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Counting Activities for the Nursery stick

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					                       Counting
                       Activities




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                       Counting Activities for the Nursery
                    Adapted from Desirable Approaches by JB

Counting

   Saying the numbers in the correct order
   Predicting the next number
   Knowing which one is missing
   Knowing which one is in the wrong place
   Counting groups of things
   Counting movements and sounds

   Comparing/matching
      The same as, one more, fewer, more, not enough

   Informal adding and subtracting, counting in groups, using prompts like fingers.

Recognising Numbers

   Everyday things (door number, telephone number, bus
    number etc)
   Recognising numbers on a dice

Writing Numbers

   Tracing them in the sand

Counting Acts

   Tidying up, counting the plates
   Action rhymes and games
   Counting toys, cars etc
   Hide and seek (count to 9)
   Bath time (counting floating ducks)
   Setting the table, counting the plates, knives and forks etc
   Counting everyone in the family
   Counting beats (climbing the stairs)
   Hands and gloves, feet and toes

Ordering Acts

   Sequencing events during the day
   Sequencing getting dressed
   Queuing




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Larger Numbers

   As labels but bigger numbers eg telephone numbers

Reading Numbers

Need experience of seeing numerals
1)    as labels
2)    to indicate number of items
3)    to indicate position in a sequence

Development

   Distinguishing numbers from letters
   Recognising and name the digits 0 to 9 in a variety of styles
   Put the digits in order
   Understand that a numeral can indicate how many things
    there are in a box (eg six eggs)
   Read numbers in a range of contexts (page numbers, price
    labels, telephone numbers)

Look at:

   Technology
   Tactile numbers (fridge door)
   Numbers in order
   Games and puzzles
   Measuring equipment
   Children‟s familiar numbers
   Environment (number walk)
   Books

Recording Numbers

Need three types of experience ..labels etc – see above under larger numbers

Development

   Using fingers to represent numbers
   Recording numbers using tallies
   Using a series of numbers to represent 3
   Selecting number from collection of numbers (including calculator)
   Knowing what numbers look like and writing them
   Writing well formed numbers




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Provide:

   Numerals in a variety of forms to select and handle
   Number and counting books
   Opportunities to write numbers in different ways (tallying etc)
   Labels for things in kitchen
   Reasons to communicate and remember numbers
   Number line, washing line etc
   Numbers in a variety of scripts
   Keeping scores in games
   Personal number book (telephone, age)

Number Problems

Need three types of experience ..labels etc see above under larger numbers

Provide

   Construction activities
   Games
   Routines/setting up
   Special events – picnic
   Decision making
   Posing problems in role play
   Questions arising from stories




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                            Ideas for use of counting stick

The stick should ideally be 1 metre long marked off in 10 equal divisions.

Reception

   Point to one end of the stick and name is „zero‟. Point to the other end and name
    it „ten‟. Starting from zero, move a finger along the stick, a division at a time and
    ask which number would go there.
    Count forwards and backwards.
    Point to random divisions and ask the children which number would go there.
    Start counting forwards and part way through stop and count back one division
    before continuing forward.

   Hold the stick in the centre to show the position of five. Get children to count on
    or back to find the positions of other numbers.

Year 1

   Point to one end of the stick and name it with an appropriate number, eg 9. Get
    children to count on from this number. Change the starting number.

   Starting with a suitable number larger than 10 get the class to count backwards.
    Change the starting number. Start counting forwards and part way through stop
    and count back one division before continuing forward.

   Call one end of the stick 5 and the other 15.
    Move your finger along a division and ask the children which number would go
    there. Count backwards repeating above.
    Change the numbers on the stick, ensuring that one of the numbers is 10 more
    than the other.

   Name one end of the stick zero and the other 20. Count in twos forward and
    when confident backwards. Start counting forwards and part way through stop
    and count back one division before continuing forward.

   As above but counting in tens, naming one end of the stick zero and the other
    100. Point to random divisions and ask which ten number goes there.

   As above but counting in fives.

   When the stick is being used as a 0-100, 0-50 and 0-20 number line, point to
    random positions (not divisions) and ask which number goes there.




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Year 2

   Name one end of the stick zero. Count in twos forward and when confident
    backwards. Start counting forwards and part way through stop and count back
    one division before continuing forward.

   Repeat for counting in fives and tens.

   When the stick is being used as a 0-100, 0-50 and 0-20 number line, point to
    random positions (not divisions) and ask which number goes there.

   Point to one end of the stick and name it with a number, such as 4. Move a finger
    along the stick, a division at a time, with children counting to 14.
    Point to random divisions and ask „which number goes here?‟
    Count forward and backwards. Choose a new starting number.

