7th Annual Enhancement Themes Conference by mby20700

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									7th Annual Enhancement Themes Conference
Graduates for the 21st Century: Integrating the Enhancement Themes

Tuesday 2 and Wednesday 3 March 2010, Heriot-Watt University

Poster Sessions
Tuesday 2 March: 13.15 – 13.45
Wednesday 3 March: 13.00 – 13.30

We hope that delegates displaying posters will to put these up on arrival at the
conference so that they can also be viewed during tea/coffee breaks.


 1     First year interest groups in engineering at the University of Glasgow
 Alison Browitt and Lynn Walker, University of Glasgow
 Themes addressed: RTL, FY
 Days presenting: 2 and 3 March
 We aimed to enhance the student first year experience and engagement with
 learning in the Faculty of Engineering. By creating a programme of activities for First
 Year Interest Groups (FYIGs) we aimed to improve social and academic integration,
 key aspects of Tinto’s theory of student retention, and promote inquiry-led learning.
 In the pilot project with the Department of Mechanical Engineering learning
 communities were created in the spirit of Freshman Interest Groups (FIGs) common
 in institutions of further and higher education in North America. Small groups of first
 year students were brought together at the start of their university careers with fourth
 year student mentors and a staff tutor to create transitional support and extend
 induction throughout first year.
 A key aspect of learning communities is that students are grouped together both by
 the subjects that they study and that they have a common activity to engage them.
 Teams of first year students worked on a design project for a competition inspired by
 the success of University of Glasgow students on the Dragons’ Den television show.
 Teams worked with the support of their fourth year mentors to design and research
 their ideas and to prepare a final PowerPoint presentation for the panel of ‘Dragons’,
 made up of senior Academics and a Student Enterprise representative, for a prize
 co-sponsored by The Royal Academy of Engineering.
 We will present findings that both first year and fourth year students reported benefits
 from their involvement in the project. Benefits included team-working and team-
 leading respectively. The experience of researching, designing and presenting was
 perceived by first year students to be useful for their time at university and beyond in
 careers in engineering. We conclude that the initiative enhances the student
 experience and supports graduate attributes.


 Key for Themes addressed:

 G21C: Graduates for the 21st Century                             RSN: Responding to Student Needs
 RTL: Research Teaching Linkages: enhancing graduate attributes   Emp: Employability
 FY: First Year: engagement and empowerment                       Assess: Assessment Integrative Assessment
 FD: Flexible Delivery
2     Developing critical analytical skills through research journal club in
      undergraduate nurses
Winifred Eboh, Neil Johnson, Shirley Catto, Amanda Brennan, Susan Ashton,
Elaine Mowatt and David Adams, Robert Gordon University
Themes addressed: RTL
Days presenting: 2 and 3 March
Student nurses and midwives are taught that evidence-based practice is essential for
good practice, however, what is not clear is how students acquire the critical
analytical skills needed to be selective in their choice of research articles and how
they choose the appropriate critiquing framework to analyse research evidence
(primary and secondary) and how this then translates to practice. The use of journal
clubs as a vehicle to increase research awareness is not a new concept but
empowering students to become major stakeholders in their own learning through the
formation and running of a research journal club has not been fully reported.
This poster presents students experiences of forming a research journal club with the
aim of enhancing their own understanding and appraisal skills of research evidence.
Through lunch-time meetings organised by the students themselves, they formed
informal discussion groups to look at what it means to be critical thinkers and looking
at different critiquing frameworks before using them to review research publications
on topics that affected their practice. Examples of areas covered included drug
administration errors, pressure bandaging of venous leg ulcers and the pros and
cons of xenotransplantation to name a few.
The zeal and enthusiasm shown by the students was motivated by their desire to be
more research aware, however, the evolution of the club will be discussed
highlighting students’ resolution of logistic barriers faced.


3    Enhancement of academic skills through paradoxes in strategic
     management
Dr Rob Dekkers, Bill Steele and Dr Louis Sheward, University of the West of
Scotland
Themes addressed: G21C, RTL
Days presenting: 2 and 3 March
This study aims to explore the extent to which students on a Strategic Management
module achieved the learning outcomes, acquired what may be considered as 21st
century attributes and to what extent these attributes facilitated studying at 3rd year
degree and honours level. The teaching in this module exposes students to typical
elements of academia: debate, critical analysis of academic literature, peer-review of
coursework, intense groupwork and the relationship between theory and practice.
This approach is supported by lectures that move away from traditional approaches
(eg teaching delivered by research-active staff) and engages students by maintaining
the complexity of theory and practice. This challenging teaching strategy aims to
enhance critical academic skills: research-informed reasoning, balancing
contradictions and interaction with peers.
Anecdotal evidence suggests that students’ confidence has grown during the module
and they are also more confident to take on challenging tasks. Students that have
successfully completed the module are more likely to continue with their studies.
However, this evidence also suggests that there are unsettling periods for the
students when traditional approaches are challenged. It requires a deep approach to
learning and the outcomes are more likely to be achieved by students that are willing
to embrace levels of uncertainty and complexity as would be encountered in a work-
related environment. The transition to this way of studying requires integration of
Key for Themes addressed:

G21C: Graduates for the 21st Century                             RSN: Responding to Student Needs
RTL: Research Teaching Linkages: enhancing graduate attributes   Emp: Employability
FY: First Year: engagement and empowerment                       Assess: Assessment Integrative Assessment
FD: Flexible Delivery
learning strategies across programmes.
In order to investigate the above further students are being invited to attend focus
groups in January and February 2010. At the time of the conference, initial results of
these focus groups will be known.


4     Scientific diving - linking research to teaching
Dr Clare Peddie and Dr Iain Matthews, University of St Andrews
Themes addressed: RTL, Emp
Days presenting: 2 and 3 March
Final year BSc Marine Biology students at the University of St Andrews have the
opportunity to engage in a field module over two weeks which provides the students
with practical and conceptual experience of field research.
In the first week the students gain practical experience of a range of behavioural and
ecological underwater survey techniques. Students are also familiarised with the
advanced buoyancy skills required for scientific diving, they gain experience using
different underwater survey equipment and keeping accurate records and they learn
the management of divers to achieve scientific objectives including safety briefing,
risk assessment and co-ordination of dives underwater.
Concurrently the students are reading recent literature, viewing the coral reef and
conceptually formulating a proposal for a research. At the end of the first week each
student gives a short presentation outlining their research proposal giving the
background, the hypothesis, the proposed survey techniques required and the
reasons why this research would be innovative and valuable. A secret ballot is then
conducted to choose the research proposal that will be implemented over the final
week of research.
The students then work together to plan the conduct of the research and may then
modify and improve the original proposal and in addition a certain amount of training
may be required to reduce observer error. The chosen project is then implemented in
the second week and each student is expected to manage the team for one scientific
dive.
Assessment is based on the management of a team of scientific divers to achieve an
objective, record keeping, the research proposal and their individual research report.
The module mirrors each stage of a research project and links teaching with practical
and very real experience of research. In addition, the students gain practical skills
and experience which enhance future employability.


5    Publications from projects (or ‘How an undergraduate practical led to a
     peer reviewed paper’)
Dr Graham Whightman, University of Abertay
Themes addressed: RTL
Days presenting: 2 and 3 March
Developing graduate attributes in our students and linking research to teaching are
key areas for our teaching and learning programmes, and the honours project is the
prime area for integrating these into our degree studies. This poster explores how
one particular undergraduate project resulted in a refereed paper.
The original concept came from a third year forensic science practical that teaches
students basic ideas of etching. An honours project was offered to produce a paste
rather than a liquid etchant for recovering erased indented marks in metals, since a
paste would be more usable in the field or on non-planar shapes. Several options
were suggested to the student. However, since this was a speculative development
Key for Themes addressed:

G21C: Graduates for the 21st Century                             RSN: Responding to Student Needs
RTL: Research Teaching Linkages: enhancing graduate attributes   Emp: Employability
FY: First Year: engagement and empowerment                       Assess: Assessment Integrative Assessment
FD: Flexible Delivery
the project also included a more basic study of underlying metal deformation to
ensure the student had adequate data to report. From these results we were later
able to develop a model of the recoverable limit for the marks. Surprisingly, the trials
with the paste often produced better results than etching with conventional reagent.
The student obtained a very good grade for her project, and on completion we looked
to see whether there were any commercial possibilities for the paste. It soon became
apparent that this would not be the case and so we began to investigate the
possibility of disseminating the development through publishing. As an academic it
was possible to review the student's data and produce a more comprehensive
interpretation, and two joint papers were written and published presenting a model for
the limit of recovery, and offering an explanation for the improved etching with the
paste.
The student was very pleased with having two publications and is now a school
chemistry teacher and applying the skills learned in her studies to enthuse the next
generation of students. The topic itself has now gone full circle and the third year
practical has been modified to include the results of the research. The paste is
compared alongside the conventional reagent and the practical is used to encourage
students to think where their honours project may lead them.


6     Use of animation in lectures on cell biology and as an on-line teaching aid
Janice Aitken, Dr Mhairi Claire Towler, Duncan of Jordanstone College of Art &
Design
Themes addressed: RTL, FD, RSN
Days presenting: 2 and 3 March
The eukaryotic cell learning tool presented here is a 3D animated, interactive on-line
teaching resource designed to enhance the teaching of structures within the
eukaryotic cell to second year life science students. The animation software ‘Maya’
was used to produce sophisticated visual animations for the purpose of teaching and
learning cell biology.
As a result of the collaborative and cross-disciplinary nature of this project, art
students were also involved in the animation production process. This resulted in a 3-
tiered approach to enhance teaching and learning and the authors wish to share their
innovative practice as an example of how cross-disciplinary collaborative working in
higher education can produce lasting benefits for all involved.
Abstract concepts that are hard to visualise can be difficult to convey to students and
animation can solve this problem (Griffeth 2005, Prinz 2005, Watters 2002). The
aims of the collaboration were to create a tool to literally bring Towler’s lecture to life
to help students understand the internal architecture of the eukaryotic cell and to
convey the dynamic 3D nature of intracellular organelles that cannot be
communicated easily using 2D static imagery. Taking a student centred approach to
the design of this tool we built on the digital fluency of the majority of today’s students
while enhancing the IT skills of those who are not digital natives.
Towler used the animation in her lecture and the online resource created by Aitken
has been made available to students via the virtual learning environment promoting
flexible access for revision post-lecture. http://imaging.dundee.ac.uk/Eukaryotic_cell/
Janice Aitken is a digital artist and lecturer based at the Duncan of Jordanstone
College of Art at the University of Dundee.
Dr Mhairi Claire Towler is a postdoctoral scientist in the Division of Molecular
Physiology, at the College of Life Sciences at the University of Dundee.


