; PREDICTORS OF ENTREPRENEURIAL INTENTIONS: A QUASI-EXPERIMENT COMPARING STUDENTS ENROLLED IN INTRODUCTORY MANAGEMENT AND ENTREPRENEURSHIP CLASSES
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PREDICTORS OF ENTREPRENEURIAL INTENTIONS: A QUASI-EXPERIMENT COMPARING STUDENTS ENROLLED IN INTRODUCTORY MANAGEMENT AND ENTREPRENEURSHIP CLASSES

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This study examines the impact of enrollment in an entrepreneurship course, as well as evaluates several covariates, in the prediction of entrepreneurial intentions by comparing students enrolled and not enrolled in a class in entrepreneurship. The impact of enrollment was influenced by the perception of support factors and attitudes toward entrepreneurship at the beginning of the semester, as well as awareness of challenges faced by entrepreneurs and the perception of barriers to entrepreneurship at the end of the semester. Contrary to hypothesized directionality, the awareness of challenges was positively related to entrepreneurial intentions, suggesting that awareness of such challenges arose from students' interaction with active entrepreneurs serving as guest speakers. [PUBLICATION ABSTRACT]

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									      PREDICTORS OF ENTREPRENEURIAL INTENTIONS: A QUASI-EXPERIMENT
       COMPARING STUDENTS ENROLLED IN INTRODUCTORY MANAGEMENT
                      AND ENTREPRENEURSHIP CLASSES

                               Brian K. Miller            James D. Bell
                                        Texas State University

                                           Mathew Palmer
                                        United States Air Force1

                                           Andres Gonzalez
                                           Pitkin Petroleum

                                              ABSTRACT

    This study examines the impact of enrollment in an entrepreneurship course, as well as evaluates
    several covariates, in the prediction of entrepreneurial intentions by comparing students enrolled
    and not enrolled in a class in entrepreneurship. The impact of enrollment was influenced by the
    perception of support factors and attitudes toward entrepreneurship at the beginning of the
    semester, as well as awareness of challenges faced by entrepreneurs and the perception of
    barriers to entrepreneurship at the end of the semester. Contrary to hypothesized directionality,
    the awareness of challenges was positively related to entrepreneurial intentions, suggesting that
    awareness of such challenges arose from students’ interaction with active entrepreneurs serving
    as guest speakers.

                                          INTRODUCTION

        Entrepreneurship is an important part of the economic landscape, providing opportunities and
    jobs for huge numbers of people. Hundreds of thousands of new businesses are established each
    year, thus creating millions of new jobs (Kuratko, 2005). To prepare future business owners, the
    number of college-level courses and programs in entrepreneurship has increased dramatically in
    the past 35 years, and the trend continues. Colleges and universities offering such courses rose
    from only six in 1967 to 400 in 1990 (Solomon & Fernaid, 1991) to 1,600 by 2003 (Katz, 2003).
    Clearly, universities are striving to meet the educational needs of those intending to become
    entrepreneurs.
        While the number of students taking such courses continues to increase, they represent only a
    small percentage of all business students. Katz (2007) reported that 125,000 students enrolled in
    at least one college-level class in entrepreneurship and another 125,000 took a class in small
    business management. However, the U.S. Department of Education (2008) reports total U.S.
    college enrollment at 14,257,000 in 2007. Using these numbers, we find that less than 2% of
    college students are enrolled in entrepreneurship or small business classes. Further, we estimate
    that the vast majority (perhaps 90%) of business majors who complete the core curriculum have
    as their only exposure to entrepreneurship perhaps 10 or fewer pages in the typical introductory
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