; Anglican History in the 21st Century: Remembering All the Baptized
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Anglican History in the 21st Century: Remembering All the Baptized

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Over the last few decades historians have, for example, increasingly seen the inclusion of the histories of women (of all ethnicities) and African American men and women in histories of the Episcopal Church-influenced by the women's movement and the Civil Rights Movements of the 1960s and 1970s, and the consequent developments in academia. [...] if we turn to our global context - the "new" realization about the significance of the Anglican Communion for our local histories-it was precisely because of Lambeth 1998, and the reactions across the communion to the consecration of Gene Robinson as bishop of New Hampshire in 2004, that so many historians began to ask questions about the history and development of the Anglican Communion with more curiosity than they ever did before.1 Books on Anglican identity, liturgy, theology, and spirituality, which largely looked to England for their inspiration and source and which were a staple part of the Episcopal seminary diet until a decade or so ago, have increasingly been replaced by histories and surveys of the global Anglican Communion.

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