   Name one end of the stick zero. Count in hundreds forward and when confident
    backwards. Start counting forwards and part way through stop and count back
    one division before continuing forward.
    Point at random divisions and ask which numbers would go there.


Year 3

   Counting in twos, fives and tens. See year 1 and 2 for examples.

   Name one end of the stick zero. Count in hundreds forward and when confident
    backwards. Start counting forwards and part way through stop and count back
    one division before continuing forward.
    Point at random divisions and ask which number would go there.

   As above but counting in thousands.

   Name one end of the stick zero the other end 10. Count to 10 pointing to each
    division. Point to the halfway position between two divisions and ask which
    number would go there.

   Name one end of the stick zero and get the children to count back from zero
    (introducing negative numbers). Count from minus 10 to zero.
    Point to random divisions and ask which number would go there.
    If children confident try counting in steps of minus 2

   Introduce counting forwards and backwards using patterns of 3 and 4.




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Year 4

   Counting forwards and backwards using patterns of 7, 8 and 9.

   Using an unmarked stick. Point to one end and name it zero and the other end
    name 100.
    Point to random positions and ask the pupils which numbers they estimate go
    there. Change the end of the stick to 1 and estimate positions of common
    fractions.

   Count in negative numbers.


Year 5

   Call one end of the stick zero and the other end 1. Count in tenths pointing to
    each division.
    Count forwards and backwards. Point to random divisions and ask for the
    numbers.
    Point to midpoints between divisions to generate decimal numbers such as 0.25,
    0.75, etc.

   As above but call the end of the stick one tenth and count in hundredths.

   Count in negative numbers. Have 0 the middle division and ask children to count.
    Counting in – 2 point to each division. Point to midpoints between divisions and
    ask for numbers.

   Count on stick to practice multiplication tables.


Year 6

   Examples from above


All of the above activities can be adapted to suit the needs of all the year groups.

For estimation ideas use a stick with no markings and use all of the above ideas,
telling the children what the start and end numbers are and then point to places on
the stick asking them to estimate the position of the finger. Then discuss with the
children why they thought that.




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Counting Activities

Year 1

   Say the number sequence 1, 2, 3… very slowly, very loudly, backwards, clapping
    as you say it…

   Count in your head until I say stop. What number did you reach? Now count aloud
    to that number.

   Sing together 'One, two, three, four, five. Once I caught a fish alive…' or 'Ten
    green bottles….‟

   Count these shells, buttons, straws… You can touch them as you count.

   Count these cubes. They are all the same size and shape. Now count these
    bricks. They are different sizes and shapes.

   These counters are arranged neatly in a straight line. Can you count them? Count
    these. They are all over the place but can you move them as you count. Now
    count these. You can touch them if you want to, but don't move them. Now count
    these - but without touching them. How many are there?

   Count these spots - stuck on A4 cards - arranged in a line, in a regular pattern, all
    over the place.

   Count this tower of jumbo bricks. Now lay them in a long line on the floor. How
    many jumbo bricks now?

   Count some things you can't touch or reach: the window panes, the chairs in the
    room, the birds in the picture on the wall, the dogs on the 'pets' graph…

   I'll say a number, and you count on - or back - from there.

   What number comes after 6? What number comes before 9? Two before 7?

   Point to the fourth counter in this row. What colour is the seventh counter? Which
    counter is after the blue one? Point to the third red counter.

   If we counted round the circle starting with Mary with 5, who would say 11? Think
    in your heads and tell me who it would be.

   Count these chime bar sounds to yourself, then tell me how many you heard
    (regular intervals).

   Look at the spots on these cards (no more than 10, in identifiable groups such as
    twos and threes.) Say how many spots there are without counting. How did you
    know?




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Year 2

   Let‟s count all our shoes in turn. Whisper you first number. Shout your second
    number. Which numbers did we whisper? Which did we shout?

   Say 'One, two buckle my shoe…' or 'Two, four, six, eight. Mary at the garden
    gate…'

   Count the even numbers. Count the odd numbers. Now count them backwards.

   Count in twos, starting with 6. Will we get to 37? How do you know? Now start
    with 15. Will we get to 48? How do you know?

   Count these chime bar sounds to yourself (chimes in pairs).

   Estimate how many spots there are on these cards when I hold them up briefly.
    Who thinks there are more than 15? Can you explain why?

   Counts in tens to 100, and then back to nought.

   Now start at 5 and count in tens. Will you say 73? How do you know?

   I shall say a number between 100 and 200. Count on (or back) from there until I
    say stop.

