 11 students, their professor and a
graduate student with a first-hand experience on the global forces that shape migration to North Carolina, as well as its effects on
migrant families and sending communities. Students returned to UNC eager and well-equipped to serve local Latino communities
through individual, sustained projects. This is a collaborative effort between APPLES and the Center for Global Initiatives.




Area Health Education Centers (AHEC) The mission of the N.C. AHEC Program is to meet the state‘s health and health
workforce needs by providing educational programs in partnership with academic institutions, health care agencies and other
organizations committed to improving the health of the people of North Carolina. AHEC educational programs and information
services target improving the distribution and retention of health-care providers, with a special emphasis on primary care and
prevention; improving the diversity and cultural competence of the health care workforce in all health disciplines; enhancing the
quality of care and improving health care outcomes; and addressing the health care needs of underserved communities and
populations. There are nine AHEC regional centers throughout the state. In 2004-2005, AHEC offered 7,745 continuing education
programs in allied health, dentistry, medicine, mental health, nursing, pharmacy, public health and other topics with 184,194
attendees. In addition, health science students in these subject areas receive part of their training under AHEC auspices in
community hospitals, rural health centers, public health departments and other health-related settings. In 2004-2005, these health
science students completed 9,707 student months of training through AHEC-supported community-based rotations. AHEC also
provides support for 326 primary care residency positions. These residency programs, located at five of the nine AHEC regional
centers, have now graduated nearly 2,000 physicians since 1980. During the past 25 years, 67 percent of the AHEC-trained
family practice residents have remained in the state to practice.
Area Health Education Centers, Pediatric Specialty Services at the Zimmer Cancer Center in Wilmington The Zimmer
Cancer Center, Southeastern North Carolina‘s only community cancer center dedicated solely to the diagnosis, treatment and
support of people with cancer, is part of the Coastal AHEC, and Pediatric Specialty Services helps parents find care locally that
wouldn‘t otherwise be available. Specialists, such as those from UNC Lineberger Comprehensive Cancer Center, travel to
Wilmington on a regular basis to treat children with special medical needs.

Ashville Project: One highly regarded preventative health care program in the area is the Asheville Project. Carolina has been a
part of the Asheville Project from the start. The initiative formed out of desires of pharmacists around the state, including then-Dean
of the UNC Pharmacy School William Campbell, to use their knowledge and training to counsel patients regularly about their health
and medicine. With the help of other pharmacy educators around the state Campbell approached former city of Asheville risk
assessor John Miall about the prospect of starting the program. Miall agreed and the Asheville Project began. This program initially
was a diabetes management experiment in 1997. Specially trained pharmacists met with city employees who were diabetes
patients on a regular basis and counseled them on managing the disease. In return for meeting with the pharmacists, the
employees received their medication free. The city had agreed to pay the pharmacists for their time and for the medication if the
year-long experiment was successful. Within six months, the project had saved the city enough money to prove its worth. The
Asheville Project now saves the city $2,000 in medical costs per patient each year. Since this initial success, the project has
expanded to seven area employers and includes asthma, high blood pressure and high cholesterol as well. The program has
caught on
around the country and has recently caught the eye of the national media, including an article in the New York Times and a feature
on NBC Nightly News.


Barbers Trimming Cancer Risk Among Black Men (TRIM) The overall purpose of this study is to assess the feasibility of
working in partnership with barbershop owners and barbers to promote health and reduce colorectal and prostate cancer risk
among their African American male customers.

BEAUTY Health Project (Bringing Education and Understanding to You) is a four-year study to assess the effectiveness of using
beauty salons in central North Carolina to share information about preventing cancer. Specifically, the UNC Lineberger Center-
UNC School of Public Health project addresses the importance of physical activity, increasing consumption of fruits and
vegetables, reducing calories from fat, maintaining or achieving a healthy weight and obtaining recommended cancer screenings.
The BEAUTY team has enrolled 62 salons within 75 miles of Chapel Hill in the program. Salon owners are recruiting at least 55
customers to participate in the program, so that nearly 3,000 African-American women are enrolled in the study. Studies have
shown that African-American women are at a higher risk for cancer mortality than other groups. The program relies on
cosmetologists to successfully promote a variety of health issues after attending specialized training workshops to get the facts
about cancer prevention. Participating salons receive an interactive, colorful display containing an array of health information as
well as health magazines.



The Behavioral Healthcare Resource Program School of Social Work, is housed at the School of Social Work and provides
training, technical assistance and consultation services statewide to providers of the NC Division MHDDSAS Mental Health and
Addiction services. Program typically trains over 2500 clinicians throughout the state annually as well as coordinates a Substance
Abuse Studies Program for advanced graduate work within the School of Social Work


Body and Soul Program Body & Soul is an evidence-based program developed to increase the consumption of fruits and
vegetables to help reduce cancer and chronic disease among African Americans. The project is the first of its kind to follow a
community-based intervention through the phases of efficacy testing, effectiveness trial, and dissemination research. This study
assesses the effect of a nationally disseminated program on fruit and vegetable consumption among participating African American
church members. Sixteen African American churches in various areas of the US have been recruited and randomized to early or
delayed intervention conditions. Seventy church members are recruited in each church to complete a baseline and, six-month
follow-up survey. These surveys assess fruit and vegetable intake and mediators of dietary change. Process measures collected at
follow-up from participants include questions about exposure to Body & Soul messages and activities, and church coordinators
also are interviewed for the process evaluation.


Campus Y The Campus Y is the oldest and largest student organization on the UNC-Chapel Hill campus. Since the Y‘s founding                x
more than 150 years ago, Campus Y students have led UNC efforts to address social justice issues and encourage volunteerism
throughout the community and around the world. Seventeen active issue-based program committees and projects span a wide
range of issues, including human rights, hunger, supporting immigrants and literacy. These committees and programs are
completely student driven and student run. The Campus Y is also one of four groups that have worked together to create the
STRETCH (STudents REaching Toward CHange) conference. This day-and-a-half annual leadership and service conference is
planned and run by students to promote leadership and community engagement.
Carolina Center for Public Service The Center‘s Public Service Scholars program provides a framework for students to                      x
complete service; connects students who care about similar issues with one another; guides participants in training that can make
their service more effective; links coursework to service; offers unique opportunities to participants; and recognizes students for
their commitment to service. Since its inception in 2003, the program has rapidly grown from 78 to more than 1,000 students. In
four years, participants have logged more than 165,000 hours of service in communities throughout North Carolina, the nation and
the world. In 2007, 96 students graduated as Public Service Scholars, with nearly 40,000 hours of service to their credit.



Carolina Center for Public Service UNC-Chapel Hill‘s public service programs reach every region of North Carolina, helping                x
communities protect public health, improve schools and medical services, stimulate business, plan for growth, understand cultural
heritage, and enrich the quality of people‘s daily lives. Launched in 1999, the Carolina Center for Public Service coordinates and
catalyzes campus outreach activities around the state. The Center has also created the Carolina Center for Public Service
Database matching its public service projects with all 100 North Carolina counties. This Internet resource contains descriptions of
858 projects currently and will continue to grow. The website attracts between 400 and 550 unique users each quarter.



Carolina Connects This chancellor-initiated tour of North Carolina is designed to highlight for local citizens the many ways that         x
UNC relates directly to their communities and their needs. A special website (http://www.unc.edu/depts/design/connects/)
chronicles the visits to every region of the state, to more than 50 communities from Manteo and Shallotte in the East to Asheville
and Cullowhee in the West and points in between. ―Carolina Connects‖ stops focused on the Carolina Covenant program, the
Citizen-Soldier initiative and multiple research and public service projects. Chancellor Moeser also visits with alumni, legislators
and news media outlets to highlight the ways in which the University‘s faculty, staff and students serve communities and people.
Each stop spotlights the University‘s teaching, research and public service work, particularly in the areas of economic
development, health care and public education because we know those are issues of interest to North Carolinians. Carolina
Connects is also an opportunity for Carolina faculty and staff to listen to the people – to ask the question, ―What problems do you
need the university to work on?‖



Carolina Dental Home The Carolina Dental Home is a three-year demonstration project. The overall goal of this project is to
develop and pilot test a comprehensive community-based system that provides access to dental services for preschool-age
Medicaid children. It will link medical and dental offices by enhancing the ability of medical providers to provide risk-based dental
referrals, and by improving the availability and adequacy of the dental workforce to meet the dental needs of preschool-age
children enrolled in Medicaid.

 The Carolina Global Water Partnership will focus on increasing the availability and usage of water treatment technologies that
can be used in homes in the developing world that do not have clean running water. Phase I of the project will explore several
different business models, including whether microfinance institutions can make it easier for poor consumers to purchase point-of-
use water filters and other treatment technologies and whether microfinancing, or microfranchising, can successfully provide seed
capital for local entrepreneurs to produce, market and distribute the filters. During this phase, researchers will also look at ways to
reduce costs through improved design, production and distribution models. See also Gillings Innovation Laboratory.




The Carolina Institute for Developmental Disabilities                                                                    The Carolina
Institute for Developmental Disabilities
TEACCH (also PE)
Center for Development and Learning
Neurodevelopmental Disorders Research Center


Carolina Mammography Registry – Focus on American Indian Women in North Carolina CMR is a collaborative research
project begun in 1993 to study the performance of screening mammography in community practice. CMR has a commitment to
understanding and improving breast health care for American Indian women in North Carolina and has three projects actively
focused on this population. A University of North Carolina at Pembroke faculty member is working with CMR to build a special
mammography registry for American Indian women, an oral history project of American Indian women breast cancer survivors and
an American Indian Breast Health Survey. Currently there are more than 1.2 million recordes in CMR.



Carolina Population Center The Carolina Population Center is a community of scholars and professionals collaborating on
interdisciplinary research and methods that advance understanding of population issues. Based at the University of North Carolina
at Chapel Hill, the center extends its resources to path-breaking work across the US and in more than 85 other countries and
makes its findings available to a global audience. A nationally recognized training program educates the next generation of
population scholars.
Carolina Public Health Magazine contains news of faculty research, first-person accounts of the life of a public health
professional, and reports on partnerships with other Schools and with corporations and foundations.

Carolina Public Health Solutions




Carolina - Shaw Partnership for the Elimination of Health Disparities (School of Public Health) The Carolina-Shaw
Partnership for the Elimination of Health Disparities Center has been funded through a $6M grant, over five years, from the
National Institutes of Health-National Center on Minority Health and Health Disparities (NIH-NCMHD). Project EXPORT, or the
Centers of Excellence Partnerships for Community Outreach, Research on Health Disparities and Training Project, comprise 26
Centers of Excellence throughout the nation to include Hawaii and Puerto Rico.
The Minority Health and Health Disparities Research and Education Act of 2000, Public Law 106-525, established the National
Center on Minority Health and Health Disparities to conduct and support research, training, dissemination of information, and other
programs to support the reduction and elimination of health disparities among ethnic minority populations (NCMHD Website).
The newly formed "Partnership" between The University of North Carolina-Chapel Hill and Shaw University seeks to eliminate
differences in minority health care and status at several levels.
Health Disparities, as defined by the National Institutes of Health, are differences in the incidence, prevalence, mortality, and
burden of diseases and other adverse health conditions that exist among specific populations in the United States


Carolina Vaccine Institute CVI‘s mission is to change the dynamics of global public health by developing safe, low-cost, effective       x
vaccines for people in the developing world. We will accomplish our mission by exploring the fundamental aspects of vaccine
design and the nature of disease-causing pathogens and by applying that knowledge in pre-clinical vaccine projects that are
accessible to all people. We focus on diseases that disproportionately afflict people in developing-world countries, but are often
overlooked by commercial vaccine companies. Our mission will be furthered by expanding the number of top-quality vaccine
researchers through training graduate students, post-doctoral fellows and visiting vaccine researchers.



Cecil G. Sheps Center for Health Services Research a unit of Carolina‘s Division of Health Affairs, seeks to improve the health
of individuals, families and populations by understanding the problems, issues and alternatives in the design and delivery of health
care services. This is accomplished through an interdisciplinary program of research, consultation, technical assistance and
training that focuses on timely and policy-relevant questions concerning the accessibility, adequacy, organization, cost and
effectiveness of health care services and the dissemination of this information to policy makers and the general public. Its current
research programs include the following areas: Aging, Disability and Long-Term Care; Child Health Services; General Health
Services Research; Health Care Economics and Finance; Health Care Organization; Health Disparities; Health Policy Analysis;
Health Professions and Primary Care; Medical Practice and Prevention; Medication Error Quality Initiative; Mental Health and
Substance Abuse Services and Systems; North Carolina Institute of Medicine; Rural Health Research Program; Southeast
Regional Center for Health Workforce Studies; and Women‘s Health Services Research.



The Center for Aging Research and Educational Services (CARES), School of Social Work, Founded in 1988, CARES has
worked in close partnership with state agencies, local health and service networks, families and other public and private
stakeholders to improve outcomes for a growing population of North Carolinians. CARES is currently engaged in a broad array of
initiatives to transform the state‘s long-term care network in all 100 of North Carolina‘s counties.


Center for AIDS Research (CFAR) The purpose of the UNC CFAR is to provide infrastructure to support investigation of the                 x
HIV/AIDS epidemic using clinical research, behavioral research, research into HIV biology and pathogenesis at the molecular level,
and educational outreach. The UNC CFAR is a consortium of three complementary institutions: UNC-Chapel Hill, Research
Triangle Institute, and Family Health International.

Center for Child and Family Health A collaborative effort of the UNC School of Medicine, Duke University and N.C. Central
University, this unique new treatment center for North Carolina‘s abused and neglected draws on the faculty, staff and resources of
the three universities to provide a full range of medical, mental health, legal and family support services for children from across
the state. The center, located in Durham, provides conference rooms, space for social workers, psychologists, law students and
trauma therapists. It also houses the N.C. Central Family Law Clinic, pediatric offices for doctors from UNC-Chapel Hill and Duke
who specialize in child abuse, interview rooms with video cameras and child-friendly waiting areas filled with toys. With the mental
health department housed right down the hall from pediatricians and social workers, it is easier for the staff to set up one visit for
families that can include interviews with pediatricians, therapists, lawyers, and social service specialists.
Center for Developmental Science The Center for Developmental Science (CDS) is a behavioral research center whose purpose
is to pursue questions in basic science related to developmental studies. CDS aims to transcend the limitations of institutional and
disciplinary divisions. Its faculty represent several universities and specialize in many disciplines including anthropology, behavioral
genetics, developmental psychology, developmental psychobiology, education, epidemiology, experimental psychology, internal
medicine, behavioral neurobiology, nursing, pediatrics, psychiatry, public health and sociology.