Key for Themes addressed:

G21C: Graduates for the 21st Century                             RSN: Responding to Student Needs
RTL: Research Teaching Linkages: enhancing graduate attributes   Emp: Employability
FY: First Year: engagement and empowerment                       Assess: Assessment Integrative Assessment
FD: Flexible Delivery
7     Making sense of graduate attributes: international students’ and lecturers’
      perceptions of their meaning and value
Dr Sabine Hotho and Helen Smith, University of Abertay
Themes addressed: G21C, RTL, Emp
Days presenting: 2 and 3 March
This poster presents first findings of a study that explores how international business
students make sense of graduate attributes (GAs). The study aims to generate a
more sophisticated understanding of how these students understand, and engage
with those components of their UK studies that intend to develop their GAs. The
study also explores the role of the lecturer as mediator in this context.
The GA literature is mostly prescriptive, or policy-oriented (HEA 2006, Barrie 2004a),
modelling typologies and dimensions of GAs and how these might be embedded in
curricula (Barrie 2004a, Killick 2008, Bath et al 2004). Overall, the success of these
efforts seems limited (Barrie 2004b). Few studies address how lecturers interpret
GAs (Barrie 2004b). And while the learning experience of international students is
well researched (Caruana and Spurling 2007, HEA 2008), few studies address if and
how these students realise that GAs form part of that experience, and how the
students home HE experience has shaped their perceptions.
To improve the implementation of GAs, we need to redefine teaching/learning as
social construction (Duffy 1995, Young and Collin 2004). This would frame the
implementation of GAs as a process of sense making (Duffy 1995). We need to
examine how lecturers and students engage in this process of recognising,
interpreting and (re)valuing GAs.
Graduate attributes cannot simply be ‘delivered’ ‘taught’ and then ‘acquired’. Those
elements of the teaching process that are designed to develop graduate attributes in
students are not passively received. Students engage with the teaching process, and
construct the intended outcomes of a teaching event.
Design/methodology/approach
The study is conducted in a Scottish university using semi-structured interviews
(Phase 1) and online questionnaires (Phase 2).
Findings
First findings indicate a number of significant mismatches between intended GA
outcomes and students’ reading of these; between intended learning outcomes and
students’ evaluation of these; and a lack of uncertainty as to whether GAs are skills,
study skills or more substantive qualities.
Discussion
First findings suggest that the modest success of GA implementation may in part be
due to the way different stakeholders make sense of GAs and the processes
designed to develop these.
Research implications/limitations
Further research, which will enhance the GA pedagogy, is required, as the single
case study limits the generalizability of findings.


8    I to we - you to me - engaging Lochee
Christine Kingsley, Fraser Bruce and Fiona Bruce, Duncan of Jordanstone
College of Art and Design
Themes addressed: G21C, RTL, Emp
Days presenting: 2 and 3 March
Responded to ‘Higher Skills for Higher Value’1 and the events of the Intersections2
Conference in Gateshead in September 2007 the Design Studies Programme (DSP)
reframed the level 2 programme to reflect design research insights from Designing
Key for Themes addressed:

G21C: Graduates for the 21st Century                             RSN: Responding to Student Needs
RTL: Research Teaching Linkages: enhancing graduate attributes   Emp: Employability
FY: First Year: engagement and empowerment                       Assess: Assessment Integrative Assessment
FD: Flexible Delivery
for the 21st Century3 and the shift in the Design Industry’s view of Graduate skills and
a Designers role.
A 20 credit module addressing contexts and stakeholders in the Design domain
became the vehicle for a community project entitled Engage Lochee aligned to a
Design Directions brief, from the annual RSA4 student competition. The brief
encouraged students to experience the changing role of the designer by
understanding the nature social issues, participatory design and co-creation
principles.
Having established links with local community officers in Dundee’s Lochee
regeneration project, students embarked on ‘back to basics’ social interaction with
the aim of improving an existing service for a group within the Lochee community.
The involvement from researchers from the diverse research culture within the
academic community at Duncan of Jordanstone was key to the long-term success of
the module and the DSP’s long-term relevance. Contributions were sought and met
from senior research Professors, PhD students and early career researchers. In
addition the module gained industry support from a visiting lecture programme
including practitioners leading the change, championed at the Intersections
conference. While students grappled with the change in role, three years on,
students and staff are becoming adept at navigating complexity and visualising
intangibles5.
The poster will show the development in student perception, understanding and
transferable skills, to a socially conscience brief. It will also show the DSP’s
philosophy of social responsibility, citizenship and sustainability and how it has
positioned itself within DJCAD to reflect a 21st Century issue driven agenda in
Design.
References
1
  http://www.ccskills.org.uk/media/cms/File/High-Level-Skills-Executive-Summary.pdf
2
  http://www.designcouncil.org.uk/Design-Council/Files/Podcast-
Transcripts/Pressing-the-pause-button/
3
  http://www.design21.dundee.ac.uk/AboutUs/About_Us.htm
4
  http://www.rsadesigndirections.org/
5
  Tom Inns workshop, Design Futures Landscape-21st Century Designers and Design
Thinking DJCAD Jan 2008


9     Public health is everyone’s business: the challenge of interprofessional
      learning within public health
Jean Cowie and Heather McAskill, Robert Gordon University and Sheila
Nutkins and Catriona McDonald, University of Aberdeen
Themes addressed: RTL, Emp, RSN
Days presenting: 2 and 3 March
The aim of this paper is to discuss the challenges and opportunities of developing
inter-professional learning to promote public health within an e-learning curriculum.
In Scotland public health is considered everybody’s business (Scottish Executive
2005/6) and the need for professionals to work collaboratively in promoting public
health is clearly documented over recent years (Scottish Office, 1999; Scottish
Executive, 2005a; Scottish Executive, 2005b; Scottish Executive, 2006a; Scottish
Executive, 2006b).However in order to work constructively and positively together,
professionals need to be educated together. They need to understand the roles and
perspectives of each other and also share a basic understanding of the principles
and values underpinning health promotion and public health work. This paper will
take cognisance of the philosophy of working together, learning together and focus
Key for Themes addressed:

G21C: Graduates for the 21st Century                             RSN: Responding to Student Needs
RTL: Research Teaching Linkages: enhancing graduate attributes   Emp: Employability
FY: First Year: engagement and empowerment                       Assess: Assessment Integrative Assessment
FD: Flexible Delivery
on the process of integrating inter-professional learning within a curriculum.
Two higher education institutions in Scotland are working collaboratively with three
professional groups: social work; nursing; and primary and secondary education to
develop shared learning within statutory and regulated curriculum. Core elements
have been identified for shared learning and simulated case studies are currently
being developed that will incur exploration of professional roles and role overlap
within a public health context. It is envisaged that this concept will develop
‘communities of practice’ to enhance the student journey and foster collaborative
working and promote lifelong learning. Practical issues of such a collaborative
innovation will be examined, in particular the challenges and opportunities of
integrating shared learning within the three curriculum, and two virtual learning
platforms. Consideration will also be given to the individual professional requirements
and the needs of the two higher education institutions. Although still in the initial
stages it is clear that there are many advantages and benefits for all students, and
future public health practice. In the long term it is anticipated that this inter-
professional learning will help in some way to overcome barriers that may have
previously hindered collaborative working in the promotion of public health. This
presentation will focus on the challenges and opportunities as well as the practical
issues involved in developing an interprofessional on-line resource to promote
collaborative working in public health.
References
Scottish Executive, 2005a. Delivering for Health. Edinburgh: Scottish Executive
Scottish Executive, 2005b. Building a Health Service Fit for the Future. Edinburgh:
Scottish Executive
Scottish Executive, 2006a. Delivering Care, Enabling Health. Edinburgh: Scottish
Executive
Scottish Executive, 2006b. VAIC: A Report of the Review of Nursing in the
Community in Scotland. Edinburgh: Scottish Executive
Scottish Government, 2008. Equally Well. Report of the ministerial task force on
inequalities. Edinburgh: Scottish Government
Scottish Office, 1999. Towards a Healthier Scotland – A White Paper on Health.
Edinburgh: Scottish Office


10 Do not mention the word Theory
Christine Kingsley and Jennifer Mackie, Duncan of Jordanstone College of Art
and Design
Themes addressed: G21C, RTL, RSN
Days presenting: 2 and 3 March
The Design Studies Programme (DSP) at Duncan of Jordanstone College of Art and
Design (DJCAD) University of Dundee has been delivering a unified theory and
practice programme since 2001, using a theory in practice approach, the learning
experiences extends beyond subject specific knowledge of design, giving students
insights into the rapidly changing Design Landscape1 by challenging students
understanding of the discipline through social, cultural and political issues affecting
Design2. For level 1students it requires a shift in learning style from individual
learning to group, from focus on design solutions and final outcome to reflection and
critical thinking of the design process to design content.
Students from the BSc programmes Interactive Media (IMD) and Product Design
(PD) enrolled on the DSP, acknowledge that their knowledge and interest of Design
lies firmly in their ability to generate ideas and visualise them in two or three
dimensions as finished design outcomes in their subject specific domain. A
Key for Themes addressed:

G21C: Graduates for the 21st Century                             RSN: Responding to Student Needs
RTL: Research Teaching Linkages: enhancing graduate attributes   Emp: Employability
FY: First Year: engagement and empowerment                       Assess: Assessment Integrative Assessment
FD: Flexible Delivery
dichotomy between the students’ needs and aspirations emerged at level 1 and 2
and the educational philosophy of the DSP led by industry and research standards
created transitional problem for students in the early years of the programme, while
student feedback in level 3 and 4 tells of realisation and appreciation of the
programmes intentions.
The DSP observed problems for students between the parity of critical thinking,
specifically design thinking3 in studio and theory components, restricted by inflexible
timetabling; staffing and separate assignments. Staff observed a disparity between
visual, verbal and written communication, manifest in assessment outcomes. The
DSP recognised the imbalance and transformed delivery by changing students’
attitudes to reading; increasing alignment with reading and written assignments,
introducing a reader and semi-structured discussions to studio assignments.
The results show student achievement in theoretical assessment improved
significantly when the new integrated structure was employed. Student assessment
in visual communication were matched or in some cases improved by results in
written communication. Students became more engaged in the cultural aspects
affecting their future lives and professional toolkit.
1
  Design Council http://designthinking.ideo.com/?p=49
2
  High-level skills for higher value 2007[online] available
from:http://www.ukdesignskills.com/pages/the_background.html [accessed 11th
November 2008]
3
  Tim Brown director of IDEO, definition of Design thinking, ‘Design Thinking can be
described as a discipline that uses the designer’s sensibility and methods to match
people’s needs with what is technologically feasible and what a viable business
strategy can convert into customer value and market opportunity.’


11 Flexible delivery helps promote the employability of Curtin graduates
Dr Brian Boswell, Curtin University of Technology, Australia
Themes addressed: RTL, FY, FD, Emp
Days presenting: 2 and 3 March
The challenge of matching employability requirements within Australia brought about
a major review of the Mechanical, Civil, Electrical and Computing courses within the
Faculty of Science and Engineering at Curtin University of Technology. This resulted
in substantial change being made to both the curriculum and the format in which the
courses are delivered.
The introduction of the engineering foundation common first year for all engineering
students produced many innovative practices to teach the multidiscipline curriculum.
A flexible teaching style was introduced five years ago; though no delivery changes
were implemented in the second to fourth years of all other courses. Those second,
third and fourth year courses are still taught using traditional lectures.
The unit content in the second to fourth years of the courses was instead altered to
reflect the new content and delivery of the engineering foundation year. The
curriculum of all Curtin University undergraduate courses has also undergone a
major review during the last two years to ensure that the curriculum meets the
following nine Curtin graduate attributes:
1        Apply discipline knowledge
2        Thinking skills
3        Information skills
4        Communication skills
5        Technology skills
6        Learning how to learn
Key for Themes addressed:

G21C: Graduates for the 21st Century                             RSN: Responding to Student Needs
RTL: Research Teaching Linkages: enhancing graduate attributes   Emp: Employability
FY: First Year: engagement and empowerment                       Assess: Assessment Integrative Assessment
FD: Flexible Delivery
7       International perspective
8       Cultural understanding
9       Professional skills
These attributes are interdisciplinary and contribute to the employability of all Curtin
graduates. All changes to the curriculum to include these attributes will be
implemented by semester one of 2010.
Course mapping shows that the attributes associated with the Mechanical course
closely match the Engineer’s Australian graduate’s attributes. Australian engineering
companies regard these attributes as essential employability skills for young
professional engineers.
Mechanical Engineering graduates need to be productive straight away due to the
resource boom in Australia. To further improve their employability, units such as
Design for Manufacture and Professional Practice are now taught. These units
involve Design Modelling and Presentation: both are examples of the assessment
strategies adopted.


