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Bipolar Disorder, Sleep issues and blue light

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Bipolar Disorder, Sleep issues and blue light Powered By Docstoc
					Bipolar Disorder and Blue Blocker Glasses
The effect of light on different affective disorders has long been documented. Flashing lights have been tied to epilepsy; Seasonal Affective Disorder (SAD) has been linked to the lack of sunlight and on-going studies are finding more and more promising results in the link between different light wave lengths and the brain. The simple truth is that we need light, not only to see the world around us, but also to help our brain stay healthy. When a person isn’t able to gauge night and day by the presence and absence of light, he or she eventually begins to develop a host of different problems from depression and confusion to psychosis. Turns out that, beyond the basic issue of the presence or absence of light is the fact that our eyes actually have three receptors, one for each of the three primary colors: red, blue and yellow. Of these different light receptors, it turns out that blue is the one that most affects certain parts of our brains, namely the stimulus that tells us when to “WAKE UP!” The latest research in this field has been tied to Bipolar disorder and insomnia. It is believed that blue light blocks the production of melatonin. Melatonin, which is produced by the pineal gland, is a hormone that calms the body down and makes it sleepy. It stands to reason that low blue lights or, even cheaper and easier, blue blocking glasses will allow the body to produce melatonin. Promising new tests are beginning to show that blue blocking glasses are, in fact, helping control Bipolar Disorder without the mood enhancing drugs that are presently being used and which many of those affected with the disorder don’t like to take. For more information on the link between blue light and bipolar disorder or sleep go to: http://www.psycheducation.org/depression/BlueLight.htm If you want to purchase blue blocking glasses, click on the image below:


				
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posted:2/26/2009
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Description: A short article about the possible link between blue light and bipolar disorder, Seasonal Affective Disorder and sleep related problems. Could blue blocking glasses help?