   Take these 12 counters out of this bag and count them onto the table one at a
    time, two at a time, three at a time, four at a time. Now try with 24 counters.

   What number is the third before 12? What number is the fourth after 17?

Year 3

   Start at any small number and count on in tens to 100, and then back again.
    What number is 30 after 6? What number is 20 before 89?

   Count in twenties to 200. Now count backwards in twenties to zero.

   Count in hundreds to 1000 and back again.

   What number is the third before 31? What number is the fourth after 48?

   Count in threes to 30. Count in fours to 40.

   Start at 2 and count in threes. Start at 5 and count in fours.

   Start at 30 and count backwards in threes. Now start at 31. Can you go beyond
    zero?




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   Start at 40 and count backwards in fours. Now start at 42. Can you go beyond
    zero?

   If we counted round the circle in fives, starting with Michael with 20, who would
    say 60? Think in your heads and tell me who it would be.

   Count in halves. Count in quarters. Count in steps of 0.5.

   Guess how many words there are on this page of your book? What‟s a good way
    to estimate?

   Look at these cards with spots on (no more than 20, randomly arranged, but in
    identifiable groups such as threes, fours or fives). Can you say how many spots
    there are without counting one by one? How did you know?

   Estimate how many spots there are on these cards when I hold them up briefly.
    Who thinks there are more than 50? Can you explain why?

   How many children in the class? How many legs, arms, eyes, fingers, toes …?

   If everyone wore a cardigan with 5 buttons, how many buttons would there be
    altogether?

   Count these chime bar sounds to yourself (regular groups of threes or fours).

Year 4

   Count these chime bar sounds to yourself, then tell me how many you heard.
    They will be in small groups at irregular intervals. What strategies did you use to
    count?

   Count up these numbers: 3, 2, 4, 1, 5, 2. How many altogether?

   Count in twenty-fives to 1000 and back again. What is 75 more than 350? 50
    less than 625?

   Count up to 100 from 0 in sixes, sevens, eights, nines. Now count back again.

   Play Fizz Buzz by counting round the class. For any multiple of 7 say Fizz. For
    any multiple of 6 say Buzz. If the number has both properties, say Fizz Buzz.

   This pattern of beads has three red, four blue, three red, four blue …
    What colour is the 25th bead? What position is the 20th red bead?

   Count all the spots on this 6-sided dice. Is there a quick way of doing it?
    What about a dice with ten sides?
   Count on in sixes. What number should we stop at if, when we count back in
    sevens, we return to the same starting number? Can you explain why? Are there
    other possiblities?


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   Tell me some numbers between 3 and 4. Start at 0.2 and count on or back in
    steps of 0.1.

Years 5 & 6

   Count up these numbers: 3, 2, 4, 1, 6, 2, 7. Put your hand up when we get to a
    multiple of 6. How many altogether?

   From any small number, count up to 100 from 0 in sixes, sevens, eights, nines.
    Count back again.

   Now choose any number. Count on – or back – in sixes, sevens, eights, nines.

   Play Fizz Buzz by counting round the class. For any multiple of 7 say Fizz. For
    any multiple of 6 say Buzz. If the number has both properties, say Fizz Buzz.

   Take turns to count on seven and then eight. Who will be the first person to say a
    number more than 100? How do you know?

   Count up to 100 and back again in elevens, twelves, fifteens.

   Count on in sixes. What number should we stop at if, when we count back in
    sevens, we return to the same starting number? Can you explain why? Are there
    other possibilities?

   How many words do you think there are on this page?
    What is a good way to estimate?

   Tell me some number between 1.2 and 1.3. Start at 0.13 and count on in steps of
    0.01.

   Start at –5 and count in –3s.




         Examples taken from Teachers Handbook, Longman Primary Maths,
          written by Peter Patilla, Paul Broadbent and Ann Montague-Smith.




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Mathematical Imaginings – Number

Dice

   Remember that opposite faces of a 1 to 6 dice add up to 7.
    Imagine throwing two dice.
    The left hand one shows five on top; the right one shows a three.
    What‟s the total score on your two dice?
    Turn the right hand dice right over.
    What‟s the total score now?

    What‟s your left hand dice showing now? And the right hand dice?
    Turn the left hand dice right over.
    What‟s the total of the two numbers on top now?

    Now turn both the dice right over.
    What is the final total on top?

   Clear your mind and throw the dice again.
    This time you choose the top numbers.
    What‟s the total score? Remember it.
    Turn both dice right over and work out the new total.
    Add this to the previous total.
    What do you get?

   Imagine a dice with a five showing on top.
    What do the four numbers round the sides of the dice add up to?