12     Nursing students’ perceptions of the ‘independent learner’: first year
       engagement or a graduate attribute?
Vic Boyd, Dr Stephanie McKendry, Dr Nicky Andrew and Dr Dorothy Ferguson,
Glasgow Caledonian University
Themes addressed: G21C, RTL, FY, RSN
Days presenting: 2 and 3 March
Autonomous learning or the development of independent lifelong learners has
become a key concept within the international higher education sector in recent
years. Within the UK, this is perhaps best evidenced by the increasing emphasis
placed on the skills agenda. In Scotland, several Quality Assurance Agency
Enhancement Themes have touched upon the subject. The Research-Teaching
linkages Theme devised a list of graduate attributes related to the independent
learner, whilst the First Year Theme focused on empowering students to become
‘autonomous learners’.
Within Glasgow Caledonian University, the Learning Teaching and Assessment
Strategy (LTAS) 2008-2015 makes specific reference to the ‘independent learner’,
appealing for programmes to equip students with the knowledge, skills and attributes
needed to become one. In addition, GCU has adopted the Independent Learning
Framework which provides a list of key learning outcomes to promote the
development of independent learning attributes.
However, whilst there is seeming consensus on the need to develop students as
‘independent learners’, there is no simple definition of what that means. There is also
inconsistency in terminology, even at an institutional level. Students may struggle to
understand the requirements of higher education if there is no definition or list of
attributes to clarify the meaning of the ‘independent learner’ for them.
This poster will provide an overview of an ongoing research project within the School
of Health examining students’ perceptions of independent learning within higher
education. A mixed method approach aims to capture students’ understanding of the
phrase at several points in their first year of study, beginning prior to registration and
continuing up to and beyond their first placement and assessment experiences. In
particular, the research investigates when students believe they should become
independent learners: is it something they think they should develop immediately or
is it an attribute achieved only at graduation or later?


Key for Themes addressed:

G21C: Graduates for the 21st Century                             RSN: Responding to Student Needs
RTL: Research Teaching Linkages: enhancing graduate attributes   Emp: Employability
FY: First Year: engagement and empowerment                       Assess: Assessment Integrative Assessment
FD: Flexible Delivery
13   Developing a framework for sustainable graduate attribute enhancement
     through employee engagement
Sally Smith and Paul Vallis, Edinburgh Napier University
Themes addressed: G21C, RTL, Emp
Days presenting: 2 and 3 March
Our poster describes our teaching development grant funded project to establish a
graduate mentoring programme based initially on one of our undergraduate courses.
The project involves building an infrastructure to support recent graduates in
mentoring final year students.
With increasing levels of unemployment there is an even greater imperative in
ensuring our graduates have the attributes that will make them valuable to
employers.
Being grounded in industrial practice is a factor in graduate employability as defined
by the HEA but presents a sizeable challenge to fast-moving disciplines such as
computing (Nelson et al, 2007, Holt et al, 2004). Course review and enhancement is
an opportunity to feed in viewpoints from industry and business partners. We have
started to investigate a more evolutionary and sustainable approach which proposes
fostering close links with employers and students through a mentoring scheme
which, for its continued success, is linked to a module.
To date the study has used current research combined with graduate outreach
activity to investigate factors that are influential to graduate employability and is
building these into a new teamworking module while proposing a mentoring scheme
which would encourage recent graduates from the course to act as mentors to
current students. The mentors will be able to pass on their knowledge of the
workplace to students through the use of informal meetings and social networking
sites. Wider engagement with professional bodies will also be promoted. The
mentoring scheme serves two purposes: to ensure the sustainability of employer
engagement and to support and guide students while providing insight into
employment and a chance to practice their communication skills. Employers have
expressed support, seeing employees participating in this activity as a personal
development activity. Our recent graduates have responded very positively.
The framework would be applicable to any course and is especially beneficial where
there is a fast rate of change in the industry.
Our poster would describe our approach and we would use the opportunity to explore
with delegates whether this model could work in their discipline.
References
Nelson J, Ahmad A, Martin N, Litecky C (2007) A comparative study of IT/IS job skills
and job definitions, ACM SIGMIS CPR conference of computer personnel research:
The global information technology workforce
Holt, D, Mackay, D and Smith, R (2004) Developing Professional Expertise in the
Knowledge Economy: Integrating Industry-Based Learning with the Academic
Curriculum in the Field of Information Technology, Asia-Pacific Journal of
Cooperative Education 5(2), 1-11


14 Using academic writing to enhance critical skills
Roger McDermott, Garry Brindley and Gordon Eccleston, Robert Gordon
University
Themes addressed: G21C, RTL, FY, Emp, Assess
Days presenting: 2 and 3 March
Many first year undergraduates within the School of Computing at the Robert Gordon
University report that one of the most problematic aspects of their course is trying to
Key for Themes addressed:

G21C: Graduates for the 21st Century                             RSN: Responding to Student Needs
RTL: Research Teaching Linkages: enhancing graduate attributes   Emp: Employability
FY: First Year: engagement and empowerment                       Assess: Assessment Integrative Assessment
FD: Flexible Delivery
express themselves in the formal academic style required for reports and
assignments. Overcoming these difficulties is a priority for these students because
competent writing skills is used as a foundation on which to build up higher level
attributes such as critical and analytical thinking, as well as group-working, and the
general communications skills which enhance graduate employability.
In recent years, the School of Computing has investigated a variety of pedagogical
approaches to the promotion of graduate attributes. These have often used elements
of social software, such as blogs, wikis and discussion fora, to introduce collaborative
aspects into the first year curriculum. While these activities encourage the
progressive development of learning skills throughout the later stages of the
undergraduate programme, experience has tended to show that a sound grasp of
academic writing skills is a practical prerequisite to the development of the higher
level attributes.
This poster illustrates some results from the RGU first year case-study. It describes
an extended piece of coursework based around a book review assignment that used
a variety of web 2.0 features to develop both writing skills and more general project
management skills within the context of a yearlong 15-credit module. Students were
divided into groups and members were asked to submit reviews of individual
chapters which were then critically assessed by their peers. These chapters were
then assembled using a wiki, and an essay on the entire book written by all members
using a collaborative software tool. This was then subject to a further round of peer-
assessment.
The poster gives details of some of the generic lessons learned from this kind of
exercise, gives examples of successful and unsuccessful practices that have been
recorded and reflects upon the student reaction to the set of tasks.


15 «interns@strathclyde»
Professor Ray Land, Ms Cherie Woolmer and Ms Alison Mitchell, University of
Strathclyde
Themes addressed: G21C, RTL, Emp
Days presenting: 2 and 3 March
In the 2009-10 session, 45 undergraduates at Strathclyde University engaged in a
research internship programme during their summer vacation. One group was
supported through the University’s Excellence Fund and another through an EPSRC-
funded vacation bursary scheme. The internships varied, providing opportunities to
interact with established research groups or external professional partners in industry
and business. In addition to the actual internships, both groups attended a newly
designed two-day programme (delivered by CAPLE) to introduce them to different
aspects of research activity and to encourage them to think about how they could
build upon the experience to undertake further postgraduate study or pursue a
research or enquiry-focused career. This programme addressed, amongst other
issues: Planning and Preparing for the Internship, Communicating Research,
attending the University’s Research Day and a Dragon’s Den competition, Building
Research Networks, the Impact of Research, Writing a Research Bid and Producing
Conference Posters. Students were required to submit a written report on what they
covered in their project and a reflective statement on the impact of the programme. In
the following autumn they displayed their achievements through a poster exhibition
and social evening where the University Principal joined them and discussed their
experience.
The University has committed to this programme in its belief that Strathclyde
graduates will be leading future organisations that are likely to be engaged in helping
Key for Themes addressed:

G21C: Graduates for the 21st Century                             RSN: Responding to Student Needs
RTL: Research Teaching Linkages: enhancing graduate attributes   Emp: Employability
FY: First Year: engagement and empowerment                       Assess: Assessment Integrative Assessment
FD: Flexible Delivery
to solve the big challenges we face in the 21st century - such as globalisation,
sustainability and security. The ability to apply knowledge in practical and applied
ways through research and enquiry is considered central to how we move forward in
responding to these issues and ensuring we play our part. In these ways also the
‘interns@strathclyde’ programme contributes to the work of the QAA Enhancement
Themes at Strathclyde in Graduates for the 21st Century, Research-Teaching
Linkages and Employability.


16 Academic skills for undergraduate students
Dr Jessie Paterson and Dr Sara Parvis, University of Edinburgh
Themes addressed: G21C, RTL, FY, FD, Emp, RSN
Days presenting: 2 March
We will present our experience of running an academic skills course for first year
students for the last two years. We will illustrate the types of skills that we cover eg
essay writing, use of Library and general IT skills - skills required for their academic
work and also for their future career (screen shots of some of the materials will be
made available). Due to timetabling issues this course is presented online,
supplemented with a few short lectures. It is zero credit bearing but it does appear in
student transcripts. Currently the course is not compulsory, although all first year
students are enrolled on the course and have two years to complete it. Uptake has
been mixed - some students say they already have these skills (although our
evidence shows otherwise) and others say it is difficult to complete along with the
demands of their other work. We are currently debating whether to make the course
compulsory and a requirement for all our degree programmes and the poster will
illustrate some of the pros and cons of our approach.


17 Promoting the Enhancement Themes in the biosciences
David Adams, Jackie Wilson and Terry McAndrew, UK Centre for Bioscience
Themes addressed: G21C, RTL, FY, Emp, RSN
Days presenting: 2 and 3 March
Recent UK Government agency and other reports make plain the need for students
to acquire a number of key subject-specific and generic skills during Bioscience
programmes. The UK Centre for Bioscience has responded to this challenge by
establishing initiatives, running events and publishing resources that should develop
creative problem solving and practical skills in graduates working in a wide range of
workplace settings. As a result we have addressed several QAA Enhancement
Themes including: Responding to Student Needs, Employability, The First Year and
Research-Teaching Linkages. The poster will focus on the following aspects of our
work:
Practical skills
Centre for Bioscience surveys and events have highlighted student and staff disquiet
with the current first year laboratory experience in UK universities. We therefore
carried out a review of the literature describing cutting edge approaches to laboratory
teaching in the biosciences and this, in turn, prompted us to lead a successful bid to
the JISC/HEA Open Educational Resources (OER) programme for the development
of An Interactive Laboratory and Fieldwork Manual for the Biosciences. The OER
initiative involves colleagues from 10 UK universities who have agreed to share
innovative learning and teaching approaches and materials with the wider HE
community.
Creativity and problem-solving
Key for Themes addressed:

G21C: Graduates for the 21st Century                             RSN: Responding to Student Needs
RTL: Research Teaching Linkages: enhancing graduate attributes   Emp: Employability
FY: First Year: engagement and empowerment                       Assess: Assessment Integrative Assessment
FD: Flexible Delivery
Many would agree we must do more to help bioscience students achieve their true
creative potential. Recently our Centre led a Science, Technology, Engineering and
Maths (STEM) event in support of ‘Creativity in the Sciences’. In addition, we have
published materials in support of creativity in the curriculum and the website
‘Creativity in the Biosciences’ describes research-led teaching approaches for the
promotion of creativity in students working as individuals or in groups. Finally, our
recently published report ‘Developing Problem Solving Skills in Bioscientists’
describes how we can promote analytical, critical and creative approaches to
problem-solving in our students.