Center for Environmental Health and Susceptibility (CEHS) The goal of this Center is to bring together a broad group of
environmental health researchers to understand the mechanistic basis of chemical toxicity and integrate this knowledge with
epidemiology in order to reduce the burden of environmentally related disease. The Community Outreach and Education Core
(COEC) of the UNC-Chapel Hill Center for Environmental Health and Susceptibility translates Center research into knowledge that
can be used to improve public health and educates the public about how individual and group susceptibilities interact with
environmental factors to cause disease. The COEC staff has worked with Center scientists and North Carolina citizens to: develop
educational and informational materials to share innovative CEHS research with diverse audiences, conduct workshops for
community-based and professional organizations, educators, and youth on a variety of environmental health issues, participate in a
variety of working groups, committees, and partnerships with state agencies and non-profit organizations to increase awareness of
relevant environmental health research, coordinate science seminars at the NC Division of Public Health to share the results of
CEHS research with the Division‘s Public Health Management Team, utilize multimedia programming to reach broad and varied
audiences with prevention messages related to environmental health, and publish the CEHS Sentinel newsletter.



Center for Health Promotion and Disease Prevention (HPDP) seeks to bring public health research findings to the daily lives of
individuals and communities with a special focus on North Carolina and populations vulnerable to disease. The majority of its
projects include research within North Carolina and all of its research addresses challenges that many state residents face. Most of
the center‘s faculty researchers have appointments in the School of Public Health or the other four UNC Health Affairs schools.
Programs: HOPE (Health Opportunities Partnership Empowerment) Works, Kids Eating Smart and Moving More, The North
Carolina Way (Worksite Activities for You) to Health, Center of Excellence for Training and Research Translation, Nutrition and
Physical Activity Self-Assessment for Child Care, Wake to Wellness grants, Weight-Wise Pilot Study, Threads of HOPE,
Comprehensive Cancer Control Collaborative of NC, Barbers Trimming Cancer Risk among Black Men, Body and Soul, NC
Tobacco Free Schools and Quitline Marketing, Internet Cigarette Vendors Study.



Center for Infant and Young Children Feeding and Care The mission of the Center for Infant and Young Child Feeding and                     x
Care in the Maternal and Child Health Department of the School of Public Health at UNC, Chapel Hill is to create an enabling
environment, at the community, state, national and global levels, in which every mother is supported to achieve optimal infant and
young child feeding and care, and every child achieves its full potential through the best start on life. The goals include: promoting
attention to the mother/child dyad for addressing health and survival, growth and development, advancing breastfeeding,
complementary feeding, and related maternal health outcomes through development and dissemination of the evidence-base to
enhance policy, programs and training throughout the world, increasing the recognition of the importance of the mother/child as the
unit for study and care, and collaborating with academic, advocacy, and action organizations worldwide and training the leaders
and practitioners of tomorrow.


Center for Infectious Diseases at the University of North Carolina encompasses a broad range of disciplines including clinical             x
infectious disease, microbiology, epidemiology and public health. The program represents a partnership between the faculties in
the Schools of Medicine, Public Health, Pharmacy, Nursing and Dentistry, and especially the Division of Infectious Disease (School
of Medicine), the Departments of Epidemiology and Health Education (School of Public Health) and the Departments of
Microbiology and Biochemistry (School of Medicine). These faculty participate in clinical, teaching, research and training activities.




Center for Research on Chronic Illness: The center, housed at the School of Nursing, has been funded by the National Institute
of Nursing Research (NINR) since 1994 to promote excellence in nursing research. The center includes 24 federally funded
research projects, a pilot study program and a range of services to advance research on preventing and managing chronic illness
in vulnerable people. The center does research on evidence-based interventions that are effective in improving health and function
in people with a chronic condition and in preventing chronic illness in vulnerable people. To be compelling, the evidence must
include documenta- tion of physiological and behavioral benefits as well as psycho-social domains. The center‘s four cores
(administrative, intervention, outcomes and dissemination) are designed to address these needs. Web site:
http://nursing.unc.edu/crci/
Contact: Diane Holditch-Davis, 966-0453, crci@unc.edu
Center for Urban and Regional Studies at The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill conducts and supports research on
urban and regional affairs—research that helps to build healthy, sustainable communities across the country and around the world.
The Center's Faculty Fellows—all leading scholars in their respective fields—participate in both multidisciplinary research and more
narrowly focused projects to generate new knowledge about urban and regional processes, problems and solutions. By supporting
this network of scholars and connecting them to government agencies and foundations that commission research, the Center plays
a vital role in linking the University community to ongoing efforts to address contemporary social problems.
Created in 1957, the Center for Urban and Regional Studies is one of the oldest university-based research centers of its kind. The
Center's mission is to promote and support within UNC-Chapel Hill, high-quality basic and applied research on urban, regional and
rural planning and policy issues. The Center seeks to generate new knowledge of urban and regional processes and problems and
ultimately to improve living conditions in our communities. This is done by involving the University's faculty and graduate students
in large, multidisciplinary research projects and smaller, more narrowly focused projects. The Center's mission also includes
promoting the use of the research it facilitates.
Many public and non-profit organizations have research needs such as collecting and analyzing basic data on urban and regional
conditions; surveying clients and prospective clients and interpreting their needs; defining and assessing problems; evaluating the
impacts of programs; and forecasting urban and regional trends. The Center matches these needs with the interests and expertise
of its Faculty Fellows -- an interdisciplinary group of UNC scholars who are leaders in their respective fields.
The Center conducts a wide variety of basic and applied research for foundations and federal, state, and local governments. It has
studied urban crime, housing and community development, urban poverty, natural hazards, coastal planning, environmental
protection, land use, growth management, and economic development. Not only does the Center enjoy a widespread reputation for
research excellence, but its recommendations frequently influence urban policy and planning decisions throughout North Carolina
and the U.S. Located on University property in the historic district of the Town of Chapel Hill, the Center is adjacent to the central
campus and all its resources. But the Center itself, with its permanent staff and comprehensive research facilities, is also easy to
reach for visitors.




Center for Women's Health Research: Conducts research and clinical trials targeting under-funded and neglected areas of
women's health, Coordinates interdisciplinary teams of researchers for innovative studies, Provides grant writing, study design and
implementation services to research teams, Teaches and guides the next generation of women's health researchers, Increases
awareness of women's health issues through community outreach efforts, Sponsors and coordinate the annual Women's Health
Research Day, Produces the renowned North Carolina Women's Health Report Card every 2 years



Center of Excellence for Training and Research Translation (Center TRT) The mission of the Center of Excellence for
Training and Research Translation is to enhance the public health impact of the WISEWOMAN program and the Nutrition and
Physical Activity Program to Prevent Obesity and Other Chronic Diseases (Obesity Prevention program) through training and
intervention translation initiatives that extend their reach, improve their effectiveness, strengthen their adoption in real-world
settings, improve the quality of their operations, and sustain their efforts over time.




China Social Science Infrastructure Program (R24)                                                                                          x

Chuck Stone Program for Diversity in Education and Media (also Access)

Clinical Center for the Study of Development and Learning A program of the School of Medicine, CDL has provided 40 years
of innovative, high-quality clinical, research, training and technical assistance to support children and adults with developmental
disabilities in North Carolina. As the state‘s University Center for Excellence in Developmental Disabilities, Education, Research
and Service, the CDL pushes the scope of research and services to include a unique focus on how people with developmental
disabilities learn and how their learning skills can be improved. CDL‘s faculty is made up of professionals in the disciplines of
pediatrics, psychology, education, nutrition, social work, physical therapy, occupational therapy, audiology, speech and language
pathology, and pediatric dentistry.


Clinical Nutrition Research Center The University of North Carolina Clinical Nutrition Research Unit (UNC CNRU) bridges
nutrition science at the interface between medicine and public health. We are specifically designed to provide expertise and core
services that increase and enhance: conduct of nutrition-related basic science, epidemiologic, and intervention (including classical
clinical nutrition) research; translation from basic to epidemiologic to intervention nutrition research and vice versa; and recruitment
of investigators from non-nutrition disciplines so that they include nutrition-relevant measures and questions in their research.


Clinical Translation Science Award (CTSA)                                                                                                  x
College Tobacco Use Prevention and Cessation Initiative Funded by the Health and Wellness Trust, this grant provides
technical assistance and training for the N.C. College Tobacco UsePrevention and Cessation Initiative. The initiative provides
funding to help prevent initiation of tobacco use among young adults ages 18-24, eliminate exposure to secondhand tobacco
smoke on college campuses, promote tobacco-use cessation among young adults, and eliminate tobacco-related health disparities
among young adults.Web site: http://www.smokefreenc.org/colleges/ Contact: Adam Goldstein, 919-966-4090,
adam_goldstein@med.unc.edu
Project Smoking, Education, Lifestyle and Fitness (SELF) Improvement (Department of Health Behavior and Health Education,
School of Public Health): Professor Eugenia Eng and Strengthening The Black Family, Inc. are conducting a participatory
evaluation of Project SELF Improvement in low-income African-American communities in Wake County. The goal of the project is
to reduce chronic disease risk factors such as lack of physical activity, poor nutrition and tobacco use among the 1,000 residents.
Tobacco interventions will focus on prevention of use among adolescents.


Community Workshops in the Library (CWL) The Health Sciences Library teaches consumer health information classes to the
public through this national award-winning partnership between area public libraries and UNC University Libraries. CWL offers free
instruction on computer and information literacy topics including three health information classes: Finding and Evaluating Online
Health Information, Online Health Information for Seniors and Online Health Information for Caregivers. The Workshops recently
won the 2007 Instruction Innovation Award from the Association of College and Research Libraries. In addition to these formal
classes, HSL responds to requests for health literacy training for healthcare providers and students. HSL librarians provide
educational sessions, presentations, and classes on a wide variety of consumer health topics to UNC campus associations and
organizations, as well as to community groups, and clubs throughout the state.




Comprehensive Cancer Control Collaborative of NC (4CNC) The Comprehensive Cancer Control Collaborative of North
Carolina (4CNC) strives to reduce the impact of cancer in our state by supporting collaboration between North Carolina
communities and researchers. 4CNC promotes and enhances partnerships that support efforts to implement evidence-based
cancer prevention and control strategies and conducts research on ways to improve cancer prevention and control.

Funded by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's Cancer Control Program and the National Cancer Institute as part of
the CDC‘s Prevention Research Center Program, 4CNC is one of eight nationwide centers that comprise the Cancer Prevention
and Control Research Network. Research builds on the knowledge base created by the systematic reviews and evidence-based
recommendations in the Guide to Community Preventive Services.

The 4CNC includes an extensive network of partners throughout North Carolina and is based at the UNC Center for Health
Promotion and Disease Prevention and includes faculty from the UNC Lineberger Comprehensive Cancer Center, the UNC School
of Medicine, the Sheps Center for Health Services Research, and the UNC School of Public Health.




Continuing Education (also Access)


Cost Effectiveness of Supportive Housing This project is exploring the cost-effectiveness of supportive housing developments
for chrnoically homeless individuals in four counties across North Carolina. As part of this effort, researchers from the School of
Social Work assist staff from county Housing Support Teams in tracking the costs of providing services to chronically homeless
individuals before and after entering permanent supportive housing.


Developmental Disabilities Training Institute (DDTI) Located within the Jordan Institute for Families in the School of Social
Work, DDTI fosters improvements in services and support to people with developmental disabilities by developing the knowledge,
attitudes and skills of staff involved in their lives. This includes identifying best practices as well as providing in-service training
activities, targeted program evaluation and technical assistance to agencies and organizations managing, coordinating or providing
services to individuals and their families. DDTI programs include training on crisis planning and management, person-centered
thinking when working with people who have developmental disabilities, and facilitating support networks for people with
developmental disabilities.
Dissemination Core (Lineberger Comprehensive Cancer Center) Our goals are to improve the quality of dissemination
research and to identify and apply the most effective strategies to increase adoption and implementation of evidence-based
innovations.
By building the field of dissemination research and enhancing dissemination infrastructure, we aim to: eliminate roadblocks to
research translation and increase our understanding and ability to propel effective interventions into practice. A key strategy to
close the gap between research and practice is developing communication systems and useful partnerships that span research,
practice and policy settings. We work with researchers and research teams to design, implement and evaluate dissemination
strategies.
We are working to help researchers do a better job of propelling their proven effective interventions from the academic setting into
real world practice.
We also provide services to people in organizations, communities, and industries that are dedicated to disease prevention and
health promotion.
We work with program planners, public health and medical practitioners, and evaluation teams to learn about evidence-based
approaches and to select and adapt the best evidence-based strategy for achieving target outcomes. We can also help
organizations and communities increase their capacity by providing technical assistance to implement, monitor and evaluate
evidence-based approaches.
Doctor of Pharmacy Partnership Program Doctor of Pharmacy Partnership Program Launched in fall 2005, the Doctor of
Pharmacy program through the UNC School of Pharmacy enrolls 10 to 15 students per year at Elizabeth City State University. This
partnership enables the Doctor of Pharmacy program to increase the number of graduates each year and to promote increased
numbers of pharmacists working in underserved populations, especially in northeastern North Carolina. Students are co-enrolled in
a BS in the Pharmaceutical Sciences program at ECSU and the Doctor of Pharmacy program at UNC-Chapel Hill. They remain on
the ECSU campus for the first three years of instruction through video-teleconferencing, Web-based teaching, and classes taught
by ECSU faculty. Graduates of this program will receive a doctor of pharmacy degree from UNC-Chapel Hill with acknowledgment
of the partnership with ECSU.



Drinking Water Research Center of the School of Public Health The focus of research at the Drinking Water Research Center
is on: the chemical, physical, and microbiological quality of drinking water; water purification technology; health effects associated
with the consumption of drinking water; and economic and planning aspects related to the supply of safe drinking water. Ongoing
research activities within the DWRC include health effects of disinfection by-products, evaluation of disinfection performance,
modeling distribution system networks, appropriate technologies for developing countries, and planning, decision-making, and risk
assessment modeling.

Durham Scholars Program is directed by James Johnson, professor of geography and director of the Urban Investment                        x
Strategies Center at the Frank Hawkins Kenan Institute of Private Enterprise at the UNC Kenan-Flagler Business School.
Established in 1993, the foundation of this program is an after-school college preparatory academy where students work on
improving both academic and social skills. Each year, 30 sixth-grade students are chosen from Durham neighborhoods where the
poverty rate exceeds 40 percent. With the help of teachers and volunteer mentors, students do homework, publish a weekly
newsletter and take part in volunteer activities. Consistent with the theory of social capital, the program gets parents involved in a
parallel set of educational programs, including nutrition workshops, consumer-credit counseling and conflict-resolution guidance.
Parents also visit their children‘s school once a month. The second part of the program is designed to help 11th and 12th graders
prepare for college. Eight need-based college scholarships are offered to Durham-area high school graduates on a competitive
basis. Recipients also participate in workshops and volunteer activities, including mentoring younger students in the after-school
program. As students in the after-school program reach 11th grade, they become eligible for the college scholarships. The
initiative, set to take place over a period of 20 years, will impact nearly 250 students.



ECHO (UNC Program on Ethnicity, Culture and Health Outcomes) The mission of ECHO is to eliminate health status and
health outcomes disparities through translatable, evidence-based research, multidisciplinary training and education, and culturally
sensitive service to North Carolina communities. The program‘s objectives include: educate faculty, students, health professionals,
and communities about the relationship between culture, ethnicity and health; educate faculty, students, health professionals, and
communities about the relationship between culture, ethnicity and health; promote a culturally competent health workforce;
encourage greater representation of racial diversity in the health workforce; and act as a public policy advisor by providing
academic guidance on the formation of effective policy.


