List of Careers - PowerPoint

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					  CAREER
DEVELOPMENT
  BRANCH
   LAUSD
      PROGRAMS & OFFICES
1.   Career Academies
2.   Non-Academy Partnerships
3.   Career Technical Education
4.   Work Experience
5.   First Break Employment Program
6.   School to Career Office
1.
CAREER
ACADEMIES
CAREER ACADEMY MODEL
 School within a School – small & personal community
 Typically grades 10 through 12 (may include 9)
 Most courses restricted to academy students
 Integrated curriculum – academic content taught with
 career focus
 Prescribed sequence of courses
 Business Partner(s) with Advisory Council
 Dedicated counselor
 Teachers work as a team; plan together
 Mentoring – in classroom and on job sites
 Internships through business partners
 Assistance with college and job placement
EXAMPLES OF ACADEMIES
New Media
Technology & Information Technology
Human Services
Junior Police
Business & Finance
International Trade
Travel & Tourism
Teaching
Live Concert Production
ACADEMY FUNDING MODELS
 California Partnership grants
 Qualified Zone Academy bonds
 School district match
 Private Partner match
   Actual dollars (not often)
   In-kind Donations
     Equipment
     Internship salaries
     Classroom visits and mentoring
     Salaries
     Career Awareness job site field trips
SUCCESSFUL OUTCOMES
 Improved attendance
 More student engagement
 Lower drop-out rate
 Increased academic achievement
 Greater sense of community
 Higher rate of job placement (regardless of
 career or focus)
 Higher college attendance rates
 Completion rate of upper level math 1.5 X
 higher than peers’ (strong predictor of
 success in college)
     2.
NON-ACADEMY
PARTNERSHIPS
           NON-ACADEMY
         PARTNERSHIP MODELS
•   Private / Corporate Partnership
•   Provide services in or outside of schools
•   Provide Basic Skills instruction when needed
•   Provide employment training
•   Provide mentorships
•   Provide internships
•   Fund scholarships for post-secondary education
    and/or training
     EXAMPLE OF NON-
  ACADEMY PARTNERSHIP #1
• Youth Service Academy (Public Non-Profit)
   – 11th & 12th graders from continuation high schools
   – Students employed at end of school day
   – Students work for Dept. of Water & Power & City Council
     offices.
   – DWP pays student salaries & workmen’s compensation (through
     contract with LAUSD).
   – DWP pays a school district administrator to direct program
     (through contract with LAUSD).
   – Students work for final 18 months of school and then can work
     six months more if in post-secondary program.
   – Students earn elective credit for work and on-site class.
   – Students must do 30 hours of community service.
  EXAMPLE OF NON-ACADEMY
      PARTNERSHIP #2
• Careers in Culinary Arts - (Private Not-for-Profit)
   – 9th - 12th graders from comprehensive high schools
   – School-based Career Pathway
   – Teachers integrate academic curriculum when
     possible.
   – Business partner provides teacher training.
   – Partner provides career-specific training off-site.
   – Partners provide guest speakers/chefs to schools.
   – Partners provide internships, mentoring,
     scholarships & job placement.
   – Students earn elective credit for sequenced classes.
3.
CAREER
TECHNICAL
EDUCATION
CAREER TECHNICAL EDUCATION
is “real-life education” in that it
integrates academic content into
vocational content in order to prepare
students to succeed in the modern world
of work. The Career Development
Branch oversees all Secondary CTE,
which accounts for 80% of CTE dollars
allotted to LAUSD.
 CAREER TECHNICAL EDUCATION
 CAREER PATHWAYS MODEL
 Federal Career & Technical Education grant (Carl D.
    Perkins) pays for counselors, teachers, professional
    development & equipment.
   Students are grouped together for instructions in career-
    focused classes.
   Designated counselor at each high school to recruit and
    oversee all Perkins pathway classes
   Minimum of two sequential courses in career focus
    (introductory plus…)
   Technical training for teachers
   Provides non-traditional gender career placement
   Includes special populations in pathways classes
   Establishes a business advisory council
   Students participate in related workplace experiences
EXAMPLES OF CAREER
PATHWAYS
   Agriculture/Landscape design    Information Systems
   Animation                       Media Production
   Auto Mechanics                  Metal Working / Manufacturing
   Aviation                        Multi-Media
   Business Education              Multi-lingual Teaching
   Child Development               Nutrition Science
   Commercial Photography          Office Occupations
   Computer Repair                 Ornamental Horticulture
   Culinary Arts                   Robotics
   Fashion Design                  Transportation & Energy
   Film Production                  Technology
   Health Careers                  Television Production
   Home Economics                  Travel & Tourism
         4.
     WORK
EXPERIENCE
WORK EXPERIENCE FLOW CHART
                                   RESOURCES
                                 Employer Partners
                                 Business Partners
                                First Break Program