18   A holistic approach to the learning experience for nutrition and dietetic
     students, including volunteering opportunities with community groups
Dr Elaine Bannerman and Mrs Jacklyn Jones, Queen Margaret University and
Mrs Diane Lockhart, NHS Lothian
Themes addressed: G21C, RTL, Emp, RSN
Days presenting: 2 March
Development of student graduate attributes and their employability may be enhanced
by a more holistic approach to learning. A range of opportunities are already
embedded within the formal academic curriculum. However, in response to student
feedback, opportunities outwith the formal academic curriculum are being explored
and evaluated within the subject area of Dietetics, Nutrition & Biological Sciences,
QMU. These include series of both professional and research seminars. Engagement
and links with a number of community groups including the NHS have been
developed in order to provide opportunities that can enhance the students’ learning
experience.
The current project evaluates a new initiative between DNBS, QMU and Voluntary
Services NHS Lothian UHD, as an opportunity for both personal and professional
development for nutrition and dietetic students. Through the processes of reflection
and personal development planning the aims of this project are to determine the
expectations and experiences of students studying nutrition or dietetics who
volunteer to assist with food and fluid provision. This initiative is highly welcomed
from the community and NHS partners as it has the potential to better nutritional care
within Lothian. Assessment of students’ expectations prior to commencing
volunteering shows four key themes namely enhance employability, development of
transferable skills, enhancement of academic programme and increase self-worth.
This volunteering opportunity may be of interest to students in other health care
programmes, with the added advantage of increasing the profile of food and nutrition
in the clinical setting. The initiative has also enhanced the research-teaching linkages
within the subject area.


19 Student-led assessment of student feedback
Audrey Fryer and Michael Topp, Robert Gordon University
Themes addressed: G21C, RTL, FY, RSN, Assess
Days presenting: 2 and 3 March
A recurrent criticism from students, eg as detailed in the results of the National
Student Survey [1], is that there is a mismatch between their expectations of
academic feedback and the reality of their educational experience.
At the same time, recent work on the use of feedback and ‘feedforward’ techniques
to enhance student learning suggests that the conceptual complexity of
constructively responding to student work has itself been underestimated, by both
Key for Themes addressed:

G21C: Graduates for the 21st Century                             RSN: Responding to Student Needs
RTL: Research Teaching Linkages: enhancing graduate attributes   Emp: Employability
FY: First Year: engagement and empowerment                       Assess: Assessment Integrative Assessment
FD: Flexible Delivery
academics and students.
The feedback process itself serves a number of purposes, related both to the
specifics of the assessment on which it is an outcome, and the more general
educational experience in which the teacher and student are engaged. This often
leads to confusion when academics use the term in one sense (eg as informal
reporting on classroom exercises) and students understand it in another (eg as
formal responses on summative assessment).
This poster reports on an ongoing project, within the School of Computing at the
Robert Gordon University, aimed at establishing what students mean when they use
the word ‘feedback’ and investigates whether there is a development of this concept
throughout their undergraduate career. Data obtained from first and final year
students is presented which suggests that, if not actively challenged, a minimalist
view of feedback persists throughout their course of studies, which is significantly
different from the view of the majority of academic staff.
The project actively involved students in the design and implementation of the
questionnaire. This has provided a fairly unique questionnaire with its content
addressing their concerns with feedback mechanisms within the School of
Computing.
[1] Higher Education Funding Council for England, The National Student Survey
2005-2007: Findings and trends,
http://www.hefce.ac.uk/pubs/rdreports/2008/rd12_08


20 Teaching Fellows for the 21st century
Dr Joy Perkins and Dr Darren Comber, University of Aberdeen
Themes addressed: G21C, RTL, FY, Emp, RSN
Days presenting: 2 and 3 March
Since 2008, the Centre for Learning & Teaching at the University of Aberdeen has
organised a dedicated annual event designed to recognise the important role played
by Teaching Fellows in supporting learning and teaching across the University. The
event provides an opportunity for Teaching Fellows to discuss new developments in
teaching, learning and assessment and also provides staff with an informal
networking opportunity, as a post-event reception is included. The programme aims
to showcase effective and interesting teaching practice and new initiatives, with
external professionals also invited to share their knowledge. Topics covered so far
include:
Teaching 21st Century Graduates
Technology in Teaching
Educating Generation Y
The format is that of invited keynote speaker followed by a facilitated workshop.
Workshop themes to date have focused on employability, an academic debate on the
efficacy of the 50 minute lecture and the support available from the 24 Higher
Education Academy (HEA) Subject Centres.
The initiative has benefited from HEA input and has been well received by Teaching
Fellows from across the three Colleges. HEA presence also heightens awareness of
the valuable support available for all teaching staff from the Academy and the
Subject Centres.
This poster outlines a summary of the rationale for this initiative and our experiences
of implementing and evaluating our Annual Teaching Fellows’ Event. It provides a
model which is transferable to other institutions, incorporating a range of aspects of
prior QE Themes under the overarching Enhancement Theme, Graduates for the
21st Century.
Key for Themes addressed:

G21C: Graduates for the 21st Century                             RSN: Responding to Student Needs
RTL: Research Teaching Linkages: enhancing graduate attributes   Emp: Employability
FY: First Year: engagement and empowerment                       Assess: Assessment Integrative Assessment
FD: Flexible Delivery
21 The STAR Award - Students Taking Active Roles
Dr Joy Perkins, Brian Snelling, Katja Christie and Peter Fantom, University of
Aberdeen
Themes addressed: G21C, RTL, FY, Emp
Days presenting: 2 and 3 March
The academic year 2009-10 sees the launch of an extended and enhanced co-
curricular STAR Award at the University of Aberdeen. The award accredits learning
that takes place outside formal taught courses and aims to recognise the transferable
skills and competencies that students develop through activities beyond the
academic curriculum. Participants include students involved in sports, societies and
volunteering, and taught course class representatives. The award has been
influenced by the results of a number of small-scale pilots which have taken place in
earlier years.
The award requires participants to record and submit evidence of their activities and
reflect on their experiences, particularly with respect to transferable skills
development in their role. Each participant is also required to attend mandatory
workshops on skills development and interview technique. At the end of the activity
period students are assessed via a competency-based interview, successful students
are then awarded a formal STAR certificate by the University. This certificate can be
taken to an employer by an awardee as proof that they have reached a prescribed
standard.
This poster outlines the distinctive and unique aspects of our 2009-10 Aberdeen STAR
Award which include the:
     development of an assessment framework to monitor student achievement of
     Aberdeen-specific Graduate attributes
     employer-focused skills and interview workshops
     use of an ePortfolio as both a presentational and reflective tool for students to
     record their co-curricular activities
     use of an end-of-activity, employer-led competency-based interview
     strong partnership between the Careers Service, the Students’ Association and
     employers to enhance the award.
As a result of initiatives such as the QAA Employability Enhancement Theme, and
the recent strategic SFC funding to develop graduate employability the subject of
skills development is gathering momentum across the higher education sector. This
project is helping to raise the profile of employability further by making graduate
attributes and transferable skills development more explicit to Aberdeen students.


22 EUSA teaching awards
Craig Stewart, Edinburgh University Students’ Assocition
Themes addressed: G21C, RTL, FY, Emp, RSN, Assess
Days presenting: 2 and 3 March
This poster will outline the aims, organisation and impact of the EUSA Teaching
Awards which were run for the first time in 2008-2009. This positive, student run and
organised campaign and Award Scheme both sought to highlight and share best
practice in teaching, and to emphasise that teaching should be valued more in the
academic career structure. The scheme highlighted a number of Enhancement
Themes, including Feedback and Assessment and Employability, in the awards
given. Additionally, the scheme collected information on student views on their
teaching, which is being fed back into University committees, and EUSA campaigns,
Key for Themes addressed:

G21C: Graduates for the 21st Century                             RSN: Responding to Student Needs
RTL: Research Teaching Linkages: enhancing graduate attributes   Emp: Employability
FY: First Year: engagement and empowerment                       Assess: Assessment Integrative Assessment
FD: Flexible Delivery
thus enabling both the institution and the Association to respond to student needs
and views. EUSA has received expressions of interest from other Universities and
Students’ Unions in the Teaching Awards, and this poster would provide a focal point
for sharing experiences and sharing best practice.


23 Future focus week: broadening student understanding of employability
Claire MacEachen, Abertay University
Themes addressed: Emp
Days presenting: 2 and 3 March
Broadening student understanding of employability is a sector wide concern. As is
common with other institutions, Abertay students gain subject specific transferable
skills within courses and ‘Careers’ offers workshops on career development. These
workshops tend to be limited to specific groups on particular programmes. From
discussions it was clear that some groups were better served by such opportunities
than others and that they tended to be linked to the vocational subject of the
programme, despite evidence that students often do not follow this subject post
university.
Future Focus Week was a new initiative consisting of a week of events, open to all
students. With wide promotion, it was hoped that with a concerted effort, in a
confined timeframe the largest possible number of students could be encouraged to
start engaging more in their career development at an earlier point in their study. The
key objectives in this event were to:
     increase all students' understanding of what employers are looking for
     get them to think about how they can increase their skills while studying
     improve their understanding of the part-time and full time job market
     improve their skills in securing a job
     get students to think about new enterprise creation.
An ambitious target of 400 students (roughly 10% of the student population) was
established.
The key finding from analysis of the event was that although 626 bookings were
taken prior to the event, this did not always translate to good attendance. The key
factors in encouraging attendance were:
     external employers ‘more attractive’ than internal staff
     timing is very important - the week selected and times of workshops
academic staff engagement in promotion is essential and therefore we need to
increase staff engagement in the planning process to ensure ownership of the event.


24    The student perspective – 21st century graduate attributes at Edinburgh
      Napier
Jill Robertson and Professor Morag Gray, Edinburgh Napier University
Themes addressed: G21C, Emp
Days presenting: 2 and 3 March
What do Edinburgh Napier students think are the key attributes they require to
compete with the best in today’s graduate employment market? We want to find out.
As part of the University’s engagement with the current QAA Enhancement Theme:
Graduates for the 21st Century, a student centred event is to be held on Saturday 13
March 2010. With interactive participation from 100 students, the aim is to identify,
from the student perspective, the key 21C Graduate Attributes.
Research has already been conducted into graduate attributes from the perspectives
of both employers and the University’s staff. Eliciting the student perspective will
Key for Themes addressed:

G21C: Graduates for the 21st Century                             RSN: Responding to Student Needs
RTL: Research Teaching Linkages: enhancing graduate attributes   Emp: Employability
FY: First Year: engagement and empowerment                       Assess: Assessment Integrative Assessment
FD: Flexible Delivery
create the opportunity to triangulate the data to produce a core grouping of attributes
as a central strand around which to align the work of other Enhancement Themes.
Key to the success of the event will be the purposeful application of the findings, the
‘so what?’ The aim of the workshop will be to identify how a shared understanding of
desired graduate attributes can:
     feed effectively into the University’s Learning, Teaching and Assessment strategy
     by developing staff’s ability to address these attributes alongside subject specific
     knowledge and understanding
     influence efforts to engage and empower students to attain 21C Graduate
     Attributes
     be communicated to prospective employers and ensure that employers’
     expectations are met
reinforce the evolving student engagement strand through greater emphasis on
students assuming active personal responsibility for the development of these
attributes


25   Get that job! Increasing students’ chances of success: preparation for
     graduation
Jenny Westwood, Mo Andrews and Steve McLellan, Edinburgh Napier
University
Themes addressed: G21C, Emp
Days presenting: 2 and 3 March
With competition for graduate jobs running at an average of 48 applicants for a job
(AGR report, Autumn 2009), students need even more advice and support to help
them stand out from the crowd. Building on Edinburgh Napier’s position of being in
the top 10 UK universities for graduate employability (HESA, 2009), Employability
Services designed a 4 day course that would contribute further to our students’
success. This was successfully piloted in June 2009, and will be run again in 2010.

The course is intensive, with pre-workshop preparation activities for students to
complete. It is built on the concept of Masterclasses, and combines high quality and
relevant personal development with targeted job searching and application activities.
It culminates in a networking lunch with some local employers.

This poster captures the essence and outline of the course and includes indicative
qualitative and quantative feedback.