Educational Renaissance, School of Pharmacy The Educational Renaissance is the School‘s plan to address the needs of the
next generation of students who are expected to learn very differently from the students of the past, said Bob Blouin, PharmD,
dean of the School of Pharmacy.
Ella Baker Women’s Center for Leadership and Community Activism has plans to establish The Ella Baker Women‘s Center
for Leadership and Community Activism near two low-income housing communities in Chapel Hill and to replicate the model
nationwide. A pilot of the Center‘s flagship program was launched in June 2007, with 10 young women activists (ages 13-18) from
the Trinity Court and Pritchard Park public housing communities in Chapel Hill. Phase I of the pilot involved the youth in eight
weeks of community organization training using curriculum guides and technical assistance from the Innovation Center for
Community and Youth Development, a Kellogg funded nonprofit organization based in Takoma Park, MD. Training focuses on
personal leadership (identity, history, vision, ethics), organizational leadership (critical thinking, decision making, accessing
resources), and community leadership (civic awareness, networking, organizing). Phase II, launched in August 2007, is a year-long
community change project led by the youth and adult partners (UNC faculty, students and community volunteers). Opportunities for
youth to identify and construct solutions to problems in their own communities underscore all activities.



Emerging Leaders in Public Health The Emerging Leaders in Public Health Program is designed to prepare the next generation                  x
of public health leaders by identifying and training those individuals with the talent to serve in significant leadership capabilities in
the next decade. The program's topics include balancing communications needs, financial resources and human resources during
times of crises, analyzing crisis scenarios and assessing their potential impact on one's organization and community, creating
sustainable organizations in public health and managing an increasingly diverse workforce.



Engaged Institutions Effort for Community Campus Partnership (School of Public Health)

Engineers Without Borders at Carolina Engineers without Borders (EWB) UNC-CH Chapter is a student organization that has
been founded for the purpose of facilitating UNC student involvement in international engineering and health projects organized or
approved by Engineers Without Borders-USA. Our chapter is involved with construction and design work, consulting, teaching,
surveying, or other tasks as determined by project needs. We raise funds to support projects, facilitate collaboration between
student groups and local engineers and other universities on development projects, and host speakers and seminars relevant to
the role of the engineer in development work abroad.




ENNEAD Society of Dental Volunteers ENNEAD Society of Dental Volunteers ENNEAD was created in 2003 by four dental
students and with the mentoring of Dr. Eugene Sandler, a School of Dentistry faculty member. The initiative focuses on helping
meet oral health needs in the community, heightening awareness of health disparities and giving students the skills and dedication
necessary to become future community leaders and volunteers. Nine student leaders, who serve as board members, are
responsible for taking requests from the community, designing projects to meet the needs outlined in those requests, and then
organizing a group of student volunteers to carry out those projects. ENNEAD provides doctor of dental surgery, dental hygiene
and dental assisting students with opportunities to volunteer at community health fairs, elementary schools and mobile dental
clinics. Almost 200 students in these fields are on the volunteer listserv. ENNEAD initiatives include mouth guard fabrication for
local student-athletes, in concert with the N.C. Dental Society‘s statewide initiative; presentations to schools and other
organizations on the importance of good oral heath habits; and participation at free clinics, working with the Open Door Dental
Clinic of Alamance executive director and N.C. Missions of Mercy president, Dr. Steven Slott of Burlington. In October 2005, 45
ENNEAD volunteers along with 22 community dentists and 10 hygienists provided almost $70,000 worth of care to 267 patients at
a two-day Missions of Mercy clinic in Burlington. The clinic received nationwide recognition as a winner of USA Weekend
Magazine‘s ―Make a Difference Day‖ Competition.



Ethnicity, Culture and Health Outcomes (ECHO) Program Researchers have established that ethnicity, socio-economic,
gender, environmental and educational factors all play a part in health disparities. Access to health care, use of health services and
experiences with physicians also vary among racial groups and can contribute to health disparities. The mission of ECHO is to
eliminate health status and health outcomes disparities through translatable, evidence-based research, multidisciplinary training
and education, and culturally sensitive service to North Carolina communities. One of the few programs of its type in the nation,
ECHO works to connect the various institutes and research agendas throughout the state concerned about health disparities,
especially through partnerships with the state‘s historically black colleges and universities.
Examining Mental Illnesses in the Jails of NC (School of Social Work) The School of Social Work was invited to engage in
this research by the Protection and Advocacy for Individuals with Mental Illnesses (PAIMI) group of the Governor‘s Advocacy
Council for Persons with Disabilities (GACPD). The researchers found that jails do a poor job of screening for individuals with
mental illnesses; jail staff are often poorly trained in issues of mental illness; access to psychotropic medication for individuals in
jails is difficult and can take up to two weeks; access to mental health care for individuals in jails is also difficult and collaboration
between jails and local mental health agencies is often weak. The results of the study have been widely disseminated, to groups as
disparate as the N.C. Psychiatric Association, the N.C. Commission for Mental Health, N.C. jail administrators, and local consumer
advocacy groups. The report came to the attention of the N.C. Association of County Commissioners, who requested a
presentation on the findings and have made this one of their top priority issues. Presentations have been planned for Dorothea Dix
Hospital and Wake Human Services staff. The report also came to the attention of Representative Verla Insko, co-chair of the
Legislative Oversight Committee for Mental Health. She has incorporated the recommendations from this report into House Bill
691 for the 2007 Legislative Session. Finally, upon recommendation of the report and with participation from the investigators,
N.C. mental health advocates are planning an ongoing task force to examine and address the issues of jails and the mentally ill.




Executive Doctoral Program in Health Leadership (School of Public Health, Department of Health Policy and
Administration) (see H) The Executive Doctoral Program in Health Leadership prepares mid-career professionals for senior-level
positions in organizations working to improve the public‘s health. The three-year, cohort-based distance program confers a DrPH in
Health Administration.
The Program targets individuals working full-time with substantial leadership responsibilities in communities, organizations and
institutions. Students may include domestic or international health directors, mid-career managers in government agencies, leaders
within nonprofit and non-governmental organizations, program officers and other mid-level or senior managers working for
foundations, and others working within the health field, including entrepreneurs and individuals working in nontraditional settings
affecting the health of the public.


Executive Education Program, Kenan-Flagler The graduate-level Certificate in Technology and Communication has admitted
159 students since its inception in 2003. Thirty-two students have completed the program. Approximately 80 percent of
participants are working professionals from North Carolina who are using e-learning as a way to continue their educations without
disrupting their careers or family life. The School‘s Executive Education program offers seminars and workshops to nearly 500
professionals in the fields of journalism and mass communication. Participants come primarily from North Carolina and the
Southeast.

Family Life Project Established at the School of Education in 2002 and funded with a $16.5 million grant from the National
Institute for Child Health and Human Development (NICHD), this study of nearly 1,300 children in rural communities is examining
the biological, individual, family and community processes that lead to good or poor outcomes for rural children. The project was
recently renewed with an additional $12 million NICHD grant to continue research on the 1,300 rural children, now turning 3, who
have been studied since birth.


Family Support Network of North Carolina (FSN): A unitof the School of Medicine, FSN promotes and provides supportfor
families with children who have special needs. Parent-to-parentsupport is available through local, affiliated FSN programs
acrossthe state and through the Central Directory of Resources (CDR).The CDR is a free resource for family members and service
providers.Callers can obtain verbal or printed information about specificdisabilities and the resources and organizations that serve
childrenand families, and they can speak with a resource specialist about a
family‘s particular issues. A Spanish-speaking resource specialist isavailable as well as some printed information in Spanish.Web
site: www.fsnnc.org
Contact: Irene Zipper, director, 919-966-6395, izipper@unc.edu
FHI-UNC Fellowship Program Family Health International (FHI) is a nonprofit organization with a mission to improve lives                  x
worldwide by addressing complex public health issues through research, education and services. FHI has offices in North Carolina
and Virginia as well as 49 offices in Africa, Asia, Europe, Latin America and the Middle East. Since its founding in 1971, FHI has
conducted clinical research in more than 95 countries utilizing greater than 1,000 sites. We have conducted more than 500 clinical
trials and 1,000 clinical research studies. FHI‘s research and development programs have brought more than 10 women‘s health
products to market in greater than 30 countries.                       FHI, in partnership with the Office of Global Health in the UNC
School of Public Health is offering a fellowship program for doctoral students and second year masters students in the UNC SPH.
This exciting fellowship program provides you with the opportunity to work with FHI‘s world-renowned researchers in global health
topics such as, HIV/AIDS, infectious diseases, reproductive, maternal and adolescent health. As a part-time research/program
assistant, you will have hands-on learning experiences that will expand your research skills as well as make important contributions
to specific research studies. Your assigned project has the potential to provide you with the basis for your dissertation or master‘s
thesis.




Financial Indicators for Local Public Health Systems (also ETCD) The UNC Public Health Leadership Program in conjunction
with various partners are working with Local Public Health Agencies (LPHA) in northeast North Carolina to implement a set of
indicators to measure, monitor and improve their financial operations and strategic planning.

First Nation Graduate Circle FNGC is an organization of American Indian graduate and professional students at the University of
North Carolina at Chapel Hill. One of FNGC‘s important concerns is ensuring that American Indian cultural heritage is recognized
and respected at Carolina through appropriate curriculum, research and administrative support. The circle educates members of
the North Carolina community about the unique cultural heritage of American Indian people in North Carolina and American Indian
people throughout the United States, Canada and Mexico. Some of its goals are to provide mentoring and support to American
Indian undergraduates and to sponsor lectures and other events related to the academic and professional accomplishments of
American Indians.


Fogarty AIDS International Research & Training Program                                                                                    x


Fort Bragg Base Realignment and Closure Baseline Assessment A community impact assessment was completed in 2006 to                        x
predict the impact of personnel changes on the public schools. The Center for Urban and Regional Studies project focused on Fort
Bragg and 11 surrounding counties (Bladen, Cumberland, Harnett, Hoke, Lee, Montgomery, Moore, Richmond, Robeson,
Sampson and Scotland). Projections will help local governments and school systems prepare for an influx of soldiers and their
families.

Frank Porter Graham Child Development Institute For the past 40 years, FPG research and outreach has shaped how the
nation cares for and educates young children. FPG has a proud history of serving as an objective, knowledgeable force for social
change to enhance the lives of children and families. Researchers focus on parent and family support; early care and education;
child health and development; early identification and intervention; equity, access and inclusion; and early childhood policy. FPG is
one of the oldest multidisciplinary centers devoted to the study of children and families. Most of the institute‘s work addresses
young children ages birth through 8 years. FPG has a special focus on children who experience biological or environmental factors
that challenge early development and learning. FPG Child Development Institute currently supports 45 projects working across the
nation and around the world. Research and outreach projects address parent and family support; early care and education; child
health and development; early identification and early intervention; equity, access and inclusion; and early childhood policy.
Example of projects directly affecting the children of North Carolina include the Family Life Project, the Nuestros Niños Early
Language and Literacy Project and the Partnerships for Inclusion. The purpose of Nuestros Niños Early Language and Literacy
Project is to develop and test an intervention designed to improve the quality of teaching practices related to literacy and language
learning among Latino children enrolled in North Carolina‘s More at Four Pre-Kindergarten program for at-risk children.
Partnerships for Inclusion promotes the inclusion of young children with disabilities, birth through 5 years, and their families in all
aspects of community life. PFI is a statewide technical assistance project with offices in the western, central and eastern regions of
North Carolina.
Get Real and HEEL Breast Cancer Program (Get Recreation, Get Exercise, Get Active, Get Living) The purpose of the
program is to provide post-diagnosed breast cancer patients with individualized prescriptive exercise and recreational therapy as a
way to help alleviate the symptoms of cancer treatment, improve quality of life, and survivorship. Patients come from the 13-county
region under the N.C. Triangle Affiliate of the Susan Komen Breast Cancer Foundation service area (Caswell, Chatham, Durham,
Edgecombe, Franklin, Granville, Harnett, Johnston, Nash, Orange, Person, Vance and Wake). Each patient is assigned to a
personal trainer (a student trained by the Department of Exercise and Sport Science-EXSS) and a licensed recreation therapist,
working out three times a week over a six-month period, free of charge. Professors from the UNC Departments of Exercise and
Sport Science, Allied Health Sciences and Biostatics, along with clinicians from UNC, are leading the way. Housed at the
Department of Exercise and Sport Science, the program‘s facility at the Women‘s Gym is designated for use of cancer patients
only. Parking is provided to all patients free of charge in a very convenient location a few yards from the program facility. Since
opening six months ago, the program has been contacted by more that 200 patients and physicians requesting more information
on how to participate in the program. So far, 25 women have either completed six months of participation in the program or are
currently participating in the program.



Gillings Innovation Labs (GILs) Competitively selected Gillings Innovation Laboratories (GILs) will focus concentrated efforts on          x
solving big public health problems, such as obesity, lack of access to clean water and health care, and epidemics around the world.
 Solutions to these problems can make a large difference in the public‘s health. The GILs are committed to accelerate delivery of
best practices to improve people‘s lives and anticipate new public health challenges. Some examples of GILs are the UNC Center
for Innovative Clinical Trials and the Carolina Global Water Partnership.

The UNC Center for Innovative Clinical Trials at the UNC School of Public Health conducts methodological, applied and
interdisciplinary research on the design and Program clinical trials. Building development of multidisciplinary research projects
Global Health Faculty Partnership Grants analysis of Designed to foster the on UNC‘s reputation and excellence in translating              x
and partnerships in global health, grants will be made to UNC-Chapel Hill faculty for international travel to establish or maintain
research relationships with colleagues in other countries (e.g., clarifying joint research interests, planning, organizing institutional
linkages, jointly developing or writing research proposals to funding agencies). GHP grant funds cannot be used to support data
collection, other actual research activity, or attendance at meetings and conferences. Grant awards will be made in amounts up to
$5,000.

GlobeMed GlobeMed is a national non-profit organization that connects student-led chapters at universities across the United               x
States directly to health organizations around the world. In forming partnerships and designing innovative health projects, we allow
ourselves and members of the community to engage, educate, and enable. Enabling students to construct change will allow them
to deepen their own education. Educating our students and community will provide a greater capacity to improve global health. This
will be done through workshops, course curriculum designs, and distance learning. Engaging students will make them more aware
of global health challenges through the various service projects that our organization will offer. While a common vision and mission
unites members at each of our campuses, the strength of the GlobeMed network rests in each chapter‘s unique projects and
efforts.


Graduate Certificate in Global Health                                                                                                      x
The purpose of the Graduate Certificate in Global Health prepares residential SPH students to work in changing environments and
with diverse populations, and to respond competently to the challenges presented by permeable geographic and cultural
boundaries.
The Certificate complements currently enrolled graduate students' departmental requirements by offering courses, seminars, and
fieldwork or internships that provide for a comprehensive understanding of global health conditions, needs, and solutions that cross
borders in both developing and industrialized countries and regions. Students will gain competence in identifying and analyzing
factors that generate disparities in health status, health resources, and access to health information and health services,
particularly for ethnic minorities and other marginalized and vulnerable population groups.
The Graduate Certificate in Global Health is open to students currently enrolled in a graduate degree program of the University of
North Carolina School of Public Health.


