Preliminary raport about Allais and Jeverdan –Rusu-Antonescu effects

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Preliminary raport about Allais and Jeverdan –Rusu-Antonescu effects Powered By Docstoc
					 PRELIMINARY REPORT UPON INVESTIGATIONS INTO
  THE ALLAIS AND JEVERDAN-RUSU-ANTONESCU
EFFECTS IN KUCHING, MALAYSIA DURING THE SOLAR
          ECLIPSE OF 14 OCTOBER 2004
                    dimitrieolenici@hotmail.com

In the period 15 September – 15 November 2004, Dimitrie Olenici
(Romania) and Thomas Goodey (UK) performed experiments with
different pendulums during several planetary alignments, to
investigate the Allais and Jeverdan-Rusu-Antonescu effects in an
equatorial region where the Foucault effect is negligible.

Our experimental location near the town of Kuching was at the works
of our sponsor, the Airship Group at Alom, located at 110º25' E
longitude, 1º32' N latitude.
Here are presented the results obtained by Dimitrie Olenici during the
solar eclipse of 14 October 2004 using a "Romanian style"
paraconical pendulum with a length of 2.87 meters and a bob mass of
12 kg.

The "Romanian style" paraconical pendulum is a pendulum
suspended upon a ball which rolls in a spherical cup, and whose bob
is shaped as a horizontal lens for aerodynamic efficiency.

Experiments were performed on 13 October, 14 October, and 15
October 2004.

The pendulum was started each time in a N-S swing azimuth. After
each start the pendulum was allowed to oscillate for a swing episode
of approximately one hour. 140 complete pendulum oscillations were
timed for assessing the JRA effect, which took approximately 8
minutes; then the pendulum azimuth was measured, which took
around two minutes; and then the procedure was repeated. Thus,
during each episode, five readings were taken at successive intervals
of approximately ten minutes after the start. For determining the
azimuth of the plane of oscillation, an angular vernier with a precision
of 0.1º was used. For the timing, a Casio timer with an accuracy of
better than one part in 40,000 and a read-out precision of 0.01 sec
was used. The timer was triggered on and off by the pointer of the
pendulum making a momentary contact with a fine sensor wire.

The solar eclipse was not visible in Kuching, but, by local Malaysian
time, it started on 14 October at 08:54 and finished at 13:04. The
eclipse maximum was at 10:59.

On 14 October, the day of the eclipse, the pendulum was started at
8:00, 9:00, 10:00, 11:05, 11:55, and 12:45.

On 13 October, the day before the eclipse, the pendulum was started
at 9:30, 10:30, 12:00, and 13:00.

On 15 October, the day after the eclipse, the pendulum was started at
8:30, 9:30, 10:15, 12:05, and 13.00.

The results relating to the change of the azimuth of the pendulum
(Allais effect) were as follows:
                                          From FIG. 1. we see that
                                          on the days before and
                                          after the eclipse (13
                                          October and 15 October),
                                          the values of azimuthal
                                          deviation reached at the
                                          end of each hour were
                                          substantially smaller, than
                                          the corresponding values
                                          upon the day of the eclipse
                                          (14 October). (The number
                                          near the end of each line
                                          represents the starting time
                                          for that episode of swinging
                                          of the pendulum.)

Moreover, on the day of the eclipse, the swing episode for which the
final azimuthal deviation was maximum corresponded exactly to the
time of maximum eclipse.

Thus we consider that the Allais effect was clearly manifested during
this eclipse.
The results relating to the period of oscillation of pendulum (Jeverdan
effect) were as follows:

On 13 October, the day before the eclipse, the average values of the
period of oscillation for each hour were:

9:30 – 3.40311 sec; 10:30 – 3.40312 sec; 12:00 – 3.40303 sec; 13:00
– 3.40306 sec.

The average value for this day was Tbefore=3.40308 sec

On 14 October, the day of the eclipse, these values were:
8:00 – 3.40302 sec; 9:00 – 3.40310 sec; 10:00 – 3.40310 sec; 11:05
– 3.40311 sec; 11:50 – 3.40310 sec; 12:45 – 3.40314 sec.

The average value for the day of eclipse between 9:00 and 14:00 was
Teclipse =3.40311 sec

For comparison, on this day, we also made a measurement between
8:00 and 9:00 before the eclipse started, but this result has not been
used in the calculation of the average value Teclipse.

On 15 October, the day after the eclipse, the values were:

8:30 – 3.40305 sec; 9:20 – 3.40303 sec; 10:15 – 3.40300 sec; 11:10
– 3.40302 sec; 12:05 – 3.40302 sec; 13:00 – 3.40302 sec.

The average value for this day was Tafter=3.40302 sec.

The average period of oscillation for the two days before and after the
eclipse was Tavg=(Tbefore + Tafter) / 2 = 3.40305 sec

So that we see that during the eclipse the period of oscillation of the
pendulum was slightly greater than the period of oscillation on the
days before and after the eclipse. This is contrary to the sense of the
effect that Jeverdan observed. Although the value is rather near the
limit of accuracy of the apparatus, we feel that it is valid.
Other criteria relating to disturbance of the movement of the
pendulum are:

The ratio e= b/a of the semi-minor axis and semi-major axis of the
ellipse of oscillation of the pendulum; and the damping of the
oscillation period.

FIG. 2 shows the variation of the ratio e in our experiments, The
differences between the day of the eclipse and the days before and
after the eclipse are clear.

                                              The values between
                                              200 mm and 150m are
                                              the values of the semi-
                                              major axis of the ellipse.
                                              On October 14, the day
                                              of the eclipse, the ratio e
                                              was much greater at the
                                              hour of maximum
                                              eclipse. The small semi-
                                              axis assumed its
                                              maximum value of
                                              10.5 mm at the eclipse
                                              maximum.
Fig. 3 shows the damping behavior:


                                           The initial amplitude of
                                           oscillation at release of the
                                           pendulum was 200 mm. At
                                           the end of every hour it had
                                           diminished to about
                                           150mm.

                                           The damping of the period
                                           of oscillation was much
                                           smaller in the day of the
                                           eclipse than in the days
                                           before and after the
                                           eclipse.

Conclusions:
1. The Allais effect and the Jeverdan-Rusu-Antonescu effect were
observed during these experiments in Kuching.

2. These effects appeared even in this equatorial zone (Borneo) in
which the solar eclipse was not itself visible. This suggests that
during a solar eclipse gravitational perturbations can be detected all
over the Earth's surface. We recommend that, during future eclipses,
simultaneous experiments should be conducted at different widely-
spaced locations.

3. The change of the period of oscillation of the pendulum might be
considered to imply that during an eclipse the value of g, the
gravitational acceleration, is different. But we know from direct
gravimetric experiments that this is not true to the extent required to
alter the period in this manner. The shocking conclusion is that either
the well-known formula for the period of oscillation of a pendulum is
invalid during an eclipse, or that unknown aspects of the gravitational
force are manifested when planetary bodies are in alignment with the
observer.
Note In our experiments in Kuching, and in many other experiments,
we have sometimes observed very strong short duration anomalies,
seemingly unpredictable and non-periodic, in the behavior of the
pendulum. We consider these anomalies to be the results of
extraterrestrial gravitational shocks of unknown cause. We term these
shocks "extraterrestrial gravitational tsunami" (EGTs).

                               -o0o-

				
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