Documents
Resources
Learning Center
Upload
Plans & pricing Sign in
Sign Out

Coming at peace from different directions

VIEWS: 22 PAGES: 2

[Bruce Adema] said that Reformed adherents live in a tension: In one hand they hold a deep desire to "never want war," and in the other hand they hold a desire to stand up for the weak and vulnerable, using redemptive violent military force if no other solution is evident. However, "if just war happens, we have not been effective agents of peace," he admitted.With a Purple Heart pinned to his lapel, [Herman Keizer] advocated for a re-examination of attitudes about conventional weapons. "In World War II, only 20 percent of the fight- ing force shot to kill," he said. "Today, that is up to 85 percent. . . . We, the U.S. and Canada, have trained- and have fielded- the deadliest and most lethal force in the history of war fighting. I am concerned because soldiers are more concerned with killing than being killed."CRC members would not disagree with Hrders assertions that "we believe that peace is the will of God," and it is most fully revealed in Jesus. However, exegetical differences showed fissures on how peace can be achieved. Jesus' claim in Matthew 10:34-7 have not come to bring peace, but a sword"- -were filtered through both CRC and Mennonite lenses. Mennonites interpret this story as the suffering servant model: Jesus sought to bring peace by making himself a sacrifice of the sword, instead of wielding it, while the CRC understands that the text does not forbid the use of violent force.

More Info
									14   Canadian Mennonite November 30, 2009




        God at work in the World                                                                 killing than being killed.”
                                                                                                    Helmut Harder, emeritus profes-

 Coming at peace from                                                                            sor of theology at Canadian Mennonite
                                                                                                 University, Winnipeg, and former general
                                                                                                 secretary of the Conference of Mennonites

 different directions
 Story and Photo by Dan Dyck
                                                                                                 in Canada (the precursor to MC Canada),
                                                                                                 addressed the question of how Mennonites
                                                                                                 have responded to contemporary chal-
                                                                                                 lenges on issues of war and peace, and how
 Mennonite church canada release
                                                                                                 this has shaped and reshaped its identity.
 WiNNiPeG
                                                                                                 Challenges to absolute pacifism by some
                                                                                                 of those in attendance were rewarded by

 W       hat happens when just war theolo-
         gians and church leaders meet face
 to face with their pacifist counterparts to
                                                                                                 Harder’s simple explanation that “exter-
                                                                                                 mination of life is always wrong.”
                                                                                                    CRC members would not disagree with
 talk about war and peace?                                                                       Harder’s assertions that “we believe that
    Last month, 43 members of Mennonite                                                          peace is the will of God,” and it is most fully
 Church Canada and the Christian                                                                 revealed in Jesus. However, exegetical dif-
 Reformed Church of Canada (CRC) took                                                            ferences showed fissures on how peace
 part in the Symposium on War and Peace                                                          can be achieved. Jesus’ claim in Matthew
 at Bethel Mennonite Church, Winnipeg.                                                           10:34—“I have not come to bring peace,
    The Reformed Church has a long-stand-                                                        but a sword”—were filtered through both
 ing tradition of just war theology—war                                                          CRC and Mennonite lenses. Mennonites
 should be used only as a last resort for the                                                    interpret this story as the suffering servant
 defence of the weak and vulnerable who are                                                      model: Jesus sought to bring peace by mak-
 unable to defend themselves—and obliga-                                                         ing himself a sacrifice of the sword, instead
 tory military service to one’s country, be-                                                     of wielding 
								
To top