GSK Student Seed Grant Program The GlaxoSmithKline Foundation has awarded the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill                  x
and Duke University a grant to bring the two institutions together to share resources and ideas in the area of global health: the GSK
UNC-Duke Global Health Project. Both Duke and UNC are committed to the development of global health research, curricula, and
capacity building both at home and in international training programs in Tanzania and Malawi, respectively. This grant is designed
to foster the development of multidisciplinary research projects and partnerships in global health between the two universities.

Funds have been designated to support student research in the form of seed grants. The grants will be awarded based on the
soundness of the research proposal and how well it demonstrates the principles of the larger grant (please note: students don't
have to focus their research on Malawi or Tanzania; research can be done any where in the world)
GSK UNC Duke Global Health Project Application materials were due January 15, 2008                                                          x
This program is available for UNC graduate students (and Duke students).
    The GlaxoSmithKline Foundation has awarded the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill and Duke University a grant to
bring the two institutions together to share resources and ideas in the area of global health: the GSK UNC-Duke Global Health
Project. Both Duke and UNC are committed to the development of global health research, curricula, and capacity building both at
home and in international training programs in Tanzania and Malawi, respectively. This grant is designed to foster the development
of multidisciplinary research projects and partnerships in global health between the two universities.
    GSK Student Seed Grant Program: Funds have been designated to support student research in the form of seed grants. The
grants will be awarded based on the soundness of the research proposal and how well it demonstrates the principles of the larger
grant.



Highway Safety Research Center For more than 40 years, the UNC Highway Safety Research Center has conducted
interdisciplinary research aimed at reducing deaths, injuries and related societal costs of roadway crashes. The center has been a
leading research institute that has helped shape the field of transportation safety. In terms of miles driven, motor-vehicle related
deaths in the United States are only one-third as likely as they were 30 years ago. Despite such progress, between 40,000 and
43,000 deaths still occur on U.S. highways every year. The Highway Safety Research driver licensing system reduces
hospitalizations and medical costs for young drivers. The state‘s graduated driver licensing (GDL) system has reduced
hospitalizations and resulting hospital costs by about one-third for 16-year-old drivers. In the 46 months after North Carolina started
GDL, hospitalizations of 16-year-old drivers declined by 36.5 percent and, consequently, hospital costs for these young drivers
dropped by 31.2 percent, or $650,000 per year. The GDL system places restrictions on young drivers that limit their exposure to
high-risk driving situations, such as driving during nighttime hours and driving with multiple passengers, while they are still adjusting
to the complexities involved in driving. GDL programs have been implemented in 40 states and the District of Columbia. North
Carolina‘s program was adopted on Dec. 1, 1997, making the state the second to implement the system. A Highway Safety
Research Center study published in 2001, based on motor vehicle crash data, showed that young drivers have been involved in
fewer crashes since GDL was implemented in the state. This previous study, published in the Journal of the American Medical
Association, also showed a 57 percent drop in fatal accidents involving 16-year-old drivers.




Honduran Health Alliance The Honduran Health Alliance is an international alliance of organizations working together in the
areas of education, capacity building, health and development. Member groups are dedicated to common ideals of cooperation
and partnership coupled with self-determination to facilitate our on-going work. The current focus of our work is promoting women's
health and community development.

HOPE (Health, Opportunities, Partnerships, Empowerment) Works The concept of hope from the field of positive psychology
offers a framework for health behavior change that highlights the importance of enhancing participants‘ ability to envision, act on,
and achieve goals that will lead to the desired health and life changes. HOPE Works seeks to increase hope among participants by
addressing obesity within the context of social and economic determinants of health (education, poverty, employment) among low-
income and minority women in two rural counties in NC. HOPE Works uses a community based participatory research approach
designed with the HPDP
Community Advisory Committee, and is implemented by Community Coordinators who work closely with
HPDP HOPE Works staff. Local community members serve as HOPE Circle Leaders and receive
training to lead bi-monthly HOPE Circles of 10 to 12 low-income, overweight women. HOPE circle
sessions provide social support, teach strategies for weight management, and help women set goals for
reaching health and economic/educational objectives. Participants receive monthly newsletters that
provide individualized health information and strategies to achieve targeted behavior changes as well as
the goals women set for health and life improvement. Community-wide events and interventions,
organized and implemented by the Community Advisory Committee (CAC) and the Community
Coordinators in conjunction with county Healthy Carolinians groups, foster community support. A
rigorous evaluation will assess the program‘s effects on HOPE Works participants followed over one
year as well as overall change in community health indicators over the 5-year project period. Evaluation
methods include focus groups, interviews, pre and post written surveys and pre and post random
community surveys.
Two HOPE Works spin-off projects, Seeds of HOPE and Threads of HOPE, address economic
empowerment through community-led strategic planning and the development of a micro-enterprise
business.
Hubbard program: The Program on Aging in the School of Medicine offers the Hubbard Program as a training opportunity
forstudents from multiple disciplines to practice collaboratively in the care of its older patients. Through weekly home visits with
patients and case conference meetings, advanced trainees in family medicine, pharmacy, occupational therapy, social workers and
nurses gain knowledge and skills in collaborative interdisciplinary practice while providing care to frail, older patients. The Hubbard
team provides a team assessment and then formulates a set of prioritized recommendations that are implemented by the primary-
care providers and others involved in the ongoing care of the patient. Web site: servnc.unc.edu/hubbard.htm
Contact: Cherie Rosemond, 919-843-8696, crosemon@med.unc.edu


iBiblio is one of the world's first Web sites and largest digital libraries. As a way to share and support free software, ibiblio has
grown to host more than 2,000 non-software related projects. From Project Gutenburg (the famous free book archive) to etree.org
(where fans of tape-friendly bands share concert music); from charities and non-profits both in North Carolina and worldwide
(notably those of the Tibetan government) to video documentaries of folk practice; and from educational sites to those of odd
amusements, ibiblio.org typically serves more than 16 million requests for information per day. In addition to its Web-based
services, ibiblio.org is involved in Internet2 projects, 3-D environments and video archiving and supports NASA educational videos
and the streaming of seven not-for-profit radio stations. ibiblio.org is also involved in free software development directly with several
local projects as well as leadership in the Linux Documentation Project.




Impact Awards for Graduate Students These awards recognize and encourage graduate students whose research is making a
difference to our state. Impact Award winners, selected by a faculty review committee, present their research, receive a cash award
and are recognized at the Annual Graduate Student Recognition Event. The research can have a direct impact on the citizens of
North Carolina (and beyond) or a more indirect impact through new knowledge or insights gained, educational, economic, health,
social and cultural or environmental effects that will be derived from the research endeavor. Projects have included research on
issues related to education, economic development, environmental issues, health and social services. One graduate student
worked with the North Carolina Rural Center for Economic Development to research and develop a new economic disaster
response program called R2R or Resources to Recover. This program is aimed at connecting nonprofit, faith-based organizations
to the state‘s workforce development system in an effort to respond to economic disasters, such as the closure of the Pillowtex
plant in Carbarrus County in 2003.



Improving the Care of Acutely Ill Elders Improving the health of North Carolina‘s elderly population by bringing education and
training in geriatric care to nurses in rural or underserved areas is the goal of a new partnership between the School of Nursing and
the N.C. Area Health Education Centers (AHEC) program. In August 2006, the program launched simultaneously in two
rural/underserved regions of North Carolina, including a five-county area where, according to U.S. census data, the poverty rate is
20.4 percent for persons aged 65 years and older. The state average for this age group is 13.7 percent. School of Nursing faculty
will teach two AHEC nurses from each area how to conduct the program workshops and the geriatric clinical simulations. The
AHEC nurses will then lead continuing education programs in their area. AHEC will provide the nurses with access to state-of-the-
art computerized mannequins for the clinical simulations.



Injury Prevention Research Center Founded in 1987, the University of North Carolina Injury Prevention Research Center (UNC
IPRC) is one of 12 "Centers of Excellence" funded by the National Center for Injury Prevention and Control, Centers for Disease
Control and Prevention. The Center's mission is to build the field of injury prevention and control through a combination of
interdisciplinary scholarly approaches to research, intervention, and evaluation as well as through the training of the next
generation of researchers and practitioners. Now in its 20th year of operation, the UNC IPRC is proud of it's accomplishments as a
mature and highly productive Center and strives to continue affecting change at the state, national, and international level.
INSPIRE is a science outreach student organization that was founded in 2002 and has been organized and run by UNC
undergraduates every spring and fall semester since, with a current faculty adviser in the College of Arts and Sciences. The
mission of the program is to provide K-12 teachers with enthusiastic undergraduate volunteers to help teach science in their
classrooms. In addition to providing this service to the community, the program also exposes undergraduates to the current state of
science education in North Carolina public schools, and encourages their consideration of science teaching careers. Each
semester, 30 to 40 undergraduates are partnered with participating K-12 teachers in the community (primarily Chapel Hill, Orange
County and Durham public schools), and each spends two to three hours per week in the classroom for 10 weeks. Each paired
teacher and INSPIRE volunteer negotiate the nature of this partnership to best serve the teacher‘s needs. Each student keeps a
log of weekly activities on the INSPIRE blackboard site and teacher evaluations are collected at the end each semester. The
response from teachers has been overwhelmingly positive. To date, more than 250 students have participated in the program,
logging more than 5,000 hours in the classroom.




Institute for Global Health and Infectious Diseases The Institute of Global Health and Infectious Diseases came out of                      x
discussions Mike Cohen, Director of the Center for Infectious Diseases in the School of Medicine, and I had with a variety of
leaders across campus. UNC-Chapel Hill is among a small minority of public and private universities with extensive and long-
standing strength in global health, including broad and important areas, such as nutrition, water, and infectious diseases. The new
Institute is seen as a way to catalyze this amazing depth and breadth of global health research, education and service being done
across UNC and around the world, making the work even stronger and deeper. The Office of Global Health in the UNC School of
Public Health (OGH) has been playing a central coordinating role for global health across campus, particularly through funding from
the Fogarty International Center and the Framework Program in Global Health grant that the OGH received. The new Institute will
expand on these efforts and has strong institutional support for sustainability.



Institute for Pharmacogenomics and Individualized Therapy, Pharmacogenomics for Every Nation Initiative By translating                      x
genetic discoveries into new ways to diagnose and treat disease, a new research institute launched at UNC will make drugs safer
and more effective and speed laboratory discoveries to physicians and patients. The Institute for Pharmacogenomics and
Individualized Therapy (IPIT), based at the UNC School of Pharmacy, brings together researchers and clinicians across Carolina to
create therapies and treatments for patients suffering from a wide variety of conditions. The institute initially will partner with the
UNC Lineberger Comprehensive Cancer Center to focus on cancer therapy, with planned expansion into cardiovascular disease,
psychiatric disorders and global health. The results will have both economic and health benefits. Pharmacogenomics is a new field
exploring how information in our genes influences our response to drugs. It involves integrating pharmacology with modern
advances in genome analysis. The institute‘s goal is to fully integrate personalized medicine into medical practice by providing
tools and tests for physicians to identify patients at risk for adverse reactions or those who are likely to benefit from a particular
treatment. Institute researchers will also identify drug targets, such as genetic markers in tumor cells, to guide development of new
drugs. IPIT will house one of 10 research centers that form the National Institutes of Health‘s Pharmacogenomics Research
Network. The institute‘s researchers also lead the Pharmacogenomics for Every Nation Initiative, a global effort to help countries
make better informed public health decisions using genetic information.



Institute for the Environment The UNC Institute for the Environment is leading UNC‘s world-renowned environmental community                 x
in developing solutions to critical challenges. The Institute carries out its public service mission in several ways, including through
its Environmental Resource Program, which promotes environmental stewardship and public health through education, research
and community service, and through various field sites, at which students and faculty work with communities to examine
environmental issues of local concern. The North Carolina Naturally program provides a state-wide database and decision support
tool for conservation and planning. An upcoming project is the report ―Energy and Environment in North Carolina.‖ The report, to
be released this summer, would assess all known UNC system energy and environment programs and would provide thoughts,
from faculty leaders' perspectives, about how the Carolina and the system could assist all sectors of the state with this critical issue.



Interdisciplinary Health Communication Health communication is a potent tool for improving the public‘s health. To be most
effective, health communication builds on expertise from many disciplines. UNC has leading programs in journalism and mass
communication, public health, information and library science, psychology and allied fields that are working together to build a new
science of health communication. The IHC initiative at UNC fosters synergy among these disciplines that makes this a uniquely
interdisciplinary place to conduct research and receive graduate training in health communication.
Our Certificate in Interdisciplinary Health Communication provides current degree-seeking residential UNC-Chapel Hill graduate
students with specialized training in health communication. Courses are designed to build expertise for applied practice, academic
and research settings.
IHC sponsors a series of colloquia for students and faculty to discuss emerging research issues. Speakers come from UNC and
from other universities and organizations.
IHC faculty who represent a half dozen disciplines provide a deeply interdisciplinary perspective on the study of health
communication. They conduct research on e-health, message tailoring, risk communication, health decision making,
dissemination, media effects, psychological processes, usability of electronic medical information and health marketing.
Interdisciplinary Health Communication Center (IHCC) The mission of IHCC is to pioneer innovative approaches to health
communication through graduate education, local and global outreach, and its priority research areas (e-health and health
informatics, message design and effects, and medical decision making). In 2007 IHCC established a graduate Certificate in
Interdisciplinary Health Communication, the first health communication certificate in the country specifically focusing on
interdisciplinary approaches. Eight graduate students from 4 departments are enrolled in the program as it starts its first year and
17 students have enrolled in the core theories and methods course.

Interdisciplinary Health Communication Certificate Program through the School of Journalism and Mass Communication,                       x
Information and Library Sciences, School of Public Health and Department of Psychology The Certificate prepares current
degree-seeking residential UNC-Chapel Hill graduate students to use theory-informed health communication strategies in applied
practice, academic and research settings. It supplements students� degree programs with focused training in one of two tracks:
Psychological processes - examining how health communication leads people to change their health behaviors.
Integrated communication strategies - examining how to create and deliver health communication messages and interventions
through interpersonal communication, print media and electronic media.



Interdisciplinary Obesity Center The escalating prevalence of obesity and its consequences is a serious and unresolved
challenge. Obesity prevention and treatment have had limited success to date, in part because interventions have focused on
isolated factors and adopted a "one size fits all" approach.
    We hypothesize that obesity must be addressed within a complex, individualized system of proximate and distal biological and
environmental factors using an intensive interdisciplinary approach. To be effective, such an approach requires coalescing
scientists and practitioners who specialize in obesity from a broad range of perspectives and providing them with a fertile
environment and infrastructure to synergize their expertise with that of investigators from other key disciplines.
    The long-term goal of this interdisciplinary strategy is to define effective interventions for prevention and treatment of obesity.
Our vision for this NIH Roadmap planning grant (P20RR20649) is to build on the collaborative environment at UNC that includes
departments that cross the Schools of Public Health and Medicine, Allied Health Sciences, and Arts and Sciences, and NIH-funded
centers that are addressing the obesity epidemic, including the Clinical Nutrition Research Center, Carolina Population Center, the
Center for Environmental Health Sciences, and the Lineberger Cancer Center.