  Work Experience Education
                                                        Work Experience
  Mentored by W.E. Teacher
                                               Jobs developed by student or teacher
    & Worksite Supervisor
                                                 W.E. Teacher issues work permit
Supported by standards –based
                                                 No formal supervision by teacher
    classroom instruction
                                                   Students earn pay, not credit
 Students earn credit and pay




    Subsidized Employment                         Non-Subsidized Employment
  Students with special needs                            Jobs at large
      Government-funded                                Employer-funded
      Requires eligibility                         No eligibility requirement
  WORK
EXPERIENCE
EDUCATION
   (WEE)
    WORK EXPERIENCE EDUCATION
             (W.E.E.)
 The Career Development Branch is
  responsible for creating, submitting and
  monitoring LAUSD’s Work Experience
  Education Plan, which is on file with the
  California Department of Education.
 Experienced Career Development staff
  provides Professional Development to all
  school-based Work Experience Teacher/
  Coordinators in order to ensure program
  quality and compliance with mandates.
KEY COMPONENTS OF W.E.E. PLAN


1.   Three Types of Work Experience
     Education
2.   Role of Work Experience Teacher
     /Coordinator & Services Provided
3.   How Students Benefit
4.   How Employer Partners Benefit
    1. Three Types of W.E. Education
   General WEE - supervised part-time employment
    to assist students in developing desirable work
    habits and attitudes in real jobs supported by
    related classroom instruction.
   Exploratory WEE - provides unpaid opportunities
    to observe and sample a variety of conditions of
    work and related classroom instruction.
   Vocational WEE – provides an extension of
    vocational learning opportunities through part-
    time employment and related classroom
    instruction. Employment serves as a practical
    laboratory activity for reinforcing the school
    learning situation.
     2. Duties of W.E. Teacher-Coordinator
   Approves students for enrollment in WEE.
   Develops written agreements which identify the responsibilities
    of the students, employers, parents, etc.
   Prepares individual training plans which outline the objectives
    that students are to accomplish at the work stations.
   Prepares related classroom instruction or guidance for each
    semester and for each type of WEE
   Makes a minimum of two on-site contacts each semester with
    work station supervisors.
   Issues or verifies work permits for students enrolled in WEE.
   Issues waivers for additional hours or work and extended
    working hours when appropriate.
   Maintains records as indicated in the LAUSD Secondary District
    Plan for WEE.
   Is knowledgeable of and complies with the appropriate
    sections of the California Education Code and other mandates.
               3. Benefits to Students
   Enter the world of work with the support of weekly
    classroom instruction and mentoring from both the
    worksite supervisor and the WEE Teacher-Coordinator.
   Earn 5 to 10 elective credits per semester up to 40
    credits during high school.
   Students behind in credits for graduation may have WEE
    periods 7 & 8 and make up to 20 elective credits in one
    year.
   College bound seniors may take WEE periods 5 & 6
    (instead of “Home”) and show career exploration
    experiences to admissions personnel.
   Learn school-to-career skills including job-getting skills
    and job-keeping skills necessary to be competitive in
    today’s world economy.
   Develop a work history that will result in higher part-time
    salary during college.
           4. Benefits to Employers
   WEE provides ongoing support to supervisor from
    experienced WEE Teacher-Coordinator
   WEE develops training objectives for the student
    worker at the worksite.
   WEE guarantees two on-site visits to discuss student
    progress in reaching worksite goals.
   Supplies intervention when problems at work occur.
   Provides a link to the parent or guardian when
    needed.
   Contributes to preparation of youth for the world of
    work.
   Hires enthusiastic employees for minimum wage.
   Develops a young workforce in the community.
WORK EXPERIENCE

