Evader: The Epic Story of the First British Airman to Be Rescued by the Com'ete Escape Line in World War II

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Evader: The Epic Story of the First British Airman to Be Rescued by the Com'ete Escape Line in World War II Powered By Docstoc
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region. Particularly striking are the behind-the-          Despite these shortcomings, as a historical
scenes explanations of actions during early US          review of US involvement in the Middle East,
political ventures as well as Middle East peace         Crisis and Crossfire serves as a good resource.
conferences. Hahn does a splendid job of setting        However, readers desiring deeper analysis and
the stage for US political and economic involve-        perhaps even recommended courses of action
ment in the area.                                       for American foreign policy in the region may
   Before World War II, US government officials         desire to seek alternate texts.
had little interest in the Middle East. “ ‘Egypt is a
                                                                        Maj Paul G. Niesen, USAF, Retired
charming place to be stationed,’ William J. Jar-
                                                                                          Scott AFB, Illinois
dine, the American minister to Cairo, wrote in
1932. ‘As I see it, there is not much going on
here of tremendous importance to my govern-
ment. . . . It appears to me to be quite a side-        Evader: The Epic Story of the First British
show’ ” (pp. 1–2). One may reasonably conclude            Airman to Be Rescued by the Com’ete Es-
that official US involvement in the Middle East           cape Line in World War II by Derek Shuff.
after World War II focuses on regional stability to       Spellmount Publishers, Tempus Publishing
ensure the flow of and US access to Middle East-          Group (http://www.spellmount.com), The Mill,
ern oil. The author illustrates how this interest         Brimscombe Port, Stroud, Gloucestershire,
arose as British influence in the region waned            GL5 2QG, 2003, 216 pages, $32.95 (hardcover).
and grew more intense as the US economy be-
came more dependent on foreign oil. Hahn’s                  On 5 August 1941, dropping from the skies of
ensuing discussion of World War II and Cold             Belgium, a British Royal Air Force Wellington 1c
War–era US government activities lead the               bomber, call sign “G for George,” crash-landed in
reader through a number of security systems,            Antwerp after its first successful bombing raid
treaties, and alliances that ultimately set the         over enemy territory. The ensuing journey back
stage for or helped preclude future conflicts in        to Allied lines was a harrowing adventure that
the region. Furthermore, Hahn shows how US              Flight Sgt Jack Newman had not expected to
interest has also waxed and waned with the de-          take, but through the brave actions of many re-
gree of Soviet—and, later, Russian—activity in          sistance fighters from Belgium, France, and Spain,
the region.                                             he lived to tell his story more than 50 years later
   The discussion of US presidential doctrine for       to Derek Shuff, author of Evader. Many strange
the Middle East is enlightening. Hahn begins            twists of fate ultimately led Newman to become
with the Truman Doctrine of 1947 and works his          the first British airman safely transported
way through to Pres. George W. Bush (current as         through the Com’ete Escape Line.
of 2005). I was happy to see discussion not only            Newman would eventually split off from the
about oil-rich Saudi Arabia, Iraq, and Iran, but        two other airmen from the G for George but not
also about Israel, its neighbors and their collec-      before they barely escaped with their lives. Local
tive issues, and US presidential involvement in a
				
DOCUMENT INFO
Description: On 5 August 1941, dropping from the skies of Belgium, a British Royal Air Force Wellington Ic bomber, call sign "G for George," crash-landed in Antwerp after its first successful bombing raid over enemy territory. The ensuing journey back to Allied lines was a harrowing adventure that Flight Sgt Jack Newman had not expected to take, but through the brave actions of many resistance fighters from Belgium, France, and Spain, he lived to tell his story more than 50 years later to Derek Shuff, author o Evader.
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