International Health Forum The School of Medicine has a long and distinguished history of international activity. Throughout the          x
School's fifty years as four-year institution, faculty members and students have studied the impact of global health and disease
upon their own interests and those of their current and future patients. They have collaborated with research colleagues in foreign
institutions, exchanged teaching and learning settings with peers in other countries, and experienced firsthand the difficulties and
rewards of providing medical care, conducting research and studying medicine under conditions far different from those at home,
but conditions which provide valuable insight into North Carolina's health care needs.

Each year between 30 and 40 School of Medicine students travel abroad for international projects and electives. Many of these
projects are arranged individually by students with the help of faculty mentors. Other students participate in programs that have
been designed by School of Medicine faculty and cooperating colleagues abroad.




Internet Cigarette Vendors (ICV) Study Since 1999, the ICV study has been examining the sales and marketing practices of
Internet Cigarette Vendors (ICVs) and their impact on public health and policy issues such as cigarette excise tax evasion and
youth access prevention, as well as attempting to learn more about how Internet vendors of all illicit materials can be better
regulated. Using state of the art techniques, the study has identified, catalogued, archived, and analyzed more than 2800 ICV
websites since its inception.

Joint Plan for Dentistry in North Carolina A joint initiative between UNC-Chapel Hill and East Carolina University to address the
increase and distribution of the dental work force statewide and North Carolina citizens' access to dental care. The plan provides
for the construction of a new Dental Sciences Building at UNC-Chapel Hill focusing on enhancing opportunities in education,
service and patient-centered research, and an increase in DDS class size from 81 to up to 100. The plan also provides for the
creation of a new dental school (DDS class size: 50) at East Carolina University and service-learning centers affiliated with ECU
within underserved communities statewide.
Jordan Institute for Families is the research, training and technical assistance arm of the School of Social Work. The Institute is
an example of how a school includes the community voice in institutional planning. Addressing family issues across the lifespan,
the Jordan Institute brings together experts -- including families themselves -- to develop and test policies and practices that
strengthen families and engage communities. The School of Social Work provides extensive training and technical assistance
through the Jordan Institute. Community partners can access a list of programs in their area through an interactive map on the
School‘s website. These projects provide technical assistance, training, and information to help families become healthy and stable.




Journal of World Health and Population Best practices, policy and innovations in the administration of healthcare in developing        x
communities and countries. For administrators, academics, researchers and policy leaders. Includes peer reviewed research
papers. Edited by Dr. John Paul, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill.

Kellogg Health Scholars Program The goal of the Health Scholars Program is to reduce and eliminate health disparities by
developing young leaders who participate in community-based participatory research (CBPR). CBPR is a collaborative approach
through which research endeavors are chosen based on the needs of a community. It aims to combine academic study with social
and policy initiatives that will improve health outcomes. The University of North Carolina School of Public Health is one of eight
national training sites for the program. The UNC Center for Health Promotion and Disease Prevention, a research center with
expertise in community research, administers the UNC grant. Kellogg Health Scholars at UNC become involved in any number of
community-based initiatives to promote individual wellness, community competence and social change.




Kellogg Initiative The School of Public Health is one of 12 U.S. schools and graduate programs of public health (chosen among
26 schools that applied) selected in January 2006 to participate in the Engaged Institutions Initiative funded by the W.K. Kellogg
Foundation. The initiative seeks to support and promote the sustained efforts of institutions of higher education working in
partnership with communities to eliminate racial and ethnic health disparities. As part of this initiative, we have developed a team
that includes school faculty and students, university officials, state and local representatives and community members who will be
working to develop an action plan for becoming increasingly engaged in community activities and research to eliminate health
disparities. Consultants will be sent to assist the team throughout the year-long initiative.


Kids Eating Smart and Moving More (KESMM) The purpose of this program is to provide brief, evidence-based assessment
and counseling tools to help primary care practices identify and treat childhood overweight and to evaluate the usefulness of the
approach when offered by providers, by case managers / trained health advisors and by both together. This program is designed
for use in children of all ages, but the study is testing the approaches for families of kids receiving Medicaid or NC Health Choice
aged 3-8 years in 24 selected practices in NC.

Leadership Center for Math and Science Teachers (LC-MAST) funded by Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics
(STEM), is a partnership involving the UNC School of Education and the national Center for Teaching Quality and designed to help
science and mathematics teachers to become nationally board certified.

Lineberger Comprehensive Cancer Center As part of the UNC system, the Center is the only public comprehensive cancer
center for the State and the people of North Carolina. Our Mission is to reduce cancer occurrence and death in North Carolina and
the nation through research, treatment, training and outreach. Center faculty treat cancer patients, conduct research into the
causes of cancer, develop and direct statewide programs in cancer prevention and train future physicians, nurses, scientists, and
public health professionals.
Malawi-Carolina Summer Public Health Institute The third annual Malawi-UNC Summer Institute will be held in June 2008 at               x
the University of Malawi College of Medicine in Blantyre. UNC has over 250 employees in Malawi conducting research and
providing health care on nutrition and infectious diseases such as HIV and malaria.


Malawi Project (School of Dentistry) The project provides an experience for four dental students to go for nearly a month to           x
provide much-needed dental care and oral health education in Malawi. The program's goals are the following: 1) Provide a cultural
exchange between UNC students and Malawians. 2) Educate Malawian school-aged children about oral health and hygiene and
about the HIV/AIDS epidemic and risks associated with the disease (ages 6-18). 3) Provide emergency, preventive and restorative
care to those in need in the Lilongwe Hospital. The participating dental students are learning while delivering important services
and will return better prepared to meet unmet health needs in their own communities. Related to this program, the School also
sponsors outreach efforts in Mexico and Honduras
Management Academy for Public Health Management Academy prepares teams of health professionals for new management                          x
challenges in community health. Management Academy will build your skills in managing money, people, data and partnerships.
Every team writes and presents a public health business plan designed to attack a key public health problem in your community.




MEASURE Project As a key component of the United States Agency for International Development's (USAID) Monitoring and
Evaluation to Assess and Use REsults (MEASURE) framework, MEASURE Evaluation forges international partnerships in
monitoring and evaluation, builds country capacity to produce and use quality health and population data, and strengthens health
information systems.
MEASURE Evaluation promotes a continuous cycle of data demand, collection, analysis and utilization to improve population and
health systems.

Media Law Handbook which was first published in 1992, is widely used by North Carolina journalists for whom it provides a ready
reference to information about libel, privacy, access to public records and meetings, the journalist‘s privilege, copyright law,
advertising regulation, and the North Carolina court system. The handbook‘s contents were researched and written by North
Carolina lawyers and academicians, each of whom contributed the time and effort to compile a chapter. Together with Cathy
Packer, a professor at the School of Journalism and Mass Communication, EGHS partners Amanda Martin and Hugh Stevens
have edited and produced an updated edition (2007), published by the North Carolina Press Foundation and the School of
Journalism and Mass Communication.


Medical Journalism Program (SOJ) at the School of Journalism and Mass Communication communicates with citizens across
the state about important health and environmental issues through a nine-year collaboration with UNC-TV. Since 1998, student
teams under the supervision of Dr. Tom Linden have prepared 17 six- to seven-minute reports on health and environmental issues
that have been broadcast on ―North Carolina Now‖ on UNC-TV. Many of the master‘s projects and theses prepared by graduate
students in our Medical Journalism Program have focused on health problems around the state. Students have prepared series of
articles, radio and video reports on a multitude of health-related issues. These reports are all archived in the Park Library in the
School of Journalism and Mass Communication. In addition, students in the science documentary television class have partnered
with independent Chapel Hill producers and UNC-TV to produce a half-hour documentary on the Haw River that aired on UNC-TV
in April 2001. One goal of the Medical Journalism Program is to provide a laboratory for learning for undergraduate and graduate
students while communicating to a larger statewide audience.



Mini Medical School (School of Medicine) UNC Mini-Medical School, features renowned researchers from the UNC-CH School
of Medicine addressing some of the latest developments in medical science. Participants need not have a background in science
or medicine to enroll – just an interest in medicine and a healthy curiosity about the science behind it. The lecture series is
specifically designed for non-medical people.


Minority Health Project (School of Public Health) The overall purpose of the Minority Health Project (MHP) is to improve the
quality of available data on racial and ethnic populations, to expand the capacity of minority-health researchers to conduct
statistical research and develop research proposals, and to foster a network of researchers in minority health. Toward these goals,
the Minority Health Project, in collaboration with other units in the University of North Carolina School of Public Health, the National
Center for Health Statistics and the Association of Schools of Public Health, conducts educational programs including the Annual
Summer Public Health Research Institute and Videoconference on Minority Health, provides information on research and sources
of data on minority health, and maintains an extensive set of links to organizations at UNC-CH and elsewhere.




National Children’s Study This study is the largest long-term look at the effects of social, behavioral, biological, community and
environmental factors on human health and development ever conducted in the U.S. Study activities will begin in seven Vanguard
Sites, including Duplin County, in summer 2008. A team of researchers from CPC/UNC, Duke University, Battelle Memorial
Institute and Mount Sinai School of Medicine are working together on planning and implementing the study. Ultimately, a national
probability sample of 100,000 children will be identified, as early as possible in pregnancy. These children will be followed for 21
years to explore the causes of a variety of health problems including obesity, injuries, asthma, and developmental delays. This
project has been funded in whole or in part with federal funds from the National Institutes of Health, Department of Health and
Human Services.
National Public Health Leadership Institute Public health is as complex, as important, and as challenging now as it ever has
been. CDC has re-funded the Public Health Leadership Institute to convene the new leaders and new partners who together will
confront the new challenges in public health. The goal: create new cadres of public health leaders who will help lead change in the
public health system. The new PHLI is a one-year leadership development program for high-potential leaders with a commitment
to leading in their own organizations and communities, but also leading system change on the national scene.




Native Health Initiative (NHI) The NHI, organized by medical student Anthony Fleg, focuses on the health disparities facing
American Indians communities in North Carolina. Now in its fourth year, the project is a collaboration between student volunteers
and American Indian communities. The principles behind NHI include educating future health care providers on the health issues
facing Native communities, providing sustainable benefits to the communities
involved, supporting meaningful cultural exchange and empowering American Indian youth through mentoring and training.
Projects began in the summer of 2005 in Waccamaw, Siouan and Lumbee communities, and NHI‘s work has since expanded.
Each summer, the NHI sends students to work with tribes throughout the state.


NC Area Health Education Centers The mission of the N.C. AHEC Program is to meet the state‘s health and health workforce
needs by providing educational programs in partnership with academic institutions, health care agencies and other organizations
committed to improving the health of the people of North Carolina. AHEC educational programs and information services target
improving the distribution and retention of health-care providers, with a special emphasis on primary care and prevention;
improving the diversity and cultural competence of the health care workforce in all health disciplines; enhancing the quality of care
and improving health care outcomes; and addressing the health care needs of underserved communities and populations. There
are nine AHEC regional centers throughout the state: the Mountain AHEC in Asheville; Northwest AHEC in Winston-Salem;
Charlotte AHEC; Greensboro AHEC; Wake AHEC in Raleigh; Southern Regional AHEC in Fayetteville; Eastern AHEC in
Greenville; Area L AHEC in Rocky Mount; and Coastal AHEC in Wilmington, plus an AHEC program office on the campus of Duke
University in Durham


NC Botanical Garden Besides its displays of native and unusual plants and its nature trails, the N.C. Botanical Garden offers art
exhibits, nature walks and courses on topics ranging from home gardening to botanical illustration. The garden is open to the public
daily for recreation and learning, including certificate programs in botanical illustration and native plant studies and classes and
workshops in gardening, botany, ecology, and botanical illustration. The Visiting Plants Program provides native plants to
elementary schools for classroom study, while school children may visit the garden for workshops, classes, guided tours, hikes and
programs correlated with the N.C. Standard Course of Study.

NC Breast Screening Program Based at the UNC Lineberger Comprehensive Cancer Center, the NC-BSP is dedicated to
reducing late-stage diagnosis of breast and cervical cancer in older African American women living in eastern North Carolina. The
program‘s efforts to increase mammography and Pap testing rates aim to improve quality and length of life for rural African
American women and, ultimately, contribute to greater equality in health between black and white women.




NC Cancer Hospital The N.C. General Assembly approved $180 million in funding for a new cancer hospital to be built by the
UNC Health Care System that will replace an aging cancer treatment facility originally built in the 1950s as a tuberculosis
sanatorium. The new hospital will also serve as the clinical home for the UNC Lineberger Comprehensive Cancer Center, one of
only 38 such National Cancer Institute-designated centers in the United States. Tentatively scheduled to open in late 2009, the
Cancer Hospital will provide North Carolinians with complete clinical cancer care and research facilities in one building. The seven-
story, 320,000-square-foot hospital is being built in front of the N.C. Neurosciences Hospital, just to the east of the building it is to
replace, the N.C. Clinical Cancer Center (also known as the Gravely Building).



North Carolina Center for Public Health Preparedness (also ETCD) The North Carolina Center for Public Health Preparedness
is a program of the North Carolina Institute for Public Health, the service and outreach arm of the University of North Carolina's
School of Public Health. The overall mission of NCCPHP is to improve the capacity of the public health workforce to prepare for
and respond to terrorism and other emerging public health threats by: assessing the competency of the public health workforce in
core public health skills and bioterrorism preparedness, facilitating training to meet the assessed needs, and carrying out applied
research on emerging health issues.

NC Civic Education Initiative
NC Institute for Public Health is the service and outreach arm of the prestigious School of Public Health at the University of North    x
Carolina at Chapel Hill. Its mission is to bring the public health scholarship and practice communities together for the common
purpose of improving the public's health and human well-being.
NCIPH is a key public health resource for imparting timely and practical knowledge about ongoing and emerging public health
issues. Its intention is to raise public awareness and stimulate discourse about public health issues, policy, and practice. Examples
of emerging public health issues include disaster and disease preparedness, accreditation, health disparities, and obesity.
As a constituent of UNC, the Institute is committed to the public health needs of North Carolina, placing those first. But public
health issues go beyond geographic boundaries. The Institute provides services to the public health communities of neighboring
states, the nation, and the world.
NCIPH provides a range of learning and development experiences that constitute the largest, most comprehensive set of public
health professional development resources in the country. It provides high-quality credit and non-credit education in accessible
venues at affordable prices.
Consulting Services provides a range of consulting services that rely on evidence-based scholarship, assessment, and strategic
planning.
 Evaluation Services at the Institute provides comprehensive, customer- focused, high quality program planning and evaluation
services, in accordance with the American Evaluation Association guidelines and in keeping with the Institute's mission of linking
practice and academia.




