ENVIRONMENTAL PERFORMANCE OF by zfz19897

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									ENVIRONMENTAL PERFORMANCE OF
   LAND FORCE QUEBEC AREAI
    JOINT TASK FORCE (EAST)




    ANNUAL REPORT 2006-2007

        5 Area Support Group (ASG)
       Resource Conservation Service
            Environment section


               October 2007
1-                          MESSAGE FROM THE COMMANDING
                            GENERAL
                            LAND FORCE QUEBEC ARENJOINT TASK FORCE (EAST)
                            (LFQNJTF (EAST))
                                         . t
                                          .    .
                                               .




 For a nurnber of years, Land Force Quebec Area has recognized the importance of
 environmental protection in its training areas and on the land for which it is responsible. As
 Commanding Officer, 1have made a clear commitment under the Area's environmental policy
 to integrate environmental factors into operational considerations and to apply sustainable
 development principles to our activities.

 The Area's environmental prograrn is implemented through the Environmental Management
 System (EMS), the tool we use to apply DND's Sustainable Development Strategy (2006). As
 part of our efforts toward continuous improvement, the EMS is fkequently updated to take into
 account the Amy's strategic environmental direction, legislative changes, lessons learned and
 changes in environmental protection and pollution prevention practices.

 As Commanding Officer of LFQAIJTF (EAST) and Chair of the EMS Executive Comrnittee, 1
 am pleased to present the Area's 2006-2007 environmental performance report, which
 highlights the major achievements of the environmental program throughout 2006-2007.
 Readers will be able to appreciate the progress achieved by the various LFQA Units in the
 sustainable management of the resources and territories for which we are the stewards in
 Quebec.




     (French version signed by)


     Brigadier-General J.G.J.C. Barabé
     Commanding Officer
Environmental Performance of LFQA
Annual Reuort 2006-2007

                                  TABLE OF CONTENTS
MESSAGE FROM THE COMMANDING GENERAL

.
1    POLLUTION PREVENTION                           ...................................................................................... 1
1.1  National Pollutant Release Inventory (NPRI)                             .............................................................1
1.2  Reduction of high-risk hazardous materials                            ............................................................... 2
1.3  Management of contaminated sites at LFQA                                 .............................................................2
1.4  Pest management          ........................................................................................................... 7
1.5  Compliance of petroleum product storage systems                                   ....................................................8
1.6  Spills of petroleum products                .........................................................................................8
1.7  Monitoring of liquid effluents                .......................................................................................9
.
2    AIR QUALITY. CLIMATE CHANGE AND PROTECTION OF THE
     OZONE LAYER             ..........................................................................................................  10
2.1  Protection of the ozone layer                ......................................................................................10
2.2  Greenhouse gas emissions               ..........................................................................................12
                                             . . ...............................................................................
2.3  Characterization of air emissions                                                                                                   14
.
3    ECOSYSTEM PROTECTION                             ..................................................................................15
3.1  Ecological mapping          ..................................................................................................... 15
3.2  Management of the aquatic environment                            .................................................................. 15
3.3  Management of wetlands                ............................................................................................  16
3.4  Protection of species at risk              ........................................................................................ 16
3.5  Wildlife management             ...............................................................................................17
3.6  Environmental clean-up of firing ranges and training areas                                        ..................................20
3.7  Operation Clean House              ...............................................................................................20
.
4    MANAGEMENT THAT PROMOTES SUSTAINABLE DEVELOPMENT                                                                             .......22
4.1  Environmental assessments                 ........................................................................................22
4.2  Environmental inspections               ..........................................................................................  22
4.3  Training  ........................................................................................................................  24
4.4  Environmental baseline studies                   .................................................................................. 25
4.5  Road salt management at the Montreal Garrison                                    ...................................................25
4.6  Monitoring of potable water consumption                            ................................................................ 25
4.7  Waste management            ......................................................................................................  26
5.   ENVIRONMENTAL COMMUNICATION                                           .............................................................28
6.   GOVERNANCE              .........................................................................................................30
REVIEW AND DIRECTION BY THE COMMANDER OF 5 AREA SUPPORT
     GROUP (5 ASG)           ..........................................................................................................32
ANNEX A NON-EXHAUSTIVE LIST OF DOCUMENTS ISSUED 2006-2007
Performance environnementale du SQFT/FOI (Est)
Rauuort annuel 2006-2007
LIST OF TABLES

Table 1          Contaminant arnounts reported to the NPRA by the Valcartier and Farnham
                 garrisons since 2002 ............................................................................................... 1
Table 2          Pesticide use during the 2005 and 2006 golf semons on the CPAC golf course
                 on the Valcartier Garrison...................................................................................        8
Table 3          Summary of animals harvested on the Valcartier Garrison ................................. 19
Table 4          Expenditures h m 1 April2006 to 31 March 2007 for the various activities of
                 the LFQA/JTF(EAST) environmental program ...................................................                        30