Boxes

   Close your eyes and imagine a single box which can store numbers.
    At the moment it is empty.
    I am going to read out a list of numbers.
    Keep a total of these in the box.
    Each time the total is a multiple of 10 put up your hand for a couple of seconds
    then put it down.
    Ready?
    2 6 7 4 1 6 3 1 2.
    Empty the box. I am going to read another list.
    Put your hand up briefly when the total is a multiple of 5.
    Ready?
    5 3 2 9 2 3 1 6 2 2 1 5 8 6 3 4.

   Close your eyes and imagine two boxes: a left hand open and a right hand one.
    These two boxes can store numbers.
    At the moment they are both empty.
    I am going to call out some numbers.
    I will tell you which box to add them to.
    Put 3 in the left hand box and 5 in the right hand box.
    Add 4 to the left hand box.


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    Add 1 to the right hand box.
    Add 7 to the left hand box.
    Add 4 to the right hand box.

Digits

   Imagine the number three hundred and sixty eight in the air in front of you. Which
    digit is on the left?
    Which digit is on the right?
    Swap these two digits round.
    What does your number say now?

   Now imagine the number forty nine thousand, six hundred and thirteen drawn in
    the air in front of you. Forty nine thousand, six hundred and thirteen.
    What‟s the middle digit?
    Which digit is in between the six and the three?
    What does the number say when you read it backwards?
    What‟s the largest number you could make using each digit once only?

   Hello. My name‟s George and I‟m splash ding years old.
    Where I come from we don‟t say one, two, three and so on.
    We say splash, cling, oink.
    Splash means one, ding means two and oink means three. Can you remember
    those? So splash ding means twelve.
    What number is ding ding?
    What number is oink splash?
    How would I say thirteen?
    How would I say thirty-two?
    And what number is ding oink splash?
    So, as I was saying, I‟m splash ding years old. How old are you?




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Picking up coins

   Today I want you to close your eyes and imagine a pile of coins on a white table
    in front of you. What colour are the coins? Which coins are bronze? Which
    coins are silver? Are your coins all the same size? Which is the biggest silver
    coin? Which is the biggest bronze coin?

   Now imagine a big pile of 2p coins. There are only 2p coins in this pile. Imagine
    picking up one coin from the pile and holding it in your left hand. Now pick up
    another coin. Put that in your left hand as well. How many coins do you have in
    your left hand? What‟s the total value of the coins in your left hand? Pick up
    another coin from the pile and add it to the coins in your left hand. How many
    coins in your left hand now? What‟s their total value? Jot down on your paper
    how many 2p coins you have, and their total value.

   In your imagination, carry on picking up another coin, and putting it with the others
    in your left hand. Each time, jot down how many coins you have, and their total
    value. Keep going until you have 10 coins altogether.

   Now work with a partner. Imagine that you have a big pile of 2p coins between
    you. Take turns. One of you must say how many of the 2p coins are to be picked
    up. The other person must say the total value of the coins. Keep a note on your
    paper of how many coins are picked up, and their total value. Choose a different
    number of coins each time.

   When you have done that, you could try again with an imaginary pile of 10p coins
    or 5p coins.

Going on a picnic

   Today we are going on a picnic. Where shall we go? To the park? To the canal?
    Or shall we go to the beach? How many people are going on the picnic? What
    shall we take for them to eat?

   Now, suppose we took a big round pizza with us. What shape is that? Can you
    draw it in the air with a finger? Now sketch it on paper. What if you wanted to
    share the pizza fairly with a friend? How many pieces would you cut it into?
    Imagine what each piece would look like. Sketch it on your paper.

   Suppose we had a sandwich. What shape is it? Let‟s call the sandwich a square.
    If you cut the sandwich in half, what would each half look like? Sketch it on your
    paper. What did your half sandwich look like? Was it a triangle, or was it
    something else?

   What if we took some samosas? What do they look like? Can you draw an
    outline in the air with a finger? If we cut a triangular samosa in half, how many
    people could have a piece? Imagine the shape you would get if you cut the
    samosa into two equal pieces. What shape would one half be? Sketch it on your
    paper.



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   Suppose you had six chocolate muffins on your picnic, and you gave half of them
    to me. How many would I get? What if you had 12 muffins? What if you had 3
    muffins? Or 7?

   Now work with a partner. One of you choose how many apples there are for a
    picnic for two people. The other one must say how many apples each of you
    would get. Make a note on your paper of what you decide each time.

Standing in a queue

   Imagine standing at a bus stop in a queue of people on a cold day. Who is first in
    the queue? Is it a girl or a boy, a woman or a man? What is that person
    wearing? What colour is their coat? How tall do you think they are?