NC Thurston Arthritis Research Center, School of Medicine The Thurston Arthritis Research Center was established at the
University of North Carolina‘s School of Medicine in 1981. Our mission is to investigate the causes, consequences and treatments
of arthritis and autoimmune diseases and to reduce their impacts on patients, their families and society.



NC Tobacco Free Schools and Quitline Marketing

North Carolina Disease Event Tracking and Epidemiologic Collection Tool (NC DETECT) NC DETECT provides statewide
early event detection and timely public health surveillance to public health officials and hospital users. NC DETECT was created by
the North Carolina Division of Public Health (NC DPH) in 2004 in collaboration with the UNC Department of Emergency Medicine to
address the need for early event detection and timely public health surveillance in North Carolina using a variety of secondary data
sources. Authorized users are currently able to view data from emergency departments, the Carolinas Poison Center, and the Pre-
hospital Medical Information System (PreMIS). Data from the Piedmont Wildlife Center, the NCSU College of Veterinary Medicine
Laboratories, and select urgent care centers are in final testing and will soon be available for user analysis. NC DETECT analyzes
these data sources with CUSUM algorithms from the Early Aberration Reporting System (EARS), developed by the Centers for
Disease Control and Prevention. NC DETECT is designed, developed and maintained by staff at the Department of Emergency
Medicine at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill with funding by the NC DPH. New functionality is added regularly based
on end user feedback.



NC Health Careers Access Program (NC-HCAP) Since 1971, NC-HCAP has served thousands of students, administrators,
practitioners, health professionals, advisors, health professions programs, community health agencies and local Area Health
Education Centers (AHEC). Today, NC-HCAP continues to develop innovative ways to serve our students and to contribute to the
overall health and well-being of North Carolina's citizens.

North Carolina Graduated Driver Licensing System Review This review was published in the journal, Traffic Injury Prevention,
and focuses on the implementation of North Carolina's Graduated Driver Licensing (GDL) system. The study demonstrates the
effectiveness of the program in reducing hospitalizations in the NC teenage community. This project demonstrates how UNC
researchers help to validate NC legislature, programs and community initiatives.

NC Health Info To assist North Carolinians with their health information needs, the Health Sciences Library developed N.C.
Health Info (www.nchealthinfo.org), a website that provides Internet users with quick and easy access to quality health information.
This summer, N.C. Health Info will be expanded into a health information portal, where North Carolinians of any literacy level may
find health information that is easy-to-read, or presented visually with audio narration. Users will find information about health
insurance, preparedness and public safety, mental health, alternative medicine and wellness, drugs and supplements, lab tests
and diagnostic procedures, educational tools, and news, all with a North Carolina focus. The portal will feature information for
citizen-soldiers and their families, seniors and Spanish speakers. The portal‘s design and development is being led by the Health
Sciences Library and conducted by a multi-institutional group of academic health sciences libraries and public and AHEC libraries
throughout North Carolina.
NC Institute for Public Health N.C. Institute for Public Health The NCIPH is the service and outreach arm of the School of Public      x
Health. Its mission is to bring the public health scholarship and practice communities together to inform and stimulate scholars and
to empower practitioners for the common purpose of improving the public‘s health and human well-being, placing the needs of
North Carolina first. Management Academy for Public Health, Southeast Public Health Leadership Institute, National PUblic
Health Leadership Institute, Emerging Leaders in Public Health.

North Carolina Center for Public Health Preparedness (also ETCD) The North Carolina Center for Public Health Preparedness
is a program of the North Carolina Institute for Public Health, the service and outreach arm of the University of North Carolina's
School of Public Health. The overall mission of NCCPHP is to improve the capacity of the public health workforce to prepare for
and respond to terrorism and other emerging public health threats by: assessing the competency of the public health workforce in
core public health skills and bioterrorism preparedness, facilitating training to meet the assessed needs, and carrying out applied
research on emerging health issues.


North Carolina Health Careers Access Program (NC-HCAP) Through a variety of programs and activities geared toward
disadvantaged students -- from elementary to graduate school -- as well as to their parents, mentors and communities, NC-HCAP
works to increase the number of these students trained and employed in the health professions in our state. When these students
pursue their careers in North Carolina's underserved communities, they promote a higher quality of life for us all.



North Carolina Public Health Academy The Academy's goal is to broaden public health professional development opportunities
and experiences through AHEC‘s multi-site educational system. "Schools" for different public health professions will provide public
health leaders and clinicians with access to knowledge and skills needed to deal with the rapidly changing public health
environment by linking them to state-of-the-art learning methods. The first schools will be for health directors and medical
residents. In the future, schools will be developed for public health nurses, environmental health specialists and social workers.



North Carolina Scholastic Media Association The North Carolina Scholastic Media Association (NCSMA) serves scholastic
journalism and works for its advancement. Member schools include junior high and high schools from across the state. A few
elementary schools are also members.
North Carolina WAY (Worksite Activities for You!) to Health Researchers at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill are
recruiting more than 1,200 overweight employees at several North Carolina colleges and universities for a study of workplace
weight-loss programs. The project will test four worksite-based weight-loss programs. Researchers hope to uncover cost-effective
ways for employers to help employees lose weight and keep it off.

―The overarching goal is to identify effective and cost-effective weight loss programs that can be easily implemented by employers
and help employees keep the weight off,‖ said Laura Linnan, Sc.D., the study‘s principal investigator and associate professor of
health behavior and health education in the UNC School of Public Health. The five-year ―WAY to Health‖ project (WAY is an
acronym for Worksite Activities for You) is based at the UNC Center for Health Promotion and Disease Prevention and funded by a
$3.4 million grant from the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute. The WAY to Health weight-loss programs at each of 14
participating colleges or universities will last 18 months. Weight loss is a primary focus, but will also monitor changes in the
campus environment to support employee health.
North Carolina Women’s Health Report Card A partnership between the School of Medicine and the Cecil G. Sheps Center for
Health Services Research, the Center for Women‘s Health Research (CWHR) produces this report card based on ongoing survey
research every two years. The researchers are particularly concerned with health disparities across racial subgroups as they exist
in the state comparing them to federal guidelines on health related to the Centers for Disease and Prevention Control and also the
National Institutes of Health‘s ‗Healthy People 2010‘ goals. The report card plays an important role in indicating further areas of
consideration for researchers and local policymakers in the areas of women‘s health.


North Carolina Youth Empowerment Study (NC YES) NC YES is a participatory research study examining the impact of youth
empowerment in preventing tobacco use. Funded by the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation, the three-year study aims to convene
an Advisory Board of lay youth and adults in a participatory research process, document the characteristics of youth programs for
tobacco-use prevention and control in North Carolina and track the role of youth involvement in initiating and implementing 100
percent tobacco-free policies in North Carolina schools.



Nourish International At Nourish International, we work to bridge the gap between students and developing communities,                 x
between good ideas and the resources they require.
   Since 2002, Nourish International has sought innovative and effective ways to make a tangible reduction in poverty around the
world. From its humble beginnings at one university to its current presence across the U.S., Nourish has achieved its goal by
teaching students the principles of sustainable enterprise and investing in pioneering development projects.
Nutrition and Physical Activity Self-Assessment for child Car (NAPSACC) The NAP SACC program contains a number of
components including a self-assessment instrument, continuing education workshops, collaborative action planning and technical
assistance materials, and an extensive resource manual which includes copy ready materials. The NAP SACC intervention was
designed for implementation through an existing infrastructure of public health professionals, typically registered nurses and health
educators, trained as NAP SACC Consultants. Key steps in the intervention, which typically takes place over 6 months, include the
following:

Nutrition Research Institute (NRI) a part of the School of Public Health at UNC-Chapel Hill, is located on the new N.C. Research
Campus in Kannapolis. Using cutting edge new methods in nutrigenomics and metabolomics, the researchers seek to understand
why people are metabolically different and how this affects health and nutrition recommendations. Research by Institute Director
Dr. Steven Zeisel includes the role of choline in human nutrition and the use of phytochemicals as possible cancer prevention
treatments.



Office of Economic and Business Development (OEBD) matches faculty and campus expertise and resources with economic                           x
development issues facing North Carolina and its communities and organizations. This office is led by Jesse White Jr., who
headed the Appalachian Regional Commission and the Southern Growth Policies Board.
During its first year of operations, OEBD worked within the university to develop a network of faculty interested in economic
development work in North Carolina. It also worked on several economic development projects in the state, including Carolina‘s
response to the state‘s successful bid to have Credit Suisse First Boston locate a major facility in the RTP area. At the
announcement ceremony, the company stated that the assets of our universities were a deciding factor in locating in North
Carolina. In addition, OEBD took the leadership role, along with the Friday Center for Continuing Education, in having UNC-Chapel
Hill become an associate of the Hickory Metropolitan Higher Education Council. Carolina can now offer credit, noncredit and
special courses and seminars in the Hickory facility. Another successful project was OEBD‘s role in helping the North Carolina
Rural Economic Development Center secure a Kellogg Foundation grant to create an entrepreneurial support system in rural North
Carolina. A multiyear, multimillion dollar grant, Carolina‘s School of Government will play a significant role in training local officials.
OEBD also continued work in Carteret County begun by the Carolina Center for Competitive Economies by analyzing the marine
sciences cluster there and working with the Economic Development Council of the county.




Office of Global Health The Office of Global Health at the UNC School of Public Health is the organizing unit for global health               x
activities at the School. Based in the Dean's Office, the OGH is lead by the Associate Dean for Global Health, Peggy Bentley, and
the Director, Gretchen Van Vliet. This organizational structure allows global health to be integrated into each department in the
School, rather than as a separate department. This makes interdisciplinary global health research, teaching and practice easier to
accomplish and more effective.
    The Office of Global Health actively supports the faculty, staff, and students of the UNC School of Public Health in their efforts
to improve the health of the world's populations. The goals of the OGH include increasing awareness of the great diversity of global
health research, teaching, and service activities underway in the School; creating more global educational and research
opportunities for students and faculty; serving as a resource for faculty engaged in global health research by identifying funding
opportunities and supporting proposal development; and enhancing cooperative partnerships with investigators and institutions
from around the university, the state, the nation, and the world.


Office of Technology Development The Office of Technology Development (OTD), in support of the university's mission to
encourage innovation and disseminate knowledge, serves the university and the public by licensing discoveries developed by
faculty, students and staff. OTD also assists faculty in obtaining research support from corporate sponsors.
We negotiate and create agreements, provide patent assistance, and assist in obtaining corporate sponsored research. A
complete list of our services is available.



Office of Undergraduate Research includes a number of internships and opportunities for students to conduct community
engaged research. These opportunities include fellowships supported by APPLES Service Learning Program and the Carolina
Center for Public Service, FPG Child Development Center and the Smallwood Foundation.
One Atmosphere Research Program The UNC Ambient Air Research Facility is used to study the chemistry of gaseous air
pollutants. Framed in wood, the structure is lined with transparent Teflon film walls through which ultraviolet, infra-red and natural
light can pass. Located three miles east of Pittsboro, N.C., the structure is the nation‘s largest and the world‘s second largest
outdoor smog chamber. Human lung cells, which are used to represent the lining of the respiratory tract, have been incorporated
into the research conducted there by connecting the chambers to incubators in the adjacent lab via aircarrying glass and Teflon
tubes. Findings from this program have provided North Carolina as well as global audiences with information regarding the
interaction of sunlight with various air pollutants and the combined effect on human lung cells. Throughout the last three decades,
the School‘s contributions to clean air have been substantial. The studies from the One Atmosphere Research Program have
helped the EPA demonstrate how control of hydrocarbon gases might affect ozone and nitrogen dioxide levels in urban areas.
Since 1975, the School‘s researchers have also provided the EPA with data to test mathematical computer models that help the
EPA regulate ozone levels throughout the country.



Partnerships for Inclusion, Frank Porter Graham Child Development Institute A program of Frank Porter Graham Child
Development Institute, PFI is a statewide technical assistance project with offices in the western, central and eastern regions of
North Carolina. PFI promotes the inclusion of young children with disabilities, from birth through five, in all aspects of community
life. PFI collaborates with local inter-agency groups to sponsor public forums, specializes in staff development activities that meet
the needs of mixed audiences from different agencies and
provides technical assistance to improve the quality of community services to children and families. Other services include the
North Carolina Early Intervention Library, which contains print and video materials available to parents and professionals.


Pediatric Telemedicine Clinic, School of Medicine Parents whose children need to see medical specialists are taking
advantage of technology that lets them stay in the Wilmington area while being checked out by doctors located hundreds of miles
away.
Telemedicine, a growing trend using the Internet, video conferencing, telephone and other tools to allow for remote visits by
doctors, is increasingly being tapped to improve health care access in rural areas.
In Southeastern North Carolina, doctors are using the equipment to address the statewide shortage in several pediatric
subspecialties, including the physicians who treat children with physical disabilities or lung problems.


Period of Purple Crying: Keeping Babies Safe in North Carolina is a statewide educational program involving UNC-CH Injury
Prevention Center, School of Medicine, School of Journalism and Mass Communication, and Duke University Medical Center.


Pharmacogenomics for Every Nation Initiative The Institute for Pharmacogenomics and Individualized Therapy (IPIT) will                   x
house one of 10 research centers that form the National Institutes of Health‘s Pharmacogenomics Research Network. The
institute‘s researchers also lead the Pharmacogenomics for Every Nation Initiative, a global effort to help countries make better
informed public health decisions using genetic information.

Pilot study of mental health among Latino immigrants Through Russell Sage and William T. Grant-funded studies, Krista M.
Perreira, an assistant professor in the Department of Public Policy in the College of Arts and Sciences, investigates how
acculturation and migration processes influence the mental health and academic achievement of Latino youth in North Carolina.
She also studies ways to improve the well-being of immigrant youth by improving the understanding of their health, education, and
labor market experiences. She has become a local expert in collecting data from hard-to-reach, Latino immigrant populations.
Through this research, she is actively engaged in 10 schools across five different school systems in the state. In addition, she
works with the N.C. Department of Health and Human Services and many Latino-serving organizations throughout the state to
promote the development of evidence-based health and education interventions.



Practica/community-based courses in the professional schools Virtually every professional school requires students to
complete community practica or take community-based courses. For instance, in the School of Public Health, all master‘s students
in health behavior and health education are required to take ―Action-Oriented Community Diagnosis.‖ Using concepts and methods
from anthropology and epidemiology, this powerful service-learning course teaches students to conduct community-based
research. Over the last 25 years, more than 1,000 students have worked with over 262 communities. For example, a recent group
of students on one team, ¡Accion Latina!, interviewed community members and developed a plan to address identified problems
with health, education, employment and transportation. Such projects provide valuable information to community members who
can then develop informed plans.
Preventing child obesity and diabetes (School of Nursing) A School of Nursing-based research team began a three-year
intervention in January 2007 to reduce risk for type 2 diabetes among middle school students in rural North Carolina. Researchers
will study students at six North Carolina middle schools to determine if changes in schools can lower risk factors for type 2
diabetes. The study is part of the nationwide HEALTHY study sponsored by the National Institutes of Health. The research team
provides intervention schools with new physical activity equipment and with lesson plans to increase aerobic activity in physical
education classes. School cafeterias offer more nutritious food options along with a marketing campaign encouraging students to
select healthier choices. Schools also restrict choices made in vending machines. The intervention includes health education for
families and classroom-based education interventions for students. Given the rising prevalence of high weight and high glucose
among our children in North Carolina and across the United States, there is a critical need now to intervene and change behaviors
to prevent young people from developing diabetes or cardiovascular disease.




