BARRIERS TO ADOPTION OF TECHNOLOGY-MEDIATED DISTANCE EDUCATION IN HIGHER-EDUCATION INSTITUTIONS by ProQuest

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									BARRIERS TO ADOPTION OF TECHNOLOGY-
MEDIATED DISTANCE EDUCATION IN
HIGHER-EDUCATION INSTITUTIONS

Baiyun Chen
University of Central Florida



       The purpose of the study was to empirically investigate the institutional approach to distance education, and
       examine whether the factors of concerns for program cost and faculty participation could statistically predict
       adoption of technology-mediated distance education (TMDE) among higher-education institutions. It is elu-
       sive to base the determination of institutional decisions merely on existing descriptive statistics. Therefore, the
       author used the logistic regression method to explore the hypotheses, with controls for extraneous explanatory
       variables, such as institution type, graduate program availability, and degree of urbanization. Specifically, a
       binary logistic regression was modeled to analyze a number of barriers that might keep institutions from start-
       ing or expanding distance offerings. Two categories of barrier factors were analyzed. The program cost fac-
       tors include program development costs and equipment maintaining costs. The faculty participation factors
       encompass concerns about faculty workload, lack of faculty interest, and lack of faculty rewards or incentives.




THEORETICAL FRAMEWORK                                               attainments accrue benefits to society, includ-
                                                                    ing greater productivity, increased community
Access to postsecondary education is an issue                       services, enhanced civic life, and decreased
of significant importance both to the individual                    reliance on government financial support
and society in general. In the United States,                       (Institute for Higher Education Policy, 1998).
estimates of the proportion of future jobs                              The rapid development of information tech-
requiring postsecondary education range from                        nology and the Internet have generated broader
70 to 90% (Gladieux & Swail, 1999). The indi-                       opportunities for students to access postsec-
viduals with a postsecondary degree earn on                         ondary education. In the fall 2005 semester,
average 50% more than high school graduates                         more than 96% of the very largest higher-
over the course of their lifetime (U.S. Bureau                      education institutions (more than 15,000 total
of Census, 1999). Also, increased educational                       enrollments) had online distance offerings, and


• Baiyun Chen, Center for Distributed Learning, 4000 Central Florida Blvd., Bldg 2, Lib-107, University of Central Flor-
ida, 32816-2810. Telephone: (407) 823-3398. E-mail: baiyun@mail.ucf.edu

The Quarterly Review of Distance Education, Volume 10(4), 2009, pp. 333–338                             ISSN 1528-3518
Copyright © 2009 Information Age Publishing, Inc.                       All rights of reproduction in any form reserved.
334                                          The Quarterly Review of Distance Education   Vol. 10, No. 4, 2009


the enrollment in online courses reached              among different types of institutions with
nearly 3.2 million, up nearly 35% over the            regard to their funding availability.
2004 figures (Allen & Seaman, 2005, 2006). In            Another important factor on institutional
2007, approximately one-third of higher edu-          adoption of TMDE is faculty participation.
cation institutions accounted for three-quarters      Those institutions most engaged
								
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