  SUBSIDIZED
NON-SUBSIDIZED
        SUBSIDIZED WORK EXPERIENCE
   Workforce Investment Act (WIA)
     – Students with barriers to success (low income,
       reading/math deficiency, language barriers, foster home,
       parents with chronic unemployment, etc.) eligible
     – W.E. Advisors train students in job-getting and job-keeping
       skills.
     – W.E. Advisors provide case management and guidance in
       career pathways.
     – Students may stay in program throughout high school.
   CalWORKS TANF (Temporary Aid to Needy Families)
     – Students with low income qualify for paid employment
     – W.E. Advisors provide orientation, site supervision, payroll
       services, and remediation for basic skills deficiencies.
   General Fund Assistance Program (Mayor’s SNAP program)
     – Students with low income and a barrier to success qualify
       for employment during intersession
     – W.E. Advisors give orientations, approve, assign, and
       supervise worksites and provide payroll services.
    Non-Subsidized Work Experience
 Funded by Employer & Business Partners
 Jobs developed by students
 Jobs developed by WE Teacher-
  Coordinators
 Jobs developed by First Break Office and
  posted on website
 Major employment campaigns developed
  by First Break Office in conjunction with
  employer partners (seasonal or ongoing)
 Jobsites must be approved by District
  staff.
5.
FIRST
BREAK
FIRST BREAK

  WEBSITE
     &
EMPLOYMENT
PARTNERSHIPS
    FIRST BREAK WEBSITE

 Benefits to Students
 Benefits to Employers
 Benefits to Schools
    First Break - How Students Benefit
   Student searches online for jobs in their
    community.
   Student receives information about employer
    expectations from the WEE Teacher-
    Coordinator at school.
   Student receives preparation and guidance
    through the application process from the WEE
    Teacher-Coordinator.
   Student receives the work permit application
    from the same information source.
First Break - How Employers Benefit
   Employers list job openings for free to a large
    employee pool, that has part-time and full time off-
    track workers year round.
   Employers can maintain their budget by offering
    minimum wage to an eager young worker.
   Employers hire many students that are bilingual.
   Employers have the applicants screened by an
    experienced WEE Teacher-Coordinator; students do
    not have direct access to the employer.
   Employers contribute to development of a more
    disciplined, skilled, and experienced young workforce in
    the community.
   Employers receive follow-up contacts to ensure
    satisfaction with the employment process.
    First Break - How Schools Benefit
   Schools have access to worksites that have been
    screened and developed by the First Break
    Staff.
   Schools’ WEE Teacher-Coordinators receive
    training on the correct use of the website.
   Schools can refer parents to the First Break
    website for safe first jobs.
   Schools can enlist First Break to participate in
    job fairs.
   Schools build positive relationships with local
    business community.
       First Break Partnerships

