Broken Vessels: Philosophical Implications of Poetic Translation (the limits, hospitality, afterlife, and Marranism of languages) by ProQuest

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									                                 Broken Vessels
          Philosophical Implications of Poetic Translation
                  (the limits, hospitality, afterlife,
                   and Marranism of languages)


                                                Andrés Claro
         Universidad de Chile, Departamento de Teoría de las Artes, Facultad de Artes




      Preliminary Notice or Rhetorical Exergue
  (from translation testimonies to four variations on the broken vessels motif)


In recent decades, the conceptions, strategies, and implications of transla-
tion have been promoted to the rank of first-order philosophical and cul-
tural problems. The explosive multiplication of transfers between territories
and cultures, on the one hand, and the doubt that has been cast over the
transparency claimed for the communication of meaning and the univer-
sality of representation, on the other, have created a growing awareness of
the importance of the difficulties and solutions involved in the different
ways of understanding and practicing translation, where poetic versions
have always been seen as the extreme case. Amidst all these developments,
the task of the translator is tending if anything to be overdetermined: the

CR: The New Centennial Review, Vol. 9, No. 3, 2010, pp. 95–136, issn 1532-687x.
© Michigan State University Board of Trustees. All rights reserved.




                                                                                        ● 95
96 ●   B r o k e n Ve s s e l s


  semantic, epistemological, ethical, historiographic, and even transcendental
  problems that arise in the passage between languages and literatures, as well
  as the trouvailles devised to cope with them, have been extended to other
  systems of signs and treated as keys to the understanding of communica-
  tion in general; figurations of the act of translating at particular times and
  places, meanwhile, are given a privileged place when it comes to assessing
  self-comprehension and relations between cultures.
      In contrast with today’s outpouring of interest, however, the place for-
  merly occupied by thinking about translation in the intellectual history of
  the West can only be described as marginal, and it was more often than not
  detached from the realm of theory and the philosophical spirit. Actua
								
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