   Imagine the number of the bus you are waiting for. Is it the 62, or is the 14? Or is
    it something else? Where does the bus go? Can you see the name on the front?
    About how far away is that?

   Now there are seven people in the queue, and you are third. How many people
    besides you are there in the queue? How many people are in front of you? How
    many people behind you? Are there fewer people before you or fewer after you?

   The bus still hasn‟t come, two more people join the queue. How many are waiting
    for the bus now? Remember, you are third in the queue. How many people are
    behind you.

   Now work with a partner one of you chooses the length of the queue, and your
    position in it. So you could say „There are nine people in the queue, and you are
    sixth.‟ The other person then has to say how many people in front of you, and
    how many behind.

   Jot down what you do. Each time write down the length of the queue, your
    position, then the number of people in front of you, then the number after you.

Paving stones

   Can you imagine one single square paving stone or slab, the sort which are used
    to make pavements. What colour is your paving stone? Could you fit it or would
    it be too big or too heavy? Imagine laying 13 paving stones, one after another, to
    make a long, thin path …1, 2, 3 …. and so on.

   Next, think of a path two stones wide and perhaps 12 long. How many paving
    stones would you need to make a path like that in the shape of a long rectangle,
    two wide and 12 long?

   If you had 15 slabs to lay, what square of rectangular pavements could you
    make? How many wide by how many long, using exactly 15 slabs?

   What rectangle or square pavements could you make with 25 paving stones?



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   If you had only 12 slabs, imagine, then write down or draw, all the different
    squares and rectangles you could make. Include the long, thin rectangles only
    one slab wide, as well as the squares and rectangles, which could be used for
    playing and sitting areas.

   Next, there are three problems to try out using paving stones. Choose any one
    you like to start.

   Problem 1
    Work in pairs for this activity. The first person, choose a number under 100 and
    tell your partner what it is. The second person will think carefully and say the
    sizes of all the different squares and rectangles she can make with that number of
    paving slabs. The first person writes them down or draws them quickly as they
    are being said. Swap over, and choose another number.

   Problem 2
    Describe a rectangular or square pavement to your partner. You might say: „It‟s 7
    long and 3 wide.‟ Then ask how many paving slabs were used. Take turns to
    answer and explain how you work it out. Write down your questions as a record.

   Problem 3
    Imagine placing one square paving stone in the corner of a square playground. It
    would be 1 long and 1 wide. Add some more paving stones to this one to make a
    square 2 long and 2 wide. How many more stones did you need? Now, add
    some more to make a bigger square, 3 by 3. How many more did you lay this
    time? Go as high as you can in your head. Jot down or draw what you find as a
    record of what you have been doing.

Oral questions involving numbers

Questions of this kind should be used a few at a time – not as one long exercise.
They can be repeated several times with similar sets of numbers, larger numbers or
more numbers. They must be read out, or put onto tape, and can be used with a
whole class, a group or individuals.

I am going to read out a few numbers then ask you some questions about them.
After I have read the numbers I will pause for you to fix the numbers in your head.
Don’t write the numbers down. When I ask the question, think of the numbers in your
head, then jot down the answer.

      6       19     3     11
What is the largest (or smallest) number?

      14    21     26    5
Which are even (or odd)?

      34     4      12    9
Which are greater than 10 (or less than 13)?




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      2     5      3      7
Which two add up to 10 (or 8 or 9)?

      8     15      12      20
Which are multiples of four (or five)?

      9     27     11   16
Which are square numbers?

      34     12      24    9
Which is closest to nineteen?

      23     4      3.6     3.4
Which are bigger (or less) than 3.5?

      3      -4     2     5
Which is the negative number?

      5      2      7      3       6
Which are factors of twelve?

      21      12   17    26
Which is a prime number?

      3/5    2/7    4/9
Which are bigger than one half?

      -5     -3     4     -7
Which are less than minus four?

      23      36     17   25
Which is the largest number? What is its square root?

      3       11    10    16
Which are triangular numbers?

      4      7    3         2
What is the mean?

Oral questions involving shape

These kind of questions must be read aloud by the teacher to the class, or by a pupil
to a partner, or they can be read silently.

I am going to describe an everyday object that you could find at school, at home or
outside. You must decide what it is.

1      This is a hexagonal prism which is about 15 centimetres long and half a
       centimetre across. It is usually shaped to have a cone at the end.



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2      This object is made from a shallow cuboid standing on four thin cylinders. The
       cuboid is about one and a half metres long, by one metre wide, by two
       centimetres deep. The cylinders are about a metre high and 5 centimetres in
       diameter.