LIST OF FIGURES
                                                                                                .   *


Figure 1   Number of LFQA contarninated sites and their management levels                                       .
           Source: Data from Econet ...................................................................................... 3
Figure 2   Groundwater concentration of TCE in Valcartier in 2006 aocording to state of
           knowledge ..............................................................................................................4
Figure 3   One of the three pilot TCE-decontamination sites .................................................                      5
Figure 4   Valcartier Garrison cornmunity garden ..................................................................6
Figure 5   Volume of spills of petroleum products (PP) of 50 litres or more reported since
           2003 at LFQA........................................................................................................7
Figure 6   Volume of spills of petroleum products (PP) of 50 litres or more reported
           since 2003 at LFQA ............................................................................................... 9
Figure 7   The ozone hole reached a record size in September 2000-28.3 million km2.
           three times the size of the United States. Dark blue areas denote high levels of
           ozone depletion..................................................................................................... 10
Figure 8   Inventory of halocarbons and changes in the ozone-depleting potential (ODP)
         .
           at LFQA facilities since 2003-2004 ..............................................................                     11
Figure 9   Halocarbon (10 kg or more) and halon releases since2003-2004 ........................12
Figure 10 Changes in LFQA GHG emissions since 1998-1999 ...........................................13
Figure 11 Changes in LFQA GHG emissions since 2002-2003 according to heated building
           area (kg GHGlm2) ............................................................................................         13
Figure 12 Wetland in Fardmm Range ..................................................................................16
Figure 13 Canker on the bark of a butternut in Ontario ........................................................17
Figure 14 Beaver habitat at St-Maurice Range in Terrebonne .............................................18
Figure 15 Snapping turtle at Feurihm .................................................................................. 19
Figure 16 Impact mounds with bullet catchers .....................................................................20
Figure 17 Camp Okpiapik, Akulivik,July 2006 ................................................................... 2               2
Figure 18 Camp installed h r Exercise Phidippidès Royal at Saint-Helen's Island .............23
Figure 19 Potable water consumption at LFQA since 1999-2000 ........................................26
Figure 20 Solid waste produced and recorded at the Valcartier Garrison ............................27
Figure 21 5 ASG Health Day information kiosk at Parc des Îles de Boucherville...............28
Figure 22 Resource conservation and environmental protection information kiosk ............28
Environmental Performance of LFQA
Annual Report 2006-2007
1      POLLUTION PREVENTION
Our operations and activities sometimes require the use of substances or materials with
potentially negative impacts on human health and the environment. As a result, pollution
prevention is the cornerstone of the LFQA environmental program.

1.1    National Pollutant Release Inventory (NPRI)

The NPRI tracks information concerning more than 300 pollutants released, disposed of or
recycled by companies and other organizations in Canada. The NPRI is the only legislated
national inventory that is accessible to the public. Every year, thousands of industrial,
commercial, government and other facilities that meet certain criteria must report to the NPRI
under the Canadian Environmental Protection Act (1999).

LFQA must therefore report some of its releases that exceed the mandatory reporting
threshold to the NPRI. The Valcartier Garrison reports its lead, zinc, copper, nitrogen oxides
and particulate matter releases, and the Farnham Garrison reports lead and copper. The
mandatory reporting thresholds are 50 kg for lead, 10 tons for copper and zinc and 0.3 tons for
particulate matter. Table 1 shows the quantities of contaminants reported to the NPRI by the
Valcartier and Farnharn garrisons since 2002.

Metals such as lead, zinc and copper come fiom munitions used during training, while
particulate matter (PM 2.5) are contaminants released into the atmosphere by the Valcartier
thermal power plant.

Table 1:     Contaminant amounts reported to the NPRI by the Valcartier and Farnham
             garrisons since 2002.
Performance environnementale du SQFT/FOI (Est)
Rapport annuel 2006-2007
1.2    Reduction of high-risk hazardous materials             ,s
                                                                      ,.
                                                                   - .h.*
                                                                   Y


Inventories of hazardous materials are conducted for LFQA units every year to identiSl high-
risk products or products of concern. Once the products are listed, a letter is sent to the units
advising them to discontinue use of the products, and alternatives that are less hazardous to
health and the environment are suggested.                               - -

Eliminating use of dichloromethane to protect employee health                            :   ,-

In 2006-2007, a project to reduce the number of aerosol containers being used was introduced
at the Valcartier Garrison. Under the Hazarhus Pruducts Act and its regulations, certain
aerosol containers are considered hazardous waste. A study showed that the 5 CMBG
mechanical workshops use the largest number of aerosol containers, where they are used to
apply brake cleaner. Most of these cleaners contain dichloromethane (DCM), a substance that
must be reported to the NPRI. DCM is a highly toxic product in the short term that can affect
the human nervous system and even be fatal at high doses.                                ..
Three bulk refilling systems for brake cleaner containers or sprayers are now in use on the
Valcartier Garrison. The advantage of these systems is that the brake cleaners used do not
contain DCM. The results of the project were twofold: employee health is being protected and
at least 7,000 containers are being kept out of landfills.     .& ,             l~   J




1.3    Management of contaminated sites at LFQA
Some LFQA-owned lands have become contaminated as a result of several years of industrial
and military activities on the garrisons, in training areas and on adjacent lands. LFQA places a
great deal of importance to the management of contaminated sites. Those under its authority
are either classified, cleaned up or managed according to the risk they pose to health and the
environment. In addition, the Area has been proactive in the management of contaminated
sites on its territory and has taken measures to prevent contamination of the soil, and surface
and ground water. In this way, past errors are being avoided. Figure 1 shows the number of
LFQA contaminated sites and their management levels. *' ':             *S.'
                                                                       1    :
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In Canada, contaminated sites under the responsibility of the federal government are managed
according to a risk-based approach. The approach incorporates several components including
site identification and characterization, detailed site investigations, risk assessment, evaluation
of different risk management strategies, implementation of a selected management strategy,
and monitoring. In addition, contaminated sites are classified according to criteria established
by the Canadian Council of Ministers of the Environment. The Treasury Board's
Contaminated Sites Inventory Policy requires al1 federal departments to establish and maintain
a database of the contaminated sites they own and to provide this information to the Treasury
Board Secretariat for incorporation into the Federal Contaminated Sites Inventory. At DND, a
central database called ECONET is used.

								
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