Major Employers include:
 Six Flags Magic Mountain – seasonal hiring

 Washington Mutual High School intern
  Program (HIP) – a two year internship
 Los Angeles County Registrar-Recorder
  Pollworker Program
        Six Flags Magic Mountain
   Seasonal hiring
   Recruits up to 250 students who are off-track
   Schools screen student applicants to ensure good
    attendance, grades, and citizenship. They distribute
    parent consent forms, work permit applications, and
    prepare trip slips.
   Orientations are conducted at the schools by personnel
    from Six Flags, First Break office, and the school
    recruiter to ensure completion of applications and
    preparation for interviews.
   Students are bused to park for interviews and are
    supervised by school personnel.
   Students are hired and travel to and from the park by
    Six Flags buses.
           Washington Mutual
    High School Intern Program (HIP)
   A two year internship
   Branch Managers learn about HIP at regional meetings
    and apply for two students.
   Students work part-time after school and full-time
    during school breaks.
   Students need to be self-starters, good team members,
    have excellent attendance, and have a 3.0 (B) average to
    qualify.
   After completion of two-year internship, students can
    explore regular employment at Washington Mutual.
      Los Angeles County Registrar-
      Recorder Pollworker Program
   One-day community service
   Utilized up to 25 students per high school for
    Presidential Election – 11/2004
   High School Seniors with a 2.5 GPA recruited at
    school through bulletins and posters.
   Screened students need parental consent letters,
    applications, attendance at training class, and
    own transportation to and from the polls.
   Students learn first hand about the election
    process and later receive a stipend of $80
    6.
SCHOOL-TO-
  CAREER
            SCHOOL-TO-CAREER
   Partnership between LAUSD, City of L.A and other
    agencies to help students transition to the world of
    work. The UNITE-LA office was created to promote the
    “School-to-Career” philosophy throughout L.A.
   Funded by state and foundation grants
   Has team to cover all areas of the city to foster
    educational and business partnerships that will benefit
    students
   Supports academies, pathways and other Career
    Development activities and programs in LAUSD schools
   Hosts events such as Job-Shadowing, where students
    visit worksites to gain exposure to the business world.
   Brings business professionals to schools as guest
    speakers to support Career Awareness
   Recruits business and industry partners for Career and
    College Fairs.
             SCANS SKILLS
• The Secretary’s Commission for Achieving
  Necessary Skills (SCANS) are a list of skills and
  competencies that young people need to
  succeed in the adult world of work.
• These skills:
  – Are transferable and apply to all jobs.
  – Give meaning to the work that people do
  – When articulated, help students understand what
    they’re learning and why
  – Show the true mission of Career Development, which
    is to prepare students for success in whatever career
    or careers they choose throughout their adult lives.
APPENDIX
   Work-Based
   Learning
     Project-Based
         Learning

          An Instructional Model
           to Engage Youth by
Combining Academic & Occupational Training
Key Components:
 Student (Worker) - Centered
 Adults as Facilitators
 Focus on SCANS Skills
 Academic Integrated into Work
 Mastery of Transferable Skills
 Students Part of Assessment
 Meaningful Work
Requirements:
 Lead-time
 Staff Training
 Mentor Training
 Plan (Schedule, Class v. Project)
 Technical Assistance
 Training Agreements
SCANS Skills
  Foundation Skills & Competencies
  Three-Part Foundation
    Basic Skills
    Thinking Skills
    Personal Qualities
  Five Workplace Competencies
      Resources
      Interpersonal
      Information
      Systems
      Technology
WORK-BASED MODELS
 Integrated Workplace &
  Classroom
 Workplace with Classroom
  Pull-outs
 Classroom Projects
  Job-Specific
  Stand-Alone
MAKING CONNECTIONS
 Starting with Project
     Projects to Tasks
     Tasks to SCANS
     SCANS to Needs & Interests
     Needs & Interests to Training
 Getting to Project
     Needs & Interests to SCANS
     SCANS to Tasks (Guided)
     Tasks to Project (Guided)
     Structure Training to Fit
Assessment - PORTFOLIO
 Work Product (memos, letters, plans)
 Class Product (lessons, reports)
 Evaluations
   Supervisor
   Teacher
   Self – Journals (written, video or audio)
 Final Product - Pictures, Videos, Manuals
 Resumés
DESIRED RESULTS
 Engagement, Ownership & Pride
 Positive Relationships with Mentors
 Conscious Connections
   Job Skills Mastered
   Life Skills Enhanced
   Academic Achievement
 A Portfolio to Show the World
 A Real-World Success

				
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