Choose a number

Aim:          To provide practice in the recall of multiplication facts.

Resources: Blackboard / large sheet of paper

To play:      The numbers 0-10 are written randomly on the blackboard or large
              sheet of paper (prepare beforehand) and the operation „x2‟ written
              alongside in bigger print.

              ie
                     7              0
              1             4              x2
                     9      2
              8                     5
                     6      10

              The teacher should establish with the children what „the operation‟
              means ie “multiply by two”. Children are then invited to choose a
              number to which the operation „x2‟ must be carried out and the answer
              worked out. The full calculation should be stated eg “six multiplied by
              two equals twelve”. This should be a rapid „quick-fire‟ game. As a child
              is chosen she/he should respond as quickly as possible before another
              child is chosen.

Variations:   1      Include numbers above 10
              2      Use other multiplication facts

Choose the operation

Aim:          To provide practice in the recall of multiplication facts.

Resources: 0 – 9 Number cards

To play:      This game is almost identical to „Choose a Number‟. However in this
              game the teacher has a set of 0 – 9 number cards and the blackboard
              is prepared as follows:

              x1            x9
                     x2
              x6                    x7
                            x5
              x3                    x8
                     x0                    x4



Medway Numeracy Team                      eae48a96-1559-4dd9-aafc-f29c820ba389.doc
             Teacher holds up a number card, eg „10‟ and asks a pupil to choose a
             number from the blackboard and multiply 10 by that number, eg child
             chooses x 8 and says – “Ten multiplied by eight equals eighty”. The
             teacher may then decide to change his/her number card or keep with
             „10‟ and ask another pupil to choose a number from the blackboard and
             multiply 10 by that number.

Number Families

Aim:         To introduce children to the number families for 7 (or any other addition
             and subtraction number facts to 10).

Resources: OHP/large sheet of paper
           OHP pens/marker

What to do: Look at the first diagram
            Addition 1
            Ask: „How many shaded squares?‟        2
                   „How many unshaded squares?‟ 5
                   „How many is that altogether?‟  7
                   „How can we write this mathematically?‟ 2 + 5 = 7

             Addition 2 – Commutative Law of Addition ie a + b = b + a
             Ask: „How else could we describe this picture?‟
                    „How may unshaded squares?‟ 5
                    „How many shaded squares?‟      2
                    „How many is that altogether?‟  7
                    „How can we write this mathematically?‟ 5 + 2 = 7

             Subtraction 1
             Ask: „How many squares are there altogether?‟           7
                   „How many are shaded?‟                            2
                   „How many are not shaded?‟                        5
                   „How can we write this mathematically?‟           7–2=5

             Subtraction 2
             Ask: „How many squares are there altogether?‟           7
                   „How many are shaded?‟                            5
                   „How many are not shaded?‟                        2
                   „How can we write this mathematically?‟           7–5=2

             Say:   „These are the 2, 5, 7 number family‟

                    2+5=7
                    5+2=7
                    7–2=5
                    7–5= 2




Medway Numeracy Team                    eae48a96-1559-4dd9-aafc-f29c820ba389.doc
             Repeat for other diagrams
             ie   3, 4, 7
                  1, 6, 7
                  0, 7, 7

Variation:   Repeat for other addition and subtraction number facts to 10.

Number families for 7




Make 7

Aim:         To provide practice in the recall of addition facts.

Resources: Dice
           Set of cards 1 – 6 per child

To play:     Children lay out their set of cards on the table. The teacher throws the
             dice and calls out the number it lands on. (eg 4) Children
             workout/recall what needs to be added to the number to make 7. They
             then select that card and hold it in the air as quickly as possible.
             Confirm the answer and repeat the process by throwing the dice again.

Variation:   1.     Make 5, 6, 8, 9, 10 …
             2.     Subtract 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10
             3.     Throw two die add/subtract the total and make/subtract 5, 6, 7,
                    8, 9, 10

Countdown

Aim:         To provide practice in using the four operations.

Resources: Blackboard/large sheet of paper

To play:     Ask a child to call out 3 two digit numbers and 4 one digit numbers,
             eg 56, 13, 78, 6, 4, 3, 1.
             Write the numbers on the board.
             Ask another child to call out a three digit „target number‟, eg 585.
             Write the number on the board, this is the target number.

             The aim is for the children to get as close to the target number as they
             can in a predetermined period of time, using known number operations.



Medway Numeracy Team                     eae48a96-1559-4dd9-aafc-f29c820ba389.doc
Variations:   1.     Use fewer numbers and a smaller target number.
              2.     Restrict the types of operations that can be used.