Program in Racial Disparities and Cardiovascular Disease During the past year, physicians and investigators at UNC-Chapel
Hill and East Carolina University have joined forces to create this partnership of communities, faculty and programs to enhance
and support access to the state‘s diverse cardiovascular patient populations and enable scientific collaborations that will bring near-
term breakthroughs in the understanding and treatment of this most common cause of illness and death in the United States.
Through its nationally recognized Schools of Medicine and Public Health, UNC-Chapel Hill provides a unique, highly interactive,
team approach to solving the problem of ethnic disparities in cardiovascular disease. The Carolina Cardiovascular Biology Center,
for example, is the fastest-growing cardiology program in the region and a national Center of Excellence with over $13 million per
year in competitively funded research dedicated to bettering detection and treatment of heart disease. The Carolina Center for
Genome Sciences is a national platform for health policy, patient advocacy and scientific inquiry that take advantage of the
explosion of knowledge of the human genome. The UNC Heart Center at Meadowmont and the UNC Latino Initiative together
provide clinical access to target patient populations crucial to understanding disparities in heart disease. And the university-wide
Ethnicity, Culture and Health Outcomes (ECHO) Program brings an evidence-based approach to culturally sensitive training,
education and service that is dedicated to reducing health disparities in communities across the state.




Project Archaeology Research laboratories of Archaeology K-12 Outreach and Raising Public Awareness of Archaeology
Project Archaeology. As state coordinators for this national program, we have offered teacher workshops and published a book of
4th through 8th grade lesson plans called Intrigue of the Past: North Carolina's First People. We are currently working closely with
LEARN|NC (UNC School of Education) in adapting these lesson plans for their digital history textbook project.



Project CONNECT: The Bridge to Healthy Communities Through Research The role of Project CONNECT is to build trusting
relationships with the black community that will lead to meaningful participation in disparities research and from these relationships
build a stable research population. Project CONNECT will accomplish this by 1) piloting the development of a registry of potential
research participants 2) networking with Black churches and community organizations to inform about different types of research,
what research participation may entail and what to expect from research participation and 3) identifying individuals who are
interested in being contacted about future research participation in health research, particularly cancer prevention and control
studies.
Serving as a liaison between registry participants and investigators, Project CONNECT will assist investigators in developing
culturally appropriate strategies for recruitment and retention of minority participants and disseminate summaries of studies to
volunteers to foster awareness of and interest in current research. Activities of Project CONNECT will enhance knowledge about
successful methods of minority recruitment and the effectiveness of a volunteer registry for facilitating enrollment of minority
participants into research studies. Current geographical focus areas include the following regions the Triangle (Orange, Durham,
and Wake counties), Area L AHEC (Edgecombe, Halifax, Nash, Northampton, and Wilson counties), Greensboro AHEC
(Alamance, Caswell, Chatham, Guilford, Montgomery, Orange, Randolph and Rockingham counties), and (DC)2 Network
Churches (Orange, Durham, Wake, Johnston, Duplin, Sampson, Cumberland, Robeson, Wilson, Vance, Warran, Halifax, Hertford,
and Bertie)
Funded by National Center for Minority Health and Health Disparities (5-P-60-MD000244-02)




Project Malawi (School of Public Health) The project provides an experience for four dental students to go for nearly a month to          x
provide much-needed dental care and oral health education in Malawi. The program's goals are the following: 1) Provide a cultural
exchange between UNC students and Malawians. 2) Educate Malawian school-aged children about oral health and hygiene and
about the HIV/AIDS epidemic and risks associated with the disease (ages 6-18). 3) Provide emergency, preventive and restorative
care to those in need in the Lilongwe Hospital. The participating dental students are learning while delivering important services
and will return better prepared to meet unmet health needs in their own communities. Related to this program, the School also
sponsors outreach efforts in Mexico and Honduras.
Project Measure at Carolina Population Center MEASURE Evaluation is a USAID-funded project implemented by the Carolina
Population Center at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill in partnership with John Snow Inc., Tulane University, Macro
International Inc., and Constella Futures. MEASURE provides technical assistance to health ministers, district caregivers and local
trainees to successfully manage data for better informed program planning and policy-making. The project‘s overall objective is to
improve the collection, analysis, and presentation of data to promote better use of data in planning, policy-making, managing,
monitoring, and evaluating population, health, and nutrition programs.




Project U~Stars, Frank Porter Graham Child Development Institute The project works with 49 schools in the state to help
kindergarten through third grade teachers recognize outstanding potential in their students.

Psychiatric Mental Health Nurse Practitioners (PMH-NP) The School of Nursing has opened a master‘s program and post-
master‘s certificate program (the first and only in the state) to prepare psychiatric mental health nurse practitioners. These
advanced-practice nurses will provide ―one-stop‖ diagnostic assessment, crisis intervention, psychotherapy, community
intervention and medication prescription and management in medically underserved areas throughout North Carolina. The School
of Nursing created this executive/distance curriculum with funding from a three-year grant from the federal Health Services
Research Administration (HRSA )and a partnership with the Graduate School and the Department of Mental Health, Developmental
Disabilities and Substance Abuse Services. The program recruits students who come from minority and disadvantaged
backgrounds and prepares them as PMH-CNS/NPs to remain in and serve their own communities after graduation. (This
commitment is a condition for funding of the students‘ tuition.) The first 12 students will graduate in 2007-2008; 10 of the 12 are
students of ethnic minority origin. Enrollment in the program will exceed 40 students in fall 2007. These graduates will make a
positive contribution to transforming the North Carolina mental health system. What happens here in North Carolina may become
the model for competent and compassionate mental health care for the nation.




Public Health Grand Rounds Public Health Grand Rounds is a series of satellite broadcasts and webcasts presenting real-world
case studies on public health issues ranging from obesity to bioterrorism, from SARS to food safety. A collaboration between the
Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill School of Public Health




Public Policy Practicum In this capstone course in the Department of Public Policy in the College of Arts and Sciences, students
majoring in public policy offer policy analyses and evaluations to North Carolina nonprofit agencies. As of 2000, North Carolina
had more than 29,000 nonprofit organizations that employed more than 15.9 million people he aims of these agencies include
improving economic equity, reducing institutionalized racism, increasing access to health and governmental services and generally
improving the choices facing women, immigrants and the poor. The leaders of these groups, however, don‘t always have the skills
they need to deliver these services in the best and most efficient way. The students in this class give nonprofits free advice on how
to meet their goals. For example, students in this course have provided an analysis to help determine the best way for a community
health center to deliver low-cost primary care to those just slightly out of range of Medicaid. Another project looked at a way to
improve the nutritional choices of those living in public housing.



Public/Private Legal Preparedness Initiative is a two-year initiative is designed to improve emergency preparedness and
response by removing the legal barriers that hinder effective and timely collaboration between the private, nonprofit, and public
sectors. The initiative will focus on two selected legislative/policy areas: Good Samaritan Liability Preparedness for business and
non-profit entities assisting in community emergencies and Development of Common Human Resources Polices for use during a
public health emergency.
Research Enrichment and Apprenticeship Program (REAP) For the past seven years, the School of Nursing has led a program
that creates mentoring partnerships between faculty researchers and nursing students who are members of a racial/ethnic minority
group. The program includes faculty mentors and students from North Carolina Central University, Winston-Salem State
University, and UNC-Chapel Hill. With funding from the National Institute of Nursing Research, NIH, the program has been able to
pay students $10 – $12/hour to work up to 172 hours on the mentors research project and to pay for them to attend and present at
a national conference. Ten students participate each year. Students also attend seven 2-hour seminars and conduct an individual
research project. The NIH funding will end June 2008. We would like to continue the program, because it has been so well
received by students and faculty, and to increase the number racial/ethnic minority students in master's and doctoral level
education in nursing and working toward careers in nursing research.
Renaissance Computing Institute (RENCI) Founded in 2004, RENCI is a major collaborative venture of UNC-Chapel Hill, Duke
University, N.C. State University and the state of North Carolina that uses sophisticated, high-performance computing resources
and expertise, primarily to help the state plan for and respond to disasters. Hurricanes and the floods and tornadoes that come in
their wake take a huge personal and economic toll on North Carolina. Between 1980 and 2005, the state endured more than 20
weather-related disasters that caused at least $1 billion in damage, according to NOAA‘s National Climate Data Center. The
RENCI approach to modeling, predicting and responding to hurricanes, severe storms and flooding is multifaceted:



RENCI, Carolina Floodplain Mapping Program, at the request of the state of North Carolina Floodplain Mapping Program with
funding from the Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) , is modernizing the floodplain maps by computing a series of
worst-case scenario flood models for coastal North Carolina using Ocracoke, RENCI‘s IBM Blue Gene/L supercomputer. Over
500,000 Ocracoke computing hours will be needed to complete the research. The new floodplain models will replace outdated,
lower resolution models that do not account for extensive coastal elevation and land use datasets developed over the last seven
years. Better representation of the physical world will also account for the rapid growth over the last 15 years of housing,
commercial and tourist developments. The new models will provide federal and state emergency response agencies with a more
accurate, reliable and available source of floodplain information. For homeowners, the new models will reveal much information
about their year-to-year flood risks, including the likelihood of experiencing a 100-year, or base, flood in any given year. The 100-
year flood is a regulatory standard used by federal agencies and most states to administer floodplain management programs. The
100-year flood is also used by the National Flood Insurance Program as the basis for insurance requirements nationwide.




Research Enrichment and Apprenticeship Program (REAP) led by the School of Nursing, creates mentoring partnerships                      x
between faculty researchers and nursing students who are members of a racial/ethnic minority group. The program includes
faculty mentors and students from North Carolina Central University, Winston-Salem State University, and UNC-Chapel Hill. With
funding from the National Institute of Nursing Research, NIH, the program has been able to pay students $10 – $12/hour to work
up to 172 hours on the mentors research project and to pay for them to attend and present at a national conference. Ten students
participate each year. Students also attend seven 2-hour seminars and conduct an individual research project. The NIH funding will
end June 2008. We aim to continue the program, because it has been so well received by students and faculty, and to increase
the number racial/ethnic minority students in master's and doctoral level education in nursing and working toward careers in
nursing research.


Roadmap for Medical Research This initiative is intended to focus future NIH funding in 21 broad areas of concentration,
encouraging researchers to attack difficult problems using interdisciplinary collaboration and sophisticated computational
techniques to create quick translations to patient care. UNC-Chapel Hill was the only university to receive eight of 21 grants in the
fall 2005 Roadmap competition. This funding so far totals $15.5 million and includes starting the Carolina Center of
Nanotechnology Excellence, which will marry expertise in nanotechnology with patient research at the Lineberger Comprehensive
Cancer Center. In 2004, Carolina also received more of the initial Roadmap grants than any other university.



Southeast Public Health Leadership Institute The Southeast Public Health Leadership Institute is a year-long leadership
development program, within the University of North Carolina School of Public Health, for mid- to senior level public health
administrators working in the states of Arkansas, North Carolina, South Carolina, Tennessee, Virginia and West Virginia.
The Institute supports the strengthening of leadership competencies, such as creating a shared vision, personal awareness,
systems thinking, risk communication, team building, ethical decision making and political and social change strategies. Scholars
interact with local and national leaders during 3 working retreats, 4 telephone conferences, and 3 online computer discussion
forums. Each scholar also completes an individual learning plan, a community leadership project, a mentoring relationship and 4
small group assignments.



Southeastern Regional Center for Excellence in Civilian Biodefense (SERCEB) A consortium of investigators from six
regional universities has been chosen to be part of a new biodefense initiative that will work to develop the next generation of
vaccines, drugs and diagnostic tests against emerging infections such as SARS, and for defense against organisms such as
smallpox that might be used in bioterrorist attacks.
The Southeast Regional Center of Excellence for Emerging Infections and Biodefense (SERCEB) will include researchers from
Duke University Medical Center, Emory University, University of Alabama at Birmingham, University of Florida, University of North
Carolina at Chapel Hill School of Medicine, and Vanderbilt University Medical Center. The consortium will be centered at Duke and
led by Barton Haynes, M.D., of the Duke Human Vaccine Institute. Its co-leaders are David Stephens, M.D., Emory University;
Richard Whitley, M.D., UAB; Richard Moyer, Ph.D., University of Florida; Frederick Sparling, M.D., University of North Carolina at
Chapel Hill School of Medicine; and Mark Denison, M.D., Vanderbilt University Medical Center.
Southern Astrophysical Research (SOAR) With help from donors and the U.S. Congress, faculty and students in the UNC
Department of Physics and Astronomy probe the skies from several new vantage points. Carolina is a partner in the SOAR
Telescope atop Cerro Pachon in northern Chile, and six Panchromatic Robotic Optical Monitoring and Polarimetry Telescopes, or
PROMPT, atop Cerro Tololo. PROMPT‘s 16-inch telescopes are designed to follow up satellite discoveries within tens of seconds
and alert SOAR to action. SOAR produces the best-quality images of any observatory in its class in the world at a location that is
ideal for viewing the Milky Way, our home galaxy and other planets in our solar system. Carolina also has a 3 percent share in the
largest telescope in the southern hemisphere, SALT (Southern African Large Telescope), located about 300 miles north of Cape
Town. The Internet is helping bring images from all three telescopes back to faculty and students in Chapel Hill. Public school
classrooms across North Carolina also benefit.



Spin-off Companies Spin-off companies Faculty discoveries and innovations have resulted in the creation of 32 UNC spin-off
companies since 2000 (36 since the office opened in 1995) and jobs for North Carolinians. For example, an experimental anti-HIV
drug being developed by Panacos Pharmaceuticals has successfully completed Phase II clinical trials. The drug was developed by
Carolina researcher Kuo-Hsiung Lee, a professor of natural products in the School of Pharmacy. Its central compound was
discovered in an herb grown in Taiwan but is also found in the bark of birch trees across North America. Other examples of
commercialization leading to spin-offs include therapeutic agents for Parkinson‘s Disease, technologies for drug delivery to treat
cancer, industrial applications for carbon nanotubes and gene therapy treatment for diseases like muscular dystrophy. Inspire
Pharmaceuticals is UNC‘s most successful spin-off. Inspire began operations in 1995 and is recognized as a leader in discoveries
potentially crucial in treating diseases that involve deficiencies in the body‘s ability to protect lungs, eyes, sinuses and other
mucosal surfaces. Inspire has discovered and developed potential drug candidates for treating dry eye, cystic fibrosis, retinal
disease and other medical conditions. Scientists at UNC and the UNC start-up company Xintek Inc. invented a new X-ray device
based on carbon nanotubes that emits a scanning X-ray beam composed of multiple smaller beams while also remaining
stationary. This technology can also lead to smaller and faster X-ray imaging systems for airport baggage screening and for
tomographic medical imaging such as CT (computed tomography) scanners. Incubated by the Carolina Entrepreneurial Initiative
and launched in 2004, the UNC spin-off company Liquidia Technologies Inc., has made important breakthroughs with numerous
applications. One discovery a liquid molding material that cures when exposed to light that has applications for computer chips, ink
jets, medical devices and pharmaceutical products. Another breakthrough was a method for creating the world's tiniest custom-
shaped manufactured particles for delivering drugs and biological materials into the human body. Liquidia's technology is the first-
ever method to create organic nanoscale particles in any shape, size or composition. A joint project of UNC-Chapel Hill and East
Carolina University, Hemocellular Therapeutics focuses on developing hemostatic agents to control active bleeding (hemorrhages),
an area where no functional therapeutic agent exists.




