BEYOND INVESTMENT: ENGAGING THE PRIVATE SECTOR IN TRADE FACILITATION

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					BEYOND INVESTMENT: ENGAGING THE PRIVATE SECTOR IN TRADE FACILITATION
Angela Strachan
International Trade Forum; 2009; 4; Docstoc
pg. 32




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Description: Trade facilitation has the potential to bring considerable economic gains to developing and least developed countries through improving their trade competitiveness and diversifying their export bases. The benefits of removing impediments to trade are substantial, with evidence suggesting that the gains from these reforms can be higher than reducing tariffs. WorldBank and UNESCAP data demonstrate that the Asia-Pacific region has made tremendous progress in reducing at- and behind-the-border time and costs, but the performance varies significantly across countries and subregions. UNESCAP recommends an integrated approach to trade facilitation which not only looks at border issues but also addresses domestic regulations and behind-the-border challenges. These issues include trade procedures and processes, barriers to the development of an efficient logistics services sector and a thorough assessment of the existing trade-related infrastructure. A number of UNESCAP members, including Armenia, Azerbaijan, Kyrgyzstan, Mongolia, Pakistan and Sri Lanka, have established, or are in the process of setting up, national trade facilitation committees or similar coordinating structures.
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