Number Facts

Aim:          To provide practice in the recall of number facts.

Resources: Blackboard

To play:      Ask a child to choose a number, eg 6 children says the number in the
              form of an addition or subtraction number fact, and writes it down on
              the blackboard. Children around the class then take turns to express 6
              as a different number fact. This continues until no more are suggested.
              A child who cannot suggest a number bond for 6 chooses a new
              number, such as 9, says it as a number fact, and the game continues.

Variation:    Choose to accept only addition / subtraction / multiplication or division
              number facts.

I Know …

Aim:          To provide children with the opportunity to demonstrate known number
              facts.

Resources: Blackboard
           OHT/Large sheet of paper – Numerals 0 – 9 written numerous times.

To play:      Ask a child to come to the OHP/paper and circle any two numbers that
              are beside each other, eg 4 and 8. Child then goes to the blackboard
              and writes these two numbers as a sum, eg 4 + 8 = 12, 8 – 4 = 4,
              8 x 4 = 32, 8 ÷ 4 = 2. As the child is writing the sum down encourage
              them to say what they are doing. Continue, asking other children to do
              the same.

Variation:    Only ask children to give addition / subtraction / multiplication / division
              examples.




Medway Numeracy Team                      eae48a96-1559-4dd9-aafc-f29c820ba389.doc
‘I know …’

    5          1           4           9           2           5           1          9
    7          5          10           3           8          10           3          7
    9          1           6           7           4           2           2          6
    4          4           2           1           2           8           7          3
    5          0           9           8           0           5           9          4
   10          3           4           5           7           4           3          10
    2          6           5           3           1           6           5          2
    6          3           4           6           4           3           8          1



Flash Cards

Aim:          To provide practice in the recall of number facts.

Resources: Cards with sums on the front and answers on the back.

To play:      Hold up one card at a time and ask individual children to offer the
              answer.

Variation:    Make addition / subtraction / multiplication / division / fractions /
              decimals / percentages cards.

Bingo

Aim:          To provide practice in the recall of addition facts.

Resources: 2 dice
           Paper
           Pencil

To play:      The children are asked to choose, and write down three numbers
              between 1 and 12. These are their bingo numbers. The teacher then
              walks around the class, and throws down two dice in front of each child.
              The pupil must add the scores together and shout out the answer for all
              to hear and check their bingo numbers. The winner / winners is / are
              the first to cross out all their numbers.

Variation:    The game may be adapted to include other operations and pupils may
              choose more than three numbers.




Medway Numeracy Team                       eae48a96-1559-4dd9-aafc-f29c820ba389.doc
Big Number Bingo

Aim:          To provide children with the opportunity to understand and read large
              numbers.

Resources: Blackboard
           Paper
           Pencil

To play:      On the blackboard write about 20 large numbers, eg 12 427, 4 645, 743
              549, 1 645, 698 etc. Ask children to choose any 10 of the numbers and
              write them on their „Bingo Card‟. Read out each of the 20 numbers at
              random, eg „twelve thousand, four hundred and twenty seven‟. „This
              number has three tens, four thousands, two hundreds and 8 units, what
              is the number?‟ If children have chosen that number on their bingo
              card they cross it out. The winner / winners is / are the first to cross out
              all their numbers.

Variation:    Choose different large numbers depending on the ability level of the
              class.

Chain Sums

Aim:          To encourage pupils to use mental maths strategies.

To play:      Ask the class to close their eyes and lean their heads on the desk –
              concentrate. Teacher then calls out a string of sums – adding or
              subtracting a single digit, eg „5 plus 3 plus 7 subtract 2 plus 6 subtract 5
              etc equals‟. When the chain sum is complete, keeping heads down
              children raise their hands when they feel an answer has been reached.
              Teacher then chooses individuals to give the answer. Repeat for
              different chains.

Variation:    Use other operations.

Using a 1 – 100 Square

   Complete an incomplete 1 – 100 square.

   Make a 1 – 100 square jigsaw.

   Using a blank 1 – 100 square children:

       make their own incomplete 0 – 99 square
       make their own 0 – 99 square jigsaw
       create their own 1 – 100 number square pattern.