SPIRE (Seeding Postdoctoral Innovators in Research and Education) is an NIH-funded postdoctoral program at the Graduate
School that is designed to help young scientists who wish to pursue careers as academic science researchers and educators. By
combining research training with professional development at Carolina and hands-on teaching at one of eight minority-serving
universities (MSUs) in the state, SPIRE is helping science scholars succeed in academic careers, bringing engaging teaching
methods into the classroom of North Carolina minority institutions and increasing diversity in science professions. . SPIRE fellows
serve as outstanding role models for future young scientists and are contributing to the changing infrastructure at North Carolina
minority serving universities. Through SPIRE, students from the MSUs have participated in numerous professional development
activities at Carolina, including research internships and networking with renowned science educators. Faculty members at the
partner MSUs have adopted new teaching strategies and technologies brought to campus by SPIRE fellows and students have
provided extremely positive feedback in their teaching evaluations. Of the 28 fellows who have exited the program so far, 19 went
into tenure track faculty positions and six of these are at MSUs in North Carolina




Strengthening Bioethics Capacity and Justice in Health Through their project, Strengthening Bioethics Capacity and Justice in          x
Health, funded by the National Institutes of Health‘s Fogarty International Center, Congolese scholars complete intensive master-
level training in bioethics at the Catholic University of Louvain in Belgium and then spend up to six months with mentors at UNC.
While in Chapel Hill, scholars complete Institutional Review Board (IRB) training, develop curricula and training modules around
bioethics issues in the developing world and strengthen their capacity for independent research.
Strong Couples - Strong Children is a community-based community intervention program whose aim is to strengthen couple                    x
and co-parenting relationships among at-risk, low-income, unmarried, expectant or new parents in Durham, NC. The project is a
partnership between the UNC-Chapel Hill School of Social Work, the Durham County Health Department, and the Durham County
Cooperative Extension Service. Interventions consist of: (1) Family-care coordination (wrap around services); (2) A relationship
skill-building curriculum; and (3) Fatherhood support services. This program seeks to address the high rate of couple dissolution
following their baby's birth by helping couples to acquire communication and problem-solving skills as well as social assest
associated with healthy couple and parenting relationships.


Student Global Health Committee is composed of students interested in global health from all seven departments of the school              x
as well as others at the university, we are excited about the opportunity to share ideas and stimulate interests across disciplines.
The mission of SGHC is to create ―awareness and understanding of global health issues among the UNC community through
education, advocacy, and service.‖ We view our community as both local and global, and we look to continue and build on
successful endeavors of years past. To provide an idea of such endeavors, below is a sampling of activities being planned for the
2007-2008 academic year:
- a multi-mkedia series of speakers, films, and workshops related to the topics of "Health and Human Rights" and "Narrativesw of
HIV"; - a "brownbag" lunch series featuring film reviews and discussions on global halth research adn methodology; social events
including a welcome-back event, international dance nights, potlucks, a student-faculty reception, language tables, and networking
night; global health educational sessions with NC middle and high school students that cover topics such as migration and halth,
HIV/AIDS, and water and sanitation; fundraising eventsw including the biannual global craft fair and an internatinonal fashion show.
                                                    As the organization, the school, and the field evolve, it is an exciting time to be
interested and involved with global public health. With ongoing upper-level research, outstanding faculty, new coursework
opportunities, and exceptional funding resources, the UNC School of Public Health looks to build on its role as a leader in global
health. The global health curriculum is designed to involve all departments, integrating the skills and resources of each discipline.
The recently revised Global Health Certificate program (www.sph.unc.edu/ogh/certificate/) provides an opportunity for students and
faculty to interact across these disciplines as well as an opportunity to formalize the training. The Office of Global Health
(www.sph.unc.edu/ogh/), under the leadership and vision of Dr. Peggy Bentley, serves as a great resource and advocate for
students pursuing their interests in the field. The opportunities to get involved in global health are numerous within the UNC School
of Public Health and throughout the campus of this major public university.


Student Health Action Coalition The Student Health Action Coalition (SHAC) is a student led organization whose mission is to:
provide free health services to local underserved individuals and communities, partner with communities to develop and implement
sustainable programs, and create an interdisciplinary service learning environments for students in the health science programs at
UNC. SHAC is run by entirely by student volunteers from many schools within UNC-CH including thee Schools of Medicine,
Pharmacy, Public Health, Physical Therapy, Nursing, Dentistry, and Social Work.

Tar Heel Bus Tour Each spring, the Tar Heel Bus Tour takes new faculty and administrators on a five-day trip across the state to          x
learn what it means to be a true Tar Heel. The privately funded tour, which marks its 10th anniversary in 2007, shows newcomers
the state in which 82 percent of the university‘s undergraduates grow up and how outreach efforts serve North Carolinians. Faculty
members see how their own interests align with the state‘s needs. The annual Tar Heel Bus Tour also allows an opportunity for
faculty and administrators to hear from community members about their perceptions of UNC‘s engagement with the state. Since it
began in1997, almost 300 faculty members and senior administrators have participated in the annual experience, visiting a wide
array of communities where UNC faculty are working in partnership to address community issues.
Two examples of outcomes of the tour are a service-learning course at the School of Government that places students in
communities visited, and a small grants program opportunity for participants offered each year by the Carolina Center for Public
Service. After visiting Peck Elementary School in Greensboro, the 2005 Bus Tour participants met with the principal and faculty to
identify priority issues. As a result, they used the grant money to develop science education and tutoring programs for the school
and held a series of grant writing work shops for teachers.



Task Force for a Healthier North Carolina UNC has partnered with the state‘s Health and Wellness Trust Fund (HWTF)
Commission to create a task force to examine barriers that limit access to health insurance and offer policy recommendations to
overcome the barriers. Medicare Part D is the first topic the task force will tackle. Other topics, which will also receive public
forums, are ―Children, Working Families and S-CHIP‖ and ―Small Business and Employer-Sponsored Health Insurance.‖ The task
force will explore strategies to improve access to group health insurance for small-businesses (with 50 or fewer employees) and
limit financial exposure for the underinsured.

Teen Media Health Project This five-year project was funded by the National Institute of Child Health and Human Development
and is housed in the School of Journalism and Mass Communication. The team examined the effects of a range of media –
television, music, movies, magazines, Internet and newspapers – on adolescents‘ sexual health through surveys of more than
3,200 North Carolina teens about media consumption and health behaviors, and content analysis of the most popular movies,
television shows, music lyrics, magazines, newspapers and websites to measure the amount and kind of sexual content in each.
Threads of HOPE (Center for Health Promotion and Disease Prevention) The concept of hope from the field of positive
psychology offers a framework for health behavior change that highlights the importance of enhancing participants‘ ability to
envision, act on, and achieve goals that will lead to the desired health and life changes. Threads of HOPE, address economic
empowerment through community-led strategic planning and the development of a micro-enterprise business.



Translational and Clinical Sciences Institute (TraCS) UNC created TraCS in January 2007. The vision for the Institute is to                  x
transform clnical and translational science by creating a platform for the development of a continuous cycle of knowledge,
discovery and dissemination abased on listening to the needs and concerns of communities across our state, translating those
needs into hypotheses for discovery, and disseminating that knowledge to our citizenry in a partnership that will improve local and
global health.



Treatment and Education of Autistic and Related Communication Children with Handicaps (TEACCH) A division of the
UNC Department of Psychiatry, TEACCH has the following mission: to enable individuals with autism to function as meaningfully
and as independently as possible in the community; to provide exemplary services throughout North Carolina to individuals with
autism and their families and those who serve and support them; to generate knowledge; to integrate clinical services with relevant
theory and research; and to disseminate information about theory, practice, and research on autism through training and
publications locally, nationally and internationally.

Tri-County Family Dental Center The School of Dentistry has a long-standing relationship with Tri-County Community Health
Council Inc., which began 30 years ago as a part-time health program for the Sampson County migrant farm worker community
and has grown to encompass five community health centers. The School has worked with Tri-County leadership in advising on
every step in creating the 18-chair dental clinic. Starting in fall 2007, the school will send two general dentistry residents to the new
dental center to provide oral health care as a part of a pilot program. UNC-Chapel Hill regularly sends dental students on rotations
to Tri-County to help provide care for patients. The Tri-County pilot residency will extend the dental clinic‘s ability to provide patient
treatment and give the school‘s students greater insight into effective oral health care delivery in underserved areas (Tri-County
serves five counties in rural southeastern North Carolina), knowledge they will bring back to the School and take into their careers.



The UNC Center for Innovative Clinical Trials at the UNC School of Public Health conducts methodological, applied and
interdisciplinary research on the design and analysis of clinical trials. Building on UNC‘s reputation and excellence in translating
research to practice, the Center seeks to advance statistical science in clinical trials and quickly move it forward into clinical and
statistical practice in existing and future studies. The Center‘s interdisciplinary focus brings together faculty from several UNC
departments and additional collaborators from industry, who will engage jointly in both methodological and applied research in
clinical trials design, analysis and evaluation. See also Gillings Innovative Laboratory.




UNC Health Care System Indigent Care The UNC Health Care System, which serves more than 400,000 patients a year,
recently overhauled its policies to improve access to the system for those in financial need. To increase access and improve
financial assistance, the system has hired five more financial counselors; negotiated a contract with Piedmont Health Systems to
increase primary care availability to the uninsured in Orange, Chatham, Alamance and Caswell counties; developed protocols for
referrals to the system from community health centers; added a statement about the availability of financial assistance counseling
to telephone appointment reminders; trained clinic staff to offer financial counseling to all new patients; trained financial counselors
to mare sure patients are aware of a no-interest payment plan for medical bills; posted signs in English and Spanish about
available financial assistance; established and staffed a toll-free Charity Care Helpline for patients; and placed two Medicaid intake
employees on site, including one who is bilingual. These and other new policies and procedures will be monitored by the system‘s
Financial Assistance Oversight Committee.



UNC Partnerhip in Global Health This is a three-year, $400,000 grant to expand global health curriculum and research                         x
opportunities campuswide and engage faculty and students in an interdisciplinary study of global health issues. A coordinated
Administrative Group, with partners from across campus, the region and the world, will implement the various activities of the
Framework Program.
UNC Thurston Arthritis Center The Thurston Arthritis Research Center was established at the University of North Carolina‘s
School of Medicine in 1981. Our mission is to investigate the causes, consequences and treatments of arthritis and autoimmune
diseases and to reduce their impacts on patients, their families and society. Thurston has proudly served the people of North
Carolina with a long tradition of excellence. Thurston is designated as a Multidisciplinary Clinical Research Center (MCRC) by the
National Institute of Arthritis, Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases (NIAMS, a division of the National Institutes of Health), one of
eight such centers in the country. Thurston is designated as a Center of Excellence in Clinical Immunology by the Federation of
Clinical Immunology Societies (FOCIS.) Thurston faculty members are major contributors to the Top 10 Arthritis Advances of 2006
by the Arthritis Foundation and are ranked in the Top 25 nationally for clinical care in rheumatology in U.S. News and World
Report‘s Best Hospitals 2005 survey. The Thurston Arthritis Research Center actively engages in 4 of the 6 UNC Tomorrow areas
of recommendation (Global Readiness, Health, Environment, and Economic Transformation and Community Development).


UNC/European Study Center, Winston House, King's College, London

UNC/National University of Singapore Joint Undergraduate Degree Program

Wake to Wellness Grants The purpose of the Wake to Wellness Grants Program is to provide funding to Wake County Public
School System (WCPSS) elementary schools to implement programs that help meet one or more nutrition and/or physical activity
requirements of state, district, and local school wellness policies. These grants support public schools in their efforts to develop
programs that create healthier school environments.



Weight Wise Pilot Study
The William and Ida Friday Center for Continuing Education offers a wide range of educational programs and services that               x
substantially broaden the population of persons throughout the state that the University is able to serve. The Friday Center‘s
programs and services fall into three main categories: a conference center for educational functions conducted by university
departments and other organizations, noncredit educational activities for professional development and personal enrichment, and a
range of flexible learning opportunities for part-time students to earn academic credit. The Friday Center also administers an
inmate education program, providing on-site study and correspondence instruction to incarcerated learners throughout North
Carolina. In fiscal year 05-06, the Friday Center for Continuing education offered 2,284 courses and events to 45,708 North
Carolina residents representing 58 of North Carolina‘s counties, 3,986 individuals from 19 other states and 1,226 individuals from
five other countries. In this fiscal year, the Friday Center served a total of 100,734 individuals. Here are some Friday Center
programs of note:


The William and Ida Friday Center for Continuing Education, Friday Center Online Programs Tracing its origins to
correspondence courses begun in 1913, the Self-paced Courses program offers both correspondence and online courses. Carolina
Courses Online, begun in 1997, offers courses on a semester schedule, with class discussions and other communication taking
place online. Each year more than 2,000 students enroll in one of the approximately 150 courses offered through Self-Paced
Courses, and more than 3,500 students enroll in one of the approximately 200 courses offered through Carolina Courses Online.
Through these two distance education programs, the University is able to serve a variety of individuals with special needs,
including students who are home-bound, who have families and full-time jobs, who are recovering from health problems, who are
away from campus to complete an internship, or who are incarcerated.



The William and Ida Friday Center for Continuing Education, Nursing Refresher Program Since 1990, the Friday Center has
worked with the School of Nursing, the North Carolina AHEC program and the North Carolina Board of Nursing to offer an
educational program for nurses who wish to return to the profession after being inactive. The Medical-Surgical Nursing Review is
now recognized as a valuable tool in addressing the state‘s shortage of nurses, having enabled hundreds of nurses to reinstate
their lapsed licenses. The program consists of an intense didactic review presented via correspondence instruction and a clinical
practicum conducted by a proctor in one of the AHEC regions across the state. Each year more than 200 nurses complete the
program and rejoin the profession. A pilot online version of the didactic part of the program is currently under development and is
scheduled for testing in the coming months.
The William and Ida Friday Center for Continuing Education, What’s The Big Idea? (WBI) Now in its third year, What‘s the
Big Idea? (WBI) is an important research dissemination and outreach initiative that provides North Carolinians with a pathway to
the University‘s ground-breaking research in the sciences. The program is offered by the Friday Center in cooperation with
Endeavors magazine, and the Office of Research Development. Organized as a series of evening lectures scheduled in the
months o