Plan 2 Strengthening Families by dcn11561

VIEWS: 6 PAGES: 3

									                                                                                                Scale IV
                 Subscale 2: Managing Stresses on Children                         Key
                        Strengthening Families                                     Parenting
                                                                                   Behaviors
GOAL: For parents to identify existing strengths of their families and to           Appropriate
consider strategies for building additional strengths.                               expectations
                                                                                    Warm responsive
SPECIAL CONSIDERATIONS                                                               parenting
There are several frameworks and models for what makes a healthy family.            Predictable routines
The model presented here prompts parents to think about what they believe               All PEP levels
contributes to “successful” families. It is not expected that parents will
embrace every trait presented.

MATERIALS
1) The Family Book, by Todd Parr
2) set of 15 3x5 cards, each with a “trait of a healthy family”
3) parent handout: Reflection about My Family’s Practices

DISCUSSION POINTS
1) Every family is unique and all families have strengths.
2) Families come in a variety of configurations: multi-generational, single parent, same sex
   parents, adoptive/foster parents, male-female parents, etc. While families with similar
   configurations may share some common problems, beliefs, and issues, there is also diversity
   among them. Research has shown that physically and emotionally healthy children come
   from a wide range of family configurations.
3) Not only are family configurations diverse, the cultures within each family are unique. The
   most recent census (2000) indicates that one of every five children in our country is either
   immigrant or has at least one parent that is an immigrant. The cultural norms, values, and
   traditions of each culture influence family relationships.
4) While there are models that identify characteristics of healthy families, each family has to
   decide whether these characteristics will contribute to their family’s wellness and how that
   might happen.

ACTIVITIES
Teaching parents
Objective: To introduce discussion about diversity of families and ideas for building stronger
families, as well as to provide parents with opportunity for reflection about their own family
strengths.
1) Read The Family Book or similar children’s literature about family, asking parents to listen
   for the “big ideas” (diversity and commonalties). Discuss what ideas were in the book,
   applying to families present. Finish with idea in book that “All families can help each other
   be strong,” which can be interpreted in two ways: within families and family to family. In
   this plan, we are primarily looking within families.
2) Present to parents the idea of frameworks for looking at what makes a family strong. Ensure
   that parents understand that they have to decide for themselves whether the ideas suggested
   in the framework have meaning for their family. The framework, Traits of a Healthy Family,



                                                                    Strengthening Families: page 1 of 3
   is a list of 15 behaviors that many family development specialists feel contribute to building
   strong families.
3) Ask parents to pick up 3x5 cards, (which are turned upside down and in no order) one by
   one, and to read the trait posted on the card. Discuss for further clarity if needed. Each card
   has a number on it, which signifies the order of priority with the strongest trait as number 1;
   least influential is number 15. After all cards are read, lay on table in order and ask parents
   how they feel about the traits. “Are there some that do not seem to apply?” (If majority agree,
   turn those cards over so they are not visible.) “Is the order about right?” You should hear
   some diverse thought that reflects the diversity and uniqueness of each family. Summarize
   what you have left in the pile, reminding parents that these are the behaviors thought to
   contribute to strong families. Other frameworks exist, but they are all relatively similar.
4) Distribute Reflection about My Family’s Practices for parents to look at the 15 traits and to
   think about the degree to which these practices occur in their homes. Help parents complete,
   as needed. Talk with parents about what they feel they do well.
5) Using the results of the reflection, ask parents if there are areas they could address to
   strengthen the well-being of their families. Ask parents to choose one or two areas to address
   on the handout. Ask parents to write down how change could benefit their children.

Practice with parents
Objectives: To facilitate parents’ ability to recognize their own personal stress and to use
strategies to both cope with that stress and to buffer their children from unhealthy stress.

In the home:
1) Discuss with parents what the “change” or application of the trait would look like in the
    home and how the parents can work toward that application.
2) Role-play or further discuss additional strategies to help parents strengthen or activate the
    trait. Be sure parents can articulate comfortably what they intend to do.
3) Refer parents back to reflection sheets and make sure that any additional ideas are added.
4) Commend parents for their commitment to strengthening their family and reiterate the
    benefits to the children. Reflect back to the message of The Family Book: All families can
    help each other be strong.

In the center:
1) Facilitate dyads in which parents can discuss with partner what the “change” or application
    of the trait would look like in the home and how the parents can work towards that
    application.
2) Encourage, through questioning, how application would occur. Encourage parents to role-
    play, if relevant. Encourage partners to add additional ideas to help strengthen each other’s
    plan. Be sure parents can articulate comfortably what they intend to do.
3) Refer parents back to reflection sheets and make sure that additional ideas are added.
4) Note the diversity of approaches in group. There is no one “right” way of doing things.
5) Commend parents for their commitment to strengthening their family and reiterate the
    benefits to children. Reflect back to the message of The Family Book: All families can help
    each other be strong.




                                                                     Strengthening Families: page 2 of 3
OBSERVATIONS OVER TIME
This is a long-term plan that needs follow-up over several points in time. If parents can make
change in one area, they may consider making another.

   Do parents recognize the importance of strengthening their family?
   Is there evidence of parents fostering change on a reasonably consistent basis?
   Are parents able to talk about what they are doing to strengthen the family? Do they see
    changes in family members as a result?
   Are they able to identify the benefit to children?




                                                                    Strengthening Families: page 3 of 3

								
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