26    The Dundee Graduate Skills Award - enhancing employability by
      developing students’ transferable skills
Graham Nicholson, University of Dundee
Themes addressed: G21C, Emp, RSN
Days presenting: 2 March
This workshop will provide an exploration of the challenges facing Universities in
delivering employability initiatives fit for purpose in the 21st Century, and how best
institutions can meet the needs of 21st Century learners.
The presentation will outline the approach taken by the University of Dundee to
tackle the issues of skills utilisation and skills mismatch, and to enhance the
employability of our students and graduates.
The presentation content will include the unique Dundee Graduate Skills Award
which aims to enhance employability by developing students’ transferable skills.
Key for Themes addressed:

G21C: Graduates for the 21st Century                             RSN: Responding to Student Needs
RTL: Research Teaching Linkages: enhancing graduate attributes   Emp: Employability
FY: First Year: engagement and empowerment                       Assess: Assessment Integrative Assessment
FD: Flexible Delivery
There will also be a chance to hear about innovative and successful undergraduate
and graduate internship programmes through the Careers Service at the University of
Dundee.
The workshop will be interactive, with the aim of getting participants views on the
outlined initiatives and how they can embed similar projects in their own institutions.


27    Student Leaders Programme - empowering students to create their own
      future
Nicky St Clair and Sara Milne, Glasgow Caledonian University
Themes addressed: G21C, Emp
Days presenting: 3 March
The Student Leaders Programme (SLP) at GCU enables students to develop and
improve employability skills so that they leave University as graduates equipped with
attributes deemed essential for the workplace. The programme provides an extra
channel for the development of leadership and employability skills.
The SLP is a three year continual development initiative, broken down into three
levels; Bronze, Silver and Gold. At each level of the programme students attend two
seminars which concentrate on competencies which GCU recognises as being
important areas of leadership - visioning, setting a positive example, communicating
constructively, encouraging, collaborating and delivering results.
Bronze Level students attend an Effective Leadership seminar and a Personal
Development seminar of their choice with topics ranging from Entrepreneurship to
Confidence Building. At Silver Level students attend a seminar on Emotional
Intelligence and one on Presentation skills. Gold Level students attend a Graduate
Assessment Centre style session and a Coaching skills seminar.
Students are also required to complete a journal, reflecting on leadership activities
they have been involved in. This helps students to harness the skills they have
developed and encourages them to articulate their leadership achievements.
78% of firms have stated that ‘employability skills’ are the most important factor when
recruiting graduates (CBI, 2009). Graduates in the 21st century must possess these
skills in addition to a degree in order to meet employers’ needs. The SLP provides
students with an array of skills such as teamwork, self-awareness, communication
skills and conflict management.
The aim of the SLP is to ensure students leave University with employability skills in
addition to their degrees. 96% of students who took part in the programme last year
have stated they will include it on their CV, demonstrating that the SLP is an initiative
that students feel will add value to their career prospects.


28    Enhancing your students’ programme of study: what Confident Futures
      can do for you and your students
Jenny Westwood, Rosie Doyle, Trish Igoe and Anne MacNab, Edinburgh Napier
University
Themes addressed: G21C, Emp, RSN
Days presenting: 2 and 3 March
Edinburgh Napier University’s Confident Futures programme has been developed to
provide its students with a series of personal development workshops of the highest
quality, that will help them to develop well-founded confidence and the skills and
attributes demanded in the 21st century.
Just over three years on, these workshops have been tested with staff and students
for general use and customised for specific use. The last eighteen months has seen
Key for Themes addressed:

G21C: Graduates for the 21st Century                             RSN: Responding to Student Needs
RTL: Research Teaching Linkages: enhancing graduate attributes   Emp: Employability
FY: First Year: engagement and empowerment                       Assess: Assessment Integrative Assessment
FD: Flexible Delivery
the team work hard with academic colleagues in the positioning and integrating of
these workshops for focused subject-specific uses, to meet specific student needs for
their academic and/or professional development. Feedback from both students and
academic staff has been very encouraging, with quantative and qualitative feedback
showing noticeable improvements in both student engagement and outcomes.
This poster captures some examples of where such positioning and integration has
been particularly successful.


29     Using experiential learning from first year as an induction tool for second
       year nursing students
Kath MacDonald, Queen Margaret University
Themes addressed: G21C, FY, Emp
Days presenting: 2 and 3 March
Introduction
The sophomore slump theory suggests that after an enthusiastic first year, students
experience a slump in second year, which results in poorer outcomes and increased
attrition rates (Gump 2007).
QAA (2009) asks, ‘what should students get from their first year? We asked students
to reflect on their first year experience in order to identify their learning, plan their
second year, enhance the student experience and perhaps reduce the potential for a
slump during second year.
Method
2 cohorts of students beginning the second year of a four year programme were
invited to a one day induction prior to formal commencement of their classes.
Students were assigned to groups and asked to reflect on some key questions in
relation to their first year experience. Additionally each group was given a letter from
a graduating student, reflecting on their experiences and their learning. Responses
were collated and discussed together.
Results
Students enjoyed forming friendships, applying theory to practice, becoming
independent and more confident. They saw their tutors as friends.
Students found placement to be all consuming and tiring. Organisational issues
(timetabling, uniforms, supervision), made life difficult.
Surprise was expressed about their own lack of knowledge in academic writing.
Groups articulated how they would use the learning to plan their second year.
Conclusion
Using a combination of reflection, peer and experiential learning in induction may
serve to enhance the student experience and reduce the potential for the sophomore
slump. Students have started to produce a top tips list for other students.
References
Gump SE (2007) Classroom Research in a General Education Course: Exploring
Implications Through an Investigation of the Sophomore Slump Journal of General
Education 56(2) 105-125
QAA (2009) Overview of the enhancement theme (2006-2008):
http://www.enhancementthemes.ac.uk/documents/firstyear/FirstYearOverview.pdf


30 StudyingEconomics?
Ryan Hoare, Economics Network
Themes addressed: FY, Emp, RSN
Days presenting: 2 and 3 March
Key for Themes addressed:

G21C: Graduates for the 21st Century                             RSN: Responding to Student Needs
RTL: Research Teaching Linkages: enhancing graduate attributes   Emp: Employability
FY: First Year: engagement and empowerment                       Assess: Assessment Integrative Assessment
FD: Flexible Delivery
Studyingeconmics.ac.uk is a new and innovative website developed largely by
economics students for economics students. The site is discipline-specific and offers
economics students studying in higher education help and information on module
choices, dissertations, and study skills as well as careers advice. Studying
Economics also provides tips on running an economics student society, being a
student ambassador and a student rep on a staff/student committee. The site has
been developed by the Economics Network, the Economics subject centre of the
Higher Education Academy and is sponsored by the Royal Economics Society.


31    Developing Graduate Attributes in Edinburgh College of Art : A Book of
      Case Studies
Professor Ian Pirie and Nichola Kett, Edinburgh College of Art
Themes addressed: G21C, Emp, Assess
Days presenting: 2 and 3 March
The ‘Project’ is a central component in the education of Artists, Architects and
Designers to the extent that, within a scheme with module description, when a
student is asked what they are currently doing they will tell you what ‘project’ they are
currently engaged with or ‘working on’ ie the module is often invisible. Projects are
and can be used to span multiple modules and are one of the main vehicles for
learning and enabling the student to achieve particular learning outcomes.
eca has implemented a constructively aligned assessment scheme which produces a
grade profile against a set of learning outcomes for each level of study. In each
project’s design staff are required to demonstrate the formal link between the project
and the learning outcomes to which it contributes. As part of making the intended
learning more explicit to the student a new Student/Staff ePortal has been designed
to enable students to formally self-evaluate and staff to both assess their students’
progress against the expected learning outcomes and ultimately be confident in the
type and range of graduate attributes which have been developed.
The portal will eventually act as a centrally held archive of project briefs across all the
College’s subjects and will enable both the sharing of project types, themes,
innovations and best practice, and the analytical evaluation of project success and/or
failure. Key in the design of the new system is to enable the student’s confidence in
understanding their particular strengths, to make explicit and to help them articulate
the range of attributes they possess.
Simultaneously the 21st century graduates institutional team have been identifying,
collating and analysing projects where there has been a particular emphasis on
developing professional attributes. These are being developed as an online resource
along with an accompanying book of case studies to facilitate the sharing and
transfer of best practice both within and outwith eca.


32 Educating graduate engineers for industry
Carol Arlett, HEA Engineering Subject Centre, Fiona Lamb, Loughborough
University and Richard Dales, Coventry University
Themes addressed: G21C, FD, Emp
Days presenting: 2 and 3 March
This poster will present exemplars of experience-led components taken from 7 in-
depth case studies from engineering departments in England that were developed for
the Engineers for Enterprise Study1, funded by the Department for Business,
Innovation and Skills. The term ‘experience-led engineering’ came from the
Sainsbury review2 and is taken to mean components of an engineering degree that
Key for Themes addressed:

G21C: Graduates for the 21st Century                             RSN: Responding to Student Needs
RTL: Research Teaching Linkages: enhancing graduate attributes   Emp: Employability
FY: First Year: engagement and empowerment                       Assess: Assessment Integrative Assessment
FD: Flexible Delivery
develop industry related skills and which may also include industry interaction. The
study used a case study approach to address the research question: ‘How can we
enhance a sustainable world-class higher education engineering sector that meets
the graduate recruitment needs of industry?’
To meet industry needs, an engineering degree must achieve the right balance
between technical skills and ‘soft’ skills on the one hand, and between depth of
knowledge within a discipline and breadth across disciplines, on the other. A report
by the Royal Academy of Engineering (2007), Educating Engineers for the 21st
Century3 summarised thus: industry wants engineering graduates who have ‘practical
experience of real industrial environments’. Specifically, ‘industry…regards the ability
to apply theoretical knowledge to real industrial problems as the single most
desirable attribute in new recruits’.
The exemplars range in scale from an individual module to a complete faculty and
from continuous, incremental, small-scale interventions to wholesale, radical change.
Either working closely with industry or delivering industry-related content, the
exemplars together highlight a wealth of innovative practice with high impact. Such
activities could be adopted and developed by other institutions with the aim of
enhancing engineering degree programmes.
The poster will also summarise the key messages arising from the analysis of the
case studies which include relevance motivates, experience counts and change
needs champions.
References
1
  http://www.engsc.ac.uk/an/engineers-for-enterprise.asp
2
  Race to the Top, 2007 Lord Sainsbury
3
  Royal Academy of Engineering (2007), Educating Engineers for the 21st Century


33 Enhancing student mobility - a student led initiative
Michelle Watt, Edinburgh Napier University
Themes addressed: G21C, Emp RSN
Days presenting: 2 and 3 March
Edinburgh Napier Nurses and Midwives International Society is a student run society
with the aims of making international student mobility easier and more widespread
amongst the nursing and midwifery faculty. This poster aims to show the work the
students do in enhancing student mobility and so their eventual employability in an
increasingly competitive job market. It includes details of how students can become
more mobile and the activities that are undertaken at home to enhance mobility and
transferable skills. It shows how effective student involvement can be when
supported by the university and how interested students are in creating their own
opportunities.


34   Supporting student employability on campus: insight into industry
     simulations
Nick Thow and Emily Dickson, Heriot-Watt University
Themes addressed: G21C, FD, Emp
Days presenting: 2 and 3 March
Insight into Industry is a resource designed by Heriot-Watt University for universities
to help enhance students’ employability skills and develop their commercial
awareness on campus. A series of 10 industrial simulations have been developed
and are intended to be used on campus with students in order for them to achieve
some of the learning outcomes related to work experience.
Key for Themes addressed:

G21C: Graduates for the 21st Century                             RSN: Responding to Student Needs
RTL: Research Teaching Linkages: enhancing graduate attributes   Emp: Employability
FY: First Year: engagement and empowerment                       Assess: Assessment Integrative Assessment
FD: Flexible Delivery
Designed to be run by careers advisers, academics or employers, the workshops are
based around a scenario that allows students to work in groups on a typical industry
problems. Each workshop is designed to simulate real life industry specific
challenges that businesses face in their working environment. Students will be
required to act as consultants and provide solutions to the problems. They would
then be expected to present their ideas/findings/solutions at the end of the session.
Many of the workshops also mirror some of the challenges that graduates may face
during an assessment centre. Industry representatives have been closely involved in
the development of these case studies to ensure the latest professional knowledge
and experience is incorporated into their designs. The structure of the workshops
have been designed to enable delivery over either a single lecture period, afternoon
workshop or on a more extended basis e.g. as part of a relevant module.
This workshop is designed to give you an insight in to the types of workshops
available and most importantly give you the opportunity to participate in one of the
business simulations.


35    Experiencing the digital city: a co-curricular module to facilitate the
      enculturation of first year students
Louise Drumm and Ian Smith, Edinburgh Napier University
Themes addressed: FY, FD, Emp
Days presenting: 2 and 3 March
A need was recognised within the university to facilitate first year students’ transition
to a) living in the UK, specifically in the city of Edinburgh and b) the culture of higher
education. This module was designed to meet those needs and provide digital skills
to students from across the university.
Edinburgh Napier University’s co-curricular modules are available to all students.
This module aims to enhance the first year experience by providing a creative, social,
cultural and scholarly experience of Scottish higher education.
Flexible delivery: The module uses a blended approach with face-to-face teaching
combined with use of the university’s virtual learning environment and Web 2.0 tools.
Students are encouraged to use online tools to communicate, collaborate and create
with their peers. This module allows for choice for the learner; they can pursue areas
of interest in relation to their assignment.
Employability: Students work collaboratively on a project to create digital artefacts
including photography, graphics and video. Working in a group enhances the
learner’s employability skills, namely communication, teamwork and organisation.
Self-directed learning and reflection develops the student as a life-long learner, both
of which are essential skills for the workplace. Digital literacy and responsible digital
citizenship skills are integral to successful completion of the module.
The first year: This module is aimed at first year international students, returning
learners and those who would identify as technological novices. First year can be an
isolating experience for the international or non-traditional learner. By working
collaboratively, the aim is for students to gain an appreciation of diversity and the
benefits of bonding socially and academically with peers. This module aims to equip
the learner with confidence in their ability to learn and reflect and specific
understanding of what is required of them at higher education level.


36 Visible, accessible and integrated e-learning in a community health course
Jean Cowie and Heather McAskill, Robert Gordon University
Themes addressed: FD, Emp, RSN
Key for Themes addressed:

G21C: Graduates for the 21st Century                             RSN: Responding to Student Needs
RTL: Research Teaching Linkages: enhancing graduate attributes   Emp: Employability
FY: First Year: engagement and empowerment                       Assess: Assessment Integrative Assessment
FD: Flexible Delivery
Days presenting: 2 and 3 March
This presentation will focus on the use of the virtual learning platform to close the gap
in distance learning, it also represents the response of an education provider to the
modernisation and evolving redesign of community nursing in Scotland. The
recommendations of the Scottish Executive (2005a; 2005b; 2006a; 2006b)
emphasise the need for health services to be provided as locally and as close to
peoples homes as possible. The geography of Scotland coupled with the changing
demography and health needs poses a further challenge for community nurses,
particularly for ‘back fill’ and time off to attend courses. Consequently educational
providers need to take cognisance of the service demands, as well as the
educational needs of practitioners working in the community and provide robust
courses that are easily accessible by all community, or aspiring community,
practitioners whether working in urban or remote and rural areas. The development
of the BN (Hons) Community Health course provided the opportunity not only to meet
the requirements of the Nursing and Midwifery Council for Specialist Community
Public Health Nurses, (Health Visitors and School Nurses), District nurses and the
proposed new breed of Community Nurses for Scotland but the challenge of
providing a flexible, accessible and engaging course that would meet the diverse
needs of the students. A sequential approach was therefore adopted following
Salmons five step model (2002). The first step being hands on class based
introduction to the virtual learning platform whilst the fourth and fifth steps
encouraged the application of theory and evidence of critical thinking, analysis and
synthesis via the use of case studies. The overall evaluation of this first module was
positive and identified that enhanced student interaction had been achieved.
Furthermore the online discussions and activities encouraged sharing of knowledge
and information from practice which in turn enabled students who were still hospital
based a much better understanding of the health and social needs of people across
the age span. It was also interesting to note that the assessment profile for the
module mirrored the effort of the on-line interaction and participation by the students.
References
Salmon G, 2002. E-tivities: The key to Active Online Learning. London: Kogan Page
Scottish Executive, 2005a. Delivering for Health. Edinburgh: Scottish Executive
Scottish Executive, 2005b. Building a Health Service Fit for the Future. Edinburgh:
Scottish Executive
Scottish Executive, 2006a. Delivering Care, Enabling Health. Edinburgh: Scottish
Executive
Scottish Executive, 2006b. VAIC: A Report of the Review of Nursing in the
Community in Scotland. Edinburgh: Scottish Executive
Key Words
Public Health; Community Health; Health Promotion; Nursing; E-learning; Blended
Learning; Interactive Learning; Distance Learning; Remote and Rural.


37 Psychology graduates for the 21st century
Marina Crowe, Higher Education Academy Psychology Network
Themes addressed: G21C, FY, FD, Emp
Days presenting: 2 and 3 March
The Higher Education Academy Psychology Network exists to enhance the
psychology student learning experience across the UK. Over the past seven years
the Network has undertaken and funded a wide range of activities that align with the
Scottish Enhancement Themes, and which have enhanced the teaching, learning
and other skills of psychology graduates for the 21st century. This poster will illustrate
Key for Themes addressed:

G21C: Graduates for the 21st Century                             RSN: Responding to Student Needs
RTL: Research Teaching Linkages: enhancing graduate attributes   Emp: Employability
FY: First Year: engagement and empowerment                       Assess: Assessment Integrative Assessment
FD: Flexible Delivery
some of these activities, including:
Our 126 page Psychology Student Employability Guide, which provides psychology
specific guidance for undergraduate students on topics of such as personal
development planning, the job market, emerging areas of psychology, self-
assessment, gaining work experience, and CV development.
Our employability project funding, which has been used to develop online learning
objects to help psychology students assess their employability skills and enhance
their CVs; to produce a collection of online films in which psychologists from the main
areas of professional psychology talk about and answer Frequently Asked Questions
from psychology students on what it is like to work in those professions; and, at the
University of Dundee, to develop an ethical toolkit for use with psychology students
that facilitates teaching, learning, self-assessment, and external appraisal of qualities
including dependability, reliability, integrity, values, and ethics.
Our miniproject and departmental teaching enhancement scheme funding, which has
been used to explore the embedding of personal response systems to enhance the
student learning experience at Glasgow Caledonian University; to develop a web
resource to test if 'experiencing the evidence' improves psychology students'
confidence about applying new knowledge and skills at the University of Aberdeen,
and to assess the value of 'managing' the psychological contract of 1st year
psychology students at Edge Hill University.
Copies of the Psychology Student Employability Guide will be available, along with
details and materials for many other relevant Psychology Network activities.


38    Mapping the involvement of international students in learning and
      teaching at Scotland’s higher education institutions
Nik Heerens, Sparqs, Mike Heffron, Sparks/NUS Scotland and Russell Gunson,
NUS Scotland
Themes addressed: G21C, FY, Emp, RSN
Days presenting: 2 and 3 March
sparqs and NUS Scotland have jointly undertaken a mapping project to determine
the opportunity and degree of involvement international students have in the
enhancement of learning and teaching at Scottish higher education institutions.
This poster session will outline the results of that mapping project and how it
connects to a number of the Enhancement Themes. It in particular addresses the
attributes student engagement brings to university graduates and the specific issues
that need to be tackled to fully include international students in this. The presenter
will encourage feedback from conference attendants on their experiences in working
with international students.
Over the course of 2009, university staff involved in quality enhancement and
international affairs, as well as student association officers at Scotland’s HEIs were
interviewed and asked to assess the quality assurance/enhancement processes at
their institution that might involve international students, and the existing support
systems in place for international students regarding learning and teaching.
Once these interviews were completed, regional focus groups were conducted with
international students to gather their views on the opportunities and degrees of
involvement they undertook or witnessed at their institutions.
The final research report, published early 2010, explores best practice and barriers to
engagement of international students in quality enhancement, looking at what
international students, institutions and student associations experience works and
doesn’t work in getting this specific group of students involved in quality at their
institution.
Key for Themes addressed:

G21C: Graduates for the 21st Century                             RSN: Responding to Student Needs
RTL: Research Teaching Linkages: enhancing graduate attributes   Emp: Employability
FY: First Year: engagement and empowerment                       Assess: Assessment Integrative Assessment
FD: Flexible Delivery
sparqs and NUS Scotland will be taking the results of this research forward by
highlighting how the sector is addressing the needs of international students through
their representative mechanisms, whether they be at the institutional, faculty,
programme levels or within the student associations themselves.
This will be a great opportunity to highlight our findings and seek feedback from
participants on our future work on international student engagement.


39 Mentoring at Edinburgh Napier University
Caroline Moffat and Claire Bee, Edinburgh Napier University
Themes addressed: G21C, FY, FD, Emp, RSN
Days presenting: 2 and 3 March
Students are increasingly aware it is no longer enough to achieve their degree.
Employers are looking for people who are self-aware and socially adaptable; who are
good time managers with a strong work ethic, and who have developed excellent
learning skills. By participating in a mentoring programme, students have the
opportunity to identify and develop important graduate attributes.
At Edinburgh Napier University, there are two mentoring programmes run by the
Wider Access & Retention Team: Student Peer Mentoring and Employer Mentoring.
The latter matches students in 3rd and 4th Year with professional people from the
students’ chosen field. It aims to help students build on their personal and
professional strengths, and develop a greater awareness of the world of work. The
Student Peer Mentoring Programme matches new students with successful,
experienced students, thus offering new students support with academic integration
whilst providing experienced students with the chance to consolidate their
interpersonal and learning skills. Participation in these programmes allows students
to evidence their commitment to their own development, demonstrate responsibility,
and highlight their ability to work with others to achieve identified goals.
These mentoring programmes address several of the Enhancement Themes,
including: engagement and empowerment of students; responding to student needs,
employability and flexibility. The poster will illustrate the objectives of the two
mentoring programmes, the benefits to students, the processes in place to ensure
quality and the outcomes of evaluations.


40 Students training students
April Edwards, Nik Heerens and Jodi Gordon, Sparqs
Themes addressed: G21C, FY, FD, Emp, RSN
Days presenting: 2 and 3 March
Since sparqs’ inception in 2003, we have developed a range of activities designed to
support and improve the effectiveness of student engagement in quality processes.
A key aim for sparqs is to provide training and support to course representatives.
One aspect of this work is achieved through our Associate Trainer Scheme, which
involves employing students as trainers to deliver a suite of Course Representative
Training within colleges and universities across Scotland.
The sparqs Associate Training Scheme delivers a range of benefits linked to most
Enhancement Themes:
1. Graduates for the 21st Century/Employability: an Associate Trainer gains
    knowledge, experience and core transferable skills, valuable for life and
    enhancing future employment prospects.
2. Responding to Student Needs: attending peer-led training is a student centred
    learning encounter grounded in the trainer’s previous knowledge and experience.
Key for Themes addressed:

G21C: Graduates for the 21st Century                             RSN: Responding to Student Needs
RTL: Research Teaching Linkages: enhancing graduate attributes   Emp: Employability
FY: First Year: engagement and empowerment                       Assess: Assessment Integrative Assessment
FD: Flexible Delivery
3. First Year Engagement and Empowerment: an effective Associate Trainer, leads
     to effective Course Representatives which empowers students to shape their own
     learning experience.
Associate Trainers are students with experience of being a student representative.
The team is recruited annually and undertake rigorous training and development,
gaining skills and knowledge required to be effective trainers. There is an overall
support framework which includes training, performance observation and feedback,
development days and peer support from more experienced trainers.
As an Associate Trainer students gain knowledge and experience and develop an
extremely high level of core transferable skills, which ultimately contributes to their
employment prospects. Skills include communication, presentation, facilitation, group
management, administration, critical thinking, self reflection, team working and
problem solving.
This is a paid professional role with an employment contract over the academic year.
It is a challenging and rewarding post, evidenced by the increasing number of
students who continue after one year and build on their previous experience by
supporting newly recruited trainers throughout their post.


41 Podcasting timely support
Courtnay McLeod and Dr Caroline Copeland, Edinburgh Napier University
Themes addressed: FY, RSN
Days presenting: 2 March
Edinburgh Napier University’s Podcast Project offers first year students timely advice
and information to support their learning and experience. Students can subscribe to
receive weekly podcasts or easily find them online. Importantly, podcasts can be
stored on students’ personal devices (phones, mp3 players, iPods, and computers),
and therefore conveniently and anonymously accessed at any time.
The project was piloted in the School of Arts and Creative Industries from September
to December 2009. Within weeks the site generated three thousand hits with over
five hundred students subscribing for weekly downloads.
This project is in keeping with several integrative aims of the conference. Student
feedback demonstrates it responded to a wide range of student needs, and to
changing expectations about how students think they should receive and consume
information. By releasing podcasts that were relevant to each week, mirroring the
journey throughout trimester one, student needs could be carefully considered and
targeted.
Engagement and empowerment were strengthened by students contributing to each
podcast. In some podcasts students were interviewed, or asked to provide top tips for
other students, in others students interviewed academic staff. The student ownership
of this project certainly increased engagement and empowerment, and made each
podcast relevant and interesting.
The poster will illustrate the virtuous circle the project created. It will outline the
original rationale for developing podcasting to improve retention, and how the project
grew to strengthen student support and experience across a range of areas. In
keeping with the project the poster will be interactive - encouraging discussion and
reflection on how technology can be used creatively to respond to student needs.




Key for Themes addressed:

G21C: Graduates for the 21st Century                             RSN: Responding to Student Needs
RTL: Research Teaching Linkages: enhancing graduate attributes   Emp: Employability
FY: First Year: engagement and empowerment                       Assess: Assessment Integrative Assessment
FD: Flexible Delivery
42 Student Review Record - an early warning system
Josephine Mackenzie and Ann Ogle, Robert Gordon University
Themes addressed: FY, RSN
Days presenting: 2 and 3 March
The Student Review Record was developed as an early warning system to alert
undergraduate nursing and midwifery students, and their personal tutors, of areas
where students could be at risk of non-completion of their programme. One of the
aims of the Student Review Record is to increase students awareness of ‘at risk’
factors and thus prompt earlier interventions with the intention of enabling students to
continue with their studies. The areas the tool focuses upon are academic
performance, clinical performance, attendance, health, disability, finance and
personal issues. The tool has received positive feedback from students and personal
tutors; the tool provides an opportunity for the student and/or personal tutor to direct
the discussion and comprehensively explore the student’s progress in a structured
format. The Student Review Record has also received funding for its implementation
and evaluation within three higher education institutions in Scotland.
The poster would aim to illustrate the underpinning student focused philosophy of the
Student Review Record, and its underpinning literature/research base in relation to
student retention and student support. The Enhancement Themes of The First Year
Experience and Responding to Students Needs have been influential in the
development of the tool, and this will also be reflected within the poster. The stages
of the project would be outlined, including the development of the VLE version of the
Student Review Record. There is also an opportunity to share the fundamental
aspects of the evaluation project and its links with Scottish Government’s overall
strategy for enhancing recruitment and retention of student nurses and midwifes
across Scotland.


43 SLEEC toolkits: supporting class reps with professional resources
Liam Burns, NUS Scotland
Themes addressed: G21C, RSN
Days presenting: 2 and 3 March
Over a twelve month period, NUS Scotland was supported by the Scottish Funding
Council to produce toolkits for academic representatives (Class Reps, Faculty/School
Officers and Vice-Presidents of Education). This was taken forward by our Student
Learner Enhancement and Engagement Committee (SLEEC).
The toolkits aimed to cover content such as ELIR, Internal Subject Reviews, VLE's,
Assessment and Feedback and much more. They offer both content knowledge,
empowering representatives to engage in learning and teaching issues in an
authoritative way, and training materials so that content knowledge could be
embedded and distributed wider.
The toolkits were launched late last academic year having been developed by
students and sent to every students' association in Scotland.
NUS Scotland will be supplementing these toolkits we facilitate further meeting of
academic representatives.
The poster aims to promote this resource and present options for sustaining their
development.




Key for Themes addressed:

G21C: Graduates for the 21st Century                             RSN: Responding to Student Needs
RTL: Research Teaching Linkages: enhancing graduate attributes   Emp: Employability
FY: First Year: engagement and empowerment                       Assess: Assessment Integrative Assessment
FD: Flexible Delivery
44 Edinburgh Napier University get AmbITion
Ian Smith and Hannah Rudman, Edinburgh Napier University
Themes addressed: FY, RSN,
Days presenting: 2 and 3 March
This poster will discuss a new partnership between higher education institutions and
the Scottish Arts Council’s AmbITion programme to initiate digital development and
change in arts organisations throughout Scotland, supported by student internships.
AmbITion Scotland is a flexible and exciting new programme that will ensure that
digital support is available to all arts organisations, no matter what their scale. Based
on a pilot programme supported by Arts Council England, this flexible and innovative
programme aims to help achieve sustainable organisational change and improve
capacity for audience engagement, through implementing integrated IT and digital
developments. http://getambition.com
The School of Computing, Edinburgh Napier University has introduced a new 20
credit, level 9 module called ‘Creative Internship’ to provide relevant work experience
for suitably qualified students. Edinburgh Napier University has significant experience
in work based learning and was an ideal candidate to pilot the initiative. Relevant
procedures have been agreed and the initial interview process has begun to facilitate
the first placement students in the workplace by June 2010.
The project is being rolled out across a range of partner higher education institutions
in Scotland and these will be highlighted in the poster.


45      Empowering and engaging students through the development of a
        student-led, Nurses Society?
Mr James Savage and Miss Joanne Theasby, Queen Margaret University
Themes addressed: FY, RSN
Days presenting: 2 and 3 March
Introduction
The last twenty years have seen many changes across HEIs including increased
student numbers and greater diversity of learners. In response to these changes,
HEIs must consider ways to increase student engagement and facilitate responses to
student needs. One such initiative ‘Nursing Lunches’ was established after a move to
a new campus in an attempt to increase interaction between students and lecturers.
Low subscription resulted in these lunches being discontinued. An alternative
strategy which was student led, was the establishment of a Nursing Society whose
aims were:
1. To promote communication and interaction between students across all year
      groups
2. To promote communication and interaction between students and lecturers
3. To facilitate a mutually supportive environment for students
We present our reflections on its construction and value.
Methods
A questionnaire was sent to all students in the BSc (Hons) Nursing course (n200) to
illicit views on a proposed nursing society.
Results
The response rate was 25% (n=62 r). 90% (n55) of respondents stated that
interacting with students from other year groups would be beneficial in learning and
74% (n46) stated that meeting with lecturers and students would be most beneficial.
Respondents also stated that informal meetings in a non-academic setting would be
highly beneficial to promoting mutual support. The results of the questionnaire were
then applied when establishing the work of the Nursing Society; informal meetings
Key for Themes addressed:

G21C: Graduates for the 21st Century                             RSN: Responding to Student Needs
RTL: Research Teaching Linkages: enhancing graduate attributes   Emp: Employability
FY: First Year: engagement and empowerment                       Assess: Assessment Integrative Assessment
FD: Flexible Delivery
between all students and staff were arranged, social events were organised,
relationships with existing support mechanisms within the university were forged and
the Society is supported through the use of IT by way of an online society publicising
the events.
Discussion
Early results suggest a promising future. Through student feedback, the Nurse
Society has demonstrated improved communication between staff and students.
Continued evaluation is required to determine future direction.


46 Think positive: student mental health
Talat Yaqoob, NUS Scotland
Themes addressed: G21C, FY, RSN
Days presenting: 2 and 3 March
Recent work by the QAA Enhancement Themes, whether on the First Year
Experience, Employability or 21st Century Graduates has clearly told us that a
student’s experience of university or college is much more then their academic
endeavours. It’s about their social integration, whether they feel personally involved
in their teaching, whether they feel equipped to take on the challenges they face after
they leave the surroundings of an educational environment.
One aspect which has perhaps been underestimated in all of this, is the impact
support and good mental wellbeing has on a student’s experience and development.
NUS Scotland is working on a Scottish Government funded project; Think Positive
with the aim to create a mentally healthy student population, with the tools and skills
to be able to maintain their own mental wellbeing and feel able to ask for support.
However it is only with an integrated approach encompassing all involved in the
student experience; from lecturing staff to student officers, will the project be
successful and truly change the culture of the student experience - and it is this
integrated approach that involved the QAA Enhancement Themes.
Many of the Enhancement Themes already have an unexplored link to mental health
and wellbeing for instance:
1. the effects of transition to first year in other words dealing with change and
     feeling part of a new community
2. personalisation of the first year in other words acknowledging an individual’s
     needs and identity
3. creating well rounded graduates in other words student who are ready both
     academically and emotionally to start their careers
The purpose of this poster presentation is to consider the ways mental health and
support can be better integrated into the academic curriculum and such
Enhancement Themes as above. By doing so, we, as a collective of individuals
working towards bettering the quality of education for our students, can use mental
health research and tools to create a mentally healthy and academically successful
student population.
A duty for all of those involved in tertiary education.


47 Giving students choice in the method of assessment
Janis Greig, Professor M Gray, Dr N Brown and Dr M Huxham, Edinburgh
Napier University
Themes addressed: RSN, Assess
Days presenting: 2 and 3 March
Assessment should be designed to enhance and encourage learning, helping
Key for Themes addressed:

G21C: Graduates for the 21st Century                             RSN: Responding to Student Needs
RTL: Research Teaching Linkages: enhancing graduate attributes   Emp: Employability
FY: First Year: engagement and empowerment                       Assess: Assessment Integrative Assessment
FD: Flexible Delivery
students to achieve their potential through an inclusive approach to assessment
which incorporates explicit acknowledgement of the range of student approaches,
aptitudes and learning styles within a diverse student population such as that at
Edinburgh Napier University. This approach to assessment is concerned with equity,
regardless of disability, learning style, approach to learning and experience of
learning and does not compromise academic standards; rather it increases the range
and nature of opportunities for students to demonstrate their acquisition of the
learning outcomes in a fair, consistent and equitable manner (Cavanagh and
Dickinson 2006). This approach is also congruent with the social, cultural and
legislative imperatives pressing the Higher Education sector to play an active role in
creating a more inclusive society (Waterfield and West 2006: 19). When reviewing
existing assessment practices, the possibilities of both modification and of devising
genuinely alternative strategies should be explored; such an approach is highly
effective pedagogy not only for students with disabilities but for all students.
This poster will summarise the early findings from a group project on inclusive
assessment run as a pilot across Edinburgh Napier University. The aim of this
project, entitled Giving students choice in the method of assessment, is to explore
the advantages and disadvantages of allowing all students the choice of assessment
method(s) to test their achievement of the module learning outcomes. The poster will
include an overview of the project, its aims, design, organisation and initial findings
with issues arising from his project and good practice identified.
References
Cavanagh, S, Dickinson, Y (2006) Disability Legislation: Practical Guidance for
Academic Staff Equality Challenge Unit available at
http://www.ecu.ac.uk/publications/guidancepublications/200610-
DisabilityLegislationGuidance.pdf (last accessed 3rd July 08)
Waterfield, J, West, B (2006) Inclusive Assessment in Higher Education: A Resource
for Change. Plymouth, University of Plymouth.
http://www.plymouth.ac.uk/pages/view.asp?page=10494


48    Molecules of life: supporting student learning in the transition to a second
      year biochemistry course
Maureen Griffiths, Angela Watt and Ute Barrett, University of Glasgow
Themes addressed: FD, RSN, Assess
Days presenting: 2 and 3 March
We have developed support material on Moodle to enhance the learning experience
of approx 330 students in a Level-2 biochemistry course (Molecules of Life). These
students had moved from a highly structured first year with intensive staff support, to
a more academically challenging year where the students have to develop a more
independent approach to study.
We decided to use a blended learning approach in that we wanted to involve online
teaching combined with face to face teaching in order to offer individual attention to a
large group of students. This is a second year biochemistry course forming the basis
of a number of honours courses. The lectures, labs and tutorials were essentially
unchanged from previous years of this course, but the online support was completely
revised.
The appearance and layout of this Moodle course was changed to give the course a
strong visual identity, and to improve navigation. All students were assigned to
tutorial groups and were provided with forums for each group to allow the students to
communicate and participate in group work. The tutorial material was not covered in
lectures but was issued online. Students were encouraged to work with their peers
Key for Themes addressed:

G21C: Graduates for the 21st Century                             RSN: Responding to Student Needs
RTL: Research Teaching Linkages: enhancing graduate attributes   Emp: Employability
FY: First Year: engagement and empowerment                       Assess: Assessment Integrative Assessment
FD: Flexible Delivery
through enquiry-based learning (EBL).
The traditional postlab lecture was replaced by a lesson that students can access at
any time after the lab, to test their understanding of the material. This can also be
used by students who miss the lab.
Each group of students also uses the group forum to collate source material and
design a poster. This is uploaded electronically then presented to their peers.
The student perception of the look and feel of the Moodle course and the support
offered in this course was assessed by anonymous questionnaire and by focus
groups. Staff were also asked for feedback on student participation and performance


49 Smart students, smart graduates!
Anne Chirnside and Hazel Christie, Edinburgh Napier University
Themes addressed: G21C, FY, RSN
Days presenting: 2 March
This poster shares knowledge about a mapping initiative undertaken at Edinburgh
Napier University in 2009/10. A ‘concept map’, Get Smart, was developed which
draws together information on the range of academic skills support available to
students across the university. The map allows information to be presented in an
accessible and visually appealing way. As such it enables students to immediately
and easily identify the generic academic support to them. Get Smart also signposts
the students to helpful information on relevant targeted initiatives on skills
development.
The map is a dynamic toolkit for students: it provides a visual framework for
understanding how academic skills support is embedded within university structures
and practices; it allows students to link directly to services that can be of help to
them; and it is easily up-dated to reflect changes in provision.
Relevance to Enhancement Themes
a. Responding to Student Needs:
Get Smart enables students to become effective learners by taking control of their
learning trajectories. A visually-appealing design encourages students to recognise -
and use - the range of support that is open to them. Presenting information in an
immediate and accessible way encourages them to reflect on their learning needs
and to identify areas where they might benefit from some support. And bringing
together a range of information in one clearly consolidated map overcomes the
problems students often face with pulling together information from fragmented
sources.
b. First-year: engagement and empowerment
The map is an excellent resource for engaging and empowering first year students.
For example, it can be used as a basis for discussion about what’s on offer at
university, and how this might differ from previous learning environment. Used in this
way, the map is a toolkit for empowering students to become effective learners.
Sharing Innovative Practice
Get Smart is not just a signposting devise. It encourages students to actively assess
their own learning needs and to seek support when necessary. Both are empowering
for students, and this is central to the aim of the map. As such get Smart is a blue
print that has broad relevance to other institutions, and discussion and reflection are
sought with other practitioners.




Key for Themes addressed:

G21C: Graduates for the 21st Century                             RSN: Responding to Student Needs
RTL: Research Teaching Linkages: enhancing graduate attributes   Emp: Employability
FY: First Year: engagement and empowerment                       Assess: Assessment Integrative Assessment
FD: Flexible Delivery
50 Associating with higher education
Margo Learmonth and Sarah Fryett, Robert Gordon University
Themes addressed: G21C, FY, RSN
Days presenting: 2 and 3 March
Associating with Higher Education:
The Associate Studentship Scheme at Robert Gordon University aims to:
Develop and implement a programme of activities to enhance college students’
awareness and preparedness for articulation to Higher Education.
The intended outcomes for the poster presentation are:
    to offer knowledge exchange in relation to developments and innovations in
    relation to the Associate Studentship scheme
    stimulate discussion in relation to Associate Studentship schemes
The Associate Student Scheme is currently free to all students who are planning to
progress to Robert Gordon University from our further education partners following
successful completion of a relevant Higher National Award.
Benefits of the Associate Scheme include access to:
    university library facilities, including online databases
    a specially designed area on the University’s Virtual Learning Environment
    (CampusMoodle)
    student rates at RGU:Sport
    the Student Union (subject to minimum age requirements).
A newsletter is sent to Associate Students two or three times per year and copies will
be made available alongside the poster.
Future proposed developments include:
    visits to the University to join first year lectures
    visits to the various campuses
    reciprocal guest teaching spots with college staff.
We hope the above activities will enable prospective direct entry students to become
familiar with the University and University life. The poster will reflect the
Enhancement Themes indicated, with the ultimate aim of producing graduates for the
21st century.


51 Innovative assessment of online writing
Jen Ross, Sian Bayne, Hamish Macleod and Clara O’Shea, University of
Edinburgh
Themes addressed: FD, RSN, Assess
Days presenting: 2 and 3 March
Learning and teaching in online environments opens up new possibilities for creating,
sharing, collaborating on, and discussing writing in 21st century higher education. As
we pursue these new possibilities as teachers and students, however, we are drawn
to question some of the assumptions and orthodoxies underpinning our institutional
assessment practices: that students’ writing is created by an individual, that it is
stable and fixed, and it has no continuation beyond the point of assessment. These
assumptions may prevent us from tuning in to and fostering critical literacies and
attributes our graduates need in a rapidly changing world. The digital text is often
collaboratively produced, fluid and persistent (Landow 2006, Bayne 2006), and
assessing it therefore becomes a matter of either artificially fixing and dividing it, or
finding new ways to engage with it that are both scholarly and contextually
meaningful.
Our experiences on the MSc in E-learning programme offer valuable insight into, and

Key for Themes addressed:

G21C: Graduates for the 21st Century                             RSN: Responding to Student Needs
RTL: Research Teaching Linkages: enhancing graduate attributes   Emp: Employability
FY: First Year: engagement and empowerment                       Assess: Assessment Integrative Assessment
FD: Flexible Delivery
   strategies for improving, assessment and feedback of student writing online. In
   grappling with the needs of online distance learners and the creation of digital texts,
   we have developed some feedback and assessment practices including:
Tu tutor-student communication, formative feedback and summative assessment
   through reflective weblogs
   assessing collaborative writing in wikis
   assessing multimodal, hypertextual and ‘mashed up’ work
   student-nominated assessment criteria
   This poster will describe and illustrate these practices, and draw out early themes
   from our new project ‘Student writing: innovative online strategies for assessment &
   feedback’ - http://www.education.ed.ac.uk/swop
   Members of the project team will be on hand to discuss the MSc’s practices and the
   research project with interested visitors.
   References
   Bayne, S (2006) Temptation, trash and trust: the authorship and authority of digital
   texts , E-learning, vol 3, issue 1
   Landow, G (2006). Hypertext 3.0. Baltimore: Johns Hopkins


   52   Responding to the skills development needs of the *'OSPAP' postgraduate
        students: A multiple strategy intervention
   Dr Charles Juwah and Dr Susanne Boyle, Robert Gordon University
   Themes addressed: G21C, RSN, Assess
   Days presenting: 2 and 3 March
   Some international postgraduate students find their initial engagement with the UK
   higher education system quite challenging. Aspects which prove challenging to the
   students are wide ranging and include: academic, cultural, social issues, etc. This
   study investigated OSPAP students’ knowledge and experience of the UK academic
   culture, a range of assessment methods, reflection and reflexive practice.
   Findings from the study demonstrated a lack of: understanding of the UK academic
   culture; experience with non-traditional assessment methods which are critical for the
   student’s success within the programme; understanding of the terms reflection and
   reflexive practice, etc.
   Enabling the OSPAP students to overcome these challenges required a multiple
   intervention strategy.
   These consisted of:
   A series of workshops
   One to one support (pastoral and academic related)
   Socialisation of the international students to the UK academic culture
   Familiarisation of the international students with a range of assessment methods
   Exemplars of how to write reflective pieces and
   Peer and collaborative learning.
   The intervention strategies demonstrated positive outcomes in enhancing the
   students’ personal and professional development and learning experience.

   * Overseas Pharmacists Assessment Programme
   Keywords: academic culture, assessment methods, reflection and reflective practice,
   intervention strategy, graduate attributes, pharmacy, internationalisation




   Key for Themes addressed:

   G21C: Graduates for the 21st Century                             RSN: Responding to Student Needs
   RTL: Research Teaching Linkages: enhancing graduate attributes   Emp: Employability
   FY: First Year: engagement and empowerment                       Assess: Assessment Integrative Assessment
   FD: Flexible Delivery
53 Assessment & feedback: the work of students' associations
Liam Burns, NUS Scotland
Themes addressed: G21C, Assess
Days presenting: 2 and 3 March
Assessment and feedback remain one of the hottest topics for students when it
comes to learning and teaching. The National Student Survey has consistently
flagged up concern around this area and students' associations are increasingly
prioritising work on this issue.
This poster will present:
1.       NUS UK’s work on principles and guidelines for student centred feedback.
2.       case studies of students' associations campaigning for anonymous marking
and why it remains so important for students.
3.       case studies of campaigning and partnerships on improving the type and
quality of feedback on academic work.


54 Assessing online learning in interprofessional education
Stella Howden, Cathy Bulley and Lynne Flynn, Queen Margaret University
Themes addressed: FD, Assess
Days presenting: 2 March
Interprofessional Education (IPE) at Queen Margaret University brings together
students from a variety of undergraduate healthcare programmes, from first to forth
year, to learn from and about each other. In year three, students work in small
interprofessional groups to interview a client about their experience of interactions
with multiple healthcare professions, culminating in a presentation of a critical
analysis of the client’s healthcare journey. The groups also take part in 15 weeks of
online learning activities - related to interprofessional issues.
Students participating in IPE come from a variety of courses with varied structures,
which means that students are rarely on campus at the same time, and the face-to-
face contact sessions for IPE are limited to three days. During year three, many
students are undertaking practice based learning, at various placement sites
throughout the UK. This can add to the challenge of keeping students engaged with
online learning activities, which are less visible and perhaps seem less important for
students who are undertaking other types of more traditional learning experiences. It
is common for profession-specific modules and clinical placements to be prioritised
as more urgent/important. To add to the complexity, the students have varying
degrees of familiarity with online learning. As a result, it is a challenge to support the
engagement of all students within the module.
This poster presents the findings from an evaluation of the online learning
experiences and the related IPE assessments in 2008-09 and the resultant plan for
revision of the assessment format, implemented in September 2009. The new
assessment format is designed to promote students reflection on what they are
learning and how they are learning together online, and enable students to use their
own online postings, as evidence of learning, within a written assignment, produced
at the end of the 15 weeks of online activities.




The Quality Assurance Agency for Higher Education (QAA). Registered charity numbers 1062746 and SC037786


Key for Themes addressed:

G21C: Graduates for the 21st Century                             RSN: Responding to Student Needs
RTL: Research Teaching Linkages: enhancing graduate attributes   Emp: Employability
FY: First Year: engagement and empowerment                       Assess: Assessment Integrative Assessment
FD: Flexible Delivery

								
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