Medway Numeracy Team                     eae48a96-1559-4dd9-aafc-f29c820ba389.doc
   Children fill in the spaces on the different sections of a 1 – 100 square, eg


                                                         15

                    47                             24    25    26

                                                         35



                                                   33          35



                    98                             53          55




                             22




                     67                                       54




Medway Numeracy Team                      eae48a96-1559-4dd9-aafc-f29c820ba389.doc
Using 0 – 10 Number Cards

   Make 7
    Choose a number card, eg 4
    Ask: What needs to be added to 4 to make 7?
    Repeat
    Variation: Make 8, 9, 10 …

   Add 6
    Choose a number card, eg 4
    Ask: Six add four equals?
    Repeat
    Variation: Add 2, 3, 4, 5, 7 …

   Subtract from 7
    Choose a number card, eg 4
    Ask: Seven subtract four equals?
    Repeat
    Variation: Subtract from 8, 9, 10 …

   Show two cards together
    Add the totals together
    Repeat

   Show two cards together
    Subtract the smaller number from the larger number
    Repeat

   Show two cards together
    Multiply the two numbers together
    Repeat

Variation:    Use cards with larger numbers on them.

Using 0 – 100 Number Cards

   Children put a set of jumbled 0 – 100 cards in order

   Make a pile of odd/even numbers

   Make a pile of numbers that are in the 2x, 5x, 10x tables etc

   Provide the children with operation cards, eg +, -, ÷ and using the number cards
    ask them to make up sums for each other.




Medway Numeracy Team                      eae48a96-1559-4dd9-aafc-f29c820ba389.doc
Using Dice

   Addition Dice 7
    Throw a die, eg 4
    Ask: What needs to be added to 4 to make 7?
    Repeat
    Variation: Dice 8, 9, 10 …

   Add 6
    Throw a dice, eg 4
    Ask: Six add four equals?
    Repeat
    Variation: Add 2, 3, 4, 5, 7 …

   Subtraction Dice 7
    Throw a dice, eg 4
    Ask: Seven subtract four equals?
    Repeat
    Variation: Dice 8, 9, 10 …

   Throw two dice together
    Add the totals together
    Repeat

   Throw two dice together
    Subtract the smaller number from the larger number
    Repeat

   Throw two dice together
    Multiply the two numbers together
    Repeat

Variation:     Use blank dice to write larger numbers on them.

Find my rule

Aim:           To identify the operation used in calculating a sum.

Resources: Blackboard

To play:       Think of a rule and secretly write it down. Ask a child to suggest a
               number and tell them that you intend to do something to the number.
               Write down the number, apply the rule and write the result on the
               board.
               eg     Child suggests                      You write
                      6                                   16
                      eg (secret rule + 10)
                      Repeat
                      28                                  38



Medway Numeracy Team                     eae48a96-1559-4dd9-aafc-f29c820ba389.doc
              Ask for another number …
                     5

              Ask: „Does anyone know what result I am going to write?‟
              Take one more number and repeat the previous question.

                     9

              Now, ask for someone to describe your rule. When it is correctly
              described, write it on the board. Repeat for other rules. When children
              are confident encourage them to take turns to make up a rule and get
              the rest of the class to discover it.

Using Dominoes

   Add the two sides of the domino.

   Find the difference between the side with the largest number of dots and the side
    with the smallest number of dots.

   Sort dominoes according to the total number of dots.

   Multiply the two sides of the domino together.

   Sort dominoes according to the difference between the side with the largest
    number of dots and the side with the smallest number of dots.

   Put the sets of dominoes in order – largest total to smallest total.

   Play the game dominoes.

Which Card?

Aim:          To aid children‟s understanding of the vocabulary associated with
              multiplication.

Resources: 1 set of children‟s cards per team
           1 set of teacher‟s cards

To play:      A set of number cards are given to each „team‟ of players.
              (The game could be played individually or in pairs.)
              These cards are placed face up on the table. The teacher reads out
              the „calculations‟ on the Teacher‟s cards one at a time. As this is done
              so the teams have to find the answer to the calculation and hold the
              appropriate card up in the air. The aim is to be the first team to hod the
              correct card up. The winning team member or a pupil chosen by the
              teacher must then give the full calculation with the answer.
              eg     “Two add two add two add two equals eight.”
                     “Three groups of two equals six.”



Medway Numeracy Team                      eae48a96-1559-4dd9-aafc-f29c820ba389.doc
Variation:   Teacher‟s cards can include any operation or level of difficulty.

Children’s Cards:


       3                4                 5                  6                   8


       9               10                 12                16                   20


Teacher’s Cards:

              2+2+2+2                                       3+3+3
                  3x2                                         5+5
               4 lots of 3                                    6x2
                  2x2                                     3 groups of 2
             2 groups of 10                               4+4+4+4
              1 group of 3                               1+1+1+1+1




Medway Numeracy Team                    eae48a96-1559-4dd9-aafc-f29c820ba389.doc

				
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Description: Counting